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Book
1 online resource (9 p. ) : digital, PDF file.
The ACS Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology was initiated in 1955 as a subdivision of the Division of Industrial and Engineering Chemistry. Probationary divisional status was lifted in 1965. The Division’s first symposium was held in Denver in 1964 and it is fitting that we kicked-off the 50th Anniversary in Denver in the spring of 2015. Listed as a small ACS Division with only about 1,000 members, NUCL’s impact over the past fifty years has been remarkable. National ACS meetings have had many symposia sponsored or cosponsored by NUCL that included Nobel Laureates, U.S. Senators, other high-ranking officials and many students as speakers. The range of subjects has been exceptional as are the various prestigious awards established by the Division. Of major impact has been the past 30 years of the NUCL Nuclear Chemistry Summer Schools to help fill the void of qualified nuclear scientists and technicians. In celebrating the 50th Anniversary we honor the past, celebrate the present and shape the future of the Division and nuclear science and technology. To celebrate this auspicious occasion a commemorative lapel pin has been designed for distribution to NUCL Division members.
Book
1 online resource.
  • Preface; Contents; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Preamble; 1.1.1 History of Manufacture of Sulphuric Acid in India; 1.1.2 History of Manufacture of Sulphuric Acid; 1.1.2.1 Sulphuric Acid Manufacture has Flourished Since the Mid-19th Century; 1.1.3 Salient Features of the Modified (3 + 2) DCDA Process; 2 Chemical and Physical Properties of Sulphur Dioxide and Sulphur Trioxide; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Sulphur Dioxide Physical Properties; 2.3 Vaporisation of SO2; 2.4 The Solubility of SO2 in Sulphuric Acid; 2.5 Solubility of Sulphur Dioxide in Water; 2.6 Chemical Properties of Sulphur Dioxide
  • 2.7 Physical Properties of Sulphur Trioxide2.8 General Properties of Liquid Sulphur Trioxide; 2.9 Properties of Liquid Sulphur Trioxide; 2.10 Viscosity of Liquid Sulphur Trioxide; 2.11 Specific Gravity of Sulphur Trioxide; 2.12 Vapour Pressure of Liquid Sulphur Trioxide; 2.13 Molar Heat Capacity of Liquid Sulphur Trioxide; 2.14 Vaporisation Curves for Sulphur Dioxide; 2.15 Enthalpy of Sulphur Trioxide Gas; 2.16 Chemical Properties of Sulphur Trioxide
  • 2.16.1 Commercially Sulphur Trioxide Is Produced by Converting 10
  • 12 % SO2 by Catalytic Conversion at Temperatures Between 360
  • 600 ̊C in Multipass Converter of Sulphuric Acid Plant2.17 One of the Special Chemical Properties of SO3 Which Has Been Safer but not Explored till date; 2.18 Sulphur Trioxide Is a Strong Sulphonating Agent for Difficult, Organic and Inorganic Chemicals; 2.18.1 Treatment of Sulphuric Acid Plant Tail Gas from Final Absorption Tower; 3 Manufacture of Sulphonating Agents Such as 25 and 65 % Oleums as well as Liquid Sulphur Trioxide; 3.1 Introduction
  • 3.2 Production of 25 % Oleum3.2.1 History; 3.3 Technical Considerations; 3.4 Manufacturing; 3.5 65 % Oleum; 3.5.1 Introduction; 3.6 Manufacturing; 3.7 Uses; 3.8 Sulphur Trioxide (Liquid or Gas); 3.8.1 Introduction; 3.9 Manufacture; 3.10 Economic Considerations; 4 Manufacture of Liquid Sulphur Dioxide; 4.1 Manufacture of Liquid Sulphur Dioxide; 4.2 Thermodynamic and Kinetic Consideration of the NEAT's Process; 4.3 International Scenario; 4.4 Merchant Market for SO2 in Various for Many Industrial Applications; 4.5 Process Description; 4.6 Operational Considerations
  • 4.6.1 Condensation and Filling Section4.7 Economics; 4.8 Environmental Considerations; 4.9 Conclusion; 5 World Production of Liquid SO2 and SO3; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 World Scenario; 5.2.1 Comparative Analysis on Techno Economic Considerations; 5.3 Economics of Manufacture of Liquid SO2; 5.4 Economics of Manufacture of Liquid SO3; 5.5 Conclusion; 6 Techno Economic Evaluation of Processes Involved to Manufacture Liquid Sulphur Dioxide and Liquid Sulphur Trioxide; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 History
This book presents a complete, in-depth analysis for on the impact of liquid sulfur dioxide and liquid sulfur trioxide to carry out complex and difficult sulfonations, as well as manufacture of sulfuric acid with a CAPEX requirement of less than half, an area requirement less than one-third, and no emission of sulfur dioxide. The processes described in this volume represents an innovative approach relevant to the current manufacturing processes of sulfuric acid, sulfamic acid, para toluene sulfonic acid and other sulfonated product.
Book
1 online resource : illustrations (some color).
  • Wonders of Water
  • Water Structure
  • O:H-O Bond Cooperativity
  • Phase Diagram: Bonding Dynamics
  • O:H-O Bond Asymmetrical Potentials
  • Mechanical Compression
  • Thermal Excitation
  • Molecular Undercoordination: Supersolidity
  • Superlubricity of Ice
  • Water Supersolid Skin
  • Mpemba Paradox
  • Aqueous Solution Point Controllers
  • Hydration Shells versus Water Skin
  • Aqueous Solution Phase Transition
  • Water Floating Bridge
  • Miscellaneous Issues
  • Approaching Strategies
  • Laws for Water.
This book features the latest advances and future trends in water science and technology. It also discusses the scientific popularization and quantitative resolution of a variety of mysterious properties of water and ice from the perspective of hydrogen-bond cooperativity in response to stimuli such as chemical contamination, electrification, magnetification, mechanical compression, molecular undercoordination, and thermal excitation. Anomalies include the floating of ice, the Hofmeister effect in solutions, regelation of ice, slipperiness of ice, water's tough skin, the Mpemba paradox, and the floating bridge. It also addresses the superfluidity of microchannels, hydrogen bond potentials, nanodroplet and bubble thermodynamics, quasisolidity and supersolidity, controlling superhydrophobicity-superhydrophilicity transition, and high-pressure ice formation. The target audience for this book includes students, senior scholars, engineers and practitioners in the area of physical chemistry, biology, as well as aqueous and colloid solutions.
Book
1 online resource.
  • Introduction.- Group 1-Group 2 Bimetallic Alkyls and Hydrides.- Silicon-nitrogen Dehydrocoupling.- Boron-nitrogen Dehydrocoupling.- Single Electron Transfer Steps in Group 2 Catalysis.- Summary.- Future Work.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book presents an in-depth study into the utility of sigma-bond metathesis in Group 2 mediated reactivity. A comprehensive introduction defines the state of the art in both Group 2 mediated catalysis and dehydrocoupling. Structural investigations giving rise to a range of mixed s-block metal hydrides including a remarkable dodecabimetallic decahydride are then described. Subsequent extensive mechanistic work focussing on both silicon-nitrogen and boron-nitrogen dehydrocoupling gives insights into both congeneric effects down Group 2 and ligand effects centring upon magnesium. These studies show the striking effects of these factors, as well as the electronic nature of the hydridic coupling partner. Finally, the unprecedented introduction of single-electron transfer steps into Group 2 catalytic manifolds is described. The use of the stable radical TEMPO to induce single-electron transfer to substituents bound to Group 2 centres coupled with sigma-bond metathesis allows a novel hydrogen release from silanes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource.
An Agilent 400-MR nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer and ancillary equipment were purchased, which are being used for molecular structure elucidation. The instrumentation is housed in a pre-existing facility designed specifically for its use. This instrument package is being used to expand the research and educational efforts of the faculty and students at SUNY-Geneseo and is made available to neighboring educational institutions and business concerns. Funds were also used for training of College personnel, maintenance of the instrumentation, and installation of the equipment.
Book
1 online resource.
Photonic and Electronic Properties of Fluoride Materials: Progress in Fluorine Science, the first volume in this new Elsevier series, provides an overview of the important optical, magnetic, and non-linear properties of fluoride materials. Beginning with a brief review of relevant synthesis methods from single crystals to nanopowders, this volume offers valuable insight for inorganic chemistry and materials science researchers. Edited and written by leaders in the field, this book explores the practical aspects of working with these materials, presenting a large number of examples from inorganic fluorides in which the type of bonding occurring between fluorine and transition metals (either d- or 4f-series) give rise to peculiar properties in many fundamental and applicative domains. This one-of-a-kind resource also includes several chapters covering functional organic fluorides used in nano-electronics, in particular in liquid crystal devices, in organic light-emitting diodes, or in organic dyes for sensitized solar cells. The book describes major advances and breakthroughs achieved by the use of fluoride materials in important domains such as superconductivity, luminescence, laser properties, multiferroism, transport properties, and more recently, in fluoro-perovskite for dye-sensitized solar cells and inorganic fluoride materials for NLO, and supports future development in these varied and key areas. The book is edited by Alain Tressaud, past chair and founder of the CNRS French Fluorine Network. Each book in the collection includes the work of highly-respected volume editors and contributors from both academia and industry to bring valuable and varied content to this active field.
Book
1 online resource (1 p. ) : digital, PDF file.
Recently, it has been predicted that topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) may exist in SnTe and Pb<sub>1-x</sub>Sn<sub>x</sub>Te thin films [1]. To date, most studies on TCIs were carried out either in bulk crystals or thin films, and no research activity has been explored in heterostructures. We present here the results on electronic transport properties of the 2D electron gas (2DEG) realized at the interfaces of PbTe/ CdTe (111) heterostructures. Evidence of topological state in this interfacial 2DEG was observed.
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. The Rare Earth Elements - a special group of metals - 2. The Ore Minerals and Major Ore Deposits of the Rare Earths 3. Physical and Chemical Properties of the Rare Earths 4. Mineral Processing and Extractive Metallurgy of the Rare Earths 5. Applications of the Rare Earths 6. Economic Aspects of the Rare Earths 7. Recycling of Rare Earths.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This book deals with the rare earth elements (REE), which are a series of 17 transition metals: scandium, yttrium and the lanthanide series of elements (lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, neodymium, promethium, samarium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, dysprosium, holmium, erbium, thulium, ytterbium and lutetium). They are relatively unknown to the wider public, despite their numerous applications and their critical role in many high-tech applications, such as high-temperature superconductors, phosphors (for energy-saving lamps, flat-screen monitors and flat-screen televisions), rechargeable batteries (household and automotive), very strong permanent magnets (used for instance in wind turbines and hard-disk drives), or even in a medical MRI application. This book describes the history of their discovery, the major REE ore minerals and the major ore deposits that are presently being exploited (or are planned to be exploited in the very near future), the physical and chemical properties of REEs, the mineral processing of REE concentrates and their extractive metallurgy, the applications of these elements, their economic aspects and the influential economical role of China, and finally the recycling of the REE, which is an emerging field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (12 p. ) : digital, PDF file.
In this memorandum, the chemical and radionuclide contaminant results from the Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2015 (CY15) sample of Tank 50H salt solution are presented in tabulated form. The Fourth Quarter CY15 Tank 50H samples were obtained on October 29, 2015 and received at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) on October 30, 2015. The information from this characterization will be used by Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) & Saltstone Facility Engineering for the transfer of aqueous waste from Tank 50H to the Salt Feed Tank in the Saltstone Production Facility, where the waste will be treated and disposed of in the Saltstone Disposal Facility. This memorandum compares results, where applicable, to Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits and targets. Data pertaining to the regulatory limits for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals will be documented at a later time per the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) for the Tank 50H saltstone task. The chemical and radionuclide contaminant results from the characterization of the Fourth Quarter Calendar Year 2015 (CY15) sampling of Tank 50H were requested by SRR personnel and details of the testing are presented in the SRNL Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan.
Book
1 online resource (17 p. ) : digital, PDF file.
Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the “microbatches” of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 7B have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, cations (Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy - ICPES), and anions (Ion Chromatography Anions - IC-A). The analytical results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from previous macrobatch samples. The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) continue to show more than adequate Pu and Sr removal, and there is a distinct positive trend in Cs removal (increasing cesium decontamination), due to the use of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The bulk chemistry of the DSSHT and SEHT samples do not show any signs of unusual behavior.
Book
1 online resource (XIII, 146 p. 73 ill., 55 illus. in color.) : online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • Literature review and research background.- Structural evolution of the thermally reduced graphene nanosheets during annealing.- Hierarchical amination of graphene for electrochemical energy storage.- Free standing graphene film with high conductivity by thermal reduction of self-assembled graphene oxide film.- Template-directed macroporous 'bubble' graphene film for the application in supercapacitors.- SnO2@graphene composite electrodes for the application in electrochemical energy storage.- Main conclusions and plan of further work.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
This PhD thesis presents the latest findings on the tunable surface chemistry of graphene/graphene oxide by systematically investigating the tuning of oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups using an innovative carbonization and ammonia treatment. In addition, novel macroscopic assemblies or hybrids of graphene were produced, laying the theoretical foundation for developing graphene-based energy storage devices. This work will be of interest to university researchers, R&D engineers and graduate students working with carbon materials, energy storage and nanotechnology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
1 online resource (32 p. ) : digital, PDF file.
Laboratory tests have been completed to test the validity of automated solubility measurement equipment using sodium nitrate and sodium chloride solutions (see test plan WRPS-1404441, “Validation Testing for Automated Solubility Measurement Equipment”). The sodium nitrate solution results were within 2-3% of the reference values, so the experiment is considered successful using the turbidity meter. The sodium chloride test was done by sight, as the turbidity meter did not work well using sodium chloride. For example, the “clear” turbidity reading was 53 FNU at 80 °C, 107 FNU at 55 °C, and 151 FNU at 20 °C. The sodium chloride did not work because it is granular and large; as the solution was stirred, the granules stayed to the outside of the reactor and just above the stir bar level, having little impact on the turbidity meter readings as the meter was aimed at the center of the solution. Also, the turbidity meter depth has an impact. The salt tends to remain near the stir bar level. If the meter is deeper in the slurry, it will read higher turbidity, and if the meter is raised higher in the slurry, it will read lower turbidity (possibly near zero) because it reads the “clear” part of the slurry. The sodium chloride solution results, as measured by sight rather than by turbidity instrument readings, were within 5-6% of the reference values.
Book
1 online resource.
Final Conference Program & Registration List
Book
1 online resource (3 p. ) : digital, PDF file.
This report summarizes the 8th International Conference on Supramolecular and Macrocyclic Chemistry (ISMSC-8). DOE funds were used to make it more affordable for students, post-docs and junior faculty to attend the conference by covering their registration costs. The conference was held in Crystal City, VA from July 7-11, 2013. See http://www.indiana.edu/~ismsc8/ for the conference website. ISMSC-8 encompassed the broad scope and interdisciplinary nature of the field. We met our goal to bring together leading scientists in molecular recognition and supramolecular chemistry. New research directions and collaborations resulted this conference. The DOE funding was crucial for us achieving our primary goal.
Book
1 online resource.
Because the current technologies for capturing CO<sub>2</sub> are still too energy intensive, new materials must be developed that can capture CO<sub>2</sub> reversibly with acceptable energy costs.
Book
1 online resource (32 p. ) : digital, PDF file.
Abstract not provided.
Book
1 online resource (p. 7810-7837 ) : digital, PDF file.
Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) thermochemistry for the sequential bond dissociations of methane, ethane, and methanol systems were obtained by analyzing and solving a very large thermochemical network (TN). Values for all possible C–H, C–C, C–O, and O–H bond dissociation enthalpies at 298.15 K (BDE<sub>298</sub>) and bond dissociation energies at 0 K (D<sub>0</sub>) are presented. The corresponding ATcT standard gas-phase enthalpies of formation of the resulting CH<sub>n</sub>, n = 4–0 species (methane, methyl, methylene, methylidyne, and carbon atom), C<sub>2</sub>H<sub>n</sub>, n = 6–0 species (ethane, ethyl, ethylene, ethylidene, vinyl, ethylidyne, acetylene, vinylidene, ethynyl, and ethynylene), and COH<sub>n</sub>, n = 4–0 species (methanol, hydroxymethyl, methoxy, formaldehyde, hydroxymethylene, formyl, isoformyl, and carbon monoxide) are also presented. The ATcT thermochemistry of carbon dioxide, water, hydroxyl, and carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen atoms is also included, together with the sequential BDEs of CO<sub>2</sub> and H<sub>2</sub>O. The provenances of the ATcT enthalpies of formation, which are quite distributed and involve a large number of relevant determinations, are analyzed by variance decomposition and discussed in terms of principal contributions. The underlying reasons for periodic appearances of remarkably low and/or unusually high BDEs, alternating along the dissociation sequences, are analyzed and quantitatively rationalized. The present ATcT results are the most accurate thermochemical values currently available for these species.
Book
1 online resource : illustrations
Book
1 online resource : illustrations
Advances in Mathematical Chemistry and Applications highlights the recent progress in the emerging discipline of discrete mathematical chemistry. Editors Subhash C. Basak, Guillermo Restrepo, and Jose Luis Villaveces have brought together 27 chapters written by 68 internationally renowned experts in these two volumes. Each volume comprises a wise integration of mathematical and chemical concepts and covers numerous applications in the field of drug discovery, bioinformatics, chemoinformatics, computational biology, mathematical proteomics, and ecotoxicology. Volume 2 explores deeper the topics introduced in Volume 1, with numerous additional topics such as topological approaches for classifying fullerene isomers; chemical reaction networks; discrimination of small molecules using topological molecular descriptors; GRANCH methods for the mathematical characterization of DNA, RNA and protein sequences; linear regression methods and Bayesian techniques; in silico toxicity prediction methods; drug design; integration of bioinformatics and systems biology, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics; metalloenzyme models; protein folding models; molecular periodicity; generalized topologies and their applications; and many more.
Book
1 online resource (15 p. ) : digital, PDF file.
No abstract provided

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