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Book
ix, 236 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Acknowledgments ix Introduction 1 1 How Teeth Work 5 2 How Teeth Are Used 34 3 Out of the Garden 60 4 Our Changing World 87 5 Foodprints 110 6 What Made Us Human 140 7 The Neolithic Revolution 169 8 Victims of Our Own Success 198 Notes 209 Index 229.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691160535 20170612
What teeth can teach us about the evolution of the human species Whether we realize it or not, we carry in our mouths the legacy of our evolution. Our teeth are like living fossils that can be studied and compared to those of our ancestors to teach us how we became human. In Evolution's Bite, noted paleoanthropologist Peter Ungar brings together for the first time cutting-edge advances in understanding human evolution and climate change with new approaches to uncovering dietary clues from fossil teeth to present a remarkable investigation into the ways that teeth--their shape, chemistry, and wear--reveal how we came to be. Ungar describes how a tooth's "foodprints"--distinctive patterns of microscopic wear and tear--provide telltale details about what an animal actually ate in the past. These clues, combined with groundbreaking research in paleoclimatology, demonstrate how a changing climate altered the food options available to our ancestors, what Ungar calls the biospheric buffet. When diets change, species change, and Ungar traces how diet and an unpredictable climate determined who among our ancestors was winnowed out and who survived, as well as why we transitioned from the role of forager to farmer. By sifting through the evidence--and the scars on our teeth--Ungar makes the important case for what might or might not be the most natural diet for humans. Traveling the four corners of the globe and combining scientific breakthroughs with vivid narrative, Evolution's Bite presents a unique dental perspective on our astonishing human development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691160535 20170612
Green Library, Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
xviii, 400 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • 1. Introduction: the social life of food-- Part I. Laying the Groundwork: 2. Framing food investigation-- 3. The practices of a meal in society-- Part II. Current Food Studies in Archaeology: 4. The archaeological study of food activities-- 5. Food economics-- 6. Food politics: power and status-- Part III. Food and Identity: The Potentials of Food Archaeology: 7. Food in the construction of group identity-- 8. The creation of personal identity: food, body and personhood-- 9. Food creates society.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107153363 20170227
This book offers a global perspective on the role food has played in shaping human societies, through both individual and collective identities. It integrates ethnographic and archaeological case studies from the European and Near Eastern Neolithic, Han China, ancient Cahokia, Classic Maya, the Inka and many other periods and regions, to ask how the meal in particular has acted as a social agent in the formation of society, economy, culture and identity. Drawing on a range of social theorists, Hastorf provides a theoretical toolkit essential for any archaeologist interested in foodways. Studying the social life of food, this book engages with taste, practice, the meal and the body to discuss power, identity, gender and meaning that creates our world as it created past societies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107153363 20170227
Green Library
Book
309 pages ; 25 cm
  • Introduction: what should we eat and how should we live?
  • The irony of insects
  • The games fruits play
  • The temptation of meat
  • The paradox of fish
  • The empire of starches
  • Elixirs
  • A truce among thieves
  • The calorie conundrum
  • The future of food
  • Afterword: Rules to eat and live by.
There are few areas of modern life that offer as much information and advice, often contradictory, as diet and health: eat a lot of meat, don't eat meat; whole-grains are healthy, whole-grains are a disaster; and on it goes. Biological anthropologist Stephen Le cuts through the confusing mass of information to present the long view of our diet. In 100 Million Years of Food Le takes readers on a historic and geographic tour of how different cuisines have evolved in tandem with their particular environments, as our ancestors took advantage of the resources and food available to them. Like his mentor Jared Diamond, Le uses history and science to present a fascinating and wide-ranging tour of human history as viewed through what and how we eat. Travelling the world to places as far- flung as Vietnam, Kenya, Nova Scotia, and Iowa, Le visits people producing food using traditional methods as well as modern techniques, and looks at how our relationship to food has strayed from centuries of tradition, to mass- produced assembly lines dependent on chemicals that bring with them a host of problems. 100 Million Years of Food argues that our ancestral diets and lifestyles are the best first line of defense in protecting our health; the optimal diet is to eat what your ancestors ate. In this clear-cut and compelling book, we learn not only what to eat, but how our diets are the product of millions of years of evolution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781250050410 20160619
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (261 pages) : illustrations.
  • Introduction: Food, Cuisine and Society in Prehistoric Greece (Paul Halstead and John C. Barrett) Evidence for Large-scale feasting at Late Neolithic Makriyalos, Northern Greece (Maria Pappa, Paul Halstead, Kostas Kotsakis and Duska Urem-Kotsou) Ceramic change and the practice of eating and drinking in Early Bronzee Age Crete (Peter Day and David Wilson) Ceramic sets in context: one dimension of food preparation and consumption in a Minoan palatial setting (Jeremy B. rutter) Mycenaean drinking services and standards of etiquette (James C. Wright) Fit for a king? Hierarchy, exclusion, aspiration and desire in the social structure of Mycenaean banqueting (Lisa Bendall) Faunal evidence for feasting: burnt offerings from the palace of Nestor at Pylos (Paul Halstead and Valasia Isaakidou) Wheat, barley, flour, olives and figs on Linear B tablets (John Killen) Social meanings of food and drink consumption at LMIII Phaistos (Elisabetta Borgna) Animal husbandry revisited: the social significance of meat consumption in a highland village of Mt Psiloritis, Centra Crete (Elia A. Vardaki).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781842171677 20180709
Food and drink, along with the material culture involved in their consumption, can signify a variety of social distinctions, identities and values. Thus, in Early Minoan Knossos, tableware was used to emphasize the difference between the host and the guests, and at Mycenaean Pylos the status of banqueters was declared as much by the places assigned to them as by the quality of the vessles form which they ate and drank. The ten contributions to this volume highlight the extraordinary opportunity for multi-disciplinary research in this area.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781842171677 20180709
Book
xii, 211 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm.
  • Contents List of Illustrations List of Tables Chapter 1 Introduction, by Anastasia Papathanasiou and Sherry C. Fox Chapter 2 Stable Isotope Analysis of Bone and Teeth as a Means for Reconstructing Past Human Diets in Greece, by Michael P. Richards Chapter 3 Stable Isotope Analyses in Neolithic and Bronze Age Greece: An Overview, by Anastasia Papathanasiou Chapter 4 Stable Isotope Analysis of Skeletal Assemblages from Prehistoric Northern Greece, by Sevasti Triantaphyllou Chapter 5 Variations in Diet in Prehistoric Thebes: The Case of the Bronze Age Mass Burial, by Efrossini Vika Chapter 6 Existence and Subsistence in Mycenaean-Era East Lokris: The Isotopic Evidence, by Carina A. Iezzi Chapter 7 Dietary Reconstruction at the Geometric-Period Burial Site of Ayios Dimitrios, by Eleni Panagiotopoulou and Anastasia Papathanasiou Chapter 8 Diet and the Polis: An Isotopic Study of Diet in Athens and Laurion during the Classical, Hellenistic, and Imperial Roman Periods, by Anna Lagia Chapter 9 Stable Isotope Evidence for Infant Feeding Practices in the Greek Colony of Apollonia Pontica, by Cynthia S. Kwok and Anne Keenleyside Chapter 10 Bread, Oil, Wine, and Milk: Feeding Infants and Adults in Byzantine Greece, by Chryssi Bourbou and Sandra Garvie-Lok Chapter 11 Summary: Patterns in the Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Data through Time, by Anastasia Papathanasiou and Michael P. Richards Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780876615492 20180611
The analysis of stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in bone collagen provides a powerful tool for reconstructing past diets, since it provides the only direct evidence of the foods that were actually consumed. The chapters that comprise this volume describe the application of this methodology to the archaeology of Greece, a country whose archaeobotanical remains have been isotopically studied more extensively than any other place in the world. The archaeological issues that can be addressed using stable isotope methods include the importance of fishing; the possible early introduction of millet; the nature of childrearing including weaning age and weaning foods; temporal shifts in protein consumption; differential access to certain foods associated with social status as well as gender and age; and cultural differences in dietary patterns. Additionally, diet is strongly correlated with health or stress markers in the teeth and bones. Knowing what people ate has vital implications for our understanding of past environments and economies, subsistence strategies, and nutrition.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780876615492 20180611
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
1 online resource (225 pages) : illustrations.
  • Contents List of Illustrations List of Tables Chapter 1 Introduction, by Anastasia Papathanasiou and Sherry C. Fox Chapter 2 Stable Isotope Analysis of Bone and Teeth as a Means for Reconstructing Past Human Diets in Greece, by Michael P. Richards Chapter 3 Stable Isotope Analyses in Neolithic and Bronze Age Greece: An Overview, by Anastasia Papathanasiou Chapter 4 Stable Isotope Analysis of Skeletal Assemblages from Prehistoric Northern Greece, by Sevasti Triantaphyllou Chapter 5 Variations in Diet in Prehistoric Thebes: The Case of the Bronze Age Mass Burial, by Efrossini Vika Chapter 6 Existence and Subsistence in Mycenaean-Era East Lokris: The Isotopic Evidence, by Carina A. Iezzi Chapter 7 Dietary Reconstruction at the Geometric-Period Burial Site of Ayios Dimitrios, by Eleni Panagiotopoulou and Anastasia Papathanasiou Chapter 8 Diet and the Polis: An Isotopic Study of Diet in Athens and Laurion during the Classical, Hellenistic, and Imperial Roman Periods, by Anna Lagia Chapter 9 Stable Isotope Evidence for Infant Feeding Practices in the Greek Colony of Apollonia Pontica, by Cynthia S. Kwok and Anne Keenleyside Chapter 10 Bread, Oil, Wine, and Milk: Feeding Infants and Adults in Byzantine Greece, by Chryssi Bourbou and Sandra Garvie-Lok Chapter 11 Summary: Patterns in the Carbon and Nitrogen Isotope Data through Time, by Anastasia Papathanasiou and Michael P. Richards Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780876615492 20180611
The analysis of stable isotope ratios of carbon and nitrogen in bone collagen provides a powerful tool for reconstructing past diets, since it provides the only direct evidence of the foods that were actually consumed. The chapters that comprise this volume describe the application of this methodology to the archaeology of Greece, a country whose archaeobotanical remains have been isotopically studied more extensively than any other place in the world. The archaeological issues that can be addressed using stable isotope methods include the importance of fishing; the possible early introduction of millet; the nature of childrearing including weaning age and weaning foods; temporal shifts in protein consumption; differential access to certain foods associated with social status as well as gender and age; and cultural differences in dietary patterns. Additionally, diet is strongly correlated with health or stress markers in the teeth and bones. Knowing what people ate has vital implications for our understanding of past environments and economies, subsistence strategies, and nutrition.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780876615492 20180611
Book
volumes cm
  • Volume 1. A-K
  • Volume 2. L-Z.
What are the origins of agriculture? In what ways have technological advances related to food affected human development? How have food and foodways been used to create identity, communicate meaning, and organize society? In this highly readable, illustrated volume, archaeologists and other scholars from across the globe explore these questions and more. The Archaeology of Food offers more than 250 entries spanning geographic and temporal contexts and features recent discoveries alongside the results of decades of research. The contributors provide overviews of current knowledge and theoretical perspectives, raise key questions, and delve into myriad scientific, archaeological, and material analyses to add depth to our understanding of food. The encyclopedia serves as a reference for scholars and students in archaeology, food studies, and related disciplines, as well as fascinating reading for culinary historians, food writers, and food and archaeology enthusiasts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780759123649 20160618
Green Library
Book
xx, 450 pages, 12 pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 25 cm.
  • 1. Introduction: integrated and multi-scalar approaches to early farmers in Europe -- 2. The future Neolithic: a new research agenda -- 3. Some possible conditions necessary for the colonisation of Europe by domesticates -- 4. Multi-agent modeling of the trajectory of the LBK Neolithic: a study in progress -- 5. Ancient DNA evidence for a homogeneous maternal gene pool in sixth millennium cal BC Hungary and the central European LBK -- 6. Settlement burials at the Karsdorf LBK site, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany: biological ties and residential mobility -- 7. Cattle and sheep herding at Cheia, Romania, at the turn of the fifth millennium cal BC: a view from stable isotope analysis -- 8. Herding practices in the ditched villages of the Neolithic Tavoliere (Apulia, SE Italy): a vicious circle? The isotopic evidence. -- 9. Linear Pottery culture household organisation: an economic model -- 10. Framing farming: a multi-stranded approach to early agricultural practice in Europe -- 11. Stewing on a theme of cuisine: biomolecular and interpretative approaches to culinary changes at the transition to agriculture -- 12. Life conditions and health in early farmers: a global perspective on costs and consequences of a fundamental transition -- 13. Biographical bodies: flesh and food at Catalhoyuk -- 14. Neolithic lifeways: microstratigraphic traces within houses, animal pens and settlements -- 15. Violence in the Neolithic: a population perspective -- 16. Mass graves of the LBK: patterns and peculiarities -- 17. Revealing our vibrant past: science, materiality and the Neolithic -- 18. Pottery, Archaeology and Chemistry: contents and context -- 19. Constructing a narrative for the Neolithisation of Britain and Ireland: the use of 'hard science' and archaeological reasoning -- 20. Doing science in the Mesolithic, Neolithic and Copper Age: an insider's perspective -- 21. Archaeological science and the Neolithic: the power and perils of proxy measures.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780197265758 20160618
The Neolithic period was one of the great transformations in human history with profound, long-term consequences. In Europe, there were no farmers at 7000 cal BC, but very few hunter-gatherers after about 4000 cal BC. Although we understand the broad chronological structure of this shift, many pressing research questions remain. Archaeologists are still vigorously debating the identity of those principally involved in initiating change, the detail of everyday lives during the Neolithic, including basic questions about settlement, the operation of the farming economy and the varied roles of material culture, and the character of large-scale and long-term transformations. They face the task not only of working at different scales, but of integrating ever-expanding amounts of evidence. As well as the data coming from larger and more intensive excavations, there has been a radical increase in the information released by many kinds of scientific analysis of archaeological remains. These now include, alongside longer established methods of looking at food remains and material, the isotopic analysis of the diet and lifetime movement of people, isotopic analysis of cereal remains for indications of manuring, a DNA analysis of genetic signatures, detailed micromorphological analysis of deposits where people lived, and the close examination of the origin and production of varying materials and artefacts. The 21 chapters by leading experts in the field demonstrate how the combination of archaeological and scientific evidence now provides opportunities for new and creative understandings of Europe's early farmers. They make an important contribution to the debate over how best to integrate these multiple lines of evidence, scientific and more traditionally archaeological, while keeping in central focus the principal questions that we want to ask of our data.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780197265758 20160618
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
252 pages ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
328 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Cavemen in condos
  • Are we stuck?
  • Crickets, sparrows, and Darwins- or, evolution before our eyes
  • The perfect paleofantasy diet : milk
  • The perfect paleofantasy diet : meat, grains, and cooking
  • Exercising the paleofantasy
  • Paleofantasy love
  • The paleofantasy family
  • Paleofantasy, in sickness and in health
  • Are we still evolving? : a tale of genes, altitude, and earwax.
We evolved to eat berries rather than bagels, to live in mud huts rather than condos, to sprint barefoot rather than play football-or did we? Are our bodies and brains truly at odds with modern life? Although it may seem as though we have barely had time to shed our hunter-gatherer legacy, biologist Marlene Zuk reveals that the story is not so simple. Popular theories about how our ancestors lived-and why we should emulate them-are often based on speculation, not scientific evidence. Armed with a razor-sharp wit and brilliant, eye-opening research, Zuk takes us to the cutting edge of biology to show that evolution can work much faster than was previously realized, meaning that we are not biologically the same as our caveman ancestors. Contrary to what the glossy magazines would have us believe, we do not enjoy potato chips because they crunch just like the insects our forebears snacked on. And women don't go into shoe-shopping frenzies because their prehistoric foremothers gathered resources for their clans. As Zuk compellingly argues, such beliefs incorrectly assume that we're stuck-finished evolving-and have been for tens of thousands of years. She draws on fascinating evidence that examines everything from adults' ability to drink milk to the texture of our ear wax to show that we've actually never stopped evolving. Our nostalgic visions of an ideal evolutionary past in which we ate, lived, and reproduced as we were "meant to" fail to recognize that we were never perfectly suited to our environment. Evolution is about change, and every organism is full of trade-offs. From debunking the caveman diet to unraveling gender stereotypes, Zuk delivers an engrossing analysis of widespread paleofantasies and the scientific evidence that undermines them, all the while broadening our understanding of our origins and what they can really tell us about our present and our future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393081374 20160610
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
vii, 405 p. : ill.
  • Machine generated contents note: Acknowledgements; 1. Introduction; Part I. The Animal Within: 2. Locating human diet in a mammalian framework; 3. Diet and hominin evolution; 4. Seasonality of environment and diet; 5. Evolution of human diet and eating behaviour; Part II. A Brave New World: 6. When our brains left our bodies behind: dietary change and health discordance; 7. Nutrition and infectious disease, past and present; 8. Inequality and nutritional health; Part III. Once Upon a Time in the West: 9. Nutrition transition; 10. Fats in the global balance; 11. Feed the world with carbohydrates; 12. Post-script; Index.
"While most of us live our lives according to the working week, we did not evolve to be bound by industrial schedules, nor did the food we eat. Despite this, we eat the products of industrialization and often suffer as a consequence. This book considers aspects of changing human nutrition from evolutionary and social perspectives. It considers what a 'natural' human diet might be, how it has been shaped across evolutionary time and how we have adapted to changing food availability. The transition from hunter-gatherer and the rise of agriculture through to the industrialisation and globalisation of diet are explored. Far from being adapted to a 'Stone Age' diet, humans can consume a vast range of foodstuffs. However, being able to eat anything does not mean that we should eat everything, and therefore engagement with the evolutionary underpinnings of diet and factors influencing it are key to better public health practice"-- Provided by publisher.
Book
vii, 405 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgements-- 1. Introduction-- Part I. The Animal Within: 2. Locating human diet in a mammalian framework-- 3. Diet and hominin evolution-- 4. Seasonality of environment and diet-- 5. Evolution of human diet and eating behaviour-- Part II. A Brave New World: 6. When our brains left our bodies behind: dietary change and health discordance-- 7. Nutrition and infectious disease, past and present-- 8. Inequality and nutritional health-- Part III. Once upon a Time in the West: 9. Nutrition transition-- 10. Fats in the global balance-- 11. Feed the world with carbohydrates-- 12. Post-script-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521869164 20160609
While most of us live our lives according to the working week, we did not evolve to be bound by industrial schedules, nor did the food we eat. Despite this, we eat the products of industrialization and often suffer as a consequence. This book considers aspects of changing human nutrition from evolutionary and social perspectives. It considers what a 'natural' human diet might be, how it has been shaped across evolutionary time and how we have adapted to changing food availability. The transition from hunter-gatherer and the rise of agriculture through to the industrialisation and globalisation of diet are explored. Far from being adapted to a 'Stone Age' diet, humans can consume a vast range of foodstuffs. However, being able to eat anything does not mean that we should eat everything, and therefore engagement with the evolutionary underpinnings of diet and factors influencing it are key to better public health practice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521869164 20160609
Green Library
Book
xiii, 182 p. : ill. maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. Ancestors-- 2. Beginnings-- 3. Foraging-- 4. Farmers-- 5. Hunger-- 6. Abundance-- 7. Contacts-- 8. Extinctions-- 9. Final thoughts.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521727075 20160603
This book explores the relationship between prehistoric people and their food - what they ate, why they ate it and how researchers have pieced together the story of past foodways from material traces. Contemporary human food traditions encompass a seemingly infinite variety, but all are essentially strategies for meeting basic nutritional needs developed over millions of years. Humans are designed by evolution to adjust our feeding behaviour and food technology to meet the demands of a wide range of environments through a combination of social and experiential learning. In this book, Kristen J. Gremillion demonstrates how these evolutionary processes have shaped the diversification of human diet over several million years of prehistory. She draws on evidence extracted from the material remains that provide the only direct evidence of how people procured, prepared, presented and consumed food in prehistoric times.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521727075 20160603
Green Library
Video
1 online resource (1 streaming video file (38 min.) : color, sound).
  • Contents: Relevance of Evolutionary Perspective for the Study of Nutrition
  • Evolution of key human differences with the emergence & early evolution of Homo at ~2.0 mya
  • Dietary regimes in traditional human societies
  • Human Activity Patterns in Comparative Perspective
  • Conclusions.
Book
xviii, 258 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
x, 335 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction.- On Methodological Issues in Zooarchaeology.- Interpreting the Meaning of Macrobotanical Remains: Issues, Promises, and Synergies.- Correspondence Analysis and Principle Components Analysis as Methods for Integrating Archaeological Plant and Animal Remains.- Methods and Meaning? An Approach for Incorporating Sea and Land Based Subsistence Resources into Archaeological Interpretations.- Tracking Hides and Corn: Methods for Evaluating Salinas Pueblo Responses to Spanish Tribute Demands.- Illusions of Change: Middle to Late Woodland Subsistence-Settlement Patterns in the Saginaw Valley of Michigan.- Big Bash in the Bottom: Integrating Animals and Plants from Cahokia's Sub-Mound 51 Borrow Pit.- Integrated Contextual Approaches to Understanding Past Activities Using Plant and Animal Remains from Formative Sites in the Titicaca Basin, Bolivia.- Investigations of Paleobotanical and Zooarchaeological Data from Dust Cave, Alabama.- Potluck on the Platform Mound: Communal Consumption in a Classic Hohokam Community.- Farmed and the Hunted: Integrating Floral and Faunal Data from Tres Zapotes, Veracruz.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781441909343 20160528
In recent years, scholars have emphasized the need for more holistic subsistence analyses, and collaborative publications towards this endeavor have become more numerous in the literature. However, there are relatively few attempts to qualitatively integrate zooarchaeological (animal) and paleoethnobotanical (plant) data, and even fewer attempts to quantitatively integrate these two types of subsistence evidence. Given the vastly different methods used in recovering and quantifying these data, not to mention their different preservational histories, it is no wonder that so few have undertaken this problem. Integrating Zooarchaeology and Paleoethnobotany takes the lead in tackling this important issue by addressing the methodological limitations of data integration, proposing new methods and innovative ways of using established methods, and highlighting case studies that successfully employ these methods to shed new light on ancient foodways. The volume challenges the perception that plant and animal foodways are distinct and contends that the separation of the analysis of archaeological plant and animal remains sets up a false dichotomy between these portions of the diet. In advocating qualitative and quantitative data integration, the volume establishes a clear set of methods for (1) determining the suitability of data integration in any particular case, and (2) carrying out an integrated qualitative or quantitative approach.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781441909343 20160528
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 372 p. : ill., maps.
Book
147 pages ; 19 cm
Green Library

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