%{search_type} search results

81 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
View results as:
Number of results to display per page
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Introduction 2. High Temperature Synthesis 3. Synthesis and Purification at Low Temperatures 4. Hydrothermal and Solvothermal Syntheses 5. High Pressure Synthesis and Preparation of Inorganic Materials 6. Inorganic Photochemical Synthesis 7. Chemical Vapor Deposition and Its Applications in Inorganic Synthesis 8. Synthesis of Coordination Compounds and Coordination Polymers 9. Cluster Compounds 10. Synthesis of Organometallic Compounds 11. Synthesis and Assembly Chemistry of Inorganic Polymers 12. Soft Inorganic Supramolecular Systems 13. Nonstoichiometric Compounds 14. Inorganic Synthesis of Actinides 15. Synthetic Chemistry of the Inorganic Ordered Porous Materials 16. Carbon Materials 17. Advanced Ceramic Materials 18. Functional Host-Guest Materials 19. Hierarchical Materials 20. Functional Crystals 21. Synthetic Chemistry of Nanomaterials 22. Amorphous Materials 23. Preparation Chemistry of Inorganic Membranes 24. Frontier of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry (I) Biomimetic Synthesis 25. Frontier of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry (II)-Designed Synthesis-Inorganic Crystalline Porous Materials.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780444635914 20170410
Modern Inorganic Synthetic Chemistry, Second Edition captures, in five distinct sections, the latest advancements in inorganic synthetic chemistry, providing materials chemists, chemical engineers, and materials scientists with a valuable reference source to help them advance their research efforts and achieve breakthroughs. Section one includes six chapters centering on synthetic chemistry under specific conditions, such as high-temperature, low-temperature and cryogenic, hydrothermal and solvothermal, high-pressure, photochemical and fusion conditions. Section two focuses on the synthesis and related chemistry problems of highly distinct categories of inorganic compounds, including superheavy elements, coordination compounds and coordination polymers, cluster compounds, organometallic compounds, inorganic polymers, and nonstoichiometric compounds. Section three elaborates on the synthetic chemistry of five important classes of inorganic functional materials, namely, ordered porous materials, carbon materials, advanced ceramic materials, host-guest materials, and hierarchically structured materials. Section four consists of four chapters where the synthesis of functional inorganic aggregates is discussed, giving special attention to the growth of single crystals, assembly of nanomaterials, and preparation of amorphous materials and membranes. The new edition's biggest highlight is Section five where the frontier in inorganic synthetic chemistry is reviewed by focusing on biomimetic synthesis and rationally designed synthesis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780444635914 20170410
Book
1 online resource (234 pages) : illustrations
  • Author Biographies vii Preface ix 1 Introduction 1 2 Common Reactions Employed in Synthesis 7 2.1 Soft-Chemistry Routes, 12 3 Ceramic Methods 17 4 Decomposition of Precursor Compounds 23 5 Combustion Synthesis 33 6 Arc and Skull Methods 37 7 Reactions at High Pressures 41 8 Mechanochemical and Sonochemical Methods 47 8.1 Mechanochemistry, 47 8.2 Sonochemistry, 50 9 Use of Microwaves 53 10 Soft Chemistry Routes 57 10.1 Topochemical Reactions, 57 10.2 Intercalation Chemistry, 64 10.3 Ion Exchange Reactions, 73 10.4 Use of Fluxes, 78 10.5 Sol Gel Synthesis, 81 10.6 Electrochemical Methods, 86 10.7 Hydrothermal, Solvothermal and Ionothermal Synthesis, 90 11 Nebulized Spray Pyrolysis 97 12 Chemical Vapour Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition 103 13 Nanomaterials 107 13.1 Nanoparticles, 107 13.2 Core Shell Nanocrystals, 116 13.3 Nanowires, 119 13.4 Inorganic Nanotubes, 133 13.5 Graphene-like Structures of Layered Inorganic Materials, 137 14 Materials 151 14.1 Metal Borides, Carbides and Nitrides, 151 14.2 Metal Chalcogenides, 157 14.3 Metal Halides, 162 14.4 Metal Silicides and Phosphides, 167 14.5 Intergrowth Structures and Misfit Compounds, 171 14.5.1 Intergrowth structures, 171 14.5.2 Misfit Compounds, 177 14.6 Intermetallic Compounds, 178 14.7 Superconducting Compounds, 182 14.8 Porous Materials, 191 14.8.1 Mesoporous Silica Materials, 191 14.8.2 Aluminophosphates, 194 14.8.3 Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs), 196 Index 201.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118832547 20180530
This compact handbook describes all the important methods of synthesis employed today for synthesizing inorganic materials. Some features: Focuses on modern inorganic materials with applications in nanotechnology, energy materials, and sustainability Synthesis is a crucial component of materials science and technology; this book provides a simple introduction as well as an updated description of methods Written in a very simple style, providing references to the literature to get details of the methods of preparation when required.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118832547 20180530
Book
1 online resource (x, 209 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates)
  • Author Biographies vii Preface ix 1 Introduction 1 2 Common Reactions Employed in Synthesis 7 2.1 Soft-Chemistry Routes, 12 3 Ceramic Methods 17 4 Decomposition of Precursor Compounds 23 5 Combustion Synthesis 33 6 Arc and Skull Methods 37 7 Reactions at High Pressures 41 8 Mechanochemical and Sonochemical Methods 47 8.1 Mechanochemistry, 47 8.2 Sonochemistry, 50 9 Use of Microwaves 53 10 Soft Chemistry Routes 57 10.1 Topochemical Reactions, 57 10.2 Intercalation Chemistry, 64 10.3 Ion Exchange Reactions, 73 10.4 Use of Fluxes, 78 10.5 Sol Gel Synthesis, 81 10.6 Electrochemical Methods, 86 10.7 Hydrothermal, Solvothermal and Ionothermal Synthesis, 90 11 Nebulized Spray Pyrolysis 97 12 Chemical Vapour Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition 103 13 Nanomaterials 107 13.1 Nanoparticles, 107 13.2 Core Shell Nanocrystals, 116 13.3 Nanowires, 119 13.4 Inorganic Nanotubes, 133 13.5 Graphene-like Structures of Layered Inorganic Materials, 137 14 Materials 151 14.1 Metal Borides, Carbides and Nitrides, 151 14.2 Metal Chalcogenides, 157 14.3 Metal Halides, 162 14.4 Metal Silicides and Phosphides, 167 14.5 Intergrowth Structures and Misfit Compounds, 171 14.5.1 Intergrowth structures, 171 14.5.2 Misfit Compounds, 177 14.6 Intermetallic Compounds, 178 14.7 Superconducting Compounds, 182 14.8 Porous Materials, 191 14.8.1 Mesoporous Silica Materials, 191 14.8.2 Aluminophosphates, 194 14.8.3 Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs), 196 Index 201.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118832547 20180530
This compact handbook describes all the important methods of synthesis employed today for synthesizing inorganic materials. Some features: Focuses on modern inorganic materials with applications in nanotechnology, energy materials, and sustainability Synthesis is a crucial component of materials science and technology; this book provides a simple introduction as well as an updated description of methods Written in a very simple style, providing references to the literature to get details of the methods of preparation when required.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118832547 20180530
Book
x, 209 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm
  • Author Biographies vii Preface ix 1 Introduction 1 2 Common Reactions Employed in Synthesis 7 2.1 Soft-Chemistry Routes, 12 3 Ceramic Methods 17 4 Decomposition of Precursor Compounds 23 5 Combustion Synthesis 33 6 Arc and Skull Methods 37 7 Reactions at High Pressures 41 8 Mechanochemical and Sonochemical Methods 47 8.1 Mechanochemistry, 47 8.2 Sonochemistry, 50 9 Use of Microwaves 53 10 Soft Chemistry Routes 57 10.1 Topochemical Reactions, 57 10.2 Intercalation Chemistry, 64 10.3 Ion Exchange Reactions, 73 10.4 Use of Fluxes, 78 10.5 Sol Gel Synthesis, 81 10.6 Electrochemical Methods, 86 10.7 Hydrothermal, Solvothermal and Ionothermal Synthesis, 90 11 Nebulized Spray Pyrolysis 97 12 Chemical Vapour Deposition and Atomic Layer Deposition 103 13 Nanomaterials 107 13.1 Nanoparticles, 107 13.2 Core Shell Nanocrystals, 116 13.3 Nanowires, 119 13.4 Inorganic Nanotubes, 133 13.5 Graphene-like Structures of Layered Inorganic Materials, 137 14 Materials 151 14.1 Metal Borides, Carbides and Nitrides, 151 14.2 Metal Chalcogenides, 157 14.3 Metal Halides, 162 14.4 Metal Silicides and Phosphides, 167 14.5 Intergrowth Structures and Misfit Compounds, 171 14.5.1 Intergrowth structures, 171 14.5.2 Misfit Compounds, 177 14.6 Intermetallic Compounds, 178 14.7 Superconducting Compounds, 182 14.8 Porous Materials, 191 14.8.1 Mesoporous Silica Materials, 191 14.8.2 Aluminophosphates, 194 14.8.3 Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs), 196 Index 201.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118832547 20180530
This compact handbook describes all the important methods of synthesis employed today for synthesizing inorganic materials. Some features: Focuses on modern inorganic materials with applications in nanotechnology, energy materials, and sustainability Synthesis is a crucial component of materials science and technology; this book provides a simple introduction as well as an updated description of methods Written in a very simple style, providing references to the literature to get details of the methods of preparation when required.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118832547 20180530
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
1 online resource (xxvi, 333 pages)
This volume of "Inorganic Syntheses" spans the preparations of wide range of important inorganic, organometallic and solid-state compounds. The volume is divided into 6 chapters. The first chapter contains the syntheses of some key early transition metal halide clusters and the very useful mononuclear molybdenum(III) synthon, MoCl3(THF)3. Chapter 2 covers the synthesis of a number of cyclopentadienyl compounds, including a novel route to sodium and potassium cyclopentadienide, MC5H5. Chapter 3 details synthetic procedures for a range of metal-metal bonded compounds, including several with metal-metal multiple bonds. Chapter 4 contains procedures for a range of early and late transition metal compounds, each a useful synthon for further synthetic elaboration. Chapter 5 deals with the synthesis of a number of main group compounds and ligands, while Chapter 6 covers teaching laboratory experiments.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118744871 20160616
Book
1 online resource (333 pages)
Book
xxii, 383 p. : ill. (some col.)
  • pt. 1. Synthetic methods
  • pt. 2. Catalysis
  • pt. 3. Combinatorial and chemical biology.
This volume represents one of the two edited by inviting a selection of young researchers participating to the European Young Chemist Award 2010. The other volume concerns the area of Nanotechnology/Material Science and is titled: Molecules at Work. This book contains the contributions of selected young chemists from the field of synthetic chemistry. The contributions are grouped under the three following umbrella topics: Synthetic Methods Catalysis Combinatorial and Chemical Biology This volume is an indispensable read for all organic and inorganic chemists, biochemists, chemists working with/on organometallics, and Ph.D. students in chemistry interested in seeing what tomorrow's chemistry will look like.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783527330904 20160608
Providing a comprehensive overview of the essential topics, this book covers the core areas of organic, inorganic, organometallic, biochemical synthesis and catalysis. The authors are among the rising stars in European chemistry, a selection of participants in the 2010 European Young Chemists Award competition, and their contributions deal with most of the frontier issues in chemical synthesis. They give an account of the latest research results in chemistry in Europe, as well as the state of the art in their field of research and the outlook for the future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783527645855 20160609
Book
xxii, 383 p. : ill. (some col.)
  • pt. 1. Synthetic methods
  • pt. 2. Catalysis
  • pt. 3. Combinatorial and chemical biology.
Book
xxii, 370 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • INTRODUCTION SOLID-STATE REACTIONS Reactions Between Solid Compounds Solid -Gas Reactions Intercalation Reactions FORMATION OF SOLIDS FROM THE GAS PHASE Chemical Vapor Transport Chemical Vapor Deposition Aerosol Processes FORMATION OF SOLIDS FROM SOLUTIONS AND MELTS Glass Precipitation Biomaterials Solvothermal Processes Sol-Gel Processes PREPARATION AND MODIFICATION OF INORGANIC POLYMERS General Aspects Polysiloxanes (Silicones) Polyphosphazenes Polysilanes Polycarbosilanes Polysilazanes and Polycarbosilazanes Other Inorganic Polymers Metal-Containing Polymers TEMPLATING METHODS Introduction to Porosity and High Surface Area Materials Metallic Foams and Porous Materials Soft Templates/Endotemplating Hard Templates/Exotemplating Templating Towards Multiscale Porosity Incorporation of Functional Groups into Porous Materials NANOSTRUCTURED MATERIALS The Origin of Nanoeffects Properties of Nanomaterials Synthesis of Nanoparticles One-Dimensional Nanostructures Nanometer-Scale Layers GLOSSARY INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783527327140 20160608
Due to their use and importance in many fields, a great deal of research focuses on developing inorganic materials. For example, a computer contains many types of inorganic materials, including the glass in the display or a layer of the LCD screen, the metal wires, and semiconductor materials in the chips and other electronic components. Computers can even be powered by solar cells, which also include inorganic materials. Zeolites also belong to this class and are found in applications ranging from catalysts to cat litter. This third edition of the popular textbook contains 30% new and/or revised content to reflect the latest developments in this fast developing field. Written from the chemist's point of view, the well-known and experienced authors provide a thorough and pedagogical introduction, now including example real-life applications of the syntheses, as well as new sections on nanomaterials, templating methods and biomineralization. A valuable resource for advanced undergraduates as well as masters and graduate students in inorganic chemistry and materials science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783527327140 20160608
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
xx, 590 p.
  • Introduction - Frontiers in Modern Inorganic Synthetic Chemistry
  • High-Temperature Synthesis
  • Synthesis and Purification at Low Temperature
  • Hydrothermal and Solvothermal Syntheses
  • High Pressure Synthesis and Preparation of Inorganic Materials
  • Inorganic Photochemical Synthesis
  • CVD and its Related Theories in Inorganic Synthesis and Materials Preparations
  • Microwave-Assisted Inorganic Syntheses
  • Syntheses of Coordination Compounds
  • Assembly Chemistry of Coordination Polymers
  • Synthetic Chemistry of Cluster Compounds
  • Synthetic Chemistry of Fullerenes
  • Synthesis of Organometallic Compounds
  • Synthetic and Assembly Chemistry of Inorganic Polymers
  • Synthetic Chemistry of Nonstoichiometric Compounds
  • Synthetic Chemistry of the Inorganic Ordered Polour Materials
  • Assembly Chemistry of Anion-Intercalated Layered Materials
  • Host-Guest Functional Materials
  • Chemical Preparation of Advanced Ceramic Materials
  • Amorphous Materials
  • Synthetic Chemistry of Nanomaterials
  • Preparation Chemistry of Inorganic Membranes
  • The Frontier of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry (I) - Biomimetic Synthesis
  • Frontier of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry (II) - Designed Synthesis - Inorganic Crystalline Porous Materials.
The book has four main parts. In the first part the discussion centers on inorganic synthesis reactions, dealing with inorganic synthesis and preparative chemistry under specific conditions: high temperature, low temperature and cryogenic, hydrothermal and solvothermal, high pressure and super-high pressure, photochemical, microwave irradiation and plasma conditions. The second part systematically describes the synthesis, preparation and assembly of six important categories of compounds with wide coverage of distinct synthetic chemistry systems: coordination compounds, coordination polymers, clusters, organometallic compounds, non-stoichiometric compounds and inorganic polymers. In the third part, seven important representative inorganic materials are selected for discussion of their preparation and assembly, including porous, advanced ceramic, amorphous- and nano-materials, inorganic membranes, synthetic crystals and advanced functional materials. The last part of the book, which is also its distinct feature, addresses the frontiers of inorganic synthesis and preparative chemistry. These final two chapters introduce the two emerging synthetic areas. Included are approximately 3000 references, a large proportion of which are from the recent decade. This title focuses on the 'chemistry' of inorganic synthesis, preparation and assembly of various compounds and describes all inorganic synthesis methods. It features: new state of the art inorganic synthesis chemistry areas; inclusion of a number of real examples for the preparation and assembly of important classes of materials; more than 3,000 reference to the primary literature; and, comprehensive state of the art reviews written by the experts in the area.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780444535993 20160604
Book
xx, 590 p. : ill. (some col.)
Book
xvi, 271 p. : ill. (some col.)
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction
  • 2. Practical Equipment
  • 2.1. Containers
  • 2.2. Milling
  • 2.3. Fabrication of Ceramic Monoliths
  • 2.4. Furnaces
  • 2.5. Powder X-ray Diffractometry
  • 3. Artificial Cuprorivaite CaCuSi4O10 (Egyptian Blue) by a Salt-Flux Method
  • 4. Artificial Covellite CuS by a Solid-Vapour Reaction
  • 5. Turbostratic Boron Nitride t-BN by a Solid-Gas Reaction Using Ammonia as the Nitriding Reagent
  • 6. Rubidium Copper Iodide Chloride Rb4Cu16I7Cl13 by a Solid-State Reaction
  • 7. Copper Titanium Zirconium Phosphate CuTiZr(PO4)3 by a Solid-State Reaction Using Ammonium Dihydrogenphosphate as the Phosphating Reagent
  • 8. Cobalt Ferrite CoFe2O4 by a Coprecipitation Method
  • 9. Lead Zirconate Titanate PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 by a Coprecipitation Method Followed by Calcination.
  • 10. Yttrium Barium Cuprate YBa2Cu3O7-δ (δ ~ 0) by a Solid-State Reaction Followed by Oxygen Intercalation
  • 11. Single Crystals of Ordered Zinc-Tin Phosphide ZnSnP2 by a Solution-Growth Technique Using Molten Tin as the Solvent
  • 12. Artificial Kieftite CoSb3 by an Antimony Self-Flux Method
  • 13. Artificial Violarite FeNi2S4 by a Hydrothermal Method Using DL-Penicillamine as the Sulfiding Reagent
  • 14. Artificial Willemite Zn1.96Mn0.04SiO4 by a Hybrid Coprecipitation and Sol-Gel Method
  • 15. Artificial Scheelite CaWO4 by a Microwave-Assisted Solid-State Metathetic Reaction
  • 16. Artificial Hackmanite Na8[Al6Si6O24]Cl1.8S0.1 by a Structure-Conversion Method with Annealing Under a Reducing Atmosphere
  • 17. Gold-Ruby Glass from a Potassium-Antimony-Borosilicate Melt with a Controlled Annealing.
Intended as a textbook for courses involving preparative solid-state chemistry, this book offers clear and detailed descriptions on how to prepare a selection of inorganic materials that exhibit important optical, magnetic and electrical properties, on a laboratory scale. The text covers a wide range of preparative methods and can be read as separate, independent chapters or as a unified coherent body of work. Discussions of various chemical systems reveal how the properties of a material can often be influenced by modifications to the preparative procedure, and vice versa. References to mineralogy are made throughout the book since knowledge of naturally occurring inorganic substances is helpful in devising many of the syntheses and in characterizing the product materials. A set of questions at the end of each chapter helps to connect theory with practice, and an accompanying solutions manual is available to instructors. This book is also of appeal to postgraduate students, post-doctoral researchers and those working in industry requiring knowledge of solid-state synthesis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470746110 20160608
Book
xvi, 271 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 23 cm.
  • Inside Front Cover: Periodic Table of the Elements. Inside Back Cover: Divisions of Geological Time. Foreword ( Derek J. Fray ). Preface. Acknowledgements. 1 Introduction. 2 Practical Equipment. 2.1 Containers. 2.2 Milling. 2.3 Fabrication of Ceramic Monoliths. 2.4 Furnaces. 2.5 Powder X-ray Diffractometry. 3 Artificial Cuprorivaite CaCuSi 4 O 10 (Egyptian Blue) by a Salt-Flux Method. 4 Artificial Covellite CuS by a Solid-Vapour Reaction. 5 Turbostratic Boron Nitride t-BN by a Solid-Gas Reaction Using Ammonia as the Nitriding Reagent. 6 Rubidium Copper Iodide Chloride Rb 4 Cu1 6 I 7 Cl 13 by a Solid-State Reaction. 7 Copper Titanium Zirconium Phosphate CuTiZr(PO 4 ) 3 by a Solid-State Reaction Using Ammonium Dihydrogenphosphate as the Phosphating Reagent. 8 Cobalt Ferrite CoFe 2 O 4 by a Coprecipitation Method. 9 Lead Zirconate Titanate PbZr 0.52 Ti 0.48 O 3 by a Coprecipitation Method Followed by Calcination. 10 Yttrium Barium Cuprate YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-delta (delta ~ 0) by a Solid-State Reaction Followed by Oxygen Intercalation. 11 Single Crystals of Ordered Zinc-Tin Phosphide ZnSnP 2 by a Solution-Growth Technique Using Molten Tin as the Solvent. 12 Artificial Kieftite CoSb 3 by an Antimony Self-Flux Method. 13 Artificial Violarite FeNi 2 S 4 by a Hydrothermal Method Using DL-Penicillamine as the Sulfiding Reagent. 14 Artificial Willemite Zn 1.96 Mn 0.04 SiO 4 by a Hybrid Coprecipitation and Sol-Gel Method. 15 Artificial Scheelite CaWO 4 by a Microwave-Assisted Solid-State Metathetic Reaction. 16 Artificial Hackmanite Na 8 [Al 6 Si 6 O 24 ]Cl 1.8 S 0.1 by a Structure-Conversion Method with Annealing Under a Reducing Atmosphere. 17 Gold-Ruby Glass from a Potassium-Antimony-Borosilicate Melt with a Controlled Annealing. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470746110 20160608
Intended as a textbook for courses involving preparative solid-state chemistry, this book offers clear and detailed descriptions on how to prepare a selection of inorganic materials that exhibit important optical, magnetic and electrical properties, on a laboratory scale. The text covers a wide range of preparative methods and can be read as separate, independent chapters or as a unified coherent body of work. Discussions of various chemical systems reveal how the properties of a material can often be influenced by modifications to the preparative procedure, and vice versa. References to mineralogy are made throughout the book since knowledge of naturally occurring inorganic substances is helpful in devising many of the syntheses and in characterizing the product materials. A set of questions at the end of each chapter helps to connect theory with practice, and an accompanying solutions manual is available to instructors. This book is also of appeal to postgraduate students, post-doctoral researchers and those working in industry requiring knowledge of solid-state synthesis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470746110 20160608
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Book
xvi, 271 p. : ill. (some col.)
  • Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction
  • 2. Practical Equipment
  • 2.1. Containers
  • 2.2. Milling
  • 2.3. Fabrication of Ceramic Monoliths
  • 2.4. Furnaces
  • 2.5. Powder X-ray Diffractometry
  • 3. Artificial Cuprorivaite CaCuSi4O10 (Egyptian Blue) by a Salt-Flux Method
  • 4. Artificial Covellite CuS by a Solid-Vapour Reaction
  • 5. Turbostratic Boron Nitride t-BN by a Solid-Gas Reaction Using Ammonia as the Nitriding Reagent
  • 6. Rubidium Copper Iodide Chloride Rb4Cu16I7Cl13 by a Solid-State Reaction
  • 7. Copper Titanium Zirconium Phosphate CuTiZr(PO4)3 by a Solid-State Reaction Using Ammonium Dihydrogenphosphate as the Phosphating Reagent
  • 8. Cobalt Ferrite CoFe2O4 by a Coprecipitation Method
  • 9. Lead Zirconate Titanate PbZr0.52Ti0.48O3 by a Coprecipitation Method Followed by Calcination.
  • 10. Yttrium Barium Cuprate YBa2Cu3O7-δ (δ ~ 0) by a Solid-State Reaction Followed by Oxygen Intercalation
  • 11. Single Crystals of Ordered Zinc-Tin Phosphide ZnSnP2 by a Solution-Growth Technique Using Molten Tin as the Solvent
  • 12. Artificial Kieftite CoSb3 by an Antimony Self-Flux Method
  • 13. Artificial Violarite FeNi2S4 by a Hydrothermal Method Using DL-Penicillamine as the Sulfiding Reagent
  • 14. Artificial Willemite Zn1.96Mn0.04SiO4 by a Hybrid Coprecipitation and Sol-Gel Method
  • 15. Artificial Scheelite CaWO4 by a Microwave-Assisted Solid-State Metathetic Reaction
  • 16. Artificial Hackmanite Na8[Al6Si6O24]Cl1.8S0.1 by a Structure-Conversion Method with Annealing Under a Reducing Atmosphere
  • 17. Gold-Ruby Glass from a Potassium-Antimony-Borosilicate Melt with a Controlled Annealing.
Book
xxxiii, 187 p. : ill.
Book
x, 253 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • PREFACE -- PART I - CELLULAR SYSTEMS -- 1. Iron Sulfur Cluster Biosynthesis: Scaffold and Donor Proteins, and Mechanistic Insights -- 2. Molecular Interaction Between Frataxin and Ferrochelatase During Heme Assembly: Frataxin's Role as a Potential Iron Chaperone During Heme Biosynthesis -- 3. Biosynthesis and Regulation of the Heme: A Biosynthetic Pathway -- 4. Assembly of Cytochrome c Oxidase -- 5. New Approaches to Analyzing the Site Selectivities and Crystal Structures of DNA Targeted Metal Complexes -- 6. Zn(II) Homeostasis in E. coli -- PART II - SYNTHETIC MODELS -- 7. N2S3X-Fe Models of Nitrile Hydratase -- 8. Studies Into the Metal Chemistry of the Carbaporphyrinoids: Insights Into the Biological Choice of Porphyrin -- 9. Bioinspired Aerobic Substrate Oxidation: A Ni(II)-Oximate Catalyst that Parallels Biological Alcohol and Amine Oxidation Chemistry -- 10. Inorganic Models for Two-Electron Redox Chemistry in Biological Systems: Ligand-Bridged Molybdenum and Tungsten Dimers -- 11. Metal-Mediated Peptide Assembly: From Discrete Molecular Species to Large-Scale Morphologies -- 12. Understanding the Biological Chemistry of Mercury Using a de novo Protein Design Strategy -- 13. Understanding Oxotransferase Reactivity in a Model System Using Singular Value Decomposition Analysis -- 14. DNA Minor Groove Recognition by Ni(II)- and Cu(II)-Gly-Gly-His Derived Metallopeptides.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780841269750 20160610
Bioinorganic Chemistry: Cellular Systems and Synthetic Models includes chapters describing cutting-edge work by renowned researchers in the field that fall within two main areas of current bioinorganic chemistry: (1) the study of cellular systems and processes that occur inside cells that are impacted by inorganic elements, e.g., biosynthetic pathways leading to the production of vital metal-containing enzymes and proteins including iron-sulfur clusters, hemes, and cytochrome c oxidase; metal homeostasis (Zn2+ in E. coli); and new strategies to examine DNA targeting by metal-based drugs using, as an example, the clinically-employed bleomycin class of antitumor agents, and (2) sophisticated new inorganic model systems, many of which escape the traditional approach of trying to use structural mimics of the native systems to produce functional mimics and instead use a more conceptual approach to the use of bioinorganic models to understand the native system or to develop useful synthetic molecules. In the former area, unlike most traditional efforts in bioinorganic chemistry that have been devoted to studies of the structures and functions of metal centers located within individual metal-containing proteins, the topics described in this volume seek to describe whole systems of interaction between multiple interacting biomolecules that are impacted by inorganic species. In the latter area, along with chapters devoted to more traditional ligand systems and inorganic reactivities, peptide- and protein-like ligand systems are emphasized creating agents that: lead to novel structures and morphologies, de novo designed systems that model biological Hg binding, and unique DNA-targeted agents that mimic the activities of nucleic acid-targeted natural products and proteins. Together, these chapters provide examples of the exciting current work in two important areas in the exciting field of bioinorganic chemistry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780841269750 20160610
dx.doi.org American Chemical Society
Book
x, 227 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Functional Group Oriented Bond-Sets.- Skeleton Oriented Bond-Sets.- Building Block Oriented Synthesis.- The Basis for Planning.- Formation of Cyclic Structures.- Protecting Groups.- Ranking of Synthesis Plans.- Computer-Aided Synthesis Planning.- Stereogenic Centers and Planning of Syntheses.- Enjoying the Art of Synthesis.- Summary and Concluding Remarks.- Solutions to Problems.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783540792192 20180521
Synthesis is at the core of organic chemistry. In order for compounds to be studied-be it as drugs, materials, or because of their physical properties- they have to be prepared, often in multistep synthetic sequences. Thus, the target compound is at the outset of synthesis planning. Synthesis involves creating the target compound from smaller, readily available building blocks. Immediately, questions arise: From which bui- ing blocks? In which sequence? By which reactions? Nature creates many highly complex "natural products" via reaction cascades, in which an asso- ment of starting compounds present within the cell is transformed by speci c (for each target structure) combinations of modular enzymes in speci c - quences into the target compounds [1, 2]. To mimic this ef ciency is the dream of an ideal synthesis [2]. However, we are at present so far from - alising such a "one-pot" operation that actual synthesis has to be achieved via a sequence of individual discrete steps. Thus, we are left with the task of planning each synthesis individually in an optimal fashion. Synthesis planning must be conducted with regard for certain speci - tions, some of which are due to the structure of the target molecule, and some of which relate to external parameters such as costs, environmental compatibility, or novelty. We will not consider these external aspects in this context. Planning of a synthesis is based on a pool of information regarding chemical reactions that can be executed reliably and in high chemical yield.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783540792192 20180521
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
Book
2 v. (xxv, 721 p.) : ill. (some col.) ; 25 cm.
  • Preface A Note From The Editors THE EARLY YEARS OF IONIC LIQUIDS SYNTHESIS AND PURIFICATION Synthesis Quality Aspects and other Questions Related to Commercial Ionic Liquid Production Synthesis of Task-specific Ionic Liquids PHYSICO-CHEMICAL PROPERTIES Melting Points Viscosity and Density Solubility and Solvation in Ionic Liquids Gas Solubilities Polarity Electrochemistry STRUCTURE AND DYNAMICS Order in the Liquid State and Structure Computational Modelling of Ionic Liquids Translational Diffusion Molecular Reorientational Dynamics ORGANIC SYNTHESIS Ionic Liquids in Organic Synthesis: Effects on Rate and Selectivity Stoicheiometric Organic Reactions and Acid-catalysed Reactions in Ionic Liquids Transition Metal Catalysis in Ionic Liquids Ionic Liquids in Multiphasic Reactions Task Specific Ionic Liquids (TSILs): A New Generation of Soluble Supports for Supported Organic Synthesis (SPOS) Supported Ionic Liquid Phase Catalysts Multiphasic Catalysis Using Ionic Liquids in Combination with Compressed CO2 INORGANIC SYNTHESIS Directed Inorganic and Organometallic Synthesis Making of Inorganic Materials by Electrochemical Methods Ionic Liquids in Material Synthesis: Functional Nanoparticles and Other Inorganic Nanostructures POLYMER SYNTHESIS IN IONIC LIQUIDS BIOCATALYTIC REACTIONS IN IONIC LIQUIDS INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS OF IONIC LIQUIDS CONLUDING REMARKS AND OUTLOOK.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783527312399 20160605
The second, completely revised and enlarged edition of what has become the standard reference work in this fascinating field brings together the latest developments, supplemented by numerous practical tips, providing those working in both research and industry with an indispensable source of information. New contributions have been added, to reflect the fact that industrial processes are already established, and ionic liquids are now commercially available. A must for everyone working in the field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783527312399 20160605
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Book
xvii, 363 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Preface. List of Contributors. 1 Carbon Dioxide Reduction and Uses as a Chemical Feedstock (Michele Aresta). 1.1 Introduction. 1.2 Properties of the CO2 Molecule. 1.3 CO2 Coordination to Metal Centers and Reactivity of Coordinated CO2. 1.4 CO2 Conversion. 1.5 Conclusions. References. 2 Nitrogen Monoxide and Nitrous Oxide Binding and Reduction (Dong-Heon Lee, Biplab Mondal, and Kenneth D. Karlin). 2.1 Introduction. 2.2 NO. 2.3 N2O. 2.4 Summary and Conclusions. References. 3 Bio-organometallic Approaches to Nitrogen Fixation Chemistry (Jonas C. Peters and Mark P. Mehn). 3.1 Introduction - The N2 Fixation Challenge. 3.2 Biological N2 Reduction. 3.3 Biomimetic Systems that Model Structure and Function. 3.4 Concluding Remarks. References. 4 The Activation of Dihydrogen (Jesse W. Tye and Michael B. Hall). 4.1 Introduction. 4.2 Structure and Bonding of Metal-bound H-Atoms. 4.3 Intramolecular H-Atom Exchange. 4.4 Nonclassical H-Bonds. 4.5 Reactivity of Metal-bound H-Atoms. 4.6 Recent Advances in the Activation of Dihydrogen by Synthetic Complexes. 4.7 Enzymatically Catalyzed Dihydrogen Oxidation and Proton Reduction. 4.8 Conclusions. Acknowledgments. Abbreviations. References. 5 Molecular Oxygen Binding and Activation: Oxidation Catalysis (Candace N. Cornell and Matthew S. Sigman). 5.1 Introduction. 5.2 Additive Coreductants. 5.3 Ligand-modified Catalysis. 5.4 Conclusions and Outlook. References. 6 Dioxygen Binding and Activation: Reactive Intermediates (Andrew S. Borovik, Paul J. Zinn and Matthew K. Zart). 6.1 Introduction. 6.2 Dioxygen Binders. 6.3 Reactive Intermediates: Iron and Copper Species. 6.4 Cobalt-Dioxygen Complexes. 6.5 Manganese-Dioxygen Complexes. 6.6 Nickel-Dioxygen Complexes and Their Reactive Intermediates. 6.7 Summary. Acknowledgments. References. 7 Methane Functionalization (Brian Conley, William J. Tenn, III, Kenneth J.H. Young, Somesh Ganesh, Steve Meier, Jonas Oxgaard, Jason Gonzales, William A. Goddard, III, and Roy A. Periana). 7.1 Methane as a Replacement for Petroleum. 7.2 Low Temperature is Key to Economical Methane Functionalization. 7.3 CH Activation as a Pathway to Economical Methane Functionalization via CH Hydroxylation. 7.4 Conclusions and Perspective for Methane Functionalization. References. 8 Water Activation: Catalytic Hydrolysis (Lisa M. Berreau). 8.1 Introduction. 8.2 Water Activation: Coordination Sphere Effects on M-OH2 Acidity and Structure. 8.3 Secondary H-Bonding Effects on Substrate Coordination, Activation and Catalytic Hydrolysis Involving Phosphate Esters. 8.4 Summary and Future Directions. References. 9 Carbon Monoxide as a Chemical Feedstock: Carbonylation Catalysis (Piet W.N.M. van Leeuwen and Zoraida Freixa). 9.1 Introduction. 9.2 Rhodium-catalyzed Hydroformylation. 9.3 Methanol Carbonylation. 9.4 Concluding Remarks. References. Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783527313129 20160528
The first to combine both the bioinorganic and the organometallic view, this handbook provides all the necessary knowledge in one convenient volume. Alongside a look at CO2 and N2 reduction, the authors discuss O2, NO and N2O binding and reduction, activation of H2 and the oxidation catalysis of O2. This book is edited by the highly renowned William Tolman, who has won several awards for his research in the field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783527313129 20160528
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Science Library (Li and Ma)

Articles+

Journal articles, e-books, & other e-resources
Articles+ results include