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Book
331 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 29 cm
Unapologetically incorporating her body into her works of art, Carolee Schneemann emerged as one of the leading forcesin the feminist art movement of the 1970s. This wide-rangingbook follows Schneemann's remarkable career in its entirety.The monograph shows the immense range of Schneemann'soeuvre: paintings, assemblages, performances, experimentalfilms and video installations. Including the controversial worksfor which she is most famous, such as Eye Body, Meat Joy, and Interior Scroll, this volume takes a critical look at variousthemes in the artist's career, focusing particularly on whatthe artist termed "kinetic painting." Essays on Schneemann'spersonal politics, her experimental film, and the purposefulambiguities of her pieces offer clear-eyed perspectives on thebrilliance of her work. Illustrations of her work are accompaniedby Schneemann's own commentary. Schneemann's workemerges as a celebratory, liberating, and important aspect ofcreative expression that stands in its own right-and stands thetest of time.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783791355085 20160619
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
83 p. : chiefly ill. (chiefly col.) ; 28 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
270 p. : ill. (some col.), ports. ; 23 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
67 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 21 x 26 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)

5. Carolee Schneemann [1982]

Book
2 v. in 1 : ill. (some col.), ports. ; 18 x 21 cm.
  • 1. Early work 1960/1970
  • 2. Recent work.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
95 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 21 x 27 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
347 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Carolee Schneemann is one of the pioneers of performance, installation, and video art. Although other visual artists, such as Salvador Dali and Yves Klein, had used live self-portraiture and performance as a vehicle for public provocation, Schneemann was among the first to use her body to animate the relationship between the world of lived experience and the imagination, as well as issues of the erotic, the sacred, and the taboo. In the 1960s, her work prefigured the feminist movement's sexual self-assertion for women, and by the mid-1970s, her work anticipated the field of women's studies and its critique of patriarchal institutions. In the 1980s, she was one of the first to experiment with virtual environments. "Imaging Her Erotics" integrates images from Schneemann's works in painting, collage, drawing, and video sculptures with written material drawn from the artist's journals, dream diaries, essays, and lectures. Encompassing four decades of her work, it demonstrates her profound influence on artists in all media. An opening essay by Kristine Stiles presents Schneemann's major themes and places her work in a historical context. Among other topics, the book covers Schneemann's response to the widespread use by artists of the ideas of theoreticians such as Georges Bataille, Jacques Derrida, and Jacques Lacan; her relationship to male artists such as Joseph Cornell, Robert Morris, and Claes Oldenburg; and reminiscences about her friends Ana Mendieta, Charlotte Moorman, and Hannah Wilke. The book also contains essays by Jay Murphy and David Levi-Strauss and interviews with the artist by Kate Haug, Linda Montano, and Aviva Rahmani.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262194594 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
281 p. : chiefly ill., ports. ; 23 x 27 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
127 p. : ill. ; 20 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
lxii, 513 p., [24] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations-- Preface-- Acknowledgments-- Introduction The Letters-- 1. 1956-1968-- 2. 1969-1975-- 3. 1976-1986-- 4. 1987-1999 Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822345114 20160605
Creator of such acclaimed works as the performance Meat Joy and the film Fuses, the artist Carolee Schneemann has saved the letters she has written and received for decades. Much of this correspondence is published here for the first time, providing an epistolary history of Schneemann and other figures central to international avant-garde happenings, Fluxus, performance, and conceptual art. Schneemann corresponded for more than forty years with individuals including the composer James Tenney, the filmmaker Stan Brakhage, the artist Dick Higgins, the dancer and filmmaker Yvonne Rainer, the poet Clayton Eshleman, and the psychiatrist Joseph Berke. Her "tribe, " as she called it, altered the conditions under which art is made and the form in which it is presented, shifting art away from private acts and the creation of unique objects to art engaged directly with the public in ephemeral performances and in expanded, non-traditional forms of music, film, dance, theatre, and literature. Kristine Stiles selected, edited, annotated, and wrote the introduction to the letters, assembling them so that readers can follow the development of Schneemann's art, thought, and private and public relationships. The correspondence chronicles a history of energy and invention, as well as of charged personal and artistic struggles, arguments, and displays of ego. It sheds light on internecine aesthetic politics and the mundane activities that constitute the exasperating vicissitudes of making art, building an artistic reputation, and negotiating an industry as unpredictable and demanding as the art world in the mid-to-late twentieth century. For her part, Schneemann discusses financial dilemmas, grapples with her career, shares her success, joy, and love, and contends with loneliness, aging, and disappointment. Her correspondence reveals her to be a writer of considerable literary talent, as well as one whose letters are consummately visual, both in communicating images of sensate and corporeal experience and as material objects, as shown in the volume's many images.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822345114 20160605
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Archive/Manuscript
128 linear feet (248 containers)
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
The papers of Carolee Schneemann chronicle in detail her work as an artist, film maker, writer, art historian, feminist, and teacher, focusing on her more recent projects (1990s-2000s). Her own writing and notes dominate, but there is a significant amount of correspondence, including printed and annotated email exchanges. One of the main series is devoted to project files, which begin around 1990. These have not been physically arranged, and in most cases folder titles were transcribed directly from the original. Printed material about Schneemann includes exhibit and event publicity as well as reviews and criticism. Of the many photographs and slides, most document her art and its evolution, as do the audiovisual media. There are also lecture and workshop notes, scrapbooks, research files, and book preparation material, especially for "Correspondence Course, An Epistolary History of Carolee Schneemann and Her Circle" edited by Kristine Stiles.
Special Collections
Book
317 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 26 cm
Carolee Schneemann is one of the most important artists of the postwar period. Her work in a range of media-painting, film, video, dance and performance, constructions and installations, the written word, and assemblage-presents an unparalleled catalogue of radical aesthetic experimentation. Meat Joy, 1964, Fuses, 1964-66, Up To and Including Her Limits, 1973-1976, and Interior Scroll, 1975, are now considered canonical projects, required entries in any meaningful account of contemporary art, belying their once notoriety as feminist challenges of the very concept of the art historical canon.Throughout the last fifty years, Schneemann has participated in the most significant formulations of the avant-garde, having made crucial contributions in Fluxus, happenings, expanded cinema, and performance cultures, while complicating generic definitions that might cohere to her work. Schneemann has been the subject of numerous exhibitions and publications throughout her career, and her work is in the collections of Tate Modern, Commune di Milano, Centre Georges Pompidou, Muzeum Wspoczesne Wroclaw, Whitney Museum of American Art and the Museum of Modern Art.Carolee Schneemann: Unforgivable is the most thorough visual overview of Schneemann's work to date. Organized by five interrelated categories-Interviews and Correspondence, Painting, Cinema, Sites, and Technological Processes-this volume brings together previously published essays and interviews by authorities on the artist's work. The texts, many scarce or out of print, examine the significance of Schneemann's work in its historical context, and its vital urgency for our present.Contributors: Stephane Aquin, Emily Caigan, R Bruce Elder, Ron Hanson, Juan Carlos Kase, Brett Kashmere, Anette Kubitza, Erica Levin, Scott MacDonald, Thomas McEvilley, Ara Osterweil, Melissa Ragona, Maura Reilly, Kristine Stiles and Kenneth White.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781908966513 20160619
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Video
1 videodisc (6 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Meat joy is an erotic rite -- excessive, indulgent, a celebration of flesh as material: raw fish, chicken, sausages, wet paint, transparent plastic, ropes, brushes, paper scrap. Its propulsion is towards the ecstatic -- shifting and turning among tenderness, wildness, precision, abandon; qualities that could at any moment be sensual, comic, joyous, repellent. Physical equivalences are enacted as a psychic imagistic stream, in which the layered elements mesh and gain intensity by the energy complemet of the audience. The original performances became notorious and introduced a vision of the "sacred erotic."
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Video
5 3/4 inch videotapes: U-matic, 1 MiniDV
Collection
Women art revolution : videotape interviews by Lynn Hershman-Leeson for film, 1990-2008
Book
[46] p. : ill. ; 33 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 224 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm
Offering an incisive rejoinder to traditional histories of modernism and postmodernism, this original book examines the 1960s performance work of three New York artists who adapted modernist approaches to form for the medium of the human body. Finding parallels between the tactility of a drip of paint and a body's reflexive movements, Elise Archias argues convincingly that Yvonne Rainer (b. 1934), Carolee Schneemann (b. 1939), and Vito Acconci (b. 1940) forged a dialogue between modernist aesthetics and their own artistic community's embrace of all things ordinary through work that explored the abstraction born of the body's materiality. Rainer's task-like dances, Schneemann's sensuous appropriations of popular entertainment, and Acconci's behaviorist-inflected tests highlight the body's unintended movements as vital reminders of embodied struggle amid the constraining structures in contemporary culture. Archias also draws compelling comparisons between embodiment as performed in the work of these three artists and in the sit-ins and other nonviolent protests of the era.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300217971 20170123
Green Library

18. Breaking the frame [2012]

Video
1 videodisc (102 min.) : sound, color and black & white ; 4 3/4 in. Sound: digital; optical. Video: NTSC. Digital: video file; Blu-ray; all region.
"A feature-length documentary portrait of the New York artist Carolee Schneemann by Canadian filmmaker Marielle Nitoslawska. A pioneer of performance and body art as well as avant-garde cinema, Schneemann has been breaking the frames of the art world for five decades, in a variety of mediums, challenging assumptions of feminism, gender, sexuality, and identity. Utilizing a rich variety of film and hi-definition formats, Breaking The Frame can be described as a kinetic, hyper-cinematic intervention, a critical meditation on the relation of art to the physical, domestic and conceptual aspects of daily life and on the attributes of memory. It uses Schneemann's autobiographical materials to narrate the historic upheaval within Western art in post-war America. The film captures Schneemann in her own words, images and reflections, at work, at home, in the studio, and interweaves extensive film excerpts from her groundbreaking film work in both super 8 and 16mm such as Fuses (1967) and Kitch's Last Meal (1973-76), with documentation of performances including Meat Joy (1964), Interior Scroll (1975) and more recent museum commissions and exhibitions. ... The visual composition is complemented by a soundtrack featuring the music of composer James Tenney. Tenney was Schneemann's companion and collaborator for many years, and the two remained close friends until his death in 2006."--From breakingtheframe.com.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Digital content
49 items
Archive/Manuscript
4 linear feet
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Videotaped interviews with over 40 artists, critics, historians, and curators for the film Women Art Revolution, documenting the development of the Feminist Art Movement from the 1970s through 2013.
Special Collections
View all 49 items
Women art revolution trailers [2010]
Hershman-Leeson, Lynn, 1941-
DISBAND performance [2008]
Disband (Musical group)
View all 49 items
Archive/Manuscript
6.5 linear feet
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Correspondence, manuscripts and publications of essays in support of Super-8 film and of the media arts, scripts, notebooks, clipping files, exhibition flyers and books, journal publications, audiotapes of interviews (four of Varela, three by Varela of Paul Sharits, Stan Brakhage, and Andrej Zdravic), and videotapes.
Special Collections

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