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Book
xiii, 234 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Victimhood and government accountability
  • Explaining redress outcomes
  • Constructing victimhood and villainy in Japan and Korea
  • Hansen's Disease survivors' rights
  • The politics of hepatitis C-tainted blood products
  • The North Korean abductions and abductee families' activism
  • Conclusion: The politics of redress.
Green Library
Book
xxxii, 266 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Rashomon Effect: Introduction (Arun Mahizhnan): Not Quite an "Internet" Election: Survey of Media Use of Voters (Tan Tarn How and Arun Mahizhnan)-- Legal Landmines and OB Markers: Survival Strategies of Alternative Media (Cherian George)-- Untapped Potential: Internet Use by Political Parties (Debbie Goh and Natalie Pang)-- Pro, Anti, Neutral: Political Blogs and their Sentiments (Natalie Pang and Debbie Goh)-- Who Calls the Shots? Agenda Setting in Mainstream and Alternative Media (Paul Wu Horng-Jyh, Randolph Tan Gee Kwang and Carol Soon)-- Different but not that Different: New Media's Impact on Young Voters' Political Participation (Trisha T C Lin and Alice Y H Hong)-- The Leap from the Virtual to the Real: Facebook Use and Political Participation (Marko M Skoric)-- David vs Goliath: Twitter's Role in Equalising Big-Party Dominance (Xu Xiaoge)-- Lifting the Veil of Ignorance: Internet's Impact on Knowledge Gap (Debbie Goh)-- Squaring Political Circles: Coping with Conflicting Information (Natalie Pang)-- The Silence of the Majority: Political Talk during Election Time (Weiyu Zhang)-- Conclusion (Tan Tarn How)-- Appendices: Background on Survey-- Fact Sheet on the 2011 General Election-- About the Contributors--.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Singapore 2011 General Election was dubbed by some as the first "Internet" election. How far is this true and to what extent did old and new media influence voting behaviour and political participation? What was the role of Facebook, Twitter, party political websites, political discussion and the alternative and conflicting information offered online? What theoretical insights can be gleaned about media and its use by voters? This edited volume provides an in-depth analysis of these questions through a first-ever survey of media use, political traits, political participation and attitudes towards media, and through experiments, content analysis and interviews.This landmark collection of essays also lays the groundwork for understanding future elections, including the next general election. It also serves as a valuable record of the state of affairs on the ground in the rapidly shifting dynamics of a Singapore political landscape that is undergoing dramatic and unprecedented transformation.This book will appeal to researchers in political communication, political science and media communication. It will also be of interest to policy makers, members of media, community leaders and observers of the impact of media on politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
xix, 247 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm
  • 51 percent (and growing every day): the new American majority
  • Meet the new American majority
  • Blinded by the white
  • Requiem for the white swing voter
  • Fewer smart-ass white boys
  • Invest wisely
  • What is justice? Policy priorities for the new American majority
  • Conservatives can count
  • Conclusion: From fear to hope.
Green Library
Book
xx, 281 pages ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction: Peacebuilding, elites, and the problem of capture
  • Elites and the Salvadoran state
  • Making the captured peace
  • Electoral politics in the postwar era : parties, polarization, and participation
  • El Salvador in the neoliberal era
  • The politics of exclusion : migration, crime, and society in the postwar era
  • Reclaiming the captured peace.
El Salvador is widely considered one of the most successful United Nations peacebuilding efforts, but record homicide rates, political polarization, socioeconomic exclusion, and corruption have diminished the quality of peace for many of its citizens. In Captured Peace: Elites and Peacebuilding in El Salvador, Christine J. Wade adapts the concept of elite capture to expand on the idea of "captured peace, " explaining how local elites commandeered political, social, and economic affairs before war's end and then used the peace accords to deepen their control in these spheres. While much scholarship has focused on the role of gangs in Salvadoran unrest, Wade draws on an exhaustive range of sources to demonstrate how day-to-day violence is inextricable from the economic and political dimensions. In this in-depth analysis of postwar politics in El Salvador, she highlights the local actors' primary role in peacebuilding and demonstrates the political advantage an incumbent party?-?in this case, the Nationalist Republican Alliance (ARENA)?-?has throughout the peace process and the consequences of this to the quality of peace that results.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • Introduction by Emily Schnee, Alison Better and Martha Clark Cummings.- Part I: Social Structures and Student Agency.- Introduction to Part I by Alison Better.- Community College as a Site for Community Organizing: A Model for Facilitating Social Justice Engagement by Stuart Parker.- Disrupting the Dream: Teaching Civil Rights History at a 21st Century Community College by Debra Schultz.- The Political is Personal: Public Sociology and Social Change through Community Engagement by Alison Better.- Supporting Critical Civic Learning with Interactive Technology by Jason Leggett.- Part II: Civic Engagement within the Disciplines.- Introduction to Part II by Emily Schnee.- What Does this Have to Do with Psychology?: Challenges and Possibilities of Civic Engagement in Introduction to Psychology by Jason VanOra.- Incorporating Civic Engagement in the Human Anatomy and Physiology Course by Anna Rozenboym.- Creating Civically Engaged Writing in a Cross-Cultural Teacher Education Class: Challenges and Possibilities by Laura Kates.- Personal Connection and Formal Research: Community College Students Develop Multicultural Counseling Competency by Michelle Billies and Catheleen Heyliger.- Addressing Civic Issues in Biology Lab through Citizen Science by Christina Colon.- Undocumented Immigrants and Myself: Building Bridges through Research in a First Year English Course by Tisha Ulmer.- Part III: College as Community.- Introduction to Part III by Martha Clark Cummings.- Learning about Community in a First Semester Learning Community: How Community Based Projects Strengthen Student Engagement by George Hill.- Engaging Students in the Community of College by Emily Schnee.- From Discontent to Civic Engagement in an ESL Learning Community by Martha Clark Cummings.- Developing Effective Service Learning Campus - Community Partnerships by Peter Fiume.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book will help post-secondary educators to discover the joys and challenges of implementing theoretically grounded civic engagement projects on their campuses. The essays on civic engagement and public scholarship are written by an interdisciplinary group of community college faculty who have designed and implemented civic engagement projects in their classrooms. The projects they describe stand at the intersection of research, theory and pedagogy. They challenge dominant constructions of civic engagement as students bring their community, culture and history into the classroom. The authors consider the particular complexities and constraints of doing civically engaged teaching and scholarship at the community college level and situate their projects within current theoretical debates about civic engagement, public scholarship, and public higher education.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xi, 194 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Preface 1 Introducing the Journey 2 Explaining "Partially" Critical Junctures 3 Lebanon: Intricacies of a Sectarian Power-sharing System 4 Activism and Electoral Non-Reform in Lebanon 5 Libya: Intricacies of a Stateless Society 6 Libya's Activists Struggle for a New Constitution 7 Moving past "Partially" Critical Junctures Annexes Annex 1 List of Interviewees Annex 2 Libya Survey Questions Annex 3 Lebanon Election Observation Methodology Annex 4 Note on Transliteration.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Lebanon and Libya have undergone critical political events in recent years. However, demands for reform from civic institutions during these transitions have not led to concrete political decisions. Civil Society and Political Reform in Lebanon and Libya reveals the deeply-entrenched historical patterns and elements of continuity that have led to path dependent outcomes in the political transitions of both countries. Motivated by personal experiences as an activist in Lebanon, the author draws together a wide range of data from participant observations, nation-wide surveys, interviews and focus groups in a careful analysis of these two civil society-led reform campaigns. The study demonstrates how the combination of weak states and power-sharing agreements marginalizes civic organisations and poses institutional constraints on the likelihood of reform. Written by an active participant in the political events discussed, this book offers new insight into two countries which present comparable and informative case studies. As such, it is a valuable resource for students, scholars and policymakers interested in civil society, politics and reform in the Middle East and North Africa.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
219 pages ; 23 cm
  • Commons Democracy: An Introduction One. Telling Stories: Vernacular versus Formal Democracy Two. Between Savagery and Civilization: The Whiskey Rebellion and a Democratic Middle Way Three. The Privatizing State: The Pioneers and the Closing of the Legal Commons Four. Settler Self-Governance: Democratic Politics on the Frontier Five. From Nothing to Start, Into Being: The Anti-Rent Wars, the Indian Question, and the Triumph of Liberalism Conclusion: "The Wayward Multitudinous People.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Commons Democracy highlights a poorly understood dimension of democracy in the early United States. It tells a story that, like the familiar one, begins in the Revolutionary era. But instead of the tale of the Founders' high-minded ideals and their careful crafting of the safe framework for democracy--a representative republican government--Commons Democracy examines the power of the democratic spirit, the ideals and practices of everyday people in the early nation. As Dana D. Nelson reveals in this illuminating work, the sensibility of participatory democratic activity fueled the involvement of ordinary folk in resistance, revolution, state constitution-making, and early national civic dissent. The rich variety of commoning customs and practices in the late colonies offered non-elite actors a tangible and durable relationship to democratic power, one significantly different from the representative democracy that would be institutionalized by the Framers in 1787. This democracy understood political power and liberties as communal, not individual. Ordinary folk practiced a democracy that was robustly participatory and insistently local. To help tell this story, Nelson turns to early American authors--Hugh Henry Brackenridge, James Fenimore Cooper, Robert Montgomery Bird, and Caroline Kirkland--who were engaged with conflicts that emerged from competing ideals of democracy in the early republic, such as the Whiskey Rebellion and the Anti-Rent War as well as the enclosure of the legal commons, anxieties about popular suffrage, and practices of frontier equalitarianism. While Commons Democracy is about the capture of "democracy" for the official purposes of state consolidation and expansion, it is also a story about the ongoing (if occluded) vitality of commons democracy, of its power as part of our shared democratic history and its usefulness in the contemporary toolkit of citizenship.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
120 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction 1. Two Approaches to Elite Dominance 2. A Theory of Constrained Elitism 3. The Contemporary Networked Public Sphere 4. Constraint in the Networked Public Conclusion Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Today, examples of the public's engagement with political issues through commercial and communicative mechanisms have become increasingly common. In February 2012, the Susan G. Komen Foundation reversed a decision to cease funding of cancer screening programs through Planned Parenthood amidst massive public disapproval. The same year, restaurant chain Chic-fil-A became embroiled in a massive public debate over statements its President made regarding same-sex marriage. What exactly is going on in such public engagement, and how does this relate to existing ideas regarding the public sphere and political participation? Is the public becoming increasingly vocal in its complaints? Or are new relationships between the public and economic and political leaders emerging? Timothy Kersey's book asserts that the widespread utilization of internet communications technologies, especially social media applications, has brought forth a variety of new communicative behaviors and relationships within liberal polities. Through quick and seemingly chaotic streams of networked communication, the actions of these elites are subject to increasingly intense scrutiny and short-term pressure to ameliorate or at least address the concerns of segments of the population. By examining these new patterns of behavior among both elites and the general public, Kersey unearths the implications of these patterns for contemporary democratic theory, and argues that contemporary conceptualizations of "the public'" need to be modified to more accurately reflect practices of online communication and participation. By engaging with this topical issue, Kersey is able to closely examine the self-organization of both elite and non-elite segments of the population within the realm of networked communication, and the relations and interactions between these segments. His book combines perspectives from political theory and communication studies and so will be widely relevant across both disciplines.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 390 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Green Library
Book
viii, 307 pages : portrait ; 25 cm
  • The vision
  • A marathon, not a sprint : Vermont
  • One step forward, how many back? Massachusetts
  • A victory lost and regained : California
  • Losing forward : Maine
  • The end game : Windsor and Obergefell
  • One state at a time
  • Revisionist history
  • Federal forums
  • Supreme recognition
  • People power
  • "Completely hopeless"
  • Korematsu's legacy
  • At home abroad
  • Messages and messengers
  • Transformative transparency
  • The Obama difference.
How did gay and lesbian couples' right to marry go from unthinkable to inevitable? How did the individual right to bear arms, dismissed as fraudulent by Chief Justice Warren Burger in 1990, become a constitutional right in 2008? And what compelled President George W. Bush to rein in many of his initiatives in the war on terror before leaving office, even though past presidents have had a free hand in wartime? We are likely to answer that, in each case, the Supreme Court remade our nation's most fundamental law. Yet as the award-winning legal scholar David Cole argues in Engines of Liberty, citizen activists are the true drivers of constitutional change. Drawing on interviews with participants in the most successful rights movements of the last 30 years, he shows that time and again, associations of ordinary Americans confronting long odds have managed to transform the nation's highest law. And they have done so largely through advocacy outside the federal courts altogether. We witness marriage equality advocates in the 1980s and 1990s uniting behind a strategy of state-based incrementalism that paved the way for their historic Supreme Court victory. We see the NRA building a loyal and active membership base that can swing elections and influence state and federal law, thereby shaping the debate about guns at the Supreme Court. And we watch as civil liberties and human rights groups encourage foreign populations and governments to challenge the president when few domestic institutions would. Offering a new vision of the role we all play in shaping our Constitution and illuminating the tactics successful reform campaigns have employed, Engines of Liberty restores faith in the power of citizen activists to help shape our nation's future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 350 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction / Georg Aichholzer, Herbert Kubicek and Lourdes Torres
  • Closing the evaluation gap in e-participation research and practice / Herbert Kubicek and Georg Aichholzer
  • Citizen participation in climate goverance / Georg Aichholzer
  • Evaluating public (e-)information provision / Basilio Acerete, Ana yetano and Sonia Royo
  • Evaluating public Ie-)consultation processes / Herbert Kubicek
  • Collaborative forms of citizen (e-)participation / Georg Aichholzer and Stefan Strauß
  • Evaluating collaborative (e-)participation in climate protection : approach and field study / Georg Aichholzer, Doris Allhutter, Herbert Kubicek and Stefan Strauß
  • Impact measurement via carbon calculators / Ralf Cimander, Ana Yetano and Sonia Royo
  • Comparing output and outcome of citizen : government collaboration on local climate targets / Georg Aichholzer, Doris Allhutter and Stefan Strauß
  • Attitude and behavior changes through (e-)participation in citizen panels on climate targets / Georg Aichholzer, Dieter Feierabend and Doris Allhutter
  • Citizen panels on climate targets : ecological impact at individual level / Ralf Cimander
  • Citizen panels on climate targets : ecological impact at collective level / Ralf Cimander, Sonia Royo and Ana Yetano
  • Citizen panels on climate targets : analyzing dropout in long-term (e-)collaboration processes / Ralf Cimander
  • The managers' view of participation processes with citizen panels / Vicente Pina and Lourdes Torres
  • What difference does the 'E" make? : comparing communication channels in public consultation and collaboration processes / Herbert Kubicek
  • Summary and outlook / Herbert Kubicek and Georg Aichholzer.
There is a widely acknowledged evaluation gap in the field of e-participation practice and research, a lack of systematic evaluation with regard to process organization, outcome and impacts. This book addresses the state of the art of e-participation research and the existing evaluation gap by reviewing various evaluation approaches and providing a multidisciplinary concept for evaluating the output, outcome and impact of citizen participation via the Internet as well as via traditional media. It offers new knowledge based on empirical results of its application (tailored to different forms and levels of e-participation) in an international comparative perspective. The book will advance the academic study and practical application of e-participation through fresh insights, largely drawing on theoretical arguments and empirical research results gained in the European collaborative project "e2democracy". It applies the same research instruments to a set of similar citizen participation processes in seven local communities in three countries (Austria, Germany and Spain). The generic evaluation framework has been tailored to a tested toolset, and the presentation and discussion of related evaluation results aims at clarifying to what extent these tools can be applied to other consultation and collaboration processes, making the book of interest to policymakers and scholars alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 301 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: gender quotas and women's descriptive representation: missing mechanisms
  • The German political recruitment process
  • Eligibles
  • Aspirants
  • Gatekeepers
  • Candidates and elected officials
  • Conclusion: a glass half full
  • Appendix A: translation of survey and descriptive statistics
  • Appendix B: list of interviews.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 230 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Sowing the seeds of American agriculture's chemical dependency
  • Hidden hands of the harvest
  • The budding movement for pesticide reform, 1962-1972
  • Movements in transition : environmentalists, farmworkers, and the regulatory state, 1970-1976
  • A different kind of border war in Arizona, 1971-1986
  • Resisting rollbacks in California, 1982-1990
  • From the ground up : fumigants, ozone, health.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xviii, 116 pages ; 19 cm
"One of the greatest political advisers of all time, Niccolò Machiavelli thought long and hard about how citizens could identify great leaders--ones capable of defending and enhancing the liberty, honor, and prosperity of their countries. Drawing on the full range of the Florentine's writings, acclaimed Machiavelli biographer Maurizio Viroli gathers and interprets Machiavelli's timeless wisdom about choosing leaders. The brief and engaging result is a new kind of Prince--one addressed to citizens rather than rulers and designed to make you a better voter. Demolishing popular misconceptions that Machiavelli is a cynical realist, the book shows that he believes republics can't survive, let alone thrive, without leaders who are virtuous as well as effective. Among much other valuable advice, Machiavelli says that voters should pick leaders who put the common good above narrower interests and who make fighting corruption a priority, and he explains why the best way to recognize true leaders is to carefully examine their past actions and words. On display throughout are the special insights that Machiavelli gained from long, direct knowledge of real political life, the study of history, and reflection on the great political thinkers of antiquity. Recognizing the difference between great and mediocre political leaders is difficult but not at all impossible--with Machiavelli's help. So do your country a favor. Read this book, then vote like Machiavelli would"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
xx, 226 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Preface and acknowledgements-- 1. Introduction: politics of inclusion in Latin America-- 2. Women, Afrodescendants, and indigenous peoples in elected office-- 3. Gender quotas: why and how? 4. Indigenous reservations and gender parity in Bolivia with Juan Pablo Ossa-- 5. The rise and fall of political inclusion in Colombia-- 6. Brazil: combatting exclusion through quotas in higher education-- 7. After quotas: women's presence and legislative behavior in Argentina with Marina Lacalle and Juan Pablo Micozzi-- Conclusion-- Appendix 1. List of research trips-- Appendix 2. Mechanisms of inclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book analyzes why and how fifteen Latin American countries modified their political institutions to promote the inclusion of women, Afrodescendants, and indigenous peoples. Through analysis and comparison of experiences in Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Mexico, the book accounts for the origins of quotas and reserved seats in international norms and civic mobilization. It shows how the configuration of political institutions and the structure of excluded groups set the terms and processes of inclusion. Arguing that the new mechanisms have delivered inclusion but not representation, the book demonstrates that quotas and reserved seats increased the presence in power of excluded groups but did not create constituencies or generate civic movements able to authorize or hold accountable their representatives.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
xiii, 298 pages ; 23 cm
  • Acknowledgments ix Introduction. Ingenious Agency: Democratic Agency and Its Disavowel 1 Part I. Beginning 1. Improvising Citizenship: Appropriating the Liberal Citizenship Script 37 Part II. Episodes 2. Migrant Domestic Workers, Hidden Tactics, and Appropriating Political Citizenship 61 3. Global Sex Workers, Calculated Abjection, and Appropriating Economic Citizenship 101 4. Trans People, Morphing Technologies, and Appropriating Gendered Citizenship 149 5. Suicide Bombers, Sacrificial Violence, and Appropriating Life Itself 191 Part III. (Un)Ending Conclusion. Politics without Politics: Democracy as Meant for Ingenious Appropriation 247 Notes 257 Works Cited 269 Index 287.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
In Ingenious Citizenship Charles T. Lee centers the daily experiences and actions of migrant domestic workers, sex workers, transgender people, and suicide bombers in his rethinking of mainstream models of social change. Bridging cultural and political theory with analyses of film, literature, and ethnographic sources, Lee shows how these abject populations find ingenious and improvisational ways to disrupt and appropriate practices of liberal citizenship. When voting and other forms of civic engagement are unavailable or ineffective, the subversive acts of a domestic worker breaking a dish or a prostitute using the strategies and language of an entrepreneur challenge the accepted norms of political action. Taken to the extreme, a young Palestinian woman blowing herself up in a Jerusalem supermarket questions two of liberal citizenship's most cherished values: life and liberty. Using these examples to critically reinterpret political agency, citizenship practices, and social transformation, Lee reveals the limits of organizing change around a human rights discourse. Moreover, his subjects offer crucial lessons in how to turn even the worst conditions and the most unstable positions in society into footholds for transformative and democratic agency.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Introduction: Knowing Governance-- Jan-Peter Voss-- Richard Freeman PART I: KNOWING THE BODY POLITIC: COLLECTIVE AGENCY 2. Modeling The State: An Actor-Network Approach-- Jan-Hendrik Passoth-- Nicholas Rowland 3. Co-Producing European Integration: Research, Policy And Welfare Activation-- Thomas Pfister 4. Experimenting With Global Governance: Learning Lessons In The Contact Group On Piracy-- Christian Bueger PART II: KNOWING INSTRUMENTS: MODES OF GOVERNING 5. Cultivating 'Nudge': Behavioural Governance In The UK-- Holger Strassheim-- Rebecca Korinek 6. Realizing Instruments: Performativity In Emissions Trading And Citizen Panels-- Jan-Peter Voss 7. Translating Participation: Scenario Workshops And Citizens' Juries Across Situations And Contexts-- Linda Soneryd-- Nina Amelung PART III: MATERIAL KNOWING: DOCUMENTS AND BODIES 8. Fact-Making In Permit Markets: Document Networks As Infrastructures Of Emissions Trading-- Arno Simons 9. Training Participants: Building A Community Of Practice To Negotiate Sustainability-- Sonja Van Der Arend-- Jelle Behagel PART IV: BOUNDARIES OF KNOWING: SCIENCE AND POLITICS 10. Boundary-Making In The International Organisation: Public Engagement Expertise At The OECD-- Brice Laurent 11. Black-Boxing Sustainable Development: Environmental Impact Assessment On The River Uruguay-- Nicolas Baya-Laffite PART V: KNOWING REFLEXIVELY: DOING KNOWLEDGE POLITICS 12. Knowing Doing Governing: Realising Heterodyne Democracies-- Andrew Stirling.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Knowing Governance sets out to understand governance through the design and making of its models and instruments. What kinds of knowledge do they require and reproduce? How are new understandings of governance produced in practice, by scientists and policy makers and by the publics with whom they engage?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
ix, 153 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Alternative media and online activism
  • Media celebration: Shanzhai media culture as media intervention
  • Media disaster: citizen journalism as alternative crisis communication
  • Media scandal: online weiguan as networked collective action
  • Internet interventionism and deliberative politics in China's web 2.0 era.
This book is among the first to use a "media events" framework to examine Chinas Internet activism and politics, and the first study of the transformation of Chinas media events through the parameter of online activism. The author locates the practices of major modes of online activism in China (shanzhai [culture jamming]; citizen journalism; and weiguan [mediated mobilisation]) into different types of Chinese media events (ritual celebration, natural disaster, political scandal). The contextualised analysis of online activism thus enables exploration of the spatial, temporal and relational dimensions of Chinese online activism with other social agents -- such as the Party-state, mainstream media and civil society. Analysis reveals Internet politics in China on three interrelated levels: the individual, the discursive and the institutional. Contemporary cases, rich in empirical research data and interdisciplinary theory, demonstrate that the alternative and activist use of the Internet has intervened into and transformed conventional Chinese media events in various types of agents, their agendas and performances, and the subsequent and corresponding political impact. The Party-market controlled Chinese media events have become more open, contentious and deliberative in the Web 2.0 era due to the active participation of ordinary Chinese people aided by the Internet.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
ix, 123 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Book
xi, 185 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
Green Library

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