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Book
xviii, 403 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Music recording
1 online resource.
  • Gandalf (The wizard) (6:11) - Lothlórien (The Elvenwood) (7:25)
  • Gollum (Sméagol) (9:53)
  • Journey in the dark (The Mines of Moria ; The Bridge of Khazad-Dûm) (8:50)
  • Hobbits (8:58).
Book
xxi, 399 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps (some col.) ; 24 cm.
  • List of Illustrations Preface and Acknowledgments List of Interviews Abbreviations Introduction: Sequel-itis PART ONE: THE FILM 1. Prudent Aggression 2. Not Your Father's Tolkien 3. Handcrafting a Blockbuster PART TWO: BUILDING THE FRANCHISE 4. Flying Billboards and FAQs 5. Click to View Trailer 6. Fans on the Margins, Pervy Hobbit Fanciers, and Partygoers PART III: BEYOND THE MOVIE 7. Licenses to Print Money 8. Interactive Middle-earth PART IV: THE LASTING POWER OF THE RINGS 9. Fantasy Come True 10. Right in Your Own Backyard Notes Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520247741 20160528
"Once in a lifetime." The phrase comes up over and over from the people who worked on Peter Jackson's "The Lord of the Rings". The film's seventeen Oscars, record-setting earnings, huge fan base, and hundreds of ancillary products attest to its importance and to the fact that Rings is far more than a film. Its makers seized a crucial moment in Hollywood - the special effects digital revolution plus the rise of "infotainment" and the Internet - to satisfy the trilogy's fans while fostering a huge new international audience. The resulting franchise of franchises has earned billions of dollars to date with no end in sight. Kristin Thompson interviewed seventy-six people to examine the movie's scripting and design and the new technologies deployed to produce the films, video games, and DVDs. She demonstrates the impact Rings had on the companies that made it, on the fantasy genre, on New Zealand, and on independent cinema. In fast-paced, compulsively readable prose, she affirms Jackson's Rings as one the most important films ever made.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520247741 20160528
hdl.handle.net ACLS Humanities E-Book
Green Library
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 301 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
This collection of essays offers a positive consensus of director Peter Jackson's spectacularly successful adaptations of J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), The Two Towers (2002) and The Return of the King (2003). Part One of the collection, "Techniques of Structure and Story, " compares and contrasts the organizational principles of the books and films. Part Two, "Techniques of Character and Culture, " focuses on the methods used to transform the characters and settings of Tolkien's narrative into the personalities and places visualized on screen. Each of the sixteen essays includes extensive notes and a separate bibiliography.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780786446360 20160606
Green Library
Video
1 online resource (44 min.).
Looks at the planet Saturn and its fascinating rings; how they may have been created; how the latest probes have answered questions and revealed new mysteries about the planet, and how Saturn's moon Titan may hold more resources of petroleum than Earth will ever need.
Book
xi, 476 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
423 p. fold. map. 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
237 p. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
271 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
808 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
"This book explores the writings, art, philosophy, fantasy, films and culture of J.R.R. Tolkien ... the first part considers the themes, landscapes, philosophies and characters of Tolkien's Middle-earth, as well as Tolkien's biography, the writing and publication of The Lord of the Rings, and the Tolkien industry. The second part looks at the film, TV and radio adaptions of Tolkien's fiction, concluding with an in-depth, scene-by-scene examination of the 2001-03 Hollywood versions of The Lord of the Rings"--P. [4] of cover.
Green Library
Book
x, 160 pages ; 23 cm
  • Introduction
  • The wages of heroism
  • The bitter end
  • Songs and stones
  • Haunting the dead
  • Applicability: "Hope without guarantees".
"In 1956, J. R. R. Tolkien famously stated that the real theme of The Lord of the Rings was "death and immortality." The deaths that underscore so much of the subject matter of Tolkien's masterpiece have a great deal to teach us. From the heroic to the humble, Tolkien draws on medieval concepts of death and dying to explore the glory and sorrow of human mortality. Three great themes of death link medieval northern European culture, The Lord of the Rings, and contemporary culture: the way in which we die, the need to remember the dead, and above all the lingering apprehension of what happens after death. Like our medieval ancestors, we still talk about what it means to die as a hero, a traitor, or a coward; we still make decisions about ways to honor and remember the departed; and we continue to seek to appease and contain the dead. These themes suggest a latent resonance between medieval and modern cultures and raise an issue not generally discussed in contemporary Western society: our deeply rooted belief that how one dies in some way matters. While Tolkien, as a medieval scholar, naturally draws much of his inspiration from the literature, folklore, and legends of the Middle Ages, the popularity of his work affirms that modern audiences continue to find these tropes relevant and useful. From ideas of "good" and "bad" deaths to proper commemoration and disposal of the dead, and even to ghost stories, real people find comfort in the ideas about death and dying that Tolkien explores. "The Sweet and the Bitter": Death and Dying in J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings examines the ways in which Tolkien's masterwork makes visible the connections between medieval and modern conceptions of dying and analyzes how contemporary readers use The Lord of the Rings as a tool for dealing with death"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
[109] p. : col. maps ; 19 x 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
310 p.
  • Chapter 1 Introduction Part 2 Part I: The Ring Chapter 3 The Pagan Tolkien Chapter 4 The Christian Tolkien: A Response to Ronald Hutton Chapter 5 The Entwives: Investigating the Spritual Core ofLord of the Rings Chapter 6 "Like Heathen Kings:" Religion as Palimpsest in Tolkien's Fiction Chapter 7 Confronting the World's Weirdness: J. R. R. Tolkien'sThe Children of Hurin Chapter 8 Eru Erased: The Minimalist Cosmology ofThe Lord of the Rings Chapter 9 The Ring and the Cross: How J. R. R. Tolkien Became a Christian Writer Part 10 Part II: The Cross Chapter 11 Redeeming Sub-Creation Chapter 12 Catholic Scholar, Catholic Sub-Creator Chapter 13 "An Age Comes On:" J. R. R. Tolkien and the English Catholic Sense of History Chapter 14 The Lord of the Rings and the Catholic Understanding of Community Chapter 15 Tracking Catholic Influence inThe Lord of the Rings Chapter 16 Saintly and Distant Mothers Chapter 17 The "Last Battle" as a Johannine Ragnarok: Tolkien and the Universal.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611470659 20160606
The conversation, sometimes heated, about the influence of Christianity on the writings of J.R.R. Tolkien has a long history. What has been lacking is a forum for a civilized discussion about the topic, as well as a chronological overview of the major arguments and themes that have engaged scholars about the impact of Christianity on Tolkien's oeuvre, with particular reference to The Lord of the Rings. The Ring and the Cross addresses these two needs through an articulate and authoritative analyses of Tolkien's Roman Catholicism and the role it plays in understanding his writings. The volume's contributors deftly explain the kinds of interpretations put forward and evidence marshaled when arguing for or against religious influence. The Ring and the Cross invites readers to draw their own conclusions about a subject that has fascinated Tolkien enthusiasts since the publication of his masterpiece, The Lord of the Rings.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611470659 20160606
Book
x, 156 pages ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • Community, or "power with"
  • Dialectic, or "power from"
  • Oppression, or "power over"
  • Dis-, re-, un-empowered: journeying and environment
  • Conclusion: morality and environment.
With the box office successes of movies based on The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit, familiarity with J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-Earth is growing. Unfortunately, scholarship dealing with Middle-Earth itself is comparatively rare in Tolkien studies, and students and scholars seeking greater insight have few resources. Similarly, although public concern for the environment is widespread and "going green" has never been trendier, ecocriticism is also an underserved area of literary studies. Arda Inhabited fills a gap in both areas by combining ecocritical and broader postmodern concerns with the growing appreciation for Tolkien's Middle-Earth. Susan Jeffers looks at the way different groups and individuals in The Lord of the Rings interact with their environments. Drawing substantially on ecocritical theory, she argues that there are three main ways these groups relate to their setting: "power with, " "power from, " and "power over." Ents, Hobbits, and Elves have "power with" their environments. Dwarves and Men draw "power from" their place, interacting with the world symbolically or dialectically. Sauron, Saruman, and Orcs all stand as examples of narcissistic solipsism that attempts to exercise "power over" the environment. Jeffers further considers how wanderers in Middle-Earth interact with the world in light of these three categories and examines how these relationships reflect Tolkien's own moral paradigm. Arda Inhabited responds to environmental critics such as Neil Evernden and Christopher Manes, as well as to other touchstones of postmodern thought such as Hegel, DeSaussure, Adorno, and Deleuze and Guattari. It blends their ideas with the analyses of Tolkien scholars such as Patrick Curry, Verlyn Flieger, and Tom Shippey and builds on the work of other scholars who have looked at environment and Tolkien such as Matthew Dickerson and Jonathan Evans. Arda Inhabited demonstrates how Tolkien studies enhances ecocriticism with a fresh examination of interconnection and environment, and ecocriticism enriches Tolkien studies with new ways of reading his work.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781606352014 20160617
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

78. El viaje de Frodo [2010]

Book
93 p.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
38 p.
Green Library
Book
211 p. 18 cm.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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