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Book
xvi, 311 pages ; 23 cm
  • The historicality of individuals
  • Human nature in processual thinking
  • Linked ecologies
  • Lyrical sociology
  • The problem of excess
  • The idea of outcome
  • Social order and process
  • Inequality as a process
  • Professionalism empirical and moral.
For the past twenty years, noted sociologist Andrew Abbott has been developing what he calls a "processual" ontology for social life. In this view, the social world is constantly changing making, remaking, and unmaking itself, instant by instant. He argues that even the units of the social world both individuals and entities must be explained by these series of events rather than as enduring objects, fixed in time. This radical concept, which lies at the heart of the Chicago School of Sociology, provides a means for the disciplines of history and sociology to interact with and reflect on each other. In "Processual Sociology, " Abbott first examines the endurance of individuals and social groups through time and then goes on to consider the question of what this means for human nature. He looks at different approaches to the passing of social time and determination, all while examining the goal of social existence, weighing the concepts of individual outcome and social order. Abbott concludes by discussing core difficulties of the practice of social science as a moral activity, arguing that it is inescapably moral and therefore we must develop normative theories more sophisticated than our current naively political normativism. Ranging broadly across disciplines and methodologies, "Processual Sociology" breaks new ground in its search for conceptual foundations of a rigorously processual account of social life.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226336626 20160619
Green Library
Book
xv, 259 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • To the Reader 1 Introduction 2 A Library Ethnography 3 Fundamentals 4 The Preliminary Phase 5 Midphase Bibliography 6 Midphase Scanning, Browsing, and Brute Force 7 Reading 8 Midphase Files and Organization 9 Midphase Analysis 10 Midphase Writing 11 Midphase Design 12 Endphase Glossary Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226167787 20160616
Today's researchers have access to more information than ever before. Yet the new material is both overwhelming in quantity and variable in quality. How can scholars survive these twin problems and produce groundbreaking research using the physical and electronic resources available in the modern university research library? In Digital Paper, Andrew Abbott provides some much-needed answers to that question. Abbott tells what every senior researcher knows: that the research process in such materials is not a mechanical, linear process, but a thoughtful and adventurous journey through a non-linear world. He breaks library research down into seven basic and simultaneous tasks: design, search, scanning/browsing, reading, analyzing, filing, and writing. He moves the reader through the phases of research, from confusion to organization, from vague idea to polished result. He teaches how to evaluate data and prior research; how to follow a trail to elusive treasures; how to organize a project; when to start over; when to ask for help. He shows how an understanding of scholarly values, a commitment to hard work, and the flexibility to change direction combine to enable the researcher to turn a daunting mass of found material into an effective paper or thesis. More than a mere how-to manual, Abbott's guidebook helps teach good habits for acquiring knowledge, the foundation of knowledge worth knowing. Those looking for ten easy steps to a perfect paper may want to look elsewhere. But serious scholars, who want their work to stand the test of time, will appreciate Abbott's unique, forthright approach and relish every page of Digital Paper.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226167787 20160616
Green Library
Book
xii, 281 p. ; 21 cm.
Abbott helps social science students discover what questions to ask. This exciting book is not about habits and the mechanics of doing social science research, but about habits of thinking that enable students to use those mechanics in new ways, by coming up with new ideas and combining them more effectively with old ones. Abbott organizes his book around general methodological moves, and uses examples from throughout the social sciences to show how these moves can open new lines of thinking. In each chapter, he covers several moves and their reverses (if these exist), discussing particular examples of the move as well as its logical and theoretical structure. Often he goes on to propose applications of the move in a wide variety of empirical settings. The basic aim of Methods of Discovery is to offer readers a new way of thinking about directions for their research and new ways to imagine information relevant to their research problems. Methods of Discovery is part of the Contemporary Societies series.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780393978148 20160604
Green Library
Book
xvi, 259 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
In this new study, Andrew Abbott presents a fresh and daring analysis of the evolution and development of the social sciences. "Chaos of Disciplines" reconsiders how knowledge actually changes and advances. Challenging the accepted belief that social sciences are in a perpetual state of progress, Abbott contends that disciplines instead cycle around an inevitable pattern of core principles. New schools of thought, then, are less a reaction to an established order than they are a reinvention of fundamental concepts. "Chaos of Disciplines" uses fractals to explain the patterns of disciplines, and then applies them to key debates that surround the social sciences. Abbott argues that knowledge in different disciplines is organized by common oppositions that function at any level of theoretical or methodological scale. Opposing perspectives of thought and method, then, in fields ranging from history, sociology and literature, become radically similar, much like fractals, they are each mutual reflections of their own distinctions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226001012 20160528
Green Library
Book
ix, 318 p. ; 24 cm.
This text focuses particularly on questions of time, events and causality. The author, Andrew Abbott, grounds each essay in straightforward examinations of social scientific analysis.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226001036 20160528
Green Library
Book
xii, 249 p. ; 24 cm.
In this history of the Chicago School of Sociology, Andrew Abbott investigates central topics in the emergence of modern scholarship, paying special attention to "schools of science" and how such schools reproduce themselves over time. What are the preconditions from which schools arise? Do they exist as rigid rules or as flexible structures? How do they emerge from the day-to-day activities of academic life such as editing journals and writing papers? Abbott analyzes the shifts in social scientific inquiry and discloses the intellectual rivalry and faculty politics that characterized different stages of the Chicago School. Along the way, he traces the rich history of the discipline's main journal, the "American Journal of Sociology". Embedded in this analysis of the school and its practices is a broader theoretical argument, which Abbott uses to redefine social objects as a sequence of interconnected events rather than as fixed entities. Abbott's theories grow directly out of the Chicago School's insistence that social life be located in time and place, a tradition that has been at the heart of the school since its founding 100 years ago.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226000992 20160528
Green Library
Book
xvi, 435 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
166 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library

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