Book
xiii, 275 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction: Memory, Trauma and World Politics-- D.S.A.Bell We Could Remember it for you Wholesale: Myths, Monuments and the Constitution of National Memories-- J.Bartelson Notes on the Memory Boom: War, Remembrance, and the Uses of the Past-- J.Winter From Theodicy to Ressentiment: Trauma and the Ages of Compensation-- J.K.Olick & C.Demetriou Remembering Relationality: Trauma Time and Politics-- J.Edkins Bewitched by the Past: Social Memory, Trauma and International Relations-- K.M.Fierke Mourning, Melancholia and Violence-- L.Ray Trauma Culture: Remembering and Forgetting in the New South Africa-- L.Meskell Memorials to Injustice-- S.Feuchtwang Remembering and Forgetting the Korean War: From Trauma to Reconciliation-- R.Bleiker & Y.J.Hoang Remembering to Forget/Forgetting to Remember-- M.Zehfuss.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780230006560 20160528
Perceptions of the past play a vital role in shaping the contemporary world. Memory, Trauma and World Politics brings together leading scholars from across the social sciences to investigate the varied and complex ways in which social memories of traumatic events, including war, genocide and political oppression, inform and construct individual and collective identities. Drawing on diverse theoretical perspectives, they analyse issues including the possibilities for post-conflict reconciliation on the Korean peninsula, Taiwan, and the former Yugoslavia, the function of memory and forgetting in the evolution of the modern state, the relationship between trauma and ressentiment, the role of the Holocaust in shaping both German and Israeli political culture, of apartheid in current South African politics, and of 9/11 in the new world order. Theoretically innovative and thematically wide-ranging, Memory, Trauma and World Politics addresses some of the most pressing issues facing analysts of world politics today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780230006560 20160528
Green Library
Book
x, 302 pages ; 24 cm
  • Preface to the English Language Edition Introduction Part I: Theoretical Foundations 1. From Individual to Collective Constructions of the Past 2. Basic Concepts and Themes of Individual and Collective Memory Part II: Analyses and Case Studies 3. How True are Memories? 4. False Memories: Pathologies of Identity at the End of the Twentieth Century 5. Incorrect Memories: On the Normative Power of Social Frameworks of Memory 6. Five Strategies of Represssion 7. German Narratives of Victimhood 8. Points of Intersection Between Lived Memory and Cultural Memory 9. Lieux de Memoire in Time and Space 10. The Future of Holocaust Memory 11. Europe as a Memory Community Conclusion: Shadows of Trauma Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780823267286 20160619
We have left the twentieth century, but this century of violence and extremes has not left us: Its shadow has become longer and blacker. Seventy years after the end of the Second World War, the memory of the Holocaust is less and less anchored in the lived experience of survivors and witnesses. Shadows of Trauma analyzes the transformation of the past from an individual experience to a collective construction, with special attention to the tensions that arise when personal experience collides with official commemoration. In addition to surveying memory's important terms and distinctions, Assmann traces the process that emerged after the fall of the Berlin Wall, of creating a new German memory of the Holocaust. Assmann revisits the pitfalls of "false memory" and lingering forms of denial and repression, as well as the new twenty-first-century discourses, such as that of German "victimhood, " as well as the new memory sites for a future in which German memory will be increasingly oriented toward a European context. Combining theoretical analysis with historical case studies, the book revisits crucial debates and controversial issues out of which "memory culture" has emerged as a collective project and a work in progress.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780823267286 20160619
Green Library
Book
xii, 362 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • The Secret Speech
  • From thaw to freeze: party history and Soviet literature, 1956-57
  • Forgetting within limits: censorship and preservation of the Stalin cult
  • Trauma and redemption: narratives of 1937 in Soviet culture
  • Between myth and memory: war, terror, and Stalin in popular memory
  • The "cult of personality" in the early Brezhnev era
  • Conclusion.
Drawing on newly available materials from the Soviet archives, Polly Jones offers an innovative, comprehensive account of de-Stalinization in the Soviet Union during the Khrushchev and early Brezhnev eras. Jones traces the authorities' initiation and management of the de-Stalinization process and explores a wide range of popular reactions to the new narratives of Stalinism in party statements and in Soviet literature and historiography. Engaging with the dynamic field of memory studies, this book represents the first sustained comparison of this process with other countries' attempts to rethink their own difficult pasts, and with later Soviet and post-Soviet approaches to Stalinism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300185126 20160612
Green Library
Book
xiv, 318 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Trauma and memory : between individual and collective experiences / Austin Sarat, Nadav Davidovitch, Michal Alberstein
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder of the virtual kind : trauma and resilience in post-9/11 America / Allan Young
  • Female trauma / Ariella Azoulay
  • The trauma of al-Nakba : collective memory and the rise of Palestinian national identity / Issam Nassar
  • Trauma image : the elephant experience / Roei Amit
  • Trauma and justice : the moral grammar of trauma discourse from Wilhelmine Germany to post-apartheid South Africa / José Brunner
  • Public health, law, and traumatic collective experiences : the case of mass ringworm irradiations / Nadav Davidovitch and Avital Margalit
  • "Illegality, " mass deportation, and the threat of violent arrest : structural violence and social suffering in the lives of undocumented migrant workers in Israel / Sarah S. Willen
  • Trauma, memory, and euthanasia at the Nuremberg medical trial, 1946-1947 / Etienne Lepicard
  • Trauma or responsibility? : memories and historiographies of Nazi psychiatry in postwar Germany / Volker Roelcke
  • Trauma, retribution, and forgiveness : should war criminals go free? / Daniel Statman
  • The secrets of mediation and trauma in contemporary film : a search from the perspective of restorative justice / Michal Alberstein
  • Healing stories in law and literature / Shulamit Almog.
"Trauma and Memory" explores different dimensions of trauma, both its relationship to the social sphere and to group identity, in order to open up new approaches to trauma from a healing perspective. The book's specific focus is doubly unique: first, because of its interest in the tension between collective and individual trauma (in trauma as socially constructed and related to identities of ethnicity, nationality, gender, and class); and second, because of its interest in the legal and medical professions (in their construction of trauma, their ways of treating it, their failures, and even their production of trauma)."Trauma and Memory" reflects the ways in which, over the last several decades, a growing interest in the social and cultural contexts of law and medicine has transformed the study of both these professions. The authors provide new readings of social and political phenomena - such as immigration, public health, gender discrimination, and transitional justice - in terms of trauma. Finally, they address the therapeutic dimensions of trauma and their relationship to reconciliation via alternative processes such as mediation, truth committees, and other new forms of justice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804754057 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 318 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Trauma and memory: between individual and collective experiences / Austin Sarat, Nadav Davidovitch, Michal Alberstein
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder of the virtual kind: trauma and resilience in post-9/11 America / Allan Young
  • Female trauma / Ariella Azoulay
  • The trauma of al-Nakba: collective memory and the rise of Palestinian national identity / Issam Nassar
  • Trauma image: the elephant experience / Roei Amit
  • Trauma and justice: the moral grammar of trauma discourse from Wilhelmine Germany to post-apartheid South Africa / José Brunner
  • Public health, law, and traumatic collective experiences: the case of mass ringworm irradiations / Nadav Davidovitch and Avital Margalit
  • "Illegality, " mass deportation, and the threat of violent arrest: structural violence and social suffering in the lives of undocumented migrant workers in Israel / Sarah S. Willen
  • Trauma, memory, and euthanasia at the Nuremberg medical trial, 1946-1947 / Etienne Lepicard
  • Trauma or responsibility?: memories and historiographies of Nazi psychiatry in postwar Germany / Volker Roelcke
  • Trauma, retribution, and forgiveness: should war criminals go free? / Daniel Statman
  • The secrets of mediation and trauma in contemporary film: a search from the perspective of restorative justice / Michal Alberstein
  • Healing stories in law and literature / Shulamit Almog.
"Trauma and Memory" explores different dimensions of trauma, both its relationship to the social sphere and to group identity, in order to open up new approaches to trauma from a healing perspective. The book's specific focus is doubly unique: first, because of its interest in the tension between collective and individual trauma (in trauma as socially constructed and related to identities of ethnicity, nationality, gender, and class); and second, because of its interest in the legal and medical professions (in their construction of trauma, their ways of treating it, their failures, and even their production of trauma)."Trauma and Memory" reflects the ways in which, over the last several decades, a growing interest in the social and cultural contexts of law and medicine has transformed the study of both these professions. The authors provide new readings of social and political phenomena - such as immigration, public health, gender discrimination, and transitional justice - in terms of trauma. Finally, they address the therapeutic dimensions of trauma and their relationship to reconciliation via alternative processes such as mediation, truth committees, and other new forms of justice.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804754057 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxxiii, 325 p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
  • Contents Foreword Introduction Representing the Unrepresentable Part One: Music Chapter One: Hip Hop Lyrics as Tool for Conflict Resolution in the Niger Delta Chapter Two: Grooving on Broken: Dancing War Trauma in Angolan Kuduro Chapter Three: Local Arts versus Global Terrorism: The Manifestations of Trauma and Modes of Reconciliation in Moroccan Music Festivals Part Two: Visual Arts Chapter Four: Transforming Arms into Ploughshares: Weapons that Destroy and Heal in Mozambican Urban Art Chapter Five: Unlocking the Doors of Number Four Prison: Curating the Violent Past in Contemporary South Africa Chapter Six: Imaging Life after Death: Photography and the 1994 Genocide in Rwanda Part Three: Literature Chapter Seven: 'It was a terrible time to be alive': Narrative Reconciliation in Contemporary West African Fiction Chapter Eight: Truth Will Set You Free: Implications of a Creative Narrative for the 'Official' Discourse of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission Chapter Nine: Re-fathoming the Dark of Heartness: Contrapuntal Representations of the Rwandan Genocide Part Four: Film Chapter Ten: Reconciling the African Nation: Fanta Regina Nacro's La Nuit de la Verite Chapter Eleven: Closed Windows onto Morocco's Past: Leila Kilani's Our Forbidden Places Chapter Twelve: Beyond 'Victimology': Generating Agency through Film in Eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo Chapter Thirteen: Truth, Reconciliation and Cinema: Reflections on South Africa's Recent Past in Ubuntu's Wounds and Homecoming.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781848856929 20160615
The traumas of conflict and war in postcolonial Africa have been widely documented, but less well known are their artistic representations. A number of recent films, novels and other art forms have sought to engage with and overcome postcolonial atrocities and to explore the attempts of reconciliation commissions towards peace, justice and forgiveness. This creativity reflects the memories and social identities of the artists, whilst offering a mirror to African and worldwide audiences coming to terms with a collective memory that is often traumatic in itself. The seeming paradox between creative representation and the reality of horrific events such as genocide presents challenges for the relationship between ethics, poetics and politics. In Art and Trauma in Africa, Lizelle Bisschoff and Stefanie Van de Peer bring together multiple ways of analyzing the ethical responsibility at the heart of an artist's decision to tackle such controversial and painful subjects. Also, to study trauma, conflict and reconciliation through art in a pan-African context offers new perspectives on a continent that is often misrepresented by the Western media. The inexpressible nature of atrocities that are the crux of how Africa is generally regarded from the outside is challenged with new art forms that in and of themselves question perception and interpretation. African artists are renewing the field of trauma studies through representing the unrepresentable in order to incessantly invigorate insights and theories. Art and Trauma in Africa examines a diverse range of art forms, from hip hop in Nigeria and dance in Angola to Moroccan films and South African literature, taking an original pan-African approach. It is in doing so that this groundbreaking volume will inspire those interested in African history and politics as well as those with an interest in trauma, cultural and artistic studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781848856929 20160615
Green Library
Book
viii, 239 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Introduction. Part I: Theory of Collective and National Trauma. 1 Exploring Collective and National Trauma. 2 Impact of Collective and National Trauma. 3 The Role of Mental Health Professionals and Social Workers in Situations of Collective and National Trauma. Part II: Mental Health and Psychosocial Systemic Interventions in Situations of Collective and National Trauma.4 Systemic Intervention in Situations of Collective and National Trauma. 5 Impact of Interventions on the Helpers' System. 6 Evaluation of Systemic Interventions in Situations of National and Collective Trauma.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138892453 20160619
Systemic Interventions for Collective and National Trauma explains the theoretical basis for understanding collective and national trauma through the concept of systems theory, and gives ways of implementing systems theory in interventions at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Particular attention is given to the use of socio-political and cultural aspects of interventions with victims, as well as to the ethical codes that social workers and other mental health professionals need to integrate in their work with collective/national trauma. Separated into two distinct parts on theory and practice, this volume is appropriate for practitioners as well as students in advanced courses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138892453 20160619
Green Library
Book
viii, 229 p. : ill., ports. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction A. The Sociology of Memory "Collective Memory: The Two Cultures" (Sociological Theory) "Collective Memory and Cultural Constraint: Holocaust Myth and Rationality in the Federal Republic of Germany" (American Sociological Review) "Genre Memories and Memory Genres: A Dialogical Analysis of May 8th, 1945 Commemorations in the Federal Republic of Germany" (American Sociological Review) "Figurations of Memory: A Process-Relational Approach" (Unpublished manuscript) B. The Politics of Regret "The Politics of Regret: Analytical Frames" (The Politics of the Past: On Repairing Historical Injustices) "The Value of Regret: Lessons from and for Germany" (Religion and Public Life) "Collective Memory and Chronic Differentiation: Historicity and the Public Sphere" (originally published in Spanish, Ayer) "From Theodicy to Ressentiment: Trauma and the Ages of Compensation" (Memory, Trauma, and World Politics: Reflections on the Relationship between Past and Present.).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415956833 20160527
In the past decade, Jeffrey Olick has established himself as one of the world's pre-eminent sociologists of memory (and, related to this, both cultural sociology and social theory). His recent book on memory in postwar Germany, "In the House of the Hangman" (University of Chicago Press, 2005) has garnered a great deal of acclaim. This book collects his best essays on a range of memory related issues and adds a couple of new ones. It is more conceptually expansive than his other work and will serve as a great introduction to this important theorist. In the past quarter century, the issue of memory has not only become an increasingly important analytical category for historians, sociologists and cultural theorists, it has become pervasive in popular culture as well. Part of this is a function of the enhanced role of both narrative and representation - the building blocks of memory, so to speak - across the social sciences and humanities. Just as importantly, though, there has also been an increasing acceptance of the notion that the past is no longer the province of professional historians alone. Additionally, acknowledging the importance of social memory has not only provided agency to ordinary people when it comes to understanding the past, it has made conflicting interpretations of the meaning of the past more fraught, particularly in light of the terrible events of the twentieth century. Olick looks at how catastrophic, terrible pasts - Nazi Germany, apartheid South Africa - are remembered, but he is particularly concerned with the role that memory plays in social structures. Memory can foster any number of things - social solidarity, nostalgia, civil war - but it always depends on both the nature of the past and the cultures doing the remembering. Prior to his studies of individual episodes, he fully develops his theory of memory and society, working through Bergson, Halbwachs, Elias, Bakhtin, and Bourdieu.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415956833 20160527
Green Library
Book
ix, 266 pages ; 23 cm
  • 1. Introduction-- Simona Mitroiu PART I 2. Memories of Displacement and Unhomely Spaces: History, Trauma, and the Politics of Spatial Imagination in Ukraine and Poland-- Irene Sywenky 3. Forgotten Memory? Vicissitudes of the Gulag Remembrance in Poland-- Lidia Zessin-Jurek 4. When Memory Is Not Enough: Roaming and Writing the Spaces of the Other Europe-- Katarzyna Kwapisz Williams 5. Re-Reading the Monuments of the Past-- Andrea Pruchova PART II 6. Dignity and Defiance: The Resilience to Repair and Rebuild in Response to Despair-- Hannah Kliger and Sheryl Perlmutter Bowen 7. Individual and Official Narratives of Conflict in Croatia: Schools as Sites of Memory Production-- Borislava Manojlovic 8. Bordering on Tears and Laughter: Changes of Tonality in the Life Histories of Estonian Deportees-- Aigi Rahi-Tamm 9. Memory of Lost Local Homelands. Social Transmission of Memory of the Former Polish Eastern Borderlands in Contemporary Poland-- Malgorzata Glowacka-Grajper PART III 10. Caught Between Historical Responsibility and the New Politics of History. On Patterns of Hungarian Holocaust Remembrance-- Ferenc Laczo 11. From Skull Tower to Mall: Competing Victim Narratives and the Politics of Memory in the Former Yugoslavia-- Michele Frucht Levy 12. Post-communist Romanians Facing the Mirror of Securitate Files-- Raluca Ursachi 13. Divided memory in Hungary: the House of Terror and the lack of a left-wing narrative-- Csilla Kiss.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137485519 20160619
This volume addresses the issues of remembering and performing the past in Eastern European ex-communist states in the context of multiplication of the voices of the past. The book analyzes the various ways in which memory and remembrance operate; it does so by using different methods of recollecting the past, from oral history to cultural and historical institutions, and by drawing on various political and cultural theories and concepts. Through well-documented case studies the volume showcases the plurality of approaches available for analyzing the relationship between memory and narrative from an interdisciplinary and international perspective.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137485519 20160619
Green Library
Book
268 p. ; 22 cm.
Collective Traumas is about the traumatic European history of the 20th century - war, genocide, dictatorship, ethnic cleansing - and how individuals, communities and nations have dealt with their dark past through remembrance, historiography and legal settlements. Memories, and especially collective memories, serve as foundations for national identities and are politically charged. Regardless whether memory is used to support or to challenge established ideologies, it is inevitably subject to political tensions. Consequently, memory, history and amnesia tend to be used and abused for different political and ideological purposes. From the perspectives of historical, literary and visual studies the essays focus on how the experiences of war and profound conflict have been represented and remembered in different national cultures and communities. This volume is a vital contribution to memory studies and trauma theory. Collective Traumas is a result of the multi-disciplinary research project on Memory Culture that was initiated in 2002 at Karlstad University, Sweden. A previous publication with Peter Lang is Memory Work: The Theory and Practice of Memory (2005).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789052010687 20160527
Green Library
Book
xi, 207 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Iconic events : public imagination and social memory
  • Historical sketches of the events
  • The represented event : journalism's initial spin
  • The representational event : political appropriations
  • Iconic events in popular culture
  • The significance of iconic events.
"Iconic Events" explores the social forces that have shaped the meanings around and enduring significance of events that have captured the public's imagination, including Titanic, Pearl Harbor, Columbine, and September 11th. The book focuses on three interpretive phases including journalistic representations, political appropriations, and popular adaptations and pays particular attention to the development of dominant and resistive event narratives.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780739115206 20160528
Green Library
Book
286 pages ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 223 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Creating childhood : autobiography and cultural memory
  • Consuming childhood : buying and selling the autobiographical child
  • Authoring childhood : the road to recovery and redemption
  • Scripts for remembering : childhoods and nostalgia
  • Scripts for remembering : traumatic childhoods
  • Ethics : writing about child abuse, writing about abusive parents
  • The ethics of reading : witnessing traumatic childhoods
  • Writing childhood in the twenty-first century.
The late 1990s and early 2000s witnessed a surge in the publication and popularity of autobiographical writings about childhood. Linking literary and cultural studies, "Contesting Childhood" draws on a varied selection of works from a diverse range of authors - from first-time to experienced writers. Kate Douglas explores Australian accounts of the Stolen Generation, contemporary American and British narratives of abuse, the best-selling memoirs of Andrea Ashworth, Augusten Burroughs, Robert Drewe, Mary Karr, Frank McCourt, Dave Pelzer, and Lorna Sage, among many others. Drawing on trauma and memory studies and theories of authorship and readership, "Contesting Childhood" offers commentary on the triumphs, trials, and tribulations that have shaped this genre. Douglas examines the content of the narratives and the limits of their representations, as well as some of the ways in which autobiographies of youth have become politically important and influential. This study enables readers to discover how stories configure childhood within cultural memory and the public sphere.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813546643 20160603
Green Library
Book
x, 278 p. ; 24 cm.
The central focus of this book is the traumatized German war veteran. Using previously unexplored source material written by the psychologically scarred veterans themselves, this innovative work traces how some of the most vulnerable members of society, marginalized and persecuted as 'enemies of the nation, ' attempted to regain authority over their own minds and reclaim the authentic memory of the Great War.Under Weimar Germany and the Third Reich, the mentally disabled survivor of the trenches became a focus of debate between competing social and political groups, each attempting to construct their own versions of the national community and the memory of the war experience. Views on class, war, masculinity and social deviance were shaped and in some cases altered by the popularised debates that surrounded these traumatized members of society.Through the tortured words of these men and women, Jason Crouthamel reveals a hidden layer of protest against prevailing institutions and official memory, especially the Nazi celebration of war as the cornerstone of the 'healthy' male psyche. He also shows how these 'social outsiders' attempted to reform healthcare and reconstruct notions of 'comradeship', 'manliness' and the national community in ways that complicate the history of the veteran in this highly militarised society.By examining the psychological effects of war on ordinary Germans and the way these war victims have shaped perceptions of madness and mass violence, Crouthamel is able to illuminate potent and universal problems faced by societies coping with war and the politics of how we care for our veterans.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780859898423 20160528
Green Library
Book
xii, 192 pages ; 24 cm
  • Acknowledgements Chapter 1: Cultural Memory in a Fallen Nation Chapter 2: Repairing Biographies and Aligning Family Memories Chapter 3: Defeat Reconsidered: Heroes, Victims, & Perpetrators in the Popular Media Chapter 4: Pedagogies of War and Peace: Teaching World War II to Children Chapter 5: The Moral Recovery of Defeated Nations: A Global-Comparative Look Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190239152 20160618
In The Long Defeat, Akiko Hashimoto explores the stakes of war memory in Japan after its catastrophic defeat in World War II, showing how and why defeat has become an indelible part of national collective life, especially in recent decades. Divisive war memories lie at the root of the contentious politics surrounding Japan's pacifist constitution and remilitarization, and fuel the escalating frictions in East Asia known collectively as Japan's "history problem." Drawing on ethnography, interviews, and a wealth of popular memory data, this book identifies three preoccupations - national belonging, healing, and justice - in Japan's discourses of defeat. Hashimoto uncovers the key war memory narratives that are shaping Japan's choices - nationalism, pacifism, or reconciliation - for addressing the rising international tensions and finally overcoming its dark history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190239152 20160618
Green Library
Book
1 online resource
  • Acknowledgements Chapter 1: Cultural Memory in a Fallen Nation Chapter 2: Repairing Biographies and Aligning Family Memories Chapter 3: Defeat Reconsidered: Heroes, Victims, & Perpetrators in the Popular Media Chapter 4: Pedagogies of War and Peace: Teaching World War II to Children Chapter 5: The Moral Recovery of Defeated Nations: A Global-Comparative Look Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190239152 20160618
In The Long Defeat, Akiko Hashimoto explores the stakes of war memory in Japan after its catastrophic defeat in World War II, showing how and why defeat has become an indelible part of national collective life, especially in recent decades. Divisive war memories lie at the root of the contentious politics surrounding Japan's pacifist constitution and remilitarization, and fuel the escalating frictions in East Asia known collectively as Japan's "history problem." Drawing on ethnography, interviews, and a wealth of popular memory data, this book identifies three preoccupations - national belonging, healing, and justice - in Japan's discourses of defeat. Hashimoto uncovers the key war memory narratives that are shaping Japan's choices - nationalism, pacifism, or reconciliation - for addressing the rising international tensions and finally overcoming its dark history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190239152 20160618
Book
xxiv, 392 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • List of Figures-- List of Maps-- Acknowledgements-- Preface-- Introduction: Political Transition, peace-making and the past-- Part 1 Cultural memory, trauma, and conflict in the Irish Troubles-- 1. Memory, myth, and tradition: Concepts of the past in the Irish Troubles-- 2. Trauma, memory, politics: Paradoxes of the Irish peace process-- Part 2 Remembering Bloody Sunday-- 3. Public arenas, personal testimonies: The institution and contestation of British offical memory of Bloody Sunday-- 4. Trauma and life-stories: Survivor memories of Bloody Sunday-- 5. Widening the circle of memory: Human rights and the politics of Bloody Sunday commemoration-- 6. Counter memory, truth and justice: Bloody Sunday and the Irish peace process-- Part 3 'The Forgotten Victims?' Border Protestants and the Memory of Terror-- 7. The Troubles on the Border: Ulster-British identity and the cultural memory of 'ethnic cleansing'-- 8. Giving voice: Protestant and Unionist victims' groups and memories of the Troubles in the Irish peace process-- 9. Mobilizing memories: The Unionist politics of victimhood and the Good Friday Agreement-- 10. Remembrance, reconciliation, and the reconstruction of the site of the Enniskillen 'Poppy Day' bomb-- Afterword-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780719056710 20160527
This book looks at the Irish Troubles and how memory and trauma are being used in the process of reconciliation. Trauma studies is a relatively new discipline and is applied here to both 'sides' in the conflict. Dawson investigates how personal, empirical experience has influenced the narratives and ideologies of the public pronouncements over the last thirty-five or so years. It focuses on two specific instances - the targeting of Protestants by the IRA and the violence perpetrated on what has become known as Bloody Sunday.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780719056710 20160527
Green Library
Book
143 p. ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 330 pages : illustration ; 23 cm.
  • Contributors Thomas Berger, Frances Gouda, Julian T. Jackson, Fania Oz-Salzbe, Gilbert Rozman, Igor Torbakov, and Roger Petersen.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295993454 20160613
The legacy of the Second World War has been, like the war itself, an international phenomenon. In both Europe and Asia, common questions of criminality, guilt, and collaboration have intersected with history and politics on the local level to shape the way that wartime experience has been memorialized, reinterpreted, and used. By directly comparing European and Asian legacies, Confronting Memories of World War II, provides unique insight into the way that World War II continues to influence contemporary attitudes and politics on a global scale. The collection brings together experts from a variety of disciplines and perspectives to explore the often overlooked commonalities between European and Asian handling of memories and reflections about guilt. These commonalities suggest new understandings of the war's legacy and the continuing impact of historical trauma. Daniel Chirot is Herbert J. Ellison Professor of Russian and Eurasian Studies at the University of Washington. Gi-Wook Shin is director of the Walter H. Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center at Stanford University, as well as holder of the Tong Yang, Korea Foundation, and Korea Stanford Alumni Chair of Korean Studies. Daniel Sneider is associate director of the Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Center. Contributors include Thomas Berger, Frances Gouda, Julian T. Jackson, Fania Oz-Salzbe, Gilbert Rozman, Igor Torbakov, and Roger Petersen. "A provocative, timely, superbly documented volume on urgent moral, political and historical topics. There is no trace of idealization - the book is objective, clear-minded, and historically poignant. A substantial, truly enriching addition in terms of a global comparative approach." (Vladimir Tismaneanu, University of Maryland, College Park). "This truly 'international' edited volume on the issues of war, memory, and national identity explores how memories about wartime experiences - including criminality, collaboration and reconciliation - are shaped and reshaped, connected to questions of national identity, and used for domestic and international political purposes." (Patricia L. Maclachlan, University of Texas, Austin).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295993461 20160613
The legacy of the Second World War has been, like the war itself, an international phenomenon. In both Europe and Asia, common questions of criminality, guilt, and collaboration have intersected with history and politics on the local level to shape the way that wartime experience has been memorialized, reinterpreted, and used. By directly comparing European and Asian legacies, Confronting Memories of World War II, provides unique insight into the way that World War II continues to influence contemporary attitudes and politics on a global scale. The collection brings together experts from a variety of disciplines and perspectives to explore the often overlooked commonalities between European and Asian handling of memories and reflections about guilt. These commonalities suggest new understandings of the war's legacy and the continuing impact of historical trauma.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780295993454 20160613
Green Library
Book
ix, 295 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: What Remains: Reflections on Crisis Oral History, Mark Cave -- Part I: Clamor -- 1. When All is Lost: Metanarrative in the Oral History of Hanifa, Survivor of Srebrenica, Selma Leydesdorff -- Oral history by Selma Leydesdorff with "Hanifa, " Refugee camp, East Bosnia, April 2004 -- 2. "To Dream My Family Tonight": Listening to Stories of Grief and Hope among Hazaras Refugees in Australia, -- Denise Phillips -- Oral histories by Denise Phillips with Reza and Juma, Brisbane and Melbourne, Australia, 2004-2011 -- 3. Exhuming the Self: Trauma and Student Survivors of the Shootings at Virginia Tech, Tamara Kennelly and Susan E. Fleming-Cook -- Oral histories by Susan E. Fleming Cook with Yang Kim, Derek O'Dell, and Kristina Heeger-Anderson, Blacksburg, Virginia, 2009-2010 -- 4. Talking Cure: Trauma, Narrative, and the Cuban Rafter Crisis, Elizabeth Campisi -- Oral histories by Elizabeth Campisi with Cuban Rafter Crisis survivors conducted in Miami, Florida, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and Rochester, New York, 1998-2001 -- 5. In the Ghost Forest: Listening to Tutsi Rescapes, Taylor Krauss -- Oral histories by Taylor Krauss with Rwandan Rescapes, Kigali, Rwanda, 2007-2008. -- 6. The Continuing and Unfinished Present: Oral History and Psychoanalysis in the Aftermath of Terror, Ghislaine Boulanger -- Part II: Resonance -- 7. Unlocked: Perspective and the New Orleans Prison Evacuation Crisis, Mark Cave -- Oral histories by Mark Cave with members of the Louisiana Department of Corrections, Angola, Pineville, and Keithville, Louisiana, March 23 and 24, June 17 and 18, 2009 -- 8. Living Too in Murder City: Oral History as Alternative Perspective to the Drug War in Ciudad Juarez, Eric Meringer -- Oral histories by Eric Rodrigo Meringer with Juarez residents Jonathan, Rosa and Raul, Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, 2009-2010 -- 9. Until Our Last Breath: Voices of Poisoned Workers in China, Karin Mak -- Oral histories by Karin Mak with "Ren, " "Min, " "Fu, " and "Wu, " Huizhou, Guangdong and rural Sichuan, China, August and September, 2007 -- 10. Woven Together: Attachment to Place in the Aftermath of Disaster, Perspectives from Four Continents, -- Eleonora Rohland, Maike Bocker, Gitte Cullmann, Ingo Haltermann, Franz Mauelshagen -- Oral histories by Eleonora Rohland, Maike Bocker, Gitte Cullmann, and Ingo Haltermann with residents of New Orleans, Louisiana-- Accra, Ghana-- eastern Brandenburg, Germany-- and Chaiten, Chile, 2009-2010 -- 11. Smile Through the Tears: Life, Art, and the Rwandan Genocide, Steven High -- Oral history by Jessica Silva with Rupert Bazambanza, Montreal, Canada, June 3 and 12 and July 6, 2008 -- 12. A Spiritual War: Crises of Faith in Combat Chaplains from Iraq and Afghanistan, David Peters -- Interviews by David W. Peters with "Christina, " "Michael, " "Timothy, " "Craig, " and "George, " Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC, 2011 -- 13. A Long Song: Oral History in the Time of Emergency and After, Mary Marshall Clark -- Oral histories by Gerry Albarelli and Temma Kaplan with Mohammad Bilal-Mizra, Talat Hamdani, Zaheer Jaffery, Salman Jaffery, and Zohra Saed, New York City, October 2001 to June 2005 -- Conclusion: The Fabric of Crisis: Approaching the Heart of Oral History, Stephen Sloan -- Contributors -- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199859313 20160613
From the headlines of local newspapers to the coverage of major media outlets, scenes of war, natural disaster, political revolution and ethnic repression greet readers and viewers at every turn. What we often fail to grasp, however, despite numerous treatments of events is the deep meaning and broader significance of crisis and disaster. The complexity and texture of these situations are most evident in the broader personal stories of those whom the events impact most intimately. Oral history, with its focus on listening and collaborative creation with participants, has emerged as a forceful approach to exploring the human experience of crisis. Despite the recent growth of crisis oral history fieldwork, there has been little formal discussion of the process and meaning of utilizing oral history in these environments. Oral history research takes on special dimensions when working in highly charged situations often in close proximity to traumatic events. The emergent inclination for oral historians to respond to document crisis calls for a shared conversation among scholars as to what we have learned from crisis work so far. This dialogue, at the heart of this collection of oral history excerpts and essays, reveals new layers of the work of the oral historian. From the perspective of crisis and disaster oral history, the book addresses both the ways in which we think about the craft of oral hsitory, and the manner in which we use it. The book presents excerpts from oral histories done after twelve world crises, followed by critical analyses by the interviewers. Additional analytical chapters set the interviews in the contexts of pyschoanalysis and oral history methodology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780199859313 20160613
Green Library

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