%{search_type} search results

11 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
View results as:
Number of results to display per page
Book
165 p. : ill., plans ; 26 cm.
  • List of Illustrations. Notes on Contributors. C. Anne Wilson: Foreword. Ivan Day: Introduction. David Eveleigh: Cast Iron Progress - the Development of the Kitchen Range. Ivan Day: Ox Roasts from Frost Fair to Mop. Peter Brears: The Roast Beef of Windsor Castle. Ivan Day: The Clockwork Cook - A Brief History of the English Spring-jack. Laura Mason: Barms and Leavens. Susan McLellan Plaisted: Baking in a Beehive Oven. Bibliography. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781903018675 20160528
These essays were presented at the seventeenth Leeds Symposium on Food History, of which this is the fourteenth volume in the series 'Food and Society'. Their common theme is the way in which we cooked our food from the medieval to the modern eras, most especially, how we roasted meats. The authors are distinguished food historians, mostly from the north of England. David Eveleigh discusses the rise of the kitchen range, from the 19th-century coal-fired monsters to the electric and gas cookers of the early 20th century. Ivan Day, in two essays, talks about techniques of roasting. In the first he tells of the ox roast - the open-air celebration with the cooking done on a blazing campfire. In the second he traces the history of the clockwork spit, the final, most domestic version of the open-hearth device that had been driven by dogs or scullions in earlier centuries. Peter Brears gives us the fruits of many years' involvement in the reconstruction of the kitchens at Hampton Court and other Royal Palaces in his account of roasting, specifically the 'baron of beef', in these important locales. The final two chapters discuss aspects of baking rather than roasting. Laura Mason tells of the English reliance on yeast as a raising agent - in the earliest times deriving it from brewing le; and Susan McClellan Plaisted gives an account of running a masonry wood-fired oven in living-history museums in America, discussing the transmission of cooking techniques from the Old to the New World, and the problems encountered in baking a satisfactory loaf. The book is very generously illustrated, both by photographs of artefacts and reproductions of early prints and engravings that elucidate their purpose and function.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781903018675 20160528
Green Library
Book
127 p. ; ill. ; 26 cm.
  • Acknowledgements Foreward Notes on Contributors Preface by Eileen White The English Kitchen: Introductory Remarks, by Tom Jaine Soups, Broths and Pottages, by Eileen White The Rise and Fall of the Herring, by Ann Rycraft Blancmange: A Tale of Seven Centuries, by C. Anne Wilson A Tale of Two Dishes: Olios and Fricassees, by Gilly Lehmann Boiled Puddings through the Ages, by Laura Mason A History of Baked Puddings, by Fiona Lucraft Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781903018507 20160527
English cookery is always in search of its identity. This book offers some clues in respect of particular dishes or types of food. Not that these are the only markers of Englishness, but taken altogether they do point up some of our most enduring culinary characteristics. None more so than the pudding, and Laura Mason does a good job of account for the rise of the boiled pudding wrapped in its floured cloth that so typifies the glory-days of Victorian cookery. The blancmange, too, now something that strikes horror in the breast of the upstanding Englishman, might wave a flag for the wonders of the pink and jellified mould that so handsomely adorned the tables of our Edwardian grandparents. Olios and fricassees are indeed of foreign origin - not British at all - but Gilly Lehmann shows how their adoption and adaptation in seventeenth and early eighteenth century kitchens lays bare the true nature of English cookery (not actually very good). Soups, broths and pottages are shared by all nations of the world but each has taken its own particular line with this form and Eileen White describes the development of this essential preliminary to dinner more clearly that hitherto.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781903018507 20160527
Green Library
Book
166 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
Green Library
Book
282 p. : ill., map ; 26 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 171 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
From comforting hypocras, caudels and possets, to exotic sherbert, nourishing beverages have been popular since prehistory. This book traces the history of liquid foods and drinks and the social context in which they were prepared and consumed. It looks at a number of beverages once significant but either little known today or existing only in a very different form. Amongst the potable foods described are prehistoric pottages with their strange ingredients, and their medieval successors. Cider, hot spiced ale and distilled wine are some of the stimulating drinks in this food history. Illustrations accompany the text and early recipes are included, modernized where necessary.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780748604241 20160528
Green Library
Book
viii, 159 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 170 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 192 p. : maps ; 22 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv, 111 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 45 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxii, 138 p. : ill., map ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

Articles+

Journal articles, e-books, & other e-resources
Articles+ results include