Book
xii, 120 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Acknowledgements List of contributors Introduction: The Academic Book of the Future-- Rebecca E. Lyons and Samantha J. Rayner PART I: ACADEMICS 1. The academic book as a socially-embedded media artefact-- Tom Mole 2. Wearable books-- Michael Pidd 3. The impossible constellation: Practice-as-Research as a viable alternative-- Sarah Barrow PART II: PUBLISHERS 4. The academic book of the future and the need to break boundaries-- Jenny McCall and Amy Bourke-Waite 5. The academic 'book' of the future and its function-- Frances Pinter 6. The university press and the academic book of the future-- Anthony Cond PART III: LIBRARIANS 7. National libraries and academic books of the future-- Maja Maricevic 8. Strategic engagement and librarians-- Neil Smyth 9. Academic libraries and academic books: vessels of cultural continuity, agents of cultural change-- Kate Price PART IV: BOOKSELLERS 10. Selling words: an economic history of bookselling-- Jaki Hawker 11. The future of the academic book: the role of booksellers-- Peter Lake 12. Back to the future: the role of the campus bookshop-- Craig Dadds Bibliography Further Reading Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book is open access under a CC-BY licence. Part of the AHRC/British Library Academic Book of the Future Project, this book interrogates current and emerging contexts of academic books from the perspectives of thirteen expert voices from the connected communities of publishing, academia, libraries, and bookselling.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
iii, 360 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction to Academic e-books / Suzanne M. Ward, Robert S. Freeman, and Judith M. Nixon
  • Publishers' and vendors' products and services
  • An industry perspective: publishing in the digital age / Nadine Vassallo
  • The journey beyond print: perspectives of a commercial publisher in the academic market / Rhonda Herman
  • Production, marketing, and legal challenges: the university press perspective on e-books in libraries / Tony Sanfilippo
  • Delivering American Society for Microbiology e-books to libraries / Christine B. Charlip
  • Platform diving: a day in the life of an academic e-book aggregator / Bob Nardini
  • Librarians' challenges
  • University of California, Merced: primarily an electronic library / Jim Dooley
  • Patron-driven acquisitions: assessing and sustaining a long-term PDA e-book program / Karen S. Fischer
  • Use and cost analysis of e-books: patron-driven acquisitions plan vs. librarian-selected titles / Suzanne M. Ward and Rebecca A. Richardson
  • E-books across the consortium: reflections and lessons from a three-year DDA experiment at the Orbis Cascade Alliance / Kathleen Carlisle Fountain
  • The simplest explanation: Occam's reader and the future of interlibrary loan and e-books / Ryan Litsey, Kenny Ketner, Joni Blake, and Anne McKee
  • Developing a global e-book collection: an exploratory study / Dracine Hodges
  • Users' experiences
  • A social scientist uses e-books for research and in the classroom / Ann Marie Clark
  • The user experience of e-books in academic libraries: perception, discovery and use / Tao Zhang and Xi Niu
  • E-book reading practices in different subject areas: an exploratory log analysis / Robert S. Freeman and E. Stewart Saunders
  • Library e-book platforms are broken: let's fix them / Joelle Thomas and Galadriel Chilton
  • Case studies
  • A balancing act: promoting Canadian scholarly e-books while controlling user access / Ravit H. David
  • Of Euripides and e-books: the digital future and our hybrid present / Lidia Uziel, Laureen Esser, and Matthew Connor Sullivan
  • Transitioning to e-books at a medium-sized academic library: challenges and opportunities: a feasibility study of a psychology collection / Aiping Chen-Gaffey
  • E-books and a distance education program: a library's failure rate in supplying course readings for one program / Judith M. Nixon
  • Mobile access to academic e-book content: a Ryerson investigation / Naomi Eichenlaub and Josephine Choi
  • E-reader checkout program / Vincci Kwong and Susan Thomas
  • Out with the print and in with the e-book: a case study in mass replacement of a print collection / Stephen Maher and Neil Romanosky
  • Epilogue / Michael Levine-Clark
  • Contributors.
"Academic E-Books: Publishers, Librarians, and Users provides readers with a view of the changing and emerging roles of electronic books in higher education. The three main sections contain contributions by experts in the publisher/vendor arena, as well as by librarians who report on both the challenges of offering and managing e-books and on the issues surrounding patron use of e-books. The case study section offers perspectives from seven different sizes and types of libraries whose librarians describe innovative and thought-provoking projects involving e-books. Read about perspectives on e-books from organizations as diverse as a commercial publisher and an association press. Learn about the viewpoint of a jobber. Find out about the e-book challenges facing librarians, such as the quest to control costs in the patron-driven acquisitions (PDA) model, how to solve the dilemma of resource sharing with e-books, and how to manage PDA in the consortial environment. See what patron use of e-books reveals about reading habits and disciplinary differences. Finally, in the case study section, discover how to promote scholarly e-books, how to manage an e-reader checkout program, and how one library replaced most of its print collection with e-books. These and other examples illustrate how innovative librarians use e-books to enhance users' experiences with scholarly works"-- Provided by publisher.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
90 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 23 cm
"In 2016 the University of Nebraska Press celebrates its 75th anniversary. Proudly rooted in the Great Plains, the Press has established itself as the largest and most diversified publisher located between Chicago and California. The achievements of a vast network of devoted authors, editors, board members, series editors, and staff, the Press has published more than 4,000 books and more than 30 journals of influential and enduring value. What started as a one-person operation at a land grant institution on the sparsely populated plains of Nebraska has tenaciously grown into a press that has earned an international reputation for publishing notable works in Native studies, history, anthropology, American studies, sports, cultural criticism, fiction, fiction in translation, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Winning numerous awards through the years, most notably several Nobel Prizes, the Press has contributed richly to the state, the region, and far beyond. The Press's partnership with the Jewish Publication Society has placed an emphasis on books in Jewish studies and Bible studies, while the acquisition of Potomac Books has expanded the Press's subject matter to include national and world affairs and more widespread coverage of military history. In honor of its 75th anniversary, the Press has produced the publication Big House on the Prairie, which features a narrative of press highlights, profiles of key historical employees, and lists of its 75 most significant books, 30 journals, and 75 most noteworthy book covers. Please join us in celebrating 75 years of publishing excellence"-- Provided by publisher.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
PDFs (343 pages) : illustrations.
  • Conceptualising recognition of prior learning processes in the age of open learning / Elizabeth Ruinard, Judith McNamara
  • Australian universities' RPL policies and practices: what knowledge counts? / Tim Pitman, Lesley Vidovich
  • Rediscovering the North American legacy of self-initiated learning in prior learning assessments / Xenia Coulter, Alan Mandell
  • Innovating processes to determine quality alongside increased inclusivity in higher education / Nick Kelly, Rory Sie, Robert Schuwer
  • Enabling meaningful certificates from massive open online courses (MOOCs): a data-driven curriculum e-map design model / Yianna Vovides, Sarah Inman
  • Smaller by design: how good practice features from MOOCs can be adapted to enhance core curricula delivery / David Lyon, Lynette Steele, Cath Fraser
  • Re-purposing MOOCs and OER for academic credit in the UK using a flexible work based learning program at an English university / Jon Talbot
  • Developing a transdisciplinary work-based learning curriculum: a model for recognising learning from work / Darryll Bravenboer, Barbara Workman
  • eRPL and ePR in higher education contexts / Roslyn Cameron, Linda Pfeiffer
  • Considerations of self in recognising prior learning and credentialing / Lloyd Hawkeye Robertson, Dianne Conrad
  • Toward an open empowered learning model of pedagogy in higher education / Robyn Smyth, Carina Bossu, Adrian Stagg
  • Open-sourced personal, networked learning and higher education credentials / Merilyn Childs, Regine Wagner
  • Quality assessment and certification in open scholarly publishing and inspiration for MOOC credentialing / Xiang Ren
  • Equity and access as keys for opening open learning: the case for virtually facilitated work-based learning / Luke van der Laan, Liz Neary.
The discipline of education is a multi-faceted system that must constantly integrate new strategies and procedures to ensure successful learning experiences. Enhancements in education provide learners with greater opportunities for growth and advancement. Open Learning and Formal Credentialing in Higher Education: Curriculum Models and Institutional Policies is an authoritative reference source for the latest scholarly research on learner-focused approaches within adult education environments. Featuring expansive coverage on topics relating to open education, lifelong learning, and formal qualifications, this book is a crucial reference source for researchers, educators, policy makers, and educational administrators interested in the relationship between formal credentials and open education. This book features timely, research-based chapters across a variety of relevant topics including, but not limited to, educational resources, lifelong learning achievements, and the benefits of formal qualifications and licensing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 PDF (xv, 90 pages).
  • 1. Scholarship in networked participatory environment
  • 1.1 Scholarship and digital scholarship
  • 1.1.1 Scholarship, scholar activities, and ICT influence on scholarship
  • 1.1.2 Digital scholarship
  • 1.2 Scholarly collaboration
  • 1.2.1 Definition of scholarly collaboration
  • 1.2.2 Scholarly collaboration on the social web
  • 1.2.3 Factors for successful scholarly collaboration on the social web
  • 1.3 Summary
  • 2. Technology readiness for social scholarly collaboration
  • 2.1 Functional block for establishing scholars' online identity
  • 2.1.1 The function for supporting research tasks
  • 2.1.2 Developing profile and reputation
  • 2.1.3 Registering scholarly work
  • 2.2 Functional block for collaborating with peer scholars
  • 2.2.1 Developing relationship
  • 2.2.2 Grouping and co-production
  • 2.2.3 Information exchange
  • 2.2.4 Building conversations
  • 2.3 Mechanisms for engaging general public
  • 2.3.1 Crowdsourcing platforms
  • 2.3.2 Crowdfunding platforms
  • 2.3.3 Citizen science platforms
  • 2.4 Summary
  • 3. Coupling work for social scholarly collaboration
  • 3.1 Overview of coupling work
  • 3.2 Stages and collaboration in research process
  • 3.2.1 Collaboration in the conceptualization stage
  • 3.2.2 Collaboration in the design stage
  • 3.2.3 Collaboration in the execution stage
  • 3.2.4 Collaboration in the dissemination stage
  • 3.3 Coupling academic tasks on the social web
  • 3.3.1 Coupling work in the dissemination stage on the social web
  • 3.3.2 Coupling work in the conceptualization stage on the social web
  • 3.3.3 Coupling work in the design stage on the social web
  • 3.3.4 Coupling work in the execution stage on the social web
  • 3.4 Factors affecting scholarly collaboration tasks on the social web
  • 3.5 Summary
  • 4. Common ground for social scholarly collaboration
  • 4.1 Common ground in collaboration
  • 4.2 Important roles of scholars' online profiles
  • 4.3 Collaboration behaviors for recording past experience
  • 4.4 Collaborative behaviors for building shared knowledge
  • 4.5 Collaborative behaviors for sharing common beliefs and assumptions in management
  • 4.6 Summary
  • 5. Collaboration readiness for social scholarly collaboration
  • 5.1 Factors affecting collaboration readiness
  • 5.2 Influences by scholars' own characteristics
  • 5.2.1 Demographics
  • 5.2.2 Disciplines
  • 5.3 Extrinsic and intrinsic motivations of social scholarly collaborations
  • 5.3.1 Extrinsic motivations
  • 5.3.2 Intrinsic motivationS
  • 5.4 Influences of incentives for social scholarly collaboration
  • 5.4.1 Incentives on academic social platforms
  • 5.4.2 Lack of incentives outside of the social web
  • 6. Discussions and conclusions
  • 6.1 Implications
  • 6.1.1 Scholarly collaboration activities
  • 6.1.2 Academic social web platforms
  • 6.1.3 Content management and reuse on the academic social web
  • 6.2 Limitations
  • 6.3 Conclusions
  • Bibliography
  • Authors' biographies.
Collaboration among scholars has always been recognized as a fundamental feature of scientific discovery. The ever-increasing diversity among disciplines and complexity of research problems makes it even more compelling to collaborate in order to keep up with the fast pace of innovation and advance knowledge. Along with the rapidly developing Internet communication technologies and the increasing popularity of the social web, we have observed many important developments of scholarly collaboration on the academic social web. In this book, we review the rapid transformation of scholarly collaboration on various academic social web platforms and examine how these platforms have facilitated academics throughout their research lifecycle.from forming ideas, collecting data, and authoring articles to disseminating findings. We refer to the term "academic social web platforms" in this book as a category of Web 2.0 tools or online platforms (such as CiteULike, Mendeley, Academia.edu, and ResearchGate) that enable and facilitate scholarly information exchange and participation. We will also examine scholarly collaboration behaviors including sharing academic resources, exchanging opinions, following each other's research, keeping up with current research trends, and, most importantly, building up their professional networks. Inspired by the model developed by Olson et al. [2000] on factors for successful scientific collaboration, our examination of the status of scholarly collaboration on the academic social web has four emphases: technology readiness, coupling work, building common ground, and collaboration readiness. Finally, we talk about the insights and challenges of all these online scholarly collaboration activities imposed on the research communities who are engaging in supporting online scholarly collaboration. This book aims to help researchers and practitioners understand the development of scholarly collaboration on the academic social web, and to build up an active community of scholars who are interested in this topic.
Book
237 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Origins of South Africa's university presses
  • Between survival and scholarship: publishing lists and the continuum model
  • Authors and gatekeeping
  • Readership and distribution
  • Business practices and the economics of publishing
  • Into the post-apartheid period.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 239 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
The author discusses the impact of English as a global academic language The growth of the assessment culture surrounding publication The practices of knowledge construction at institutional and local levels The emergence of Open Access and social media publishing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 191 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Some fundamental economics
  • Academic journal publishing and the open access movement
  • On the access principle in science : a law and economics analysis
  • The future of academic publishing
  • Conclusions and further research
  • Appendix.
This book addresses the recent debate about copyright law and its impact on the distribution of scientific knowledge from an economic perspective. The focus is on the question whether a copyright regime or an open access regime is better suited to the norms and organizational structure in a purely global science community. The book undertakes a thorough economic analysis of the academic journal market and showcases consequences of a regime change. It also takes account of the Digital Divide debate, reflecting issues in developing countries. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of legal action in the light of international Intellectual Property (IP) agreements offers prospects on the future of academic publishing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (xvi, 191 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • Introduction.- Some Fundamental Economics.- Academic Journal Publishing and the Open Access Movement.- On the Access Principle in Science: A Law & Economics Analysis.- The Future of Academic Publishing.- Conclusions and Further Research.- Appendix.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book addresses the recent debate about copyright law and its impact on the distribution of scientific knowledge from an economic perspective. The focus is on the question whether a copyright regime or an open access regime is better suited to the norms and organizational structure in a purely global science community. The book undertakes a thorough economic analysis of the academic journal market and showcases consequences of a regime change. It also takes account of the Digital Divide debate, reflecting issues in developing countries. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of legal action in the light of international Intellectual Property (IP) agreements offers prospects on the future of academic publishing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
x, 242 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Contents: Introduction-- Traditional and emerging editorial models-- Modelling (digital) texts-- Modelling text transmission: from documents to texts, and return-- What's on the page? Objectivity and interpretation in scholarly editing-- Work and workflow of digital scholarly editions-- The publication of digital scholarly editions-- Using digital scholarly editions-- Trusting the edition: preservation and reliability of digital editions-- The present and the future of digital scholarly editions-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book provides an up-to-date, coherent and comprehensive treatment of digital scholarly editing, organized according to the typical timeline and workflow of the preparation of an edition: from the choice of the object to edit, the editorial work, post-production and publication, the use of the published edition, to long-term issues and the ultimate significance of the published work. The author also examines from a theoretical and methodological point of view the issues and problems that emerge during these stages with the application of computational techniques and methods. Building on previous publications on the topic, the book discusses the most significant developments in digital textual scholarship, claiming that the alterations in traditional editorial practices necessitated by the use of computers impose radical changes in the way we think and manage texts, documents, editions and the public. It is of interest not only to scholarly editors, but to all involved in publishing and readership in a digital environment in the humanities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xii, 202 pages) : illustrations
  • Don't Do As I Do-- Do As I Say John S. Edwards Grabbing Readers: How to Focus Your Paper's Title and Contents on Its Major Theoretical Contribution Rather than the Local Context of the Study Arch G. Woodside Well Done Literature Reviews: A Journal's Editor-in-Chief Perspective Murray E. Jennex Positioning Your Paper for Publication in a Journal: Where Do Authors Go Wrong? Alex Koohang Publishing in Technology and Innovation Management Journals: Perspectives from Both Sides of the Fence Jeremy Hall How Could My Paper Have Gotten Rejected? James R. Marsden Advice on Preparing and Revising Journal Manuscripts in Business and Society Topics Duane Windsor Interdisciplinary Research: Pathway to Meaningful Publications Donald E. Brown Models of Editing and Editorial Boards Daniel E. O'Leary The Editor Is Often a Coach Steven R. Gordon Happy Marriage or Odd Couple: Reflections on Editing the Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Irmak Renda-Tanali and Sibel McGee Rules for Referees Dennis E. Logue Writing Scientific Journal Articles: Motivation, Barriers, and Support Joanna O. Paliszkiewicz Lost in Translation and Other Challenges of New and International Researchers Seeking Publication Anthony K.P. Wensley Publishing in Leading Journals: An Overview for Aspirant Authors Early in Their Careers Suprateek Sarker.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Most academics still wrestle with the "publish or perish" phenomenon. Based on Dr. Liebowitz's 25 years serving as the editor-in-chief of a leading international journal, along with insights from some of the most knowledgeable journal editors, this book shares key lessons learned to help new professors, doctoral students, and practitioner-scholars increase their chances of being published in selective, refereed international journals. It focuses on the key practices needed to ensure journal publication, with interesting cases and helpful tips sprinkled throughout the book. A Guide to Publishing for Academics provides useful knowledge from leading journal editors of both traditional and online journals, as well as various tiers of journals. Although the focus is mainly in the business and IT areas, much of the guidance provided can cross into other fields. The book contains interesting vignettes and do's and don'ts so that potential authors can understand what goes on behind the scenes once the manuscript arrives on the journal editor's desk. The book provides constructive guidance on choosing what and where to publish, what to consider when writing a title for a paper, how to prepare and submit journal manuscripts, and how to position a paper for publication. It also has valuable information for current and future journal editors, including models of editing and editorial boards, editorial coaching advice, and editing smart practices. With the information in this book, the next generation of academics and practitioner-scholars will be well equipped to overcome the publish or perish phenomenon.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF
  • Don't Do As I Do-- Do As I Say John S. Edwards Grabbing Readers: How to Focus Your Paper's Title and Contents on Its Major Theoretical Contribution Rather than the Local Context of the Study Arch G. Woodside Well Done Literature Reviews: A Journal's Editor-in-Chief Perspective Murray E. Jennex Positioning Your Paper for Publication in a Journal: Where Do Authors Go Wrong? Alex Koohang Publishing in Technology and Innovation Management Journals: Perspectives from Both Sides of the Fence Jeremy Hall How Could My Paper Have Gotten Rejected? James R. Marsden Advice on Preparing and Revising Journal Manuscripts in Business and Society Topics Duane Windsor Interdisciplinary Research: Pathway to Meaningful Publications Donald E. Brown Models of Editing and Editorial Boards Daniel E. O'Leary The Editor Is Often a Coach Steven R. Gordon Happy Marriage or Odd Couple: Reflections on Editing the Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management Irmak Renda-Tanali and Sibel McGee Rules for Referees Dennis E. Logue Writing Scientific Journal Articles: Motivation, Barriers, and Support Joanna O. Paliszkiewicz Lost in Translation and Other Challenges of New and International Researchers Seeking Publication Anthony K.P. Wensley Publishing in Leading Journals: An Overview for Aspirant Authors Early in Their Careers Suprateek Sarker.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Most academics still wrestle with the "publish or perish" phenomenon. Based on Dr. Liebowitz's 25 years serving as the editor-in-chief of a leading international journal, along with insights from some of the most knowledgeable journal editors, this book shares key lessons learned to help new professors, doctoral students, and practitioner-scholars increase their chances of being published in selective, refereed international journals. It focuses on the key practices needed to ensure journal publication, with interesting cases and helpful tips sprinkled throughout the book. A Guide to Publishing for Academics provides useful knowledge from leading journal editors of both traditional and online journals, as well as various tiers of journals. Although the focus is mainly in the business and IT areas, much of the guidance provided can cross into other fields. The book contains interesting vignettes and do's and don'ts so that potential authors can understand what goes on behind the scenes once the manuscript arrives on the journal editor's desk. The book provides constructive guidance on choosing what and where to publish, what to consider when writing a title for a paper, how to prepare and submit journal manuscripts, and how to position a paper for publication. It also has valuable information for current and future journal editors, including models of editing and editorial boards, editorial coaching advice, and editing smart practices. With the information in this book, the next generation of academics and practitioner-scholars will be well equipped to overcome the publish or perish phenomenon.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
vii, 241 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Understanding impact
  • Impact in practice
  • Understanding bibliometrics
  • Bibliometrics in practice
  • Understanding altmetrics
  • Altmetrics in practice
  • Disciplinary impact
  • Impact and the role of librarians.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
141 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction / Dominique Pety -- L'héritage latin et l'âge classique -- Hyperdonat de Lyon à Naples / Michele Ambrosino, Bruno Bureau, Gaia Castaldi, Sara Fascione, Federica Nicolardi et Christian Nicolas -- L'invention du lecteur : un enjeu stratégique des préfaces de pièces de théâtre aux XVIe et XVIIe siècles (France, Italie, Espagne) / Marc Vuillermoz -- Du corpus à l'outil herméneutique : la base de données intertextuelle Molière 21 / Claude Bourqui -- Faire lire les Nouvelles Nouvelles de Donneau de Visé : défis et opportunités d'une édition en ligne / Christophe Schuwey -- Archives et manuscrits du XIXe siècle -- Les archives zoliennes: création et évolution du site ArchiZ en fonction de ses lecteurs et usagers / Jean-Sébastien Macke -- Donner à voir, à lire, à comprendre : destinataires et finalités d'une édition polymorphe des manuscrits de Stendhal / Cécile Meynard et Thomas Lebarbé -- Les "seconds volumes" possibles de Bouvard et Pécuchet : l'avènement d'un lecteur auteur ? / Stéphanie Dord-Crouslé.
"À travers l'étude d'une dizaine de sites Internet qui permettent désormais la consultation et l'exploitation en ligne de corpus littéraires complexes (consacrés à une période, un auteur, ou une oeuvre : manuscrits latins du site Hyperdonat, paratextes et intertextes du théâtre du XVIIe siècle européen, manuscrits de Stendhal, dossier du roman inachevé de Flaubert Bouvard et Pécuchet, archives Zola, etc.), il s'agit de réfléchir au rôle nouveau qui semble dévolu au lecteur à l'ère des Humanités numériques. La notion de texte et la pratique de la lecture s'appréhendent h en effet différemment sur d'autres supports que ceux du livre et de l'imprimé ; l'histoire littéraire se reconfigure quand deviennent accessibles quantité d'écrits ou d'images jusqu'alors laissés dans l'ombre ; et le travail d'édition et d'interprétation des textes évolue vers une démarche de co-construction où les parcours et les apports des lecteurs, de mieux en mieux pris en compte, joueront bientôt un rôle essentiel dans la transmission du patrimoine littéraire."--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library
Book
356 pages ; 25 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 278 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Preface Acknowledgments Chapter 1. Scholarly Communications - The Intersection of Research and Commerce Chapter 2. The Scientific Journal - An Historical Perspective to Modern Times Chapter 3. The Scholarly Book - Its Hard Times and Rise Again Chapter 4. Secondary Publishing From Abstracting and Indexing to Access and Information Chapter 5. The Rise and Fall of the CD-ROM Technology Chapter 6. The Birth of Online - the Internet and the Web Change Scholarly Communication Chapter 7. Traditional Economics of Academic Publishing Chapter 8. Institutional Buyers, Scholars, and Open Access: A Continuing Story Chapter 9. Big Data, Big Science, and Social Academic Networks Chapter 10. The Rise of Workflow Systems Index About the Author.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Scholarly Communications: A History from Content as King to Content as Kingmaker traces the development of scholarly communications from the creation of the first scientific journal through the wide diversity of professional information services today. Unlike any other book, this work is an authoritative history by the past President of Elsevier and current Professor at Long Island University, which examines the changing nature of scholarly communication throughout its history, including its research importance as well as its business value. It specifically covers four key themes: 1.the value of scholarly content and information at various stages of it development and use; 2.the role that technology has played on the use, importance, and value of scholarly information and research communications; 3.the changing business models affecting the system of scholarly communication from the way it is produced to how it is distributed and consumed; and 4.some of the implications of mobile, cloud, and social computing technologies on the future of scholarly communications. Attention is paid to analyzing the structural changes that the professional publishing community now faces. Regazzi examines research content as an economic good; how technology and business models have greatly affected the value of scholarly publishing; and the drivers of the future sustainability of our system of scholarly communication.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Book
xii, 963 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: the drunk, the keys, and the streetlamp / Blaise Cronin and Cassidy R. Sugimoto
  • Citation indexes for science: a new dimension in documentation through association of ideas (1955) / Eugene Garfield
  • Fascination or fetishism? / Blaise Cronin and Cassidy R. Sugimoto
  • The need for a theory of citing (1981) / Blaise Cronin
  • Referencing as persuasion (1977) / G. Nigel Gilbert
  • Beyond the holy grail: from citation theory to indicator theories (1999) / Paul Wouters
  • Informetric analyses on the world wide web: methodological approaches to "webometrics" (1997) / Tomas C. Almind and Peter Ingwersen
  • The new metrics of scholarly authority (2007) / Michael Jensen
  • Toward a rhopography of scholarly communication (2008) / Blaise Cronin
  • Scientometrics 2.0: toward new metrics of scholarly impact on the social web (2010) / Jason Priem and Bradley M. Hemminger
  • Messy matters of meaning and motivation / Blaise Cronin and Cassidy R. Sugimoto
  • Abuses of citation indexing (1967) / Kenneth O. May
  • The footnote fetish (1977) / Jon Wiener
  • Citation analysis: queries and caveats (1977) / Alan L. Porter
  • Do you sincerely want to be cited? or: read before you cite (2006) / Mikhail Simkin and Vwany Roychowdhury
  • Problems of citation analysis: a critical review (1989) / Michael H. MacRoberts and Barbara R. MacRoberts
  • No citation analyses please, we're British (1991) / Alun Anderson
  • Scientific communication - a vanity fair? (1999) / Georg Franck
  • Coercive citation in academic publishing (2012) / Allen W. Wilhite and Eric A. Fong
  • Show me data (2007) / Mike Rossner, Heather Van Epps and Emma Hill
  • The uses and abuses of bibliometrics (2012) / Martin H. Johnson, Jacques Cohen, and Gedis Grudzinskas
  • Sick of impact factors (2012) / Stephen Curry
  • The devil is in the details / Cassidy R. Sugimoto and Blaise Cronin
  • Journal selection for current contents: editorial merit vs. political pressure (1985) / Eugene Garfield
  • Lost science in the third world (1995) / W. Wayt Gibbs
  • Opportunities for and limitations of the book citation index (2013) / Juan Gorraiz, Philip J. Purnell and Wolfgang Glänzel --Google's book search: a disaster for scholars (2009) / Geoffrey Nunberg
  • Using Google Scholar for journal impact factors and the h-index in Nationwide Publishing Assessments in Academia-siren songs and air-raid sirens (2012) / Péter Jacsó
  • Manipulating Google Scholar citations and Google Scholar metrics: simple, easy and tempting (2012) / Emilio Delgado López-Cózar, Nicolás Robinson-Garcia, and Daniel Torres-Salinas
  • Novel forms of impact measurement - an empirical assessment (2012) / Paul Wouters and Rodrigo Costas
  • Critical questions for big data: provocations for a cultural, technological, and scholarly phenomenon (2012) / Danah Boyd and Kate Crawford
  • Issues of time, credit and peer review (2012) / Diane Harley
  • Angels on a pinhead / Cassidy R. Sugimoto and Blaise Cronin
  • An index to quantify an individual's scientific research output (2005) / J.E. Hirsch
  • Do we need the h index and its variants in addition to standard bibliometric measures (2009) / Lutz Bornmann, Rüdiger Mutz and Hans-Dieter Daniel
  • A quantitative analysis of indicators of scientific performance (2008) / Sune Lehmann, Andrew D. Jackson and Benny E. Lautrup
  • The inconsistency of the h-index (2012) / Ludo Waltman and Nees Jan van Eck
  • How can impact factors be improved? (1996) / Eugene Garfield
  • The number that's devouring science (2005) / Richard Monastersky
  • "3...2...1... impact [factor]: target [academic career]!": just another statistical casualty (2012) / Roger A. Brumback
  • Towards a new crown indicator: an empirical analysis (2011) / Ludo Waltman, Nees Jan van Eck, Thed N. van Leeuwen, Martijn S. Visser and Anthony F.J. van Raan
  • Remembering problems with the "new crown indicator" (MNCS) of the CWTS (2011) / Loet Leydesdorff and Tobias Opthof
  • There are [sic] neither "King" or "Crown" in scientometrics: comments on a supposed "alternative" method of normalization (2011) / Yves Gingras and Vincent Lariviére
  • Accounting for science / Cassidy R. Sugimoto and Blaise Cronin
  • A review of bibliometric and other science indicators and their role in research evaluation (1987) / Jean King
  • Measuring science: irresistible temptations, easy shortcuts, and dangerous consequences (2007) / Giovanni Abramo and Ciriaco Andrea D'Angelo
  • One size doesn't fill all: on the co-evolution of national evaluation systems and social science publishing (2013) / Diana Hicks
  • Fatal attraction: conceptual and methodological problems in the ranking of universities by bibliometric methods (2005) / Anthony F.J. van Raan
  • The future of research evaluation rests with an intelligent combination of advanced metrics and transparent peer review (2007) / Henk F. Moed
  • Explaining Australia's increased share of ISI publications: the effects of a funding formula based on publication counts (2003) / Linda Butler
  • Changing incentives to publish (2011) / Chiara Franzoni, Giuseppe Scellato and Paula Stephan
  • Looks good on paper: a flawed system for judging research is leading to academic fraud (2013) / The Economist
  • A call for action / Susanne Weigelin-Schwiedrzik
  • Mirror, mirror on the wall / Blaise Cronin and Cassidy R. Sugimoto
  • Science against science (1998) / Marian Apostol
  • New age numerology: a gloss on Apostol (1998) / Blaise Cronin
  • Endowing mediocrity: neoliberalism, information technology and the decline of radical pedagogy (1999) / Mike Sosteric
  • Bibliometrics as weapons of mass citation (2010) / Antoinette Molinié and Geoffrey Bodenhausen
  • The follies of citation indices and academic ranking lists: a brief commentary to "bibliometrics as weapons of mass citation" (2010) / Richard R. Ernst
  • Living with the h-index? metric assemblages in the contemporary academy (2012) / Roger Burrows
  • Impact of bibliometrics upon the science system: Inadvertent consequences? (2005) / Peter Weingart
  • Research governance in academia: are there alternatives to academic rankings? (2009) / Margit Osterloh and Bruno S. Frey
  • Epilogue: the bibliometrics baby and the bathwater / Blaise Cronin and Cassidy R. Sugimoto.
Interest in bibliometrics - the quantitative analysis of publications, authors, bibliographic references, and related concepts - has never been greater, as universities, research councils, national governments, and corporations seek to identify robust indicators of research effectiveness. In Scholarly Metrics Under the Microscope, editors Blaise Cronin and Cassidy R. Sugimoto bring together and expertly annotate a wealth of previously published papers, harvested from a wide range of journals and disciplines, that provide critical commentary on the use of metrics, both established and emerging, to assess the quality of scholarship and the impact of research. The expansive overview and analysis presented in this remarkable volume will be welcomed by any scholar or researcher who seeks a deeper understanding of the role and significance of performance metrics in higher education, research evaluation, and science policy.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
1 online resource (vi, 205 pages)
  • List of illustrations Acknowledgements Introduction: Journal Publication and Translation Studies-- Yifeng Sun PART I: THE ROLE OF JOURNALS 1. Aims and Scope: Journal Identity and Twenty-First-Century Scholarly Publishing-- Valerie Henitiuk, Carol O'Sullivan 2. Translation Studies in Contemporary China: Retrospect, Reflection and Prospect-- Ping Yang 3. The Translator: Creativity, Continuity and Change-- Sue-Ann Harding 4. International Journals: A Case Study of Asia Pacific Translation & Intercultural Studies-- Xuanmin Luo, Min Wang 5. My Responsibilities as a Journal Editor-- Gangqiang He PART II: TRANSLATION RESEARCH AT WORK 6. Translation, Cultural Politics and Poetic Form-A Comparative Study of the Translation of Modernist Poetry in Les Contemporains (1932-35) and Literary Currents (1956-59)-- SONG Zijiang, Chris 7. A Contact Linguistic Analysis of Translation-Induced Changes-- Xie Hui, Gong Qi 8. 'Eco' and 'Adaptation-selection' in Eco-translatology Explained-- Jiang Xiaohua 9. Crowdsourcing Translation in China: Features and Implications-- Wenjing Li 10. Masculine Fantasies and Feminine Representations in the English Translations of Pre-modern Chinese Poetry in Journals-- Kar Yue Chan 11. Subtitling Made in Hong Kong and Missing Heteroglossia-- Bo Li List of contributors.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This volume comes at a time of rapid expansion in the discipline of Translation Studies and the growth of related journals. Experts and editors of leading journals in the field probe the interactive relationship between the production of journals and the development of Translation Studies and provide a contextual framework for evaluating the field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xv, 257 p. : ill. ; 23 cm
Education Library (Cubberley)
Book
vii, 268 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • A university press in the south
  • Culture in the south
  • Books that ought to be written
  • A case history in book publishing
  • Objectivity and social science
  • The sainted book burners
  • Do intellectuals have minds?
  • The human potential for modernism
  • The word and the rope.
William Terry Couch (1901-1989) began his four-decade publishing career building the University of North Carolina Press into one of the nation's leading university presses. His editorial attacks on the social ills of the South earned him a reputation as a southern liberal. By the 1940s, his disaffection with New Deal politics turned him toward the right, resulting in his firing as director of University of Chicago Press in 1950. As a conservative, Couch sought books and articles that would sway general readers from what he saw as an intellectual torpor that accepted the growing role of government in American life. The liberals who controlled the presses found him dogmatic and irascible. When he tried to turn Collier's Encyclopedia into a journal of conservative opinion, he was fired as editor in chief in 1959. He ended his career as publisher for the libertarian William Volker Fund, which collapsed in the 1960s under charges of Nazism. Couch was committed to publishing as a social cause and strove to disturb American complacency. This first book-length biography of Couch covers the career of a publisher who brought academic scholarship to the reading public to effect social, political and economic change.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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