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Journal/Periodical
computer files (volumes ; 22 cm)
Medical Library (Lane)
Book
1 online resource (7 p.).
Journal/Periodical
v. 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 p. l., p. 563-573 ; 24cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxxii, 531 p. : ill. ; 29 cm.
"The Encyclopedia of Black Studies" will be the leading reference source for dynamic and innovative research on the Black Experience. The concept for the encyclopedia was developed from the successful "Journal of Black Studies" and contains a full analysis of the economic, political, sociological, historical, literary and philosophical issues related to Americans of African descent. The content is considered at the forefront of the recent explosive growth in quality scholarship in the field. More than a chronicle of black culture or black people, this encyclopedia deals with the emergence and maturity of an intellectual field over the past four decades.Beginning with the protests at San Francisco State College in 1967 that led to the first degree-granting department of Black Studies, the field's rapid growth over time necessitates an authoritative account of the discipline. More than ever scholars and students need a clear conception of what the evolutionary processes have been in the creation and maintenance of the discipline. It includes over 240 signed articles by nearly 200 scholars, organized A to Z, with coverage spanning the social sciences. It is edited by the founder and current editor of the "Journal of Black Studies". The Reader's Guide facilitates browsing by topic and easy access to information.This work contains: numerous illustrative charts, sidebars, and historical photographs; appendices with listings of doctoral granting programs, major journals in the field, and professional and scholarly associations. The master bibliography covers such topics as: Afrocentricity; annual conferences; anti-racism; arts; associations and organizations; books; campus politics; civil rights; classical Africa; concepts; culture; departmental histories; films; intellectual schools; institutions; journals; legal issues; movements; newspapers; political issues; professional organizations; publishers; racism; religion; reparations; research centers; resistance; theories; and, United States constitution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761927624 20160528
Green Library
Book
ix, 171 p. ; 23 cm.
  • Chapter 1 Preface Chapter 2 Acknowledgements Chapter 3 Introduction Chapter 4 I. Appearances Chapter 5 II. The Opportunity to Earn a Dollar Chapter 6 III. Pray, Shout, and Sing Chapter 7 IV. Pedagogs and Pupils Chapter 8 V. "In All Things Social" Chapter 9 VI. Manners and Morals Chapter 10 VII. Political Participation Chapter 11 Epilogue Chapter 12 Bibliography Chapter 13 About the Author.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761851059 20160602
Historians and other scholars often use first-hand accounts, including contemporary observations, as sources for study of the past. These types of sources are valuable, especially when used in conjunction with other documents, as they help us to approximate the past. This study uses these types of sources to attain glimpses of African American life in the post-emancipation South. Spanning from the 1860s through the New Deal, this study incorporates a broad cross-section of the views of European travelers and Euro-American visitors from the North, based upon travel books as well as articles and essays from periodicals and scholarly journals. The study synthesizes the outsiders' observations and assesses their summaries' overall validity for increasing our understanding of the lives of blacks in the post-emancipation South. Furthermore, these accounts allow for a reconstruction of African American life and labor in the major aspects of black culture-religion, education, politics, criminal justice, employment and entrepreneurship, social life and status-of the times. The work is constructed in the context of contemporary anthropology, ethnography, psychology, and sociology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780761851059 20160602
Green Library
Video
1 videodisc (116 min.) : sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 4 3/4 in.
Four prominent African-American writers each write and narrate a period in the life of the sociologist and author W.E.B. Du Bois. They chronicle Du Bois' role as a founder of the NAACP, organizer of the first Pan-African Congress, editor of Crisis, a journal of the black cultural renaissance, and author of a series of landmark sociological studies. Anathematized during the McCarthy years, Du Bois immigrated to Ghana, the first independent African state, where he died.
Media & Microtext Center
Video
1 videocassette (116 min.) : sd., col. with b&w sequences ; 1/2 in.
In this film, four prominent African-American writers, Wesley Brown, Thulani Davis, Toni Cade Bambara and Amiri Baraka, each narrate a period in the life of W.E.B. Du Bois and describe his impact on their work. They chronicle Du Bois' role as a founder of the NAACP, organizer of the first Pan-African Congress, editor of Crisis, a journal of the black cultural renaissance, and author of a series of landmark sociological studies.
Media & Microtext Center
Book
541 p.
  • Part 1 American modernism, race and national culture: pragmatism and Americanism-- the Americanization of "race" and "culture"-- cultural pluralism and national identity-- cultural nationalism and the lyrical Left. Part 2 The transformation of literary institutions: "The Crisis" and the nation's conscience-- toward a new negro aesthetic-- reading these United States - "The Nation" and "The New Republic"-- the native arts of radicalism and/or race-- V.F. Calverton, "The Modern Quarterly" and an anthology-- mediating race and nation - the cultural politics of "The Messenger"-- "Superior Intellectual Vaudeville" - "American Mercury"-- black writing and modernist American publishing. Part III Producing "The New Negro": staging a Renaissance-- "The New Negro" - an interpretation.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674372634 20160527
By restoring interracial dimensions left out of accounts of the Harlem Renaissance - or blamed for corrupting it - this book aims to transform our understanding of black and white literary modernism, interracial literary relations, and 20th century cultural nationalism in the United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674372634 20160527
By restoring interracial dimensions left out of accounts of the Harlem Renaissance - or blamed for corrupting it - George Hutchinson provides his understanding of black (and white) literary modernism, interracial literary relations, and 20th-century cultural nationalism in the United States. He proposes that what has been missing from literary histories of the time is a broader sense of the intellectual context of the Harlem Renaissance, and Hutchinson supplies that here: Boas's anthropology, Park's sociology, various strands of pragmatism and cultural nationalism - ideas that shaped the New Negro movement and the literary field, where the movement flourished. Hutchinson tracks the resulting transformation of literary institutions and organizations in the 1920s, offering a detailed account of the journals and presses, black and white, that published the work of the "New Negroes". This cultural excavation discredits bedrock assumptions about the motives of white interest in the renaissance, and about black relationships to white intellectuals of the period. It also gives a careful investigation of the tensions among black intellectuals of the 1920s. Hutchinson's analysis shows that the general expansion of literature and the vogue of writing cannot be divorced from the explosion of black literature often attributed to the vogue of the New Negro - any more than the growing sense of "Negro" national consciousness can be divorced from expanding articulations and permutations of American nationality. The book concludes with a full-scale interpretation of the landmark anthology "The New Negro". A work that exposes the oversimplifications and misrepresentations of popular readings of the Harlem Renaissance, this book reveals the composite nature of American literary culture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674372627 20160528
Green Library
Book
xii, 223 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Although Charles S. Johnson (1893-1956) called himself a "sidelines activist, his advocacy for racial equality was never watered-down or half-hearted. His strategy was to work indirectly, sometimes behind the scenes, to influence public policy and to mobilize groups with special concerns for the tragic plight of rural black sharecroppers. In coalition with an embattled band of southern white liberals he pressed the federal government to end lynching, the poll tax, "separate but equal" schooling, and other racial inequities of the Jim Crow era. Throughout his career he played the vital role of building bridges between the races, specifically in gaining white philanthropic support, in conducting sociological research, and in stimulating activism in the black community. This is the first full-length biography of Johnson. Together with W. E. B. Du Bois and E. Franklin Frazier he has been defined as a "founding father" among contemporary black sociologists. His career as a professional sociologist was only one aspect of a many-sided life which took him from the small town of Bristol in southwest Virginia into the greater world of crisis and conflict. In Chicago he conducted landmark research on the devastating race riot there in 1919. In Harlem in the twenties he directed research for the Urban League, edited its journal Opportunity, and functioned as "entrepreneur of the Harlem Renaissance", paving the way to publication for such writers as Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston. He returned to the South and Fisk University, where for a quarter of a century he conducted research on the South's twin system of economic and racial exploitation. Two of his books -- Shadow of the Plantation(on the South's declining feudal cotton economy) and Growing up in the Black Belt (a study of black youth and its problems in the 1930s) -- are recognized today as classics. In the last ten years of his life Johnson served as the first black president of Fisk University, one of the most important of the historically black colleges.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780878059041 20160527
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 223 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Although Charles S. Johnson (1893-1956) called himself a "sidelines activist, his advocacy for racial equality was never watered-down or half-hearted. His strategy was to work indirectly, sometimes behind the scenes, to influence public policy and to mobilize groups with special concerns for the tragic plight of rural black sharecroppers. In coalition with an embattled band of southern white liberals he pressed the federal government to end lynching, the poll tax, "separate but equal" schooling, and other racial inequities of the Jim Crow era. Throughout his career he played the vital role of building bridges between the races, specifically in gaining white philanthropic support, in conducting sociological research, and in stimulating activism in the black community. This is the first full-length biography of Johnson. Together with W. E. B. Du Bois and E. Franklin Frazier he has been defined as a "founding father" among contemporary black sociologists. His career as a professional sociologist was only one aspect of a many-sided life which took him from the small town of Bristol in southwest Virginia into the greater world of crisis and conflict. In Chicago he conducted landmark research on the devastating race riot there in 1919. In Harlem in the twenties he directed research for the Urban League, edited its journal Opportunity, and functioned as "entrepreneur of the Harlem Renaissance", paving the way to publication for such writers as Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston. He returned to the South and Fisk University, where for a quarter of a century he conducted research on the South's twin system of economic and racial exploitation. Two of his books -- Shadow of the Plantation(on the South's declining feudal cotton economy) and Growing up in the Black Belt (a study of black youth and its problems in the 1930s) -- are recognized today as classics. In the last ten years of his life Johnson served as the first black president of Fisk University, one of the most important of the historically black colleges.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780878059041 20160527
Law Library (Crown)

12. Phylon [1960 - ]

Journal/Periodical
v. ; 25 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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