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Book
xiv, 224 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Monuments and metabolism : Kenzo Tange and the attempts to bring new architecture to Buddhism's oldest site
  • Ecumenical parks and cosmological gardens : Braphai and Lek Wiriyaphan and Buddhist spectacle culture
  • Buddhist museums and curio cabinets : Shi Fa Zhao and ecumenism without an agenda.
Buddhism, often described as an austere religion that condemns desire, promotes denial, and idealizes the contemplative life, actually has a thriving leisure culture in Asia. Creative religious improvisations designed by Buddhists have been produced both within and outside of monasteries across the region-in Nepal, Japan, Korea, Macau, Hong Kong, Singapore, Laos, Thailand, and Vietnam. Justin McDaniel looks at the growth of Asia's culture of Buddhist leisure-what he calls "socially disengaged Buddhism"-through a study of architects responsible for monuments, museums, amusement parks, and other sites. In conversation with noted theorists of material and visual culture and anthropologists of art, McDaniel argues that such sites highlight the importance of public, leisure, and spectacle culture from a Buddhist perspective and illustrate how "secular" and "religious, " "public" and "private, " are in many ways false binaries. Moreover, places like Lek Wiriyaphan's Sanctuary of Truth in Thailand, Su?i Tien Amusement Park in Saigon, and Shi Fa Zhao's multilevel museum/ritual space/tea house in Singapore reflect a growing Buddhist ecumenism built through repetitive affective encounters instead of didactic sermons and sectarian developments. They present different Buddhist traditions, images, and aesthetic expressions as united but not uniform, collected but not concise: together they form a gathering, not a movement. Despite the ingenuity of lay and ordained visionaries like Wiriyaphan and Zhao and their colleagues Kenzo Tange, Chan-soo Park, Tadao Ando, and others discussed in this book, creators of Buddhist leisure sites often face problems along the way. Parks and museums are complex adaptive systems that are changed and influenced by budgets, available materials, local and global economic conditions, and visitors. Architects must often compromise and settle at local optima, and no matter what they intend, their buildings will develop lives of their own. Provocative and theoretically innovative, Architects of Buddhist Leisure asks readers to question the very category of "religious" architecture. It challenges current methodological approaches in religious studies and speaks to a broad audience interested in modern art, architecture, religion, anthropology, and material culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780824865986 20170130
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xiv, 327 pages : illustrations (black and white) ; 24 cm
  • AcknowledgmentsNote on TranscriptionIntroduction1. Monks and Kings2. Texts and Magic3. Rituals and Liturgies4. Art and ObjectsConclusionNotesBibliographyIndex.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231153775 20160612
Stories centering on the lovelorn ghost (Mae Nak) and the magical monk (Somdet To) are central to Thai Buddhism. Historically important and emotionally resonant, these characters appeal to every class of follower. Metaphorically and rhetorically powerful, they invite constant reimagining across time. Focusing on representations of the ghost and monk from the late eighteenth century to the present, Justin Thomas McDaniel builds a case for interpreting modern Thai Buddhist practice through the movements of these transformative figures. He follows embodiments of the ghost and monk in a variety of genres and media, including biography, film, television, drama, ritual, art, liturgy, and the Internet. Sourcing nuns, monks, laypeople, and royalty, he shows how relations with these figures have been instrumental in crafting histories and modernities. McDaniel is especially interested in local conceptions of being "Buddhist" and the formation and transmission of such identities across different venues and technologies. Establishing an individual's "religious repertoire" as a valid category of study, McDaniel explores the performance of Buddhist thought and ritual through practices of magic, prognostication, image production, sacred protection, and deity and ghost worship, and clarifies the meaning of multiple cultural configurations. Listening to popular Thai Buddhist ghost stories, visiting crowded shrines and temples, he finds concepts of attachment, love, wealth, beauty, entertainment, graciousness, security, and nationalism all spring from engagement with the ghost and the monk and are as vital to the making of Thai Buddhism as venerating the Buddha himself.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231153775 20160612
Green Library
Book
xiii, 358 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. ; 23 cm.
"Gathering Leaves and Lifting Words" examines modern and pre-modern Buddhist monastic education traditions in Laos and Thailand. Through five centuries of adaptation and reinterpretation of sacred texts and commentaries, Justin McDaniel traces curricular variations in Buddhist oral and written education that reflect a wide array of community goals and values. He depicts Buddhism as a series of overlapping processes, bringing fresh attention to the continuities of Theravada monastic communities that have endured despite regional and linguistic variations. Incorporating both primary and secondary sources from Thailand and Laos, he examines pre-modern inscriptional, codicological, anthropological, art historical, ecclesiastical, royal, and French colonial records. He traces how pedagogical techniques found in pre-modern palm-leaf manuscripts are pervasive in modern education by looking at modern sermons, and even television programmes and websites.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295988498 20160528
Green Library
Book
xiv, 327 pages, [16] pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • AcknowledgmentsNote on TranscriptionIntroduction1. Monks and Kings2. Texts and Magic3. Rituals and Liturgies4. Art and ObjectsConclusionNotesBibliographyIndex.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231153768 20160606
Stories centering on the lovelorn ghost (Mae Nak) and the magical monk (Somdet To) are central to Thai Buddhism. Historically important and emotionally resonant, these characters appeal to every class of follower. Metaphorically and rhetorically powerful, they invite constant reimagining across time. Focusing on representations of the ghost and monk from the late eighteenth century to the present, Justin Thomas McDaniel builds a case for interpreting modern Thai Buddhist practice through the movements of these transformative figures. He follows embodiments of the ghost and monk in a variety of genres and media, including biography, film, television, drama, ritual, art, liturgy, and the Internet. Sourcing nuns, monks, laypeople, and royalty, he shows how relations with these figures have been instrumental in crafting histories and modernities. McDaniel is especially interested in local conceptions of being "Buddhist" and the formation and transmission of such identities across different venues and technologies. Establishing an individual's "religious repertoire" as a valid category of study, McDaniel explores the performance of Buddhist thought and ritual through practices of magic, prognostication, image production, sacred protection, and deity and ghost worship, and clarifies the meaning of multiple cultural configurations. Listening to popular Thai Buddhist ghost stories, visiting crowded shrines and temples, he finds concepts of attachment, love, wealth, beauty, entertainment, graciousness, security, and nationalism all spring from engagement with the ghost and the monk and are as vital to the making of Thai Buddhism as venerating the Buddha himself.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231153768 20160606
Green Library
Book
xxii, 218 pages ; 24 cm
This book introduces contemporary Buddhists from across Asia and from various walks of life. Eschewing traditional hagiographies, the editors have collected sixty-six profiles of individuals who would be excluded from most Buddhist histories and ethnographies. In addition to monks and nuns, readers will encounter artists, psychologists, social workers, part-time priests, healers, and librarians as well as charlatans, hucksters, profiteers, and rabble-rousers-all whose lives reflect changes in modern Buddhism even as they themselves shape the course of these changes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780824858544 20160808
Green Library
Book
xii, 288 pages : color illustrations, color facsimiles ; 24 cm.
  • Preface -Lynn Ransom Introduction -Justin Thomas McDaniel PART I. THE ART OF THE BOOK Chapter 1. The Characteristics of Elephants: A Thai Manuscript and Its Context -Hiram Woodward Chapter 2. Representations of Space and Place in a Burmese Cosmology Manuscript at the British Museum -Alexandra Green Chapter 3. Stories Steeped in Gold: Narrative Scenes of the Decorative Kammavaca Manuscripts of Burma -Sinead Ward PART II. INSCRIBING RELIGIOUS PRACTICE AND BELIEF Chapter 4. Drawn to an "Extremely Loathsome" Place: The Buddha and the Power of the Northern Thai Landscape -Angela S. Chiu Chapter 5. Shifting Modes of Religiosity: Remapping Early Chinese Religion in Light of Recently Excavated Manuscripts -Ori Tavor Chapter 6. Living with Ghosts and Deities in the Qin State: Methods of Exorcism from "Jie " in the Shuihudi Manuscript -Daniel Sou PART III. TECHNOLOGIES OF WRITING Chapter 7. Spoken Text and Written Symbol: The Use of Layout and Notation in Sanskrit Scientific Manuscripts -Kim Plofker Chapter 8. Abbreviations in Medieval Astronomical and Astrological Manuscripts Written in Arabic Script -Sergei Tourkin Chapter 9. Creating a Codicology of Central Asian Manuscripts -Susan Whitfield Chapter 10. Providing Access to Manuscripts in the Digital Age -Peter M. Scharf Notes Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812247367 20160619
  • The characteristics of elephants : a Thai manuscript and its context / Hiram Woodward
  • Representations of space and place in a Burmese cosmology manuscript at the British Museum / Alexandra Green
  • Stories steeped in gold : narrative scenes of the decorative Kammavaca manuscripts of Burma / Sinéad Ward
  • Drawn to an "extremely loathsome" place : the Buddha and the power of the northern Thai landscape / Angela S. Chiu
  • Shifting modes of religiosity : remapping early Chinese religion in light of recently excavated manuscripts / Ori Tavor
  • Living with ghosts and deities in the Qin 秦 state : methods of exorcism from "Jie 詰" in the Shuihudi 睡虎地 manuscript / Daniel Sou
  • Spoken text and written symbol : the use of layout and notation in Sanskrit scientific manuscripts / Kim Plofker
  • Abbreviations in medieval astronomical and astrological manuscripts written in Arabic script / Sergei Tourkin
  • Creating a codicology of Central Asian manuscripts / Susan Whitfield
  • Providing access to manuscripts in the digital age / Peter M. Scharf.
While European manuscripts have been the subject of numerous historical, philological, and art historical studies over the past three decades, the study of the material culture of Asian (Buddhist, Hindu, Islamic, Taoist, and the like) manuscript traditions remains a relatively unexplored field. But Asian manuscripts, as the contributors to From Mulberry Leaves to Silk Scrolls demonstrate, contain much more than the semantic meaning of the words they reproduce. The ten essays collected here look closely at a wide variety of manuscript traditions with a special focus on both their history and the ways in they can be studied through digital technology to make the cataloguing, comparative analysis, and aesthetic appreciation of them more accessible to scholars and students. Each essay examines ways in which hand-produced texts-from ancient to early modern Thai, Pali, Chinese, Central Asian, Sanskrit, and Arabic manuscript traditions-shape both meaning and interpretation, and to a larger extent, the cultural norms that define their use. Together, the essays explore topics such as the best current practices for preservation and cataloging, the value of collaboration among scholars who work on different aspects of codicological, paleographic, orthographic, and material culture studies, and the use of these material objects for religious, political, cultural and pedagogical purposes. From Mulberry Leaves to Silk Scrolls explores issues relating to the complex relationships between text and image and between the spoken and the written word, and among the overlapping realms of religion, science, and society. Contributors: Angela S. Chiu, Alexandra Green, Justin Thomas McDaniel, Kim Plofker, Lynn Ransom, Peter Scharf, Daniel Sou, Ori Tavor, Sergei Tourkin, Sinead Ward, Susan Whitfield, Hiram Woodward.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812247367 20160619
Green Library
Book
2 volumes : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 30 cm
Green Library

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