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Book
xix, 695 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
"Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are an important functional material because of their potential implications in diverse research fields. The materials have been developed for a range of uses including separation, environmental, biomedical and sensor applications. In this book, the chapters are clustered into two main sections: Strategies to be employed when using the affinity materials, and rational design of MIPs for advanced applications. In the first part, the book covers the recent advances in producing MIPs for sample design, preparation and characterizations. In the second part, the chapters demonstrate the importance and novelty of creation of recognition imprinted on the materials and surfaces for a range of microbial detection sensors in the biomedical, environmental and food safety fields as well as sensing human odor and virus monitoring systems. Part 1: Strategies of affinity materials Molecularly imprinted polymers MIP nanomaterials Micro- and nanotraps for solid phase extraction Carbonaceous affinity nanomaterials Fluorescent MIPs MIP-based fiber optic sensors Part 2: Rational design of MIP for advanced applications MIP-based biomedical and environmental sensors Affinity adsorbents for environmental biotechnology MIP in food safety MIP-based virus monitoring MIP-based drug delivery and controlled release Biorecognition imprints on the biosensor surfaces MIP-based sensing of volatile organic compounds in human body odour MIP-based microcantilever sensor system"--Provided by publisher.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
xix, 416 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
xxvi, 557 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm.
Nanomaterials have been used for years in industries such as consumer products, textile production, and biomedicine, yet the literature outlining their use in environmental causes is limited. The safety, toxicity, transportation, and removal of this technology must be addressed as nanotechnology and nanomaterial use is expected to grow. Applying Nanotechnology for Environmental Sustainability addresses the applications of nanomaterials in the field of environmental conservation and sustainability, and analyses the potential risks associated with their use. It elucidates the scientific concepts and emerging technologies in nanoscience and nanotoxicity by offering a wide range of innovative topics and reviews regarding its use. This publication is essential for environmental engineers, researchers, consultants, students, regulators, and professionals in the field of nanotechnology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781522505853 20161114
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
1 volume (various pagings) : color illustrations ; 29 cm
  • 1. Chemists and Chemistry. 2. Atoms, Molecules, and Ions. 3. Stoichiometry. 4. Types of Chemical Reactions and Solution Stoichiometry. 5. Gases. 6. Chemical Equilibrium. 7. Acids and Bases. 8. Applications of Aqueous Equilibria. 9. Energy, Enthalpy, and Thermochemistry. 10. Spontaneity, Entropy, and Free Energy. 11. Electrochemistry. 12. Quantum Mechanics and Atomic Theory. 13. Bonding: General Concepts. 14. Covalent Bonding: Orbitals. 15. Chemical Kinetics. 16. Liquids and Solids. 17. Properties of Solutions. 18. The Representative Elements. 19. Transition Metals and Coordination Chemistry. 20. The Nucleus: A Chemista (TM)s View. 21. Organic and Biochemical Molecules. Appendix 1. Mathematical Procedures. Appendix 2. Units of Measurement and Conversions Among Units. Appendix 3. Spectral Analysis. Appendix 4. Selected Thermodynamic Data. Appendix 5. Equilibrium Constants and Reduction Potentials. Appendix 6. Deriving the Integrated Rate Laws. Glossary. Answers to Selected Exercises.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781305581982 20160619
Develop the qualitative, conceptual foundation you need to think like a chemist with CHEMICAL PRINCIPLES, 8e. Designed for students with solid mathematical preparation, this best-seller emphasizes models, everyday applications of chemistry, and a thoughtful, step-by-step problem-solving approach.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781305581982 20160619
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
CHEM-31X-01
Book
pages cm
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
x, 268 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm
  • PREFACE ix 1. Fundamentals of Chromatography 1 1.1 Theory 1 1.1.1 Component Separation 3 1.1.2 Retention Factor 6 1.1.3 Separation 11 1.1.4 Resolution and Theoretical Plates 13 1.2 Band Broadening 20 1.2.1 Diffusion 21 1.2.2 Linear Velocity 23 1.2.3 Broadening in Open Tubes with No Stationary Phase and No Retention 24 1.2.4 Broadening in Open Tubes with a Stationary Phase 28 1.2.5 Broadening in a Packed Column 34 1.2.6 Putting It All Together 43 1.2.7 Practical Consequences of Broadening Theory 45 1.3 General Resolution Equation 47 1.4 Peak Symmetry 51 1.5 Key Operating Variables 51 1.6 Instrumentation 53 1.7 Practice of The Technique 53 1.7.1 Quantitation 53 1.7.2 Internal Standards and the Method of Standard Additions 55 1.8 Emerging Trends and Applications 55 1.9 Summary 55 Problems 56 References 59 Further Reading 59 2. Gas Chromatography 61 2.1 Theory of Gas Chromatographic Separations 61 2.1.1 GC Columns and Partitioning 64 2.2 Key Operating Variables that Control Retention 64 2.2.1 Adjusting Retention Time: Temperature 65 2.2.2 Adjusting Retention Time: Temperature Programming 67 2.2.3 Adjusting Retention Time: Mobile Phase Flow Rate 69 2.2.4 Adjusting Retention Time: The Column and the Stationary Phase 72 2.2.5 Adjusting Retention Time: Summary 78 2.2.6 Measures of Retention 78 2.3 Gas Chromatography Instrumentation 82 2.3.1 Carrier Gas Supply 83 2.3.2 The Injection Port and the Solute Injection Process 83 2.3.3 Oven/Column Compartment 97 2.3.4 Detectors 98 2.4 A More Detailed Look at Stationary Phase Chemistry: Kovats Indices and Mcreynolds Constants 111 2.4.1 Kovats Retention Indices 111 2.4.2 Stationary Phase Selection 120 2.5 Gas Chromatography in Practice 124 2.5.1 Syringe Washing 124 2.5.2 Controls and Blanks/Ghost Peaks 124 2.5.3 Autosamplers 125 2.5.4 GC Septa 125 2.5.5 Qualitative Analysis 126 2.5.6 Quantitative Analysis 126 2.5.7 Derivatization 128 2.5.8 High-Speed GC 128 2.5.9 Tandem GC 129 2.5.10 Microfabricated GC 129 2.6 A Real-World Application of Gas Chromatography 131 2.6.1 GC and International Oil Trading 131 2.7 Summary 136 Problems 137 References 143 Further Reading 144 3. Liquid Chromatography 145 3.1 Examples of Liquid Chromatography Analyses 145 3.2 Scope of Liquid Chromatography 147 3.3 History of LC 148 3.3.1 Modern Packing Materials 149 3.4 Modes of Liquid Chromatography 152 3.4.1 Normal Phase Liquid Chromatography (NPLC) 152 3.4.2 Reversed-Phase Liquid Chromatography (RPLC) 154 3.4.3 Ion-Exchange Chromatography (IEX) 165 3.4.4 Hydrophilic Interaction Chromatography (HILIC) 173 3.4.5 Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC) 175 3.4.6 Affinity Chromatography 178 3.5 HPLC Instrumentation 180 3.5.1 The Proportioning Valve 181 3.5.2 Mixing Chamber 181 3.5.3 Pumps 181 3.5.4 Injection 183 3.5.5 The Column and Particles 185 3.5.6 Guard Columns 187 3.5.7 Detectors 188 3.6 Specific Uses of and Advances in Liquid Chromatography 201 3.6.1 Chiral Separations 202 3.6.2 Preparative-Scale Chromatography 207 3.6.3 Ultra-High Performance Liquid Chromatography (UHPLC) for High-Speed Separations 212 3.6.4 Tandem-Column Liquid Chromatography 216 3.6.5 Two-Dimensional Liquid Chromatography (2D-LC) 218 3.7 Application of LC Analysis of Pharmaceutical Compounds in Groundwater 224 3.7.1 Sampling 225 3.7.2 Analysis Method for 21 Antibiotics Sample Pretreatment 225 3.7.3 Use of Internal Standards and Other Quality Assurance Issues 227 3.7.4 LC Analyses 228 3.7.5 Mass Spectrometric Selected Ion Monitoring Detection 228 3.7.6 Results 229 3.8 Summary 230 Problems 230 References 232 SOLUTIONS 237 Index 263.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119270881 20161128
Provides students and practitioners with a solid grounding in the theory of chromatography, important considerations in its application, and modern instrumentation. * Highlights the primary variables that practitioners can manipulate, and how those variables influence chromatographic separations * Includes multiple figures that illustrate the application of these methods to actual, complex chemical samples * Problems are embedded throughout the chapters as well as at the end of each chapter so that students can check their understanding before continuing on to new sections * Each section includes numerous headings and subheadings, making it easy for faculty and students to refer to and use the information within each chapter selectively * The focused, concise nature makes it useful for a modular approach to analytical chemistry courses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119270881 20161128
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
xvi, 399 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Process Analysis - The Importance of Mass and Energy Balances-- Introduction to Chemical Reaction Engineering-- Concepts of Fluid Flow-- An Introduction to Heat Transfer-- An Introduction to Mass-Transfer Operations-- Scale-Up in Chemical Engineering-- An Introduction to Particle Systems-- An Introduction to Process Control-- Economic Appraisal of Large Projects-- Process and Personal Safety-- Engineering Statistics. Process Integration, and Experimental Design-- Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782623588 20161114
Based on a former popular course of the same title, Concepts of Chemical Engineering for Chemists outlines the basic aspects of chemical engineering for chemistry professionals. It clarifies the terminology used and explains the systems methodology approach to process design and operation for chemists with limited chemical engineering knowledge. The book provides practical insights into all areas of chemical engineering with well explained worked examples and case studies. The new edition contains a revised chapter on Process Analysis and two new chapters "Process and Personal Safety" and "Systems Integration and Experimental Design", the latter drawing together material covered in the previous chapters so that readers can design and test their own pilot process systems. This book is a guide for chemists (and other scientists) who either work alongside chemical engineers or who are undertaking chemical engineering-type projects and who wish to communicate with their colleagues and understand chemical engineering principles.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782623588 20161114
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
pages cm
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
xxiii, 424 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 26 cm
  • A Note to the Reader Preface Author Biography Acknowledgments INTRODUCTION - Grandma Needs a Walker PART I - The Story Line and Its Underpinnings CHAPTER ONE - Down the Road and the Gemisch Dramatis Personae, Part I: Nadrian Seeman Molecular Crystals - Inspiration from Escher Perspiration and Reinvention Dramatis Personae, Part II: Noel Clark, Tommaso Bellini Liquid Crystals and Self-Assembly Seeman, Bellini and Clark, and Base Complementarity Conventional Wisdom and an Alternative View Endnotes CHAPTER TWO - DNA: The Molecule That Makes Life Work-and More Erwin Chargaff Rosalind Franklin James Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins DNA Sequencing Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (PAGE) DNA Synthesis Exercises for Chapter Two Endnotes CHAPTER THREE - Travels to the Nanoworld The Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) Moving Atoms With an STM Standing Waves Quantum Corrals Nanomethodology Spherical Nucleic Acids (SNAs) Biodiagnostic Detection Using SNAs Exercises for Chapter Three Endnotes CHAPTER FOUR - Liquid Crystals: Nature's Delicate Phase of Matter Phase Transitions Classes of Liquid Crystals Cell Membranes and the Langmuir Trough Micelles Liquid Crystal Displays Exercises for Chapter Four Endnotes CHAPTER FIVE - Tools of the Trade Polarized Light Microscopy Liquid Crystal Texture Seen Through a Depolarized Light Microscope Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) X-Ray Diffraction and Bragg's Law The Phase Problem Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Exercises for Chapter Five Endnotes PART II - The Emerging Technology: Nanomaterials Constructed From DNA CHAPTER SIX - The Three Pillars of Structural DNA Nanotechnology Branched DNA and DNA Junctions Sticky Ends Immobile Four-Arm DNA Junction Two-Dimensional Ligation of DNA Junctions Deconstruction of Concatenated Nucleic Acid Junctions Macrocycles Three-Dimensional Constructions and Catenanes The DNA Cube Exercises for Chapter Six Endnotes CHAPTER SEVEN - Motif Generation, Sequence Design, Nanomechanical Devices Flexible Junctions Redux The Double-Crossover (DX) Molecule Design and Self-Assembly of Two-Dimensional DNA Crystals Two-Dimensional Nanoparticle Arrays Sequence Design Nanomechanical Devices Exercises for Chapter Seven Endnotes CHAPTER EIGHT - DNA Origami, DNA Bricks Scaffolded DNA Origami DNA Origami Patterns Strand Invasion also called Strand Displacement DNA Origami With Complex Curvatures in Three Dimensions DNA Tiles in Two Dimensions DNA Bricks in Three Dimensions DNA Brick Shapes in Three Dimensions DNA Brick Crystals Seeman, Rothemund, and Yin Exercises for Chapter Eight Endnotes CHAPTER NINE - DNA Assembly Line and the Triumph of Tensegrity Triangles DNA Nanoscale Assembly Line (Overview) DNA Walkers DNA Machines and Paranemic Crossover Molecules DNA Cassette With Robot Arm and DNA Origami Track DNA Assembly Line The Triumph of Tensegrity Triangles Exercises for Chapter Nine Endnotes BRIEF INTERLUDE I - Back to Methuselah Molecular-Scale Weaving Moors and Crossover Molecules Tensegrity Sculpting Mayan Pottery, Chirality, and the Handedness of Life Endnotes CHAPTER TEN - DNA Nanotechnology Meets the Real World Cell Membrane Channels Synthetic Membrane Channels via DNA Nanotechnology Current Gating Channels as Single-Molecule Sensors Molecular Nanorobots Built by DNA Origami: Cell-Targeted Drug Delivery Tests of Nanorobot Function Test of Binding Discrimination: Healthy Cells vs. Leukemia Cells (NK Cells) Exercises for Chapter Ten Endnotes PART III - The Possible Origins of Life's Information Carrier CHAPTER ELEVEN - Chance Findings Onsager's Criterion for an Isotropic-Nematic Liquid Crystal Phase Transition NanoDNA Seems to Violate Onsager's Venerable Criterion The Details Shifting Gears Phase Separation into Liquid Crystal Droplets The Depletion Interaction Flory's Model Exercises for Chapter Eleven Endnotes CHAPTER TWELVE - Unexpected Consequences Hierarchical Self-Assembly NanoRNA Blunt Ends and Sticky Ends Base Stacking Forces The Scope of the Self-Assembly Mechanisms of Nucleic Acids Random-Sequence NanoDNA The Strange World of Random-Sequence NanoDNA Liquid Crystal Ordering of Random-Sequence NanoDNA Non-Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics: Kinetic Arrest and Nonergodic Behavior Exercises for Chapter Twelve Endnotes CHAPTER THIRTEEN - Ligation: Blest be the Tie That Binds NanoDNA Stacking: Weak Physical Attractive Forces vs. Chemical Ligation Abiotic Ligation Experiments with EDC The Scheme: Polyethylene glycol (PEG)-Induced Phase Separation Gel Electrophoresis of D1p Oligomers With Polyacrylamide and Agarose Gels Another Stellar Contribution by Chemist Paul J. Flory Analysis of Gel Profiles: The Experimental Data is Well Described by the Flory Model The Lowdown on Ligation Efficiency The Liquid Crystal Phase as Gatekeeper Cascaded Phase Separation Exercises for Chapter Thirteen Endnotes BRIEF INTERLUDE II - The Handedness of Life Chirality Life is Homochiral Macroscopic Chiral Helical Precession of Molecular Orientation Bellini and Clark Examine NanoDNA Chirality A Lighter Take on Chirality Exercises for Brief Interlude II Endnotes CHAPTER FOURTEEN - All the World's a Stage and Life's a Play-Did it Arise From Clay? Emergence and Complexity Miller-Urey Experiment RNA World Hypothesis Other Plausible Venues Replicator-First vs. Metabolism-First Feats of Clay The Lipid World Liquid Crystals in the Work of Deamer and the Work of Bellini/Clark Manfred Eigen and Stuart Kauffman Exercises for Chapter Fourteen Endnotes CHAPTER FIFTEEN - The Passover Question: Why is This Origins Proposal Different From All Other Proposals? Emergence and Broken Symmetry About-Face Occam's Razor The RNA World Revisited Sticky Business, Part I: What Constitutes Plausible Prebiotic Conditions? Sticky Business, Part II: The Origins Question-Whose Home Turf Is It? Discovering the Physical Processes that Enabled the Chemistry of Life Metabolism-First Revisited Computer Simulations and Mathematical Modeling An Ancient "Liquid Crystal World" Endnotes Epilogue APPENDIX - Texture of Liquid Crystal Optical Images Smectic Phase Liquid Crystal Texture Bent-Core Molecules Extinction Brushes Chiral Nematic Texture of NanoDNA Liquid Crystals Columnar Texture of NanoDNA Liquid Crystals Endnotes Glossary Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498750127 20161114
DNA Nanoscience: From Prebiotic Origins to Emerging Nanotechnology melds two tales of DNA. One is a look at the first 35 years of DNA nanotechnology to better appreciate what lies ahead in this emerging field. The other story looks back 4 billion years to the possible origins of DNA which are shrouded in mystery. The book is divided into three parts comprised of 15 chapters and two Brief Interludes. Part I includes subjects underpinning the book such as a primer on DNA, the broader discipline of nanoscience, and experimental tools used by the principals in the narrative. Part II examines the field of structural DNA nanotechnology, founded by biochemist/crystallographer Nadrian Seeman, that uses DNA as a construction material for nanoscale structures and devices, rather than as a genetic material. Part III looks at the work of physicists Noel Clark and Tommaso Bellini who found that short DNA (nanoDNA) forms liquid crystals that act as a structural gatekeeper, orchestrating a series of self-assembly processes using nanoDNA. This led to an explanation of the polymeric structure of DNA and of how life may have emerged from the prebiotic clutter.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498750127 20161114
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
pages cm
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
xiv, 305 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
MATLAB, a software package for high-performance numerical computation and visualization, is one of the most widely used tools in the engineering field today. Its broad appeal lies in its interactive environment, which features hundreds of built-in functions for technical computation, graphics, and animation. In addition, MATLAB provides easy extensibility with its own high-level programming language. Enhanced by fun and appealing illustrations, Getting Started with MATLAB employs a casual, accessible writing style that shows users how to enjoy using MATLAB.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190602062 20161114
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
xxxii, 846 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
xiv, 1293 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
xix, 338 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 28 cm
  • Preface, vii Acknowledgements, ix Introduction to biotechnology lab, xi About the companion website, xix Part I: METHODS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY (MB) LABORATORY EXERCISES 1 1 MB experiment 1: Lab measurements, 3 2 MB experiment 2: Use of the spectrophotometer and Beer s law, 9 3 MB experiment 3: Making solutions and buffer efficacy, 15 4 MB experiment 4: Acid base titration, 19 5 MB experiment 5: Protein denaturation and precipitation, 23 6 MB experiment 6: Bacterial transformation, 27 7 MB experiment 7: GFP purification, 33 8 MB experiment 8: SDS-PAGE analysis, 37 9 MB experiment 9: DNA isolation, 41 10 MB experiment 10: PCR-based Alu-human DNA typing, 45 11 MB experiment 11: Restriction enzyme digestion, 51 12 MB experiment 12: Agarose gel electrophoresis, 53 13 MB experiment 13: Ouchterlony and ELISA immunoassays, 57 14 MB experiment 14: Testing plant substances for antimicrobial activity, 63 15 MB experiment 15: Peroxidase enzyme activity assay, 67 Part II: ADVANCED METHODS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY (AMB) 1 LABORATORY EXERCISES 71 16 AMB 1 experiment 16: Aseptic technique and culture handling, 73 17 AMB 1 experiment 17: Yeast culture media preparation, 77 18 AMB 1 experiment 18: Growth curve, 79 19 AMB 1 experiment 19: Mini plasmid prep, 83 20 AMB 1 experiment 20: Restriction digestion, purification, concentration, and quantification of DNA, 87 21 AMB 1 experiment 21: Polymerase chain reaction (PCR), 91 22 AMB 1 experiment 22: TA, blunt end, SLIC, and CPEC cloning of PCR product, 97 23 AMB 1 experiment 23: One-step multifragment assembly cloning, 103 24 AMB 1 experiment 24: Restriction enzyme digestion and fast agarose gel electrophoresis, 111 25 AMB 1 experiment 25: Southern blot transfer, 117 26 AMB 1 experiment 26: Probe labeling and purification, 121 27 AMB 1 experiment 27: Dot blot assay, 125 28 AMB 1 experiment 28: Pre-hybridization, hybridization, and detection, 127 29 AMB 1 experiment 29: Total yeast RNA isolation and RT-PCR, 131 30 AMB 1 experiment 30: Yeast-based in vivo recombination cloning, 139 31 AMB 1 experiment 31: Plasmid DNA isolation from yeast, 143 32 AMB 1 experiment 32: E. coli transformation with yeast plasmid DNA, 145 33 AMB 1 experiment 33: X-gal filter lift assay, 147 34 AMB 1 experiment 34: Protein quantitation assay, 149 35 AMB 1 experiment 35: Quantitative -Galactosidase assay in yeast, 155 36 AMB 1 experiment 36: Gel filtration chromatography (GFC), 161 37 AMB 1 experiment 37: Ion exchange chromatography (IEC), 165 Part III: ADVANCED METHODS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY (AMB) 2 LABORATORY EXERCISES 169 38 AMB 2 experiment 38: E. coli culture media preparation, 171 39 AMB 2 experiment 39: Site-directed mutagenesis, 175 40 AMB 2 experiment 40: Protein expression in E. coli, 179 41 AMB 2 experiment 41: Protein purification by affinity column chromatography, 187 42 AMB 2 experiment 42: SDS-PAGE analysis of affinity column fractions, 193 43 AMB 2 experiment 43: Western blot analysis of affinity column fractions, 199 44 AMB 2 experiment 44: Yeast media preparation and phenotypic analysis of yeast strains, 203 45 AMB 2 experiment 45: Yeast transformation for yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assay and genome editing by CRISPR-Cas system, 209 46 AMB 2 experiment 46: Yeast mating-mediated Y2H assay and genomic PCR, 215 47 AMB 2 experiment 47: Yeast colony PCR screening and cycle DNA sequencing, 221 48 AMB 2 experiment 48: DNA sequencing electrophoresis, 227 49 AMB 2 experiment 49: RNA interference, 237 50 AMB 2 experiment 50: Protein preparation for 2D gel electrophoresis, 241 51 AMB 2 experiment 51: Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, 245 Part IV: APPENDICES 253 1 Methods in Biotechnology Appendix 1, 255 2 MB Appendix 2, 261 3 MB Appendix 3, 265 4 MB Appendix 4, 267 5 AMB 1 Appendix 1, 271 6 AMB 1 Appendix 2, 281 7 AMB 1 Appendix 3, 287 8 AMB 1 Appendix 4, 291 9 AMB 1 Appendix 5, 297 10 AMB 2 Appendix 1, 299 11 AMB 2 Appendix 2, 307 12 AMB 2 Appendix 3, 313 13 AMB 2 Appendix 4, 317 14 AMB 2 Appendix 5, 319 15 AMB 2 Appendix 6, 321 16 AMB 2 Appendix 7, 325 Glossary, 327 Abbreviations, 335 Index, 337.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119156789 20161114
As rapid advances in biotechnology occur, there is a need for a pedagogical tool to aid current students and laboratory professionals in biotechnological methods; Methods in Biotechnology is an invaluable resource for those students and professionals. Methods in Biotechnology engages the reader by implementing an active learning approach, provided advanced study questions, as well as pre- and post-lab questions for each lab protocol. These self-directed study sections encourage the reader to not just perform experiments but to engage with the material on a higher level, utilizing critical thinking and troubleshooting skills. This text is broken into three sections based on level Methods in Biotechnology, Advanced Methods in Biotechnology I, and Advanced Methods in Biotechnology II. Each section contains 14-22 lab exercises, with instructor notes in appendices as well as an answer guide as a part of the book companion site. This text will be an excellent resource for both students and laboratory professionals in the biotechnology field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119156789 20161114
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
xx, 761 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
  • An introduction to the mechanical bond
  • The fundamentals of making mechanical bonds
  • Making mechanical bonds under thermodynamic control
  • Molecular topologies and architectures with mechanical bonds
  • The stereochemistry of the mechanical bond
  • Molecular switches and machines with mechanical bonds.
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
xvii, 629 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
  • Examples xi Preface xiii Acknowledgments xv About the Companion Website xvii Chapter 1
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118370223 20161128
Through numerous examples, the principles of the relationship between chemical structure and the NMR spectrum are developed in a logical, step-by-step fashion * Includes examples and exercises based on real NMR data including full 600 MHz one- and two-dimensional datasets of sugars, peptides, steroids and natural products * Includes detailed solutions and explanations in the text for the numerous examples and problems and also provides large, very detailed and annotated sets of NMR data for use in understanding the material * Describes both simple aspects of solution-state NMR of small molecules as well as more complex topics not usually covered in NMR books such as complex splitting patterns, weak long-range couplings, spreadsheet analysis of strong coupling patterns and resonance structure analysis for prediction of chemical shifts * Advanced topics include all of the common two-dimensional experiments (COSY, ROESY, NOESY, TOCSY, HSQC, HMBC) covered strictly from the point of view of data interpretation, along with tips for parameter settings.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118370223 20161128
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
xii, 382 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • CHAPTER 1 BOND-LINE DRAWINGS 1 1.1 How to Read Bond-Line Drawings 1 1.2 How to Draw Bond-Line Drawings 5 1.3 Mistakes to Avoid 7 1.4 More Exercises 7 1.5 Identifying Formal Charges 9 1.6 Finding Lone Pairs that are Not Drawn 13 CHAPTER 2 RESONANCE 18 2.1 What is Resonance? 18 2.2 Curved Arrows: The Tools for Drawing Resonance Structures 19 2.3 The Two Commandments 21 2.4 Drawing Good Arrows 24 2.5 Formal Charges in Resonance Structures 26 2.6 Drawing Resonance Structures Step by Step 30 2.7 Drawing Resonance Structures by Recognizing Patterns 34 2.8 Assessing the Relative Importance of Resonance Structures 43 CHAPTER 3 ACID BASE REACTIONS 49 3.1 Factor 1 What Atom is the Charge On? 50 3.2 Factor 2 Resonance 53 3.3 Factor 3 Induction 56 3.4 Factor 4 Orbitals 59 3.5 Ranking the Four Factors 60 3.6 Other Factors 63 3.7 Quantitative Measurement (pKa Values) 64 3.8 Predicting the Position of Equilibrium 65 3.9 Showing a Mechanism 66 CHAPTER 4 GEOMETRY 69 4.1 Orbitals and Hybridization States 69 4.2 Geometry 72 4.3 Lone Pairs 76 CHAPTER 5 NOMENCLATURE 77 5.1 Functional Group 78 5.2 Unsaturation 80 5.3 Naming the Parent Chain 81 5.4 Naming Substituents 84 5.5 Stereoisomerism 88 5.6 Numbering 90 5.7 Common Names 95 5.8 Going from a Name to a Structure 96 CHAPTER 6 CONFORMATIONS 97 6.1 How to Draw a Newman Projection 98 6.2 Ranking the Stability of Newman Projections 102 6.3 Drawing Chair Conformations 105 6.4 Placing Groups On the Chair 108 6.5 Ring Flipping 112 6.6 Comparing the Stability of Chairs 119 6.7 Don t Be Confused by the Nomenclature 122 CHAPTER 7 CONFIGURATIONS 123 7.1 Locating Stereocenters 123 7.2 Determining the Configuration of a Stereocenter 126 7.3 Nomenclature 134 7.4 Drawing Enantiomers 138 7.5 Diastereomers 143 7.6 Meso Compounds 144 7.7 Drawing Fischer Projections 147 7.8 Optical Activity 152 CHAPTER 8 MECHANISMS 154 8.1 Introduction to Mechanisms 154 8.2 Nucleophiles and Electrophiles 154 8.3 Basicity vs. Nucleophilicity 157 8.4 Arrow-Pushing Patterns for Ionic Mechanisms 159 8.5 Carbocation Rearrangements 164 8.6 Information Contained in a Mechanism 169 CHAPTER 9 SUBSTITUTION REACTIONS 173 9.1 The Mechanisms 173 9.2 Factor 1 The Electrophile (Substrate) 175 9.3 Factor 2 The Nucleophile 178 9.4 Factor 3 The Leaving Group 180 9.5 Factor 4 The Solvent 183 9.6 Using All Four Factors 185 9.7 Substitution Reactions Teach Us Some Important Lessons 186 CHAPTER 10 ELIMINATION REACTIONS 188 10.1 The E2 Mechanism 188 10.2 The Regiochemical Outcome of an E2 Reaction 189 10.3 The Stereochemical Outcome of an E2 Reaction 191 10.4 The E1 Mechanism 194 10.5 The Regiochemical Outcome of an E1 Reaction 195 10.6 The Stereochemical Outcome of an E1 Reaction 196 10.7 Substitution vs. Elimination 196 10.8 Determining the Function of the Reagent 197 10.9 Identifying the Mechanism(s) 199 10.10 Predicting the Products 202 CHAPTER 11 ADDITION REACTIONS 206 11.1 Terminology Describing Regiochemistry 206 11.2 Terminology Describing Stereochemistry 208 11.3 Adding H and H 216 11.4 Adding H and X, Markovnikov 219 11.5 Adding H and Br, Anti-Markovnikov 226 11.6 Adding H and OH, Markovnikov 230 11.7 Adding H and OH, Anti-Markovnikov 233 11.8 Synthesis Techniques 238 11.9 Adding Br and Br-- Adding Br and OH 245 11.10 Adding OH and OH, ANTI 250 11.11 Adding OH and OH, SYN 253 11.12 Oxidative Cleavage of an Alkene 255 CHAPTER 12 ALKYNES 258 12.1 Structure and Properties of Alkynes 258 12.2 Preparation of Alkynes 261 12.3 Alkylation of Terminal Alkynes 262 12.4 Reduction of Alkynes 264 12.5 Hydration of Alkynes 268 12.6 Keto-Enol Tautomerization 273 12.7 Ozonolysis of Alkynes 278 CHAPTER 13 ALCOHOLS 280 13.1 Naming and Designating Alcohols 280 13.2 Predicting Solubility of Alcohols 281 13.3 Predicting Relative Acidity of Alcohols 283 13.4 Preparing Alcohols: A Review 286 13.5 Preparing Alcohols via Reduction 287 13.6 Preparing Alcohols via Grignard Reactions 294 13.7 Summary of Methods for Preparing Alcohols 298 13.8 Reactions of Alcohols: Substitution and Elimination 300 13.9 Reactions of Alcohols: Oxidation 303 13.10 Converting an Alcohol Into an Ether 305 CHAPTER 14 ETHERS AND EPOXIDES 308 14.1 Introduction to Ethers 308 14.2 Preparation of Ethers 310 14.3 Reactions of Ethers 313 14.4 Preparation of Epoxides 314 14.5 Ring-Opening Reactions of Epoxides 316 CHAPTER 15 SYNTHESIS 323 15.1 One-Step Syntheses 324 15.2 Multistep Syntheses 336 15.3 Retrosynthetic Analysis 337 15.4 Creating Your Own Problems 338 Answer Key 339 Index 000.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119110668 20160704
* Helps develop the skills needed to solve a variety of problem types. * Presents the fundamental topics clearly with an informal, friendly tone. * Describes the how-to of problem solving, including approaching problems strategically. * Discusses the relationship between concepts and puts topics in context. * Covers important areas such as resonance, nomenclature, conformations, substitution reactions, synthesis and more.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119110668 20160704
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
CHEM-35-01, CHEM-35-01
Book
pages cm
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
pages cm
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)
Book
pages cm
Chemistry & ChemEng Library (Swain)