Search results

RSS feed for this result

10 results

Book
xx, 319 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Responding to change
  • The decision context
  • A brief philosophy of adaptive ecosystem management
  • Contesting sustainability: who will own the word?
  • Introducing and grounding a procedural approach
  • Heuristic proceduralism: a general method
  • Tools of the adaptive trade
  • Constructing sustainability: imagining through metaphors
  • Adaptive collaborative management: empirical findings and case studies
  • Addressing third-generation problems.
Sustainability is a nearly ubiquitous concept today, but can we ever imagine what it would be like for humans to live sustainably on the earth? No, says Bryan G. Norton in Sustainable Values, Sustainable Change. One of the most trafficked terms in the press, on university campuses, and in the corridors of government, sustainability has risen to prominence as a buzzword before the many parties laying claim to it have come close to agreeing how to define it. But the term's political currency urgently demands that we develop an understanding of this elusive concept. While economists, philosophers, and ecologists argue about what in nature is valuable, and why, Norton here offers an action-oriented, pragmatic response to the disconnect between public and academic discourse around sustainability. Looking to the arenas in which decisions are made-and the problems that are driving these decisions-Norton reveals that the path to sustainability cannot be guided by fixed, utopian objectives projected into the future; sustainability will instead be achieved through experimentation, incremental learning, and adaptive management. Drawing inspiration from Aldo Leopold's famed metaphor of "thinking like a mountain" for a spatially explicit, pluralistic approach to evaluating environmental change, Norton replaces theory-dependent definitions with a new decision-making process guided by deliberation and negotiation across science and philosophy, encompassing all stakeholders and activists and seeking to protect as many values as possible. Looking across scales to today's global problems, Norton urges us to learn to think like a planet.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226197456 20160619
Green Library
Book
xviii, 607 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
While many disciplines contribute to environmental conservation, there is little successful integration of science and social values. Arguing that the central problem in conservation is a lack of effective communication, Bryan Norton shows in "Sustainability" how current linguistic resources discourage any shared, multidisciplinary public deliberation over environmental goals and policy. In response, Norton develops a new, interdisciplinary approach to defining sustainability - the corner-stone of environmental policy - using philosophical and linguistic analyses to create a nonideological vocabulary that can accommodate scientific and evaluative environmental discourse. Emphasizing cooperation and adaptation through social learning, Norton provides a practical framework that encourages an experimental approach to language clarification and problem formulation, as well as an interdisciplinary approach to creating solutions. By moving beyond the scientific arena to acknowledge the importance of public discourse, "Sustainability" offers an entirely novel approach to environmentalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226595214 20160528
Green Library
Book
viii, 554 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • General introduction: an interdisciplinary experiment. Part I. Pragmatism as an Environmental Philosophy: 1. The constancy of Leopold's land ethic-- 2. Thoreau and Leopold on science and values-- 3. Integration or reduction: two approaches to environmental values-- 4. Convergence corroborated: a comment on Arne Naess on wolf policies-- 5. Pragmatism, adaptive management, and sustainability-- Part II. Science, Policy, and Policy Science: 6. What is a conservation biologist?-- 7. Biological resources and endangered species: history, values, and policy-- 8. Leopold as practical moralist and pragmatic policy analyst-- 9. Improving ecological communication-- Part III. Economics and Environmental Sustainability: 10. Sustainability, human welfare, and ecosystem health-- 11. Economists' preferences and the preferences of economists-- 12. Evaluating ecosystem states: two competing paradigms-- 13. The evolution of preferences: Why 'sovereign' preferences may not lead to sustainable policies and what to do about it-- 14. Sustainability: ecological and economic perspectives-- Part IV. Scaling Sustainability: Ecology as if Humans Mattered: 15. Context and hierarchy in Aldo Leopold's theory of environmental management-- 16. Scale and biodiversity: a hierarchical approach-- 17. Ecological integrity and social values: at what scale-- 18. Change, constancy, and creativity: the new ecology and some old problems-- 19. Democracy and sense of place values-- Part V. Some Elements of a Philosophy of Sustainable Living: 20. Caring for nature: a broader look at animal stewardship-- 21. Can there be a universal earth ethic? Reflections on the earth charter-- 22. Intergenerational equity and sustainability-- Part VI. Valuing Sustainability: Toward a More Comprehensive Approach to Environmental Evaluation: 23. Commodity, amenity, and morality: the limits of quantification in valuing biodiversity-- 24. The cultural approach to conservation biology-- 25. Evaluation and ecosystem management: new directions needed?-- 26. What do we owe the future? An argument for introducing wolves into Adirondack Park-- 27. Environmental values and adaptive management.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521809900 20160528
This book examines from a multidisciplinary viewpoint the question of what we mean - what we should mean - by setting sustainability as a goal for environmental management. The author, trained as a philosopher of science and language, explores ways to break down the disciplinary barriers to communication and deliberation about environment policy, and to integrate science and evaluations into a more comprehensive environmental policy. Choosing sustainability as the keystone concept of environmental policy, the author explores what we can learn about sustainable living from the philosophy of pragmatism, from ecology, from economics, from planning, from conservation biology and from related disciplines. The idea of adaptive, or experimental, management provides the context, while insights from various disciplines are integrated into a comprehensive philosophy of environmental management. The book will appeal to students and professionals in the fields of environmental policy and ethics, conservation biology, and philosophy of science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780521809900 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
287 p.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 281 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library, Marine Biology Library (Miller), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
169 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
330 p.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
269 p.
Green Library
Book
xi, 321 p.; 23 cm.
Like wolf restoration activities in the West, the proposal to reintroduce wolves into the Adirondacks has generated intense public debate. The idea of returning top predators to settled landscapes raises complicated questions on issues ranging from property rights to wildlife management to obligations to present and future generations. "Wolves and Human Communities" brings together leading thinkers and writers from diverse fields - including Timothy Clark, Daniel Kemmis, L. David Mech, Mary Midgley, Ernest Patridge, Steward T.A. Pickett, Joseph Sax, Ridger Schlickeisen and others - to address the complex ethical, biological, legal and political concerns surrounding wolf reintroduction. Contributors specifically explore the social, cultural and ecological values that come into play as they examine: the views of stakeholders in the Adirondack decision; historical trends in public perception of restoration; the legal and policy context for species preservation, and the challenges to the current system of property law; biological and political lessons learned from Yellowstone, Isle Royale and the Great Lakes states; and the meaning of wildness, both in ourselves and the wolf. The final chapter by Niles Eldredge takes the point of view of evolutionary time and ecological scale, challenging us to develop a new consciousness regarding our position in the natural world. "Wolves and Human Communities" offers an examination of interactions between human and wild communities, and represents a useful contribution to debates over species reintroduction for policymakers, researchers, ecologists, sociologists, lawyers, ethicists, philosophers and local residents.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781559638289 20160528
Green Library
Book
xi, 305 p. ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

Looking for different results?

Modify your search: Search all fields

Search elsewhere: Search WorldCat Search library website