Search results

RSS feed for this result

9 results

Book
464 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
294 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
167 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 x 31 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
37 p., [24] p. of plates : col. ill. ; 21 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Video
1 MiniDV tape, 1 document
Collection
Women art revolution : videotape interviews by Lynn Hershman-Leeson for film, 1990-2008
Book
68 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
147 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 cm.
In The Bowery in two inadequate descriptive systems (1974--1975) Martha Rosler bridged the concerns of conceptual art with those of political documentary. The work, a series of twenty-one black-and-white photographs, twenty-four text panels and three blank panels, embraces the codes of the photo-text experiments of the late 1960s and applies them to the social reality of New York's Lower East Side. The prevailing critical view of The Bowery focuses on its implicit rejection, or critique, of established modes of documentary. In this illustrated, extended essay on the work by Rosler, Steve Edwards argues that although the critical attitude towards documentary is an important dimension of the piece, it does not exhaust the meaning of the project. Edwards situates the work in relation to debates and practices of the period, especially conceptual art and the emergence of the photo-text paradigm exemplified by the work of Robert Smithson, Bernd and Hilla Becher, Hans Haacke, Victor Burgin, and the Women and Work group. In particular, he contextualizes Rosler's work of this period within the politicized San Diego group (which included, in addition to Rosler, Allan Sekula, Fred Lonidier, and Philip Steinmetz). Comparing The Bowery to Rosler's later video vital statistics of a citizen, simply obtained (1977) and the films of the Dziga-Vertov Group (formed by Jean-Luc Godard and Jean-Pierre Gorin), Edwards shows how the work engages with conceptual art and the neo-avant-garde of the 1960s and 1970s.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781846380839 20160608
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
ix, 218 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
City scenes have been chronicled in photographs since the early 1800s, but street photography as traditionally defined has captured a relatively narrow field of these images. Revolutionizing the history of street photography, Unfamiliar Streets explores the work of Richard Avedon (1923--2004), Charles Moore (1931--2010), Martha Rosler (b. 1943), and Philip-Lorca diCorcia (b. 1951), four American photographers whose careers in fashion, photojournalism, conceptual art, and contemporary art are not usually associated with the genre. Bussard's lively and engaging text, a timely response to a growing interest in urban photography, challenges the traditional understanding of street photography and makes original and important connections among urban culture, social history, and the visual arts, constructing a new historical model for understanding street photography. Illustrated with more than one hundred images, this book provides an interpretation of a compelling genre that is as fresh as its consideration of the city streets themselves, sites of commerce, dispossession, desire, demonstration, power, and spectacle.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300192261 20160613
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Digital content
49 items
Archive/Manuscript
29.5 linear feet
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Videotaped interviews with over 40 artists, critics, historians, and curators for the film Women Art Revolution, documenting the development of the Feminist Art Movement from the 1970s through 2013.
Special Collections
View all 49 items
Women art revolution trailers [2010]
Hershman-Leeson, Lynn, 1941-
DISBAND performance [2008]
Disband (Musical group)
View all 49 items

Looking for different results?

Modify your search: Search all fields

Search elsewhere: Search WorldCat Search library website