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Book
330 p. : col. ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Green building basics
  • The house as a system
  • Planning and design
  • Foundations
  • Framing
  • Roofs and attics
  • Windows and doors
  • Plumbing
  • Heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning
  • Electrical
  • Insulation
  • Siding and decking
  • Solar energy
  • Indoor air quality
  • Interior finishes
  • Landscaping
  • Afterword.
This is a thorough, informative and up-to-date reference on green, sustainable and energy-efficient home construction. Starting with clear explanations of the concepts and fundamentals of green, healthy and energy-efficient construction, this book walks readers through the entire construction process, injecting expert advice at every decision point. Construction techniques, materials and products are thoroughly explained and issues of site, landscaping, durability and energy-efficiency are discussed. It is an educational guide for homeowners and an invaluable manual for builders and architects.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781561589739 20160603
Engineering Library (Terman)
Book
xxii, 394 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
"The ASHRAE GreenGuide was developed primarily to provide guidance to designers of HVAC&R systems in how to participate effectively on design teams charged with producing green buildings"--Provided by publisher.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 416 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxiv, 520 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
This unique book gives the cost data and an understanding of what makes a building "green, " available financial incentives for building "green, " the cost of "green" products, and more. It includes information on many new products and materials, their primary "green" attributes, and installed cost.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780876296592 20160527
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (218 pages) : illustrations (some color), color map
Book
1 online resource ([4] p.) : col. ill.
Book
1 online resource (1 volume) : illustrations
Book
xi, 820 p. : ill.
  • Machine generated contents note: Basic Principles Foundation Water Management Doors and Windows Foundation/Floor Wall/Floor Roof/Top of Wall Window Sections Walls: Plan Views Advanced Framing and Air Sealing Remodeling Flashing/Window Installations Porches and Balconies Mechanicals.
Book
xi, 820 p. : ill.
  • Machine generated contents note: Basic Principles Foundation Water Management Doors and Windows Foundation/Floor Wall/Floor Roof/Top of Wall Window Sections Walls: Plan Views Advanced Framing and Air Sealing Remodeling Flashing/Window Installations Porches and Balconies Mechanicals.
Book
292 p. : col. ill. ; 30 cm.
This new May 2009 edition of the "Code for Sustainable Homes: Technical Guide" has been updated following industry feedback. It provides in-depth information to support the Government's Code for Sustainable Homes, the national environmental assessment method for rating and clarifying the performance of new homes. "The Technical Guide" is an essential reference for construction professionals wanting to understand the technical background to and process of achieving a Code rating for new build homes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781859463307 20160527
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xvi, 254 pages)
  • About the Authors xi Foreword xii Preface xiv Acknowledgement xvii Section 1 On contexts 1 1 Introduction 3 1.1 Why sustainability matters 3 1.2 Why asia matters 4 1.3 Why buildings matter 5 1.3.1 Root causes and solutions to the problem 6 1.3.2 Eco city principles 6 1.3.3 Liveable spaces 7 1.4 Dimensions of sustainable development 8 1.4.1 Policy support 8 1.4.2 Green market and consumption 9 1.4.3 Technology Push 10 1.5 Sustainability in practice 10 1.5.1 History of green building in Asia 11 1.5.2 Capacity building green professionals 11 1.5.3 Sustainable change for the green movement 15 1.6 Organisation of the book 15 2 Rapid urbanisation 16 2.1 Introduction 16 2.2 Asian urbanisation in context 16 2.3 Demographic changes 17 2.3.1 Global population trends 17 2.3.2 Urban population growth 18 2.3.3 The challenge of an ageing population 21 2.4 Economic changes 22 2.4.1 Growth in GDP 22 2.4.2 Increased income 22 2.4.3 Consuming society 24 2.5 Social changes 25 2.5.1 Housing needs 25 2.5.2 Employment needs 26 2.6 New growth model 26 2.6.1 Mega and compact cities 27 2.6.2 Green building markets 28 2.7 Summary 29 3 Urban environmental challenges 30 3.1 Introduction 30 3.2 Urban challenges in context 31 3.3 Climate change challenges 32 3.3.1 Vulnerability to extreme weather 32 3.3.2 Global warming 34 3.4 Urban environmental degradation 37 3.4.1 Air pollution 37 3.4.2 Energy depletion 38 3.4.3 Waste generation 42 3.4.4 Pandemic and epidemic diseases 42 3.5 Liveability degradation 43 3.5.1 Urban heat Island 43 3.5.2 Ecological footprint 44 3.6 Summary 45 4 Quest for solutions 46 4.1 Introduction 46 4.2 History of international collaborations and partnerships 47 4.3 C40 cities climate leadership group initiative 47 4.3.1 Key issues 49 4.3.2 Action plan on buildings 49 4.4 WEF partnership for future of urban development 50 4.5 Regional integration 52 4.6 Changes for solutions 53 4.6.1 Re think of sustainable development framework 53 4.6.2 Issues of policy 54 4.6.3 Issues of practices/design 55 4.6.4 Issues of people 55 4.7 Paradigm shift 56 Section 2 On policy 57 5 Policy framework 59 5.1 Introduction 59 5.2 Policy framework 60 5.3 Policy priorities 61 5.3.1 The moving target 61 5.3.2 Prioritisation of policy issues 63 5.3.3 The Asian way of change 71 5.4 Policy instruments 71 5.4.1 Regulations and standards The Stick 73 5.4.2 Economic instruments The Carrot and Stick 74 5.4.3 Voluntary schemes instrument 74 5.5 Institutional arrangements 76 5.5.1 Hierarchy who to lead 76 5.5.2 Government coordination and authority 78 5.5.3 Proposal for eco city implementation 79 5.6 Summary 80 6 Policy implementation 81 6.1 Introduction 81 6.2 General approach 81 6.3 Review of the regulations 83 6.3.1 Building energy regulations 84 6.3.2 Planning control for a better environment 86 6.4 Market solutions 87 6.4.1 Incentivising the market 87 6.5 Market based approach 90 6.5.1 Green building certification 90 6.5.2 Sustainability report and index 90 6.6 Public private partnership (PPP) 91 6.7 Collaboration with private sector 93 6.8 Capacity building 94 6.8.1 Demonstration projects and research and development 94 6.8.2 Education and training of green practitioners 95 6.9 Summary 96 Section 3 On design 97 7 Sustainability transformation 99 7.1 Introduction 99 7.2 Green transformation of building industry 100 7.2.1 Engaging stakeholders 100 7.2.2 Empowering the practitioners 102 7.3 Practice of building sustainability 103 7.3.1 Definition of sustainable building 103 7.3.2 Standardisation of practice 106 7.4 Sustainable building in action 107 7.4.1 Life cycle consideration 107 7.4.2 Design stage integrated design 110 7.4.3 Construction stage sustainable materials 113 7.4.4 Operation stage behavioural changes 120 7.5 Building information modelling 121 7.6 Summary 123 8 Engineering solutions 124 8.1 Introduction 124 8.2 Design provisions for sustainable building 125 8.3 Adaptation to climate change and resilient designs 125 8.3.1 Extreme wind engineering 125 8.3.2 Flood mitigation and prevention 128 8.3.3 Seismic design 129 8.3.4 Fire engineering 130 8.4 High performance buildings 130 8.4.1 Building physics analysis 132 8.4.2 Energy appraisal 133 8.4.3 Indoor environment 133 8.4.4 Outdoor environment 135 8.5 Design innovations 135 8.5.1 Outside building: High performance envelope 137 8.5.2 Inside building: Low energy and carbon designs 143 8.6 Summary 146 9 De-carbonisation 147 9.1 Introduction 147 9.2 Building energy performance 148 9.3 Low/zero carbon design 152 9.3.1 Definition of zero carbon 152 9.3.2 Design strategy 152 9.4 Renewable energy for urban developments and buildings 158 9.4.1 Solar energy 160 9.4.2 Wind energy 162 9.4.3 Bioenergy 162 9.4.4 Hydropower 163 9.4.5 Marine/ocean energy 164 9.4.6 Geothermal energy 164 9.5 District wide de carbonisation 166 9.5.1 Micro energy grid 167 9.5.2 District energy 169 9.6 Towards a low carbon and smart city 172 9.7 Summary 173 Section 4 On people 175 10 Space for people 177 10.1 Introduction 177 10.2 Urban context of Asia city 178 10.2.1 Liveability 178 10.2.2 A compact and vertical city 178 10.2.3 A sick building environment 180 10.3 The quest for a quality built environment 180 10.3.1 A novel planning framework for the environment 181 10.3.2 The urban climatic map 182 10.3.3 Air ventilation 183 10.3.4 Micro climate and landscape design integration 186 10.4 Reducing the urban heat Island 190 10.5 Street canyon effect roadside air pollution 192 10.6 Right of light 193 10.7 Health and well being 193 10.7.1 Natural ventilation 195 10.7.2 Daylight for habitation 196 10.7.3 Water quality 197 10.8 Summary 198 11 Community making 199 11.1 Introduction 199 11.2 Sustainable community 200 11.3 Community based design 202 11.3.1 Cultural aspect (social) 202 11.3.2 Placemaking (environment) 202 11.3.3 Sustainable housing (economics) 203 11.4 Neighbourhood assessment 207 11.4.1 History of overseas schemes 207 11.4.2 Definition of community/neighbourhood 207 11.4.3 Assessment aspects/categories 209 11.5 Development of BEAM plus neighbourhood in Hong Kong 212 11.5.1 Landscape and ecology in built environment 213 11.5.2 Stakeholder engagement 213 11.5.3 The establishment of BEAM plus neighbourhood 215 11.6 Summary 216 12 Low carbon living 217 12.1 Introduction 217 12.2 Carbon footprint of urban living 217 12.3 Behavioural changes 219 12.4 Changes in design culture 220 12.4.1 Task lighting 221 12.4.2 Thermal comfort 221 12.4.3 Natural ventilation 221 12.4.4 Green products 222 12.4.5 Smart metering 222 12.5 Eco education 222 12.6 Zero energy living experience 226 12.7 Community centre 228 12.8 Urban farming 230 12.9 Living LOHAS 231 12.10 Summary 234 Section 5 235 13 Conclusions 237 On context 237 On policy 238 On design and practice . 238 On people . 239 Way forward . 239 References 240 Index 000.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119277002 20170522
Building Sustainability in East Asia: Policy, Design and People illustrates the holistic approaches and individual strategies to building sustainability that have been implemented in construction projects in Asia. Top-down and bottom-up approaches (from formulating policy to constructing individual buildings) are effective in terms of the sustainable development of cities, and this book covers both, illustrated with a range of case study developments.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119277002 20170522
Book
xviii, 294 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Until recently, the development of building materials has focused on producing cheaper and more durable construction materials. Now more attention is given to the environmental issues. "Sustainability of Construction Materials" brings together a wealth of recent research on the subject. It provides a comprehensive and detailed analysis of the sustainability of these materials: aggregates, wood, bamboo, vegetable fibers, masonry, cement, concrete and cement replacement materials, metals and alloys, glass, and engineered wood products. Final chapters cover the use of recycled tire rubber in civil engineering works, the durability of sustainable materials, and nanotechnology in sustainable construction.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781439801307 20160527
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (602 pages) : illustrations (chiefly color)
  • Foreword xiii Preface xv Chapter 1 Introduction and Overview The Shifting Landscape for High-Performance Buildings Sustainable Development and Sustainable Construction The Vocabulary of Sustainable Development and Sustainable Construction Sustainable Design, Ecological Design, and Green Design Rationale for High-Performance Green Buildings State and Local Guidelines for High-Performance Construction Green Building Progress and Obstacles Book Organization Trends in High-Performance Green Building Summary and Conclusions Notes References Part I Green Building Foundations Chapter 2 Background Ethics and Sustainability Basic Concepts and Vocabulary Major Environmental and Resource Concerns The Green Building Movement Case Study: OWP 11, Stuttgart, Germany Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 3 Ecological Design Design versus Ecological Design Historical Perspective Contemporary Ecological Design Key Green Building Publications: Early 1990s Key Thinking about Ecological Design Evolving the Concept of Ecological Design Thermodynamics: Limits on Recycling and the Dissipation of Materials Case Study: Kroon Hall, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut Thought Piece: Regenerative Development and Design: Working with the Whole by Bill Reed Summary and Conclusions Notes References Part II Assessing High-Performance Green Buildings Chapter 4 Green Building Assessment Major Green Building Assessment Systems Used in the United States International Building Assessment Systems BREEAM CaseStudy: AHVLA Stores Building, Weybridge, United Kingdom Green Star Case Study Thought Piece: Shifting Emphasis in Green Building Performance Assessment by Raymond J. Cole Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 5 The US Green Building Council LEED Building Rating System Brief History of LEED Structure of the LEED Suite of Building Assessment Systems LEED Credentials LEED v4 Structure and Process LEED Categories152 Case Study: Research and Academic Center at Lake Nona, University of Florida, Orlando Summary and Conclusions Notes Chapter 6 The Green Globes Building Assessment System Green Globes Building Rating Tools Structure of Green Globes For New Construction Version 2 The Green Globes Assessment and Certification Process Green Globes Professional Credentials Case Study: Health Sciences Building, St. Johns River State College, St. Augustine, Florida Summary and Conclusions Note Part III Green Building Design Chapter 7 The Green Building Design Process Conventional versus Green Building Delivery Systems Executing the Green Building Project The Integrated Design Process Role of the Charrette in the Design Process Green Building Documentation Requirements Case Study: Theaterhaus, Stuttgart, Germany Summary and Conclusions Notes Chapter 8 The Sustainable Site and Landscape Land and Landscape Approaches for Green Buildings Land Use Issues Sustainable Landscapes Enhancing Ecosystems Stormwater Management Low-Impact Development Heat Island Mitigation Light Trespass and Pollution Reduction Assessment of Sustainable Sites: The Sustainable Sites Initiative Case Study: Iowa Utilities Board/Consumer Advocate Office Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 9 Energy Reduction Building Energy Issues High-Performance Building Energy Design Strategy Passive Design Strategy Building Envelope Internal Load Reduction Active Mechanical Systems Water-Heating Systems Electrical Power Systems Innovative Energy Optimization Strategies Renewable Energy Systems Fuel Cells Smart Buildings and Energy Management Systems Ozone-Depleting Chemicals in HVAC&R Systems Case Study: River Campus Building One, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland Thought Piece: Building Energy Analysis: The Present and Future by Ravi Srinivasan Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 10 Built Environment Hydrologic Cycle Global Water Resource Depletion Water Distribution and Shortages in the United States Hydrologic Cycle Terminology High-Performance Building Hydrologic Cycle Strategy Designing the High-Performance Building Hydrologic Cycle Water Budget Rules of Thumb (Heuristics) Sustainable Stormwater Management Landscaping Water Efficiency Case Study: LOTT Clean Water Alliance, Olympia, Washington Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 11 Closing Materials Loops The Challenge of Materials and Product Selection Distinguishing between Green Building Products and Green Building Materials LCA of Building Materials and Products Environmental Product Declarations Materials and Product Certification Systems Key and Emerging Construction Materials and Products Design for Deconstruction and Disassembly Case Study: Project XX Office Building, Delft, Netherlands Thought Piece: Closing Materials Loops by Bradley Guy Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 12 The Built Environment Carbon Footprint Human Impacts On The Biogeochemical Carbon Cycle Climate Change And The Carbon Cycle Mitigating Climate Change Defining The Carbon Footprint Of The Built Environment Reducing The Carbon Footprint Of The Built Environment Notes References Chapter 13 Indoor Environmental Quality Indoor Environmental Quality: The Issues Integrated IEQ Design Addressing the Main Components of Integrated IEQ Design HVAC Systems Design Emissions from Building Materials Particleboard And Plywood Economic Benefits of Good Indoor Environmental Quality Summary and Conclusions Notes References Part IV Green Building Implementation Chapter 14 Construction Operations and Commissioning Site Protection Planning Managing Indoor Air Quality during Construction Construction Materials Management Construction and Demolition Waste Management Commissioning Thought Piece: The Role of Commissioning in High-Performance Green Buildings by John Chyz Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 15 Green Building Economics General Approach The Business Case for High-Performance Green Buildings The Economics of Green Building Quantifying Green Building Benefits Managing First Costs Tunneling through the Cost Barrier Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 16 The Cutting Edge of Sustainable Construction Passive Survivability Cutting Edge: Case Studies Case Study: The Federal Building, San Francisco, California Articulating Performance Goals for Future Green Buildings The Challenges Revamping Ecological Design Today s Cutting Edge Case Study: Green Skyscrapers Thought Piece: Processes, Geometries, and Principles: Design in a Sustainable Future by Kim Sorvig Summary and Conclusions Notes References Appendix A Quick Reference for LEED 3.0 Appendix B The Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES ) Guidelines and Performance Benchmarks 2009 Appendix C Unit Conversions Abbreviations and Acronyms Glossary Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119055174 20180129
The leading green building reference, updated with the latest advances in the field Sustainable Construction is the leading reference for the design, construction, and operation of high performance green buildings. With broad coverage including architecture, engineering, and construction, this book nevertheless delivers detailed information on all aspects of the green building process, from materials selection to building systems and more. This new fourth edition has been updated to reflect the latest codes and standards, including LEED v4, and includes new coverage of carbon accounting. The discussion has been updated to align with the current thinking on economics, climate change, net zero buildings, and more, with contributions by leaders in the field that illustrate the most recent shifts in thinking and practice. Ancillary materials including an instructor's manual and PowerPoint presentations for each chapter help bring this clear and up-to-date information into the classroom, making this book a valuable reference for working construction professionals. Also, Interactive graphics found throughout the course help activate the content and highlight key concepts for students. Sustainable construction has gone mainstream, and will one day be the industry norm. This book provides a comprehensive reference to all aspects of a project to show you how green building concepts and principles apply throughout the design and construction process. * Get up to date on the latest green building codes and standards * Learn about the newest technology in green building materials * Adopt the best practices in procurement and delivery systems * Apply sustainability concepts to all aspects of construction and design Green buildings operate at a very high level of efficiency, which is made possible only by careful consideration every step of the way. Appropriate land use, landscaping, construction materials, siting, water use, and more all play a role in a structure's ultimate carbon footprint. Sustainable Construction provides clear guidance for all aspects of green building, including the most recent advances and the latest technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119055174 20180129
Book
1 online resource (602 pages) : illustrations (chiefly color)
  • Foreword xiii Preface xv Chapter 1 Introduction and Overview The Shifting Landscape for High-Performance Buildings Sustainable Development and Sustainable Construction The Vocabulary of Sustainable Development and Sustainable Construction Sustainable Design, Ecological Design, and Green Design Rationale for High-Performance Green Buildings State and Local Guidelines for High-Performance Construction Green Building Progress and Obstacles Book Organization Trends in High-Performance Green Building Summary and Conclusions Notes References Part I Green Building Foundations Chapter 2 Background Ethics and Sustainability Basic Concepts and Vocabulary Major Environmental and Resource Concerns The Green Building Movement Case Study: OWP 11, Stuttgart, Germany Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 3 Ecological Design Design versus Ecological Design Historical Perspective Contemporary Ecological Design Key Green Building Publications: Early 1990s Key Thinking about Ecological Design Evolving the Concept of Ecological Design Thermodynamics: Limits on Recycling and the Dissipation of Materials Case Study: Kroon Hall, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut Thought Piece: Regenerative Development and Design: Working with the Whole by Bill Reed Summary and Conclusions Notes References Part II Assessing High-Performance Green Buildings Chapter 4 Green Building Assessment Major Green Building Assessment Systems Used in the United States International Building Assessment Systems BREEAM CaseStudy: AHVLA Stores Building, Weybridge, United Kingdom Green Star Case Study Thought Piece: Shifting Emphasis in Green Building Performance Assessment by Raymond J. Cole Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 5 The US Green Building Council LEED Building Rating System Brief History of LEED Structure of the LEED Suite of Building Assessment Systems LEED Credentials LEED v4 Structure and Process LEED Categories152 Case Study: Research and Academic Center at Lake Nona, University of Florida, Orlando Summary and Conclusions Notes Chapter 6 The Green Globes Building Assessment System Green Globes Building Rating Tools Structure of Green Globes For New Construction Version 2 The Green Globes Assessment and Certification Process Green Globes Professional Credentials Case Study: Health Sciences Building, St. Johns River State College, St. Augustine, Florida Summary and Conclusions Note Part III Green Building Design Chapter 7 The Green Building Design Process Conventional versus Green Building Delivery Systems Executing the Green Building Project The Integrated Design Process Role of the Charrette in the Design Process Green Building Documentation Requirements Case Study: Theaterhaus, Stuttgart, Germany Summary and Conclusions Notes Chapter 8 The Sustainable Site and Landscape Land and Landscape Approaches for Green Buildings Land Use Issues Sustainable Landscapes Enhancing Ecosystems Stormwater Management Low-Impact Development Heat Island Mitigation Light Trespass and Pollution Reduction Assessment of Sustainable Sites: The Sustainable Sites Initiative Case Study: Iowa Utilities Board/Consumer Advocate Office Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 9 Energy Reduction Building Energy Issues High-Performance Building Energy Design Strategy Passive Design Strategy Building Envelope Internal Load Reduction Active Mechanical Systems Water-Heating Systems Electrical Power Systems Innovative Energy Optimization Strategies Renewable Energy Systems Fuel Cells Smart Buildings and Energy Management Systems Ozone-Depleting Chemicals in HVAC&R Systems Case Study: River Campus Building One, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland Thought Piece: Building Energy Analysis: The Present and Future by Ravi Srinivasan Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 10 Built Environment Hydrologic Cycle Global Water Resource Depletion Water Distribution and Shortages in the United States Hydrologic Cycle Terminology High-Performance Building Hydrologic Cycle Strategy Designing the High-Performance Building Hydrologic Cycle Water Budget Rules of Thumb (Heuristics) Sustainable Stormwater Management Landscaping Water Efficiency Case Study: LOTT Clean Water Alliance, Olympia, Washington Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 11 Closing Materials Loops The Challenge of Materials and Product Selection Distinguishing between Green Building Products and Green Building Materials LCA of Building Materials and Products Environmental Product Declarations Materials and Product Certification Systems Key and Emerging Construction Materials and Products Design for Deconstruction and Disassembly Case Study: Project XX Office Building, Delft, Netherlands Thought Piece: Closing Materials Loops by Bradley Guy Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 12 The Built Environment Carbon Footprint Human Impacts On The Biogeochemical Carbon Cycle Climate Change And The Carbon Cycle Mitigating Climate Change Defining The Carbon Footprint Of The Built Environment Reducing The Carbon Footprint Of The Built Environment Notes References Chapter 13 Indoor Environmental Quality Indoor Environmental Quality: The Issues Integrated IEQ Design Addressing the Main Components of Integrated IEQ Design HVAC Systems Design Emissions from Building Materials Particleboard And Plywood Economic Benefits of Good Indoor Environmental Quality Summary and Conclusions Notes References Part IV Green Building Implementation Chapter 14 Construction Operations and Commissioning Site Protection Planning Managing Indoor Air Quality during Construction Construction Materials Management Construction and Demolition Waste Management Commissioning Thought Piece: The Role of Commissioning in High-Performance Green Buildings by John Chyz Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 15 Green Building Economics General Approach The Business Case for High-Performance Green Buildings The Economics of Green Building Quantifying Green Building Benefits Managing First Costs Tunneling through the Cost Barrier Summary and Conclusions Notes References Chapter 16 The Cutting Edge of Sustainable Construction Passive Survivability Cutting Edge: Case Studies Case Study: The Federal Building, San Francisco, California Articulating Performance Goals for Future Green Buildings The Challenges Revamping Ecological Design Today s Cutting Edge Case Study: Green Skyscrapers Thought Piece: Processes, Geometries, and Principles: Design in a Sustainable Future by Kim Sorvig Summary and Conclusions Notes References Appendix A Quick Reference for LEED 3.0 Appendix B The Sustainable Sites Initiative (SITES ) Guidelines and Performance Benchmarks 2009 Appendix C Unit Conversions Abbreviations and Acronyms Glossary Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119055174 20180611
The leading green building reference, updated with the latest advances in the field Sustainable Construction is the leading reference for the design, construction, and operation of high performance green buildings. With broad coverage including architecture, engineering, and construction, this book nevertheless delivers detailed information on all aspects of the green building process, from materials selection to building systems and more. This new fourth edition has been updated to reflect the latest codes and standards, including LEED v4, and includes new coverage of carbon accounting. The discussion has been updated to align with the current thinking on economics, climate change, net zero buildings, and more, with contributions by leaders in the field that illustrate the most recent shifts in thinking and practice. Ancillary materials including an instructor's manual and PowerPoint presentations for each chapter help bring this clear and up-to-date information into the classroom, making this book a valuable reference for working construction professionals. Also, Interactive graphics found throughout the course help activate the content and highlight key concepts for students. Sustainable construction has gone mainstream, and will one day be the industry norm. This book provides a comprehensive reference to all aspects of a project to show you how green building concepts and principles apply throughout the design and construction process. * Get up to date on the latest green building codes and standards * Learn about the newest technology in green building materials * Adopt the best practices in procurement and delivery systems * Apply sustainability concepts to all aspects of construction and design Green buildings operate at a very high level of efficiency, which is made possible only by careful consideration every step of the way. Appropriate land use, landscaping, construction materials, siting, water use, and more all play a role in a structure's ultimate carbon footprint. Sustainable Construction provides clear guidance for all aspects of green building, including the most recent advances and the latest technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119055174 20180611
Book
1 online resource : illustrations.
Book
1 online resource
  • Preface viii About the author ix Acknowledgments x 1 Introduction to sustainable construction 1 1.1 Why a book focused on sustainable construction? 1 1.2 Why construct sustainably? 2 1.3 How can we define sustainability? 2 1.4 The environmental importance of design, construction, and care of buildings 19 1.5 Where next? 19 References 19 2 Procurement and sustainability 22 2.1 Procurement and construction 22 2.2 Drivers for and concepts behind sustainable procurement 23 2.3 BREEAM 2011 and sustainable procurement 30 2.4 Organisational values, risk, and stakeholder goodwill 31 2.5 Contracts and sustainable construction 38 2.6 The RIBA plan of work 39 2.7 The sustainable procurement of materials and equipment 40 2.8 Summary 42 References 42 3 Energy, water, refurbishment, and sustainable building design 45 3.1 Design related sustainability 45 3.2 Sustainable design 46 3.3 Energy and design: Building fabric 48 3.4 Energy and design: Renewable energy and sustainable technologies 78 3.5 Water 96 3.6 Design for sustainable refurbishment 102 3.7 Summary 105 References 106 4 Materials and sustainable building design 110 4.1 Materials and design 110 4.2 Responsible sourcing of materials 111 4.3 Life cycle assessment 112 4.4 Whole life carbon (embodied energy and embodied carbon) 114 4.5 Materials and recycle/reuse 129 4.6 Sustainable construction materials 132 4.7 Summary/what next? 140 References 140 5 Construction related sustainability 143 5.1 Sustainable construction 143 5.2 Site operations and organisation 145 5.3 Materials 167 5.4 Summary 183 References 183 6 Assessment and performance evaluation of buildings and construction processes 188 6.1 Building assessment 188 6.2 Introduction and rationale for the assessment of current and future building performance 188 6.3 Categories of sustainability and building assessment systems 189 6.4 Building and project specific tools 201 6.5 Post-occupancy assessments 216 6.6 Commissioning and technical assessment 223 6.7 Building simulation 238 6.8 Summary 244 References 244 7 Behaviour, sustainable construction, and the performance gap 249 7.1 People, sustainable construction, and buildings 249 7.2 The building performance gap 249 7.3 occupant behaviour: the performance gap 251 7.4 Modelling using occupant behaviour 257 7.5 Behaviour in the design process 257 7.6 Behaviour and sourcing materials 260 7.7 Sustainability and the business of construction 261 7.8 Commissioning 263 7.9 Facilities management 264 7.10 Summary 266 References 266 8 The practicalities of building with sustainable technologies 270 8.1 Building with sustainable technologies and innovations 270 8.2 General operational issues 275 8.3 Solar systems and technologies 278 8.4 Wind generation 287 8.5 Biomass 290 8.6 Ground/water/air source heat pumps 293 8.7 Micro CHP 298 8.8 Control systems and smart home energy management 299 8.9 Overheating and controlled ventilation systems 300 8.10 Rainwater and greywater collection systems 301 8.11 Summary 307 References 308 9 Future of sustainable construction 313 9.1 Future directions and policies 313 9.2 Future technologies 321 9.3 Future energy 324 9.4 Future materials 327 9.5 Future construction practices 329 9.6 Future norms and expectations 331 9.7 Chapter summary 332 References 333 Index 336.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405187596 20170403
This book explores the concepts and practicalities that lead to sustainable construction. It breaks new ground by providing the reader with the underlying principles of how to build sustainably and then assesses many of the tools required for the task. From energy to materials and from procurement to operation, all aspects play their part in turning a theoretically sustainable building project into a reality. There are many guidelines for the designer on how to maximise the sustainability of buildings but this resource text supplements these by focusing on the construction and operational aspects of sustainable buildings, as well as some of the more fundamental design-related considerations. Offers an excellent text for those learning to construct, design and operate sustainable buildings. Covers the drivers for sustainable construction, definitions, historical impacts, climate change and global, regional and individual responses. enables the construction professional to achieve optimum solutions, both in design, process and the aftercare of buildings. evaluates the effectiveness of different renewable technologies and provides guidance on the practicalities of their use. Alerts the reader to future trends in this field.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405187596 20170403

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