Book
xix, 92 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
  • Introduction: The paradox of procrastination
  • Structured procrastination
  • Procrastination and perfectionism
  • To-do lists
  • Get rhythm
  • The computer and procrastinator
  • A plea for the horizontally organized
  • Collaborating with the enemy?
  • Fringe benefits
  • Do procrastinators have to be annoying?
  • Deep concluding thoughts
  • Appendix: How to kick the habit : read at your own risk.
Procrastination - just about everyone has struggled with it. This charming, highly readable book by an internationally recognised Stanford philosopher offers a new outlook: instead of focusing on your deficits, recognise the myriad things that you do accomplish while avoiding "the important project." Laced with stealth advice that you can put to use, it's funny, wise, and useful to boot. John Perry's insights and laugh-out-loud humour bring to mind Thurber, Wodehouse, and Harry Frankfort's On Bullshit. This very readable book educates, entertains, and illuminates a universal subject. Procrastinators will be relieved to learn that actually you can accomplish quite a lot while procrastinating. In fact, the book itself is the result of Perry avoiding grading papers, refereeing academic proposals, and reviewing dissertation drafts. It also has a practical side, offering up advice that readers can put to use. Who knew that placing "Learn Chinese" at the top of your to-do list would inspire you to get the less monumental tasks below it done? Witty, wise, and beautifully written, "The Art of Procrastination" will make the perfect gift for the untold number of lollygaggers out there.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761171676 20160609
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xix, 92 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
Procrastination - just about everyone has struggled with it. This charming, highly readable book by an internationally recognised Stanford philosopher offers a new outlook: instead of focusing on your deficits, recognise the myriad things that you do accomplish while avoiding "the important project." Laced with stealth advice that you can put to use, it's funny, wise, and useful to boot. John Perry's insights and laugh-out-loud humour bring to mind Thurber, Wodehouse, and Harry Frankfort's On Bullshit. This very readable book educates, entertains, and illuminates a universal subject. Procrastinators will be relieved to learn that actually you can accomplish quite a lot while procrastinating. In fact, the book itself is the result of Perry avoiding grading papers, refereeing academic proposals, and reviewing dissertation drafts. It also has a practical side, offering up advice that readers can put to use. Who knew that placing "Learn Chinese" at the top of your to-do list would inspire you to get the less monumental tasks below it done? Witty, wise, and beautifully written, "The Art of Procrastination" will make the perfect gift for the untold number of lollygaggers out there.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761171676 20160609
Green Library
Book
xix, 92 p. : ill. ; 19 cm.
  • Introduction: The paradox of procrastination
  • Structured procrastination
  • Procrastination and perfectionism
  • To-do lists
  • Get rhythm
  • The computer and procrastinator
  • A plea for the horizontally organized
  • Collaborating with the enemy?
  • Fringe benefits
  • Do procrastinators have to be annoying?
  • Deep concluding thoughts
  • Appendix: How to kick the habit : read at your own risk.
Procrastination - just about everyone has struggled with it. This charming, highly readable book by an internationally recognised Stanford philosopher offers a new outlook: instead of focusing on your deficits, recognise the myriad things that you do accomplish while avoiding "the important project." Laced with stealth advice that you can put to use, it's funny, wise, and useful to boot. John Perry's insights and laugh-out-loud humour bring to mind Thurber, Wodehouse, and Harry Frankfort's On Bullshit. This very readable book educates, entertains, and illuminates a universal subject. Procrastinators will be relieved to learn that actually you can accomplish quite a lot while procrastinating. In fact, the book itself is the result of Perry avoiding grading papers, refereeing academic proposals, and reviewing dissertation drafts. It also has a practical side, offering up advice that readers can put to use. Who knew that placing "Learn Chinese" at the top of your to-do list would inspire you to get the less monumental tasks below it done? Witty, wise, and beautifully written, "The Art of Procrastination" will make the perfect gift for the untold number of lollygaggers out there.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761171676 20160609
Business Library
Book
xvi, 332 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Preface to the second edition
  • Preface to the first edition
  • Introduction
  • Contents and propositions
  • Utterance and context
  • Context and cognitive paths
  • Meanings and contents
  • Names and the co-reference problem
  • Names, networks, and notions
  • The no-reference problem
  • Pragmatics
  • Unarticulated constituents
  • Contents and attitudes
  • Conclusion.
In this volume John Perry develops his "reflexive-referential" account of indexicals, demonstratives, and proper names. For this new edition, Perry has added a preface and two chapters on the distinction between semantics and pragmatics and on attitude reports. He reveals a coherent and structured family of contents-from reflexive contents that place conditions on their actual utterance to fully incremental contents that place conditions only on the objects of reference-reconciling the legitimate insights of both the referentialist and descriptivist traditions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781575865249 20160609
Green Library
Book
226 p.
  • Introduccion
  • Mach y el pobre profesor
  • Paradigmas, argumentos y problemas
  • Ase ha basado la semantica en un error?
  • La teoria reflexivo-referencial
  • La intencionalidad y el contenido de red
  • El plan
  • Contenidos y proposiciones
  • Significado y contenido
  • Sentido comun y contenido oficial
  • El concepto clasificatorio de contenido
  • Condiciones y proposiciones
  • Modos de designacion
  • Proferencia y contexto
  • La teoria reflexivo-referencial
  • Signos, ejemplares y proferencias
  • Contexto
  • Usos semanticos del contexto
  • Usos del contexto complementadores del contenido
  • Contexto y rutas cognitivas
  • Juegos informativos
  • Rutas cognitivas
  • Contextos e indexicos
  • Stretch el perro
  • Dthat
  • Contextos reales, doxasticos y ficticios
  • Significados y contenidos
  • Reichenbach, la reflexividad y el contenido indexico
  • Contenido indexico y contenido referencial
  • Variedades de contenido
  • Contenido oficial
  • Estirando el contenido cognitivo
  • Llos dos tubos de austin
  • Los nombres y el problema de la co-referencia
  • El informatico
  • Nombres y convenciones
  • Nombres y significacion cognitiva
  • Reflexividad y nombres
  • Paderewski
  • Mach y el pobre profesor
  • Lo dicho
  • Nombres, redes y nociones
  • Aplicando la teoria reflexivo-referencial
  • Redes intersubjetivas de nociones
  • Las redes y los juegos informativos
  • El problema de la no-referencia
  • Nombres, convenciones y redes
  • Redes y pronombres --Redes e intencionalidad
  • Contenidos suficientemente estrechos
  • Jacob horn
  • Jugando con nombres
  • Reverso dialectico?
  • El argumento de frege
  • Sobre ser fregeano (psicologizado)
  • Kaplan y la referencia directa
  • Los argumentos de kaplan a favor de la referencia
  • Directa.
Green Library
Book
192 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction: A Catholic perspective on torture
  • Why torture is different from other warlike actions
  • Why torture?
  • Why torture is wrong
  • Torturers
  • The tortured
  • The church and torture in the twentieth century
  • Justice and forgiveness
  • Conclusion.
Until recently, torture was chiefly associated with foreign juntas or other notorious human rights abusers. In light of the "war on terror" this has changed dramatically. Whether it is the abuse of prisoners at Abu Ghraib, the policy of "extraordinary rendition" of terror suspects into the hands of overseas interrogators, or questions regarding the authority of the U.S. President to take extreme measures for the sake of national security--suddenly the practice of torture has become a matter of urgent public debate. Reviewing the history and practice of torture, and the arguments used to justify it, Perry takes us into minds of both the torturers and their victims. Ultimately, showing why torture is different from other acts of war, and why it is fundamentally immoral: "not only because it violates the dignity we owe to the human person but also because it directly or indirectly degrades any society that would tolerate it.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781570756078 20160527
Green Library
Book
xiv, 264 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • I. Identity
  • [ch.] 1. The same F
  • 1. Geach versus Frege
  • 2. A counterexample?
  • 3. Must we ever choose identity?
  • 4. In defense of identity
  • 5. Same clay, different statute
  • 6. Conclusion
  • [ch.] 2. Relative identity and relative number
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. What is relative identity?
  • 3. Frege on criteria of identity
  • 4. Frege on number
  • 5. A tension in Frege's account?
  • 6. A troublesome passage
  • 7. Conclusion
  • [ch.] 3. Can the self divide?
  • 1. A problem for the mentalist?
  • 2. Idea for a solution
  • 3. The branch language
  • 4. Another strategy
  • 5. The person-stage language
  • 6. The lifetime language
  • 7. Conclusion
  • [ch.] 4. The two faces of identity
  • 1. How can identity conditions be a problem?
  • 2. The logical properties of identity
  • 2. Is identity identity?
  • 4. The circle of predication and individuation
  • 5. Identity's two faces
  • 6. The circle of reference and individuation
  • 7. Explaining identity conditions
  • 8. Partial understanding of identity
  • 9. A regress of individuation?
  • 10. Entity without identity?
  • 11. Return to dividing selves
  • II. Personal identity
  • [ch.] 5. Personal identity, memory, and the problem of circularity
  • 1. Grice's theory
  • 2. Circles and logical constructions
  • 3. Three charges of circularity
  • 4. Memory
  • 5. Logical constructions and inferred entities
  • [ch.] 6. Williams on the self and the future
  • 1. Putative examples of body transfer
  • 2. The reduplication argument
  • 3. The nonduplication argument
  • [ch.] 7. Personal identity and the concept of a person
  • 1. Personal identity from Locke to Shoemaker
  • 2. Self-knowledge and self-identity
  • 3. Dividing selves and multiplying minds
  • 4. Persons and their pasts
  • 5. The self and the future
  • 6. Survival without identity
  • [ch.] 8. The importance of being identical
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. A theory of personal identity
  • 3. Can we explain self-concern?
  • 4. Identification
  • 5. Special reasons
  • 6. The ego project
  • 7. Conclusions : Smith, Methuselah, Lewis, Parfit
  • [ch.] 9. Information, action, and persons
  • 1. Introduction
  • 2. How can circumstantial attitudes explain?
  • 3. Meshing
  • 4. The reflexive/circumstantial structure of information
  • 5. The reflexive/circumstantial structure of action
  • 6. Harnessing information
  • 7. Indirect classification and attunement
  • 8. Information, action, and intentionality
  • 9. Pains, pleasures, and original intentionality
  • 10. Conclusion
  • III. The self
  • [ch.] 10. The self, self-knowledge, and self-notions
  • 1. "Self" and the self
  • 2. Self-knowledge
  • 3. Beliefs
  • 4. Self-ideas and self-notions
  • 5. Epistemic/pragmatic relations and R-notions
  • 6. Self-notions as R-notions
  • 7. What's special about the self
  • 8. Back to Mach
  • 9. Self-knowledge problems revisited
  • [ch.] 11. The sense of identity
  • 1. Philosophical self
  • 2. The objective self
  • 3. Nagel's problem
  • 4. Against the objective self
  • 5. The subject of the impersonal conception
  • 6. Information games
  • 7. Self-recognition
  • 8. The missing facts
  • 9. Content and cause
  • 10. The objective self
  • 11. Searching for contingency.
This volume collects a number of Perry's classic works on personal identity as well as three new pieces: The Relativity of individuation; Informative Identities; and Personal Identity and the Concept of Person, Part II; which, together with Part I, constitutes an historical and critical survey of the literature from Locke to the 1990s. Perry's introduction puts his own work and that of others on the issues of identity and personal identity in the context of philosophical studies of mind and language over the past thirty years.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780872205215 20160527
Philosophy Library (Tanner)

8. Philosophy Talk, 2002-2014 [2002 - 2014]

Digital content
431 items
Archive/Manuscript
18124.8 megabytes (336 computer files)
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
The collection contains Philosophy Talk program audio from 2002 on.
Special Collections
Book
xvi, 221 p. ; 21 cm.
Physicalism is the idea that if everything that goes on in the universe is physical, our consciousness and feelings must also be physical. Ever since Descartes formulated the mind-body problem, a long line of philosophers has found the physicalist view to be preposterous. According to John Perry, the history of the mind-body problem is, in part, the slow victory of physical monism over various forms of dualism. Each new version of dualism claims that surely something more is going on with us than the merely physical. In this book Perry defends a view that he calls antecedent physicalism. He takes on each of three major arguments against physicalism, showing that they pose no threat to antecedent physicalism. These arguments are the zombie argument (that there is a possible world inhabited by beings that are physically indiscernible from us but not conscious), the knowledge argument (that we can know facts about our own feelings that are not just physical facts, thereby proving physicalism false), and the modal argument (that the identity of sensation and brain state is contingent, but since there is no such thing as contingent identity, sensations are not brain states).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262161992 20160528
Philosophy Library (Tanner)
Book
xiii, 208 p. ; 23 cm.
In this volume, author John Perry develops a "reflexive-referential" account of indexicals, demonstratives and proper names. On these issues the philosophy of language in the 20th century was shaped by two competing traditions, descriptivist and referentialist. Referentialist tradition is portrayed as holding that indexicals contribute content that involves individuals without identifying conditions on them. Descriptivist tradition is portrayed as holding that referential content does not explain all of the identifying conditions conveyed by names and indexicals. This text reveals a coherent and structured family of contents - from reflexive contents that place conditions on their actual utterance to the fully incremental contents that place conditions only on the objects of reference - reconciling the insights of both traditions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781575863108 20160528
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner)
Book
391 p.
  • 1. Indexicals, contexts and unarticulated constituents-- 2. Reality without reference-- 3. Evading the slingshot-- 4. Broadening the mind-- 5. Myself and I-- 6. Reflexivity, indexicality and names-- 7. Rip Van Winkle and other characters-- 8. Frege on demonstratives-- 9. The problem of the essential indexical-- 10. Belief and acceptance-- 11. A problem about continued belief-- 12. Castandeda on he and I-- 13. Perception, action, and the structure of believing-- 14. From worlds to situations-- 15. Possible worlds to situations-- 16. Circumstantial attitudes and benevolent cognition-- 17. Thought without representation-- 18. Cognitive significance and new theories of reference-- 19. The prince and the phone booth-- 20. Individuals in Informational and Intentional content-- 21. Fodor and psychological explanations-- References-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781575862460 20160528
  • Indexicals, contexts and unarticulated constituents-- Reality without reference-- Evading the slingshot-- Broadening the mind-- Myself and I-- Reflexivity, indexicality and names-- Rip Van Winkle and other characters-- Frege on demonstratives-- The problem of the essential indexical-- Belief and acceptance-- A problem about continued belief-- Castandeda on he and I-- Perception, action, and the structure of believing-- From worlds to situations-- Possible worlds to situations-- Circumstantial attitudes and benevolent cognition-- Thought without representation-- Cognitive significance and new theories of reference-- The prince and the phone booth-- Individuals in Informational and Intentional content-- Fodor and psychological explanations.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781575862699 20160528
This book includes famous papers such as 'The Problem of the Essential Indexical' and 'Frege on Demonstratives' and 'Cognitive Significance and New Theories of Reference'; papers co-authored with Mark Crimmins ('The Prince and the Phone Booth') and David Israel ('Fodor on Psychological Explanations') and related papers on situation semantics, direct reference, and the structure of belief. Perry has added 'afterwords' that discuss responses to his work by Gareth Evans, Robert Stalnaker, Barbara Partee, Howard Wettstein and others. The word 'I' is called an 'indexical' which means who it stands for depends on who says it, not just on its meaning. Other indexicals are 'you', 'here' and 'now'. Perry discusses how these words work, and why they express important philosophical thoughts. He claims that indexicals pose a challenge to traditional assumptions about language and thought, and for that reason a number of these papers sparked lively debates.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781575862460 20160528
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner)
Book
ix, 71 p. ; 22 cm.
The author revisits the cast of characters of his well-known Dialogue on Personal Identity and Immortality in this lively and absorbing dialogue on good, evil, and the existence of God. Does evil in the world present a problem to those who believe in the perfection of God? What is the nature of human evil? Can fully rational actions be intentionally evil? Gretchen Weirob and her friends tackle these questions and more in a dialogue that exemplifies the subtleties and intricacies of philosophical reflection. Once again, Perry's ability to get to the heart of matters combines with his mastery of the dialogue form.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780872204614 20160527
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner)
Book
xii, 307 p. ; 22 cm.
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner)
Book
21 p. ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
21 p. ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage), Special Collections
Book
49, [2] p. ; 21 cm.
'Perry's excellent dialogue makes a complicated topic stimulating and accessible without any sacrifice of scholarly accuracy or thoroughness. Professionals will appreciate the work's command of the issues and depth of argument, while students will find that it excites interest and imagination' - David M. Rosenthal, CUNY, Lehman College.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiii, 178 p. ; 23 cm.
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. A short history of reference-- 3. Acts, roles and singular reference-- 4. Elements of reference-- 5. Demonstratives-- 6. Context sensitivity and indexicals-- 7. Names-- 8. Definite descriptions-- 9. Implicit reference and unarticulated constituents-- 10. Locutionary content and speech acts-- 11. Reference and implicature-- 12. Semantics, pragmatics and critical pragmatics-- 13. Harnessing information-- 14. Examples.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521764971 20160605
Critical Pragmatics develops three ideas: language is a way of doing things with words; meanings of phrases and contents of utterances derive ultimately from human intentions; and language combines with other factors to allow humans to achieve communicative goals. In this book, Kepa Korta and John Perry explain why critical pragmatics provides a coherent picture of how parts of language study fit together within the broader picture of human thought and action. They focus on issues about singular reference, that is, talk about particular things, places or people, which have played a central role in the philosophy of language for more than a century. They argue that attention to the 'reflexive' or 'utterance-bound' contents of utterances sheds new light on these old problems. Their important study proposes a new approach to pragmatics and should be of wide interest to philosophers of language and linguists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521764971 20160605
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner)

18. Personal identity [2008]

Book
viii, 346 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
This volume brings together the vital contributions of distinguished past and contemporary philosophers to the important topic of personal identity. The essays range from John Locke's classic seventeenth-century attempt to analyze personal identity in terms of memory, to twentieth-century defenses and criticisms of the Lockean view by Anthony Quinton, H.P. Grice, Sydney Shoemaker, David Hume, Joseph Butler, Thomas Reid, and Bernard Williams. New to the second edition are Shoemaker's seminal essay "Persons and Their Pasts", selections from the important and previously unpublished Clark-Collins correspondence, and a new paper by Perry discussing Williams.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520256422 20160528
Green Library

19. Personal identity [2008]

Book
viii, 346 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
This volume brings together the vital contributions of distinguished past and contemporary philosophers to the important topic of personal identity. The essays range from John Locke's classic seventeenth-century attempt to analyze personal identity in terms of memory, to twentieth-century defenses and criticisms of the Lockean view by Anthony Quinton, H.P. Grice, Sydney Shoemaker, David Hume, Joseph Butler, Thomas Reid, and Bernard Williams. New to the second edition are Shoemaker's seminal essay "Persons and Their Pasts", selections from the important and previously unpublished Clark-Collins correspondence, and a new paper by Perry discussing Williams.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520256422 20160528
Philosophy Library (Tanner)
Book
352 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Preface-- Part I. Introduction: 1. Meaningful situations-- 2. Evidence for a theory of linguistic meaning-- Part II. A Theory of Situations: 3. Abstract situations-- 4. Event-types-- 5. Constraints-- Part III. Situation Semantics: 6. Sentence meanings-- 7. The meaning of singular noun phrases-- Part IV. The Attitudes: 8. Seeing-- 9. Attitudes as relations to situations-- 10. Representing mental states and events-- 11. Further directions-- Appendix to chapter 6: Determiner-free aliass-- Appendix to chapter 7: Singular aliass.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781575861937 20160528
In this provocative book, Barwise and Perry tackle the slippery subject of 'meaning', a subject that has long vexed linguists, language philosophers, and logicians. Meaning does not exist solely within words and sentences but resides largely in the situation and the attitudes brought to it by those involved. The authors present an unusually lucid treatment of important innovations in the field of natural semantics, contending that the standard view of logic (as derived from Frege, Russell, and work in mathematics and logic) is inappropriate for many of the uses to which it has been put by scholars. In Situations and Attitudes Barwise and Perry provide the basics of a realistic model-theoretic semantics of natural language, explain the main ideas of the theory, and contrast them with those of competing theories.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781575861937 20160528
Green Library, Philosophy Library (Tanner)

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