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Book
1 online resource (viii, 295 p.) : ill.
  • Chapter 1. Media Commentary and the Space of Opinion -- Chapter 2. A History of Opinion in the U.S. Media -- Chapter 3. Media and Opinion Formation: Toward a New Theory of Deliberative Politics -- Chapter 4. Who Speaks in the Space of Opinion? -- Chapter 5. Formats and Norms in the U.S. Space of Opinion -- Chapter 6. Rhetorics in the Space of Contemporary U.S. Opinion -- Chapter 7. The Enron Scandal -- Chapter 8. The War on Terror -- Chapter 9. The Future of Opinion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199797929 20160614
While the newspaper op-ed page, the Sunday morning political talk shows on television, and the evening cable-news television lineup have an obvious and growing influence in American politics and political communication, social scientists and media scholars tend to be broadly critical of the rise of organized punditry during the 20th century without ever providing a close empirical analysis. What is the nature of the contemporary space of opinion? How has it developed historically? What kinds of people speak in this space? What styles of writing and speech do they use? What types of authority and expertise do they draw on? And what impact do their commentaries have on public debate? To describe and analyze this complex space of news media, Ronald Jacobs and Eleanor Townsley rely on enormous samples of opinion collected from newspapers and television shows during the first years of the last two Presidential administrations. They also employ biographical data on authors of opinion to connect specific argument styles to specific types of authors, and examine the distribution of authors and argument types across different formats. The result is a close mapping that reveals a massive expansion and differentiation of the opinion space. It tells a complex story of shifting intersections between journalism, politics, the academy, and the new sector of think tanks. It also reveals a proliferation of genres and forms of opinion; not only have the people who speak within the space of opinion become more diverse over time, but the formats of opinion-claims to authority, styles of speech, and modes of addressing publics-have also become more varied. Though Jacobs and Townsley find many changes, they also find continuities. Despite public anxieties, the project of objective journalism is alive and well, thriving in the older, more traditional formats, and if anything, the proliferation of newer formats has resulted in an intensified commitment (by some) to core journalistic values as clear points of difference that offer competing logics of distinction and professional justification. But the current moment does represent a real challenge as more and different shows compete to narrate politics in the most compelling, authoritative, and influential manner. By providing the first systematic study of media opinion and news commentary, The Space of Opinion will fill an important gap on research about media, politics, and the civil society and will attract readers in a number of disciplines, including sociology, communication, media studies, and political science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199797929 20160614
Book
viii, 295 p. : ill ; 24 cm.
  • Chapter 1. Media Commentary and the Space of Opinion -- Chapter 2. A History of Opinion in the U.S. Media -- Chapter 3. Media and Opinion Formation: Toward a New Theory of Deliberative Politics -- Chapter 4. Who Speaks in the Space of Opinion? -- Chapter 5. Formats and Norms in the U.S. Space of Opinion -- Chapter 6. Rhetorics in the Space of Contemporary U.S. Opinion -- Chapter 7. The Enron Scandal -- Chapter 8. The War on Terror -- Chapter 9. The Future of Opinion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199797936 20160614
While the newspaper op-ed page, the Sunday morning political talk shows on television, and the evening cable-news television lineup have an obvious and growing influence in American politics and political communication, social scientists and media scholars tend to be broadly critical of the rise of organized punditry during the 20th century without ever providing a close empirical analysis. What is the nature of the contemporary space of opinion? How has it developed historically? What kinds of people speak in this space? What styles of writing and speech do they use? What types of authority and expertise do they draw on? And what impact do their commentaries have on public debate? To describe and analyze this complex space of news media, Ronald Jacobs and Eleanor Townsley rely on enormous samples of opinion collected from newspapers and television shows during the first years of the last two Presidential administrations. They also employ biographical data on authors of opinion to connect specific argument styles to specific types of authors, and examine the distribution of authors and argument types across different formats. The result is a close mapping that reveals a massive expansion and differentiation of the opinion space. It tells a complex story of shifting intersections between journalism, politics, the academy, and the new sector of think tanks. It also reveals a proliferation of genres and forms of opinion; not only have the people who speak within the space of opinion become more diverse over time, but the formats of opinion-claims to authority, styles of speech, and modes of addressing publics-have also become more varied. Though Jacobs and Townsley find many changes, they also find continuities. Despite public anxieties, the project of objective journalism is alive and well, thriving in the older, more traditional formats, and if anything, the proliferation of newer formats has resulted in an intensified commitment (by some) to core journalistic values as clear points of difference that offer competing logics of distinction and professional justification. But the current moment does represent a real challenge as more and different shows compete to narrate politics in the most compelling, authoritative, and influential manner. By providing the first systematic study of media opinion and news commentary, The Space of Opinion will fill an important gap on research about media, politics, and the civil society and will attract readers in a number of disciplines, including sociology, communication, media studies, and political science.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199797936 20160614
Business Library
Book
x, 180 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Changing Images of the Soviet Union and the United States - Yassen N Zassoursky Images of America - Ellen Mickiewicz The Image of Russians in American Media and the 'New Epoch' - George Gerbner Soviet-American Television - Svetlana G Kolesnik The Crucial Years Images of the Soviet Union in the United States - Everette E Dennis Some Impressions and an Agenda for Research Images of Self and Others in American Television Coverage of the Reagan-Gorbachev Summits - Daniel C Hallin The Image of the United States in the Soviet Mass Media - Larissa Fedotova The Results of Sociological Surveys Images of the Soviet Union in American Newspapers - Won Ho Chang A Content Analysis of Three Newspapers Mass Media - Elena Androunas Stereotypes and Structure Enemy Turned Partner - Andrei G Richter A Content Analysis of Newsweek and Novoye Vremya Enemy, Friend or Competitor? A Content Analysis of the - Marius Aleksas Lukosiunas Christian Science Monitor and Izvestia The Image of the Soviet Union in Chinese Mass Media - Xu Yaokui The Image of the United States in Present-Day China - Liu Liqun The End of the Cold War and the Opportunities for Journalism - Donna Eberwine, Robert Karl Manoff and R Michael Schiffer The End of the Cold War - Yassen N Zassoursky Views from Leading Soviet International Commentators.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803939011 20160528
Beyond the Cold War represents the first-ever attempt by media scholars and journalists to dissect the Cold War by examining mutual media images in the United States and the former Soviet Union. The result of a bilateral conference in Moscow in 1989, this volume offers an original journalistic assessment of the Cold War and its aftermath as a communications phenomenon. Discussions include the past and present state of Cold War rhetoric, the portrayal of Russians and Americans on television in the two countries, and images of self and other as portrayed by the two media.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803939011 20160528
Green Library
Database topics
Statistical and Numeric Data; Sociology; Communication and Journalism; Government Information: International and Foreign
A database of polls taken on a variety of subjects all over the world. Each record in the database consists of one poll question and the participants' responses. Records are indexed by subject matter, publication year, general and specific location, and survey method. Other information provided includes: source name and contact information, sample size, and notes on the sample population.
poll.orspub.com Searchable database
Book
xiii, 213 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: White trash as social difference : groups, boundaries, and inequalities
  • Lubbers, crackers, and poor white trash : borders and boundaries in the colonies and the early republic
  • Imagining poor whites in the antebellum South : abolitionist and pro-slavery fictions
  • "Three generations of imbeciles are enough" : American eugenics and poor white trash
  • "The disease of laziness" : crackers, poor whites, and hookworm crusaders in the new South
  • Limning the boundaries of whiteness.
'White trash'. The phrase conjures up images of dirty rural folk who are poor, ignorant, violent, and incestuous. But where did this stigmatizing phrase come from? And why do these stereotypes persist? Matt Wray answers these and other questions by delving into the long history behind this term of abuse and others like it. Ranging from the early 1700s to the early 1900s, "Not Quite White" documents the origins and transformations of the multiple meanings projected on to poor rural whites in the United States. Wray draws on a wide variety of primary sources - literary texts, folklore, diaries and journals, medical and scientific articles, social scientific analysis - to construct a dense archive of changing collective representations of poor whites.Of crucial importance are the ideas about poor whites that circulated through early-twentieth-century public health campaigns, such as hookworm eradication and eugenic reforms.In these crusades, impoverished whites, particularly but not exclusively in the American South, were targeted for interventions by sanitarians who viewed them as 'filthy, lazy crackers' in need of racial uplift and by eugenicists who viewed them as a 'feeble minded menace' to the white race, threats that needed to be confined and involuntarily sterilized. Part historical inquiry and part sociological investigation, "Not Quite White" demonstrates the power of social categories and boundaries to shape social relationships and institutions, to invent groups where none exist, and to influence policies and legislation that end up harming the very people they aim to help. It illuminates not only the cultural significance and consequences of poor white stereotypes but also how dominant whites exploited and expanded these stereotypes to bolster and defend their own fragile claims to whiteness.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780822338826 20160528
Green Library
Book
3 v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Volume One: Race, Ethnicity and Culture in Modern Japan Section One: Ideologies of Race, Culture and Ethnicity 1. Kevin M. Doak, Ethnic Nationalism and romanticism in early twentieth century Japan, Journal of Japanese Studies, 22, no.1, Winter 1996, pp. 77-103. 2. John Dower, 'The Pure Self' in War Without Mercy: Race and Power in the Pacific War, (New York: Pantheon Books, 1986), pp. 203-233. 3. Takashi Fujitani, Inventing, Forgetting, Remembering in Splendid Monarchy: Power and Pageantry in Modern Japan, (New York and London: University of California Press, 1996), pp. 1-28 4. David L. Howell, Ethnicity and Culture in Contemporary Japan, Journal of Contemporary History, No. 31, 1996, pp. 171-190. 5. Mark J. Hudson, Tales Told in a Dream in Ruins of Identity: ethnogenesis in the Japanese Islands, (Hawaii: U. Hawaii Press, 1999), pp. 23-55. 6. John Lie, Pop Multiethnicity in Multi-Ethnic Japan, (Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press, 2001), pp. 53-82. 7. Tessa Morris-Suzuki, The Invention and Reinvention of Japanese Culture, The Journal of Asian Studies, 54.3 (August 1995), pp. 759-780. 8. Weiner Michael, The Discourse of Race and Nation in pre-1945 Japan, Ethnic and Racial Studies, 1995, Vol. 18, No. 3, July, pp. 433-456. 9. Kosaku Yoshino, The nihonjinron: thinking elites ideas of Japanese uniqueness in Cultural Nationalism in Contemporary Japan-- a sociological enquiry, (London: Routledge, 1992), pp. 9-38. Section Two: Former Natives: AINU 10. John Cornell, Ainu Assimilation and Cultural Extinction, Ethnology, 3, 1964, pp. 287-304. 11. Lisa Hiwasaki, Ethnic Tourism in Hokkaido and the Shaping of Ainu Identity, Pacific Affairs, Fall 2000, Vol. 73, Issue 3, pp. 393-413. 12. David Howell, Ainu Ethnicity and the Boundaries of the Early Japanese State Past and Present, February 1994, No. 142, pp. 69-93. 13. Richard Siddle, With shining eyes: Ainu protest and resistance, 1869-1945, in Race, Resistance and the Ainu of Japan, (London and New York: Routledge, 1996), pp. 113-146. 14. Georgina Stevens, The Ainu and Human Rights: Domestic and International Legal Protections, Japanese Studies, Sept. 2001, Vol.21, Issue 2, 181-198 15. Brett L. Walker Epidemic Disease, Medicine, and the Shifting Ecology of Ezo in The Conquest of the Ainu Lands: Ecology and Culture in Japanese Expansion, 1590-1800, (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2001), pp. 177-203. Volume II: Indigenous and Colonial Others Section one: Burakumin 16. George De Vos and Hiroshi Wagatsuma, Group Solidarity and Individual Mobility, in George De Vos and Hiroshi Wagatsuma (eds.) Japan's Invisible Race: Caste in Culture and Society, (Berkeley: Universi.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415208543 20160528
Drawing on the full range of materials published during the twentieth century, this three volume set incorporates previously published material concerning the formation of 'racial' identities in Japan, and social exclusion as experienced by the Ainu, Burakumin, Okinawans, and Chinese and Korean residents. It also includes material related to migration, both pre- and postwar, with special reference to the formation of Nikkeijin (Latin American national of Japanese descent) communities. In addition to those populations conventionally defined as minorities, 'racial' discourse also affects Japanese attitudes toward and perceptions of other groups (e.g. Asians, Blacks, Jews). To ensure both the fullest possible coverage of the related literature and to provide a framework for comparative analysis, this set also incorporates analyses of Japanese attitudes toward these groups. Intended as a resource for both students and specialist researchers, this collection provides a unique introduction of the English language literature related to 'race', migration, and identity in Japan. In addition to textual material related to specific issues or groups, the set provides comprehensive bibliographies and a listing of relevant Internet sources. There is also a new introduction and thorough index, making this set an invaluable reference tool.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415208543 20160528
Green Library
Book
xiv, 317 p. : ill ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction Adam Berinsky Part 1: The Meaning and Measurement of Public Opinion Chapter One: The History and Meaning of Public Opinion Susan Herbst Chapter Two: The Practice of Survey Research: Changes and Challenges D. Sunshine Hillygus Chapter Three: Two-thirds full? Citizen Competence and Democratic Governance Martin Gilens Part 2: Foundations of Political Preferences Chapter Four: Ideology and Public Opinion Christopher M. Federico Chapter Five: Partisanship and Polarization Marc Hetherington Chapter Six: Race and the Group Bases of Public Opinion Jane Junn, Tali Mendelberg and Erica Czaja Chapter Seven: Categorical Politics: Gender, Race, and Public Opinion Nancy Burns and Donald Kinder Chapter Eight: A Jump to the Right, A Step to the Left: Religion and Public Opinion David E. Campbell, Geoffrey C. Layman and John C. Green Chapter Nine: The Emotional Foundations of Democratic Citizenship Ted Brader Chapter Ten: Personality and Public Opinion Jeffery J. Mondak and Matthew V. Hibbing Part 3: The Public and Society Chapter Eleven: Campaigns and Elections John Sides and Jake Haselswerdt Chapter Twelve: Media and Politics Matthew Baum Chapter Thirteen: Public Opinion and Public Policy Andrea Louise Campbell Conclusion: Assessing Continuity and Change David O. Sears.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415885294 20160607
The field of public opinion is one of the most diverse in political science. Over the last 60 years, scholars have drawn upon the disciplines of psychology, economics, sociology, and even biology to learn how ordinary people come to understand the complicated business of politics. But much of the path breaking research in the field of public opinion is published in journals, taking up fairly narrow questions one at a time and often requiring advanced statistical knowledge to understand these findings. As a result, the study of public opinion can seem confusing and incoherent to undergraduates. To engage undergraduate students in this area, a new type of textbook is required. New Directions in Public Opinion brings together leading scholars to provide an accessible and coherent overview of the current state of the field of public opinion. Each chapter provides a general overview of topics that are at the cutting edge of study as well as well-established cornerstones of the field. Suitable for use as a main textbook or in tandem with a lengthier survey, it comprehensively covers the topics of public opinion research and pushes students further to explore critical topics in contemporary politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415885294 20160607
Green Library

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