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Book
xviii, 270 pages ; 24 cm
A groundbreaking look at the future of great power competition in an age of globalization and what the United States can do in response The two decades after the Cold War saw unprecedented cooperation between the major powers as the world converged on a model of liberal international order. Now, great power competition is back and the liberal order is in jeopardy. Russia and China are increasingly revisionist in their regions. The Middle East appears to be unraveling. And many Americans question why the United States ought to lead. What will great power competition look like in the decades ahead? Will the liberal world order survive? What impact will geopolitics have on globalization? And, what strategy should the United States pursue to succeed in an increasingly competitive world? In this book Thomas Wright explains how major powers will compete fiercely even as they try to avoid war with each other. Wright outlines a new American strategy-Responsible Competition-to navigate these challenges and strengthen the liberal order.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300223286 20170612
Green Library
Book
xiv, 226 p. : ill ; 22 cm.
Acrimony and hyperpartisanship have seeped into every part of the political process. Congress is deadlocked and its approval ratings are at record lows. America's two main political parties have given up their traditions of compromise, endangering our very system of constitutional democracy. And one of these parties has taken on the role of insurgent outlier; the Republicans have become ideologically extreme, scornful of compromise, and ardently opposed to the established social and economic policy regime. In It's Even Worse Than It Looks, congressional scholars Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein identify two overriding problems that have led Congress-and the United States-to the brink of institutional collapse. The first is the serious mismatch between our political parties, which have become as vehemently adversarial as parliamentary parties, and a governing system that, unlike a parliamentary democracy, makes it extremely difficult for majorities to act. Second, while both parties participate in tribal warfare, both sides are not equally culpable. The political system faces what the authors call "asymmetric polarization, " with the Republican Party implacably refusing to allow anything that might help the Democrats politically, no matter the cost. With dysfunction rooted in long-term political trends, a coarsened political culture and a new partisan media, the authors conclude that there is no "silver bullet" reform that can solve everything. But they offer a panoply of useful ideas and reforms, endorsing some solutions, like greater public participation and institutional restructuring of the House and Senate, while debunking others, like independent or third-party candidates. Above all, they call on the media as well as the public at large to focus on the true causes of dysfunction rather than just throwing the bums out every election cycle. Until voters learn to act strategically to reward problem solving and punish obstruction, American democracy will remain in serious danger.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780465031337 20160607
Green Library
Book
xiv, 226 p. : ill ; 22 cm.
  • The new politics of hostage taking
  • The seeds of dysfunction
  • Beyond the debt ceiling fiasco
  • Bromides to avoid
  • Fixing the politicial system
  • Reforming U.S. political institutions
  • Navigating the current system.
Acrimony and hyperpartisanship have seeped into every part of the political process. Congress is deadlocked and its approval ratings are at record lows. America's two main political parties have given up their traditions of compromise, endangering our very system of constitutional democracy. And one of these parties has taken on the role of insurgent outlier; the Republicans have become ideologically extreme, scornful of compromise, and ardently opposed to the established social and economic policy regime. In It's Even Worse Than It Looks, congressional scholars Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein identify two overriding problems that have led Congress-and the United States-to the brink of institutional collapse. The first is the serious mismatch between our political parties, which have become as vehemently adversarial as parliamentary parties, and a governing system that, unlike a parliamentary democracy, makes it extremely difficult for majorities to act. Second, while both parties participate in tribal warfare, both sides are not equally culpable. The political system faces what the authors call "asymmetric polarization, " with the Republican Party implacably refusing to allow anything that might help the Democrats politically, no matter the cost. With dysfunction rooted in long-term political trends, a coarsened political culture and a new partisan media, the authors conclude that there is no "silver bullet" reform that can solve everything. But they offer a panoply of useful ideas and reforms, endorsing some solutions, like greater public participation and institutional restructuring of the House and Senate, while debunking others, like independent or third-party candidates. Above all, they call on the media as well as the public at large to focus on the true causes of dysfunction rather than just throwing the bums out every election cycle. Until voters learn to act strategically to reward problem solving and punish obstruction, American democracy will remain in serious danger.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780465031337 20160607
Law Library (Crown)
Book
209 pages ; 20 cm
Almost-true stories for a post-truth world Wrong! Not Nice! Sad! A Manhattan party on election night. Liberal media types gather with big grins and high-end canapes to watch the Trump-Clinton results come in, expecting a smooth victory for Hillary. As the outcome shifts and they descend into panic, the host stands abruptly before her guests, confessing a shocking crime of years before. What follows is a series of witty, cutting, addictive tales of Trump times, portraying Democrats and Republicans in a divided America, from powerful to powerless, angry to thwarted, from a Starbucks barista who dreams of making it on the stage, to a couple whose online date goes bitterly awry, to a charmingly wicked U.S. businessman living undercover in rural Italy. Basket of Deplorables is a timely take on the craziness of today: almost-true fiction for a post-truth world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786488749 20180508
Green Library
Book
vi, 139 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • 1. States as Laboratories of Futility 2. The Truth about Taxes: They Don't Matter Much 3. Sportsfare: Welfare for Professional Sports 4. Welfare Queens, Calculative Criminals, And the Myth of Homo Economicus 5. Sending Signals: Illegal Immigrants and Teenage Sex 6. Democracy is the Worst Form of Government 7. Fool Me Twice, Shame on Me.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137308733 20160615
State and local governments are often trumpeted as laboratories of democracy, capable of significant policy innovation and expertise. Yet the reality is that states more often than not repeatedly reenact failed policies that past research shows do not work. American Politics in the Age of Ignorance contends that policy making is shrouded in many myths and that policy makers often ignore ample research and evidence when it comes to legislating on a range of issues. Examining such hot button issues as restricting immigration and welfare migration, seeking to lure businesses with tax breaks, and providing public subsidies for sports stadiums, this book catalogs a list of repeatedly enacted failed policies that public officials advocate, offering a critical and skeptical analysis of the policy process.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137308733 20160615
Green Library
Book
xi, 316 pages ; 25 cm
  • The world needs ditch diggers, too: non-representation
  • Come together: tyranny of the majority
  • The trivial pursuit of happiness: materialism and greed
  • Voting is for old people: non-participation
  • Culture, clubbed: ignorance and decadence
  • In the flat field: equality over merit
  • Red, white, and blue in tooth and claw: self-interest and faction
  • A bridge to nowhere too far: inefficiency and instability
  • All she wants to do is dance: isolationism or exceptionalism
  • Conclusion: fixing the holes.
Are the politics of the United States to blame for its current unsteady footing in the 21st century? This book aims to answer this uncomfortable but relevant question by examining the strengths and weaknesses of democracy, addressing complex topics such as the history of liberalism, the relationship between democracy and capitalism, the nature of representation, and the difference between government and politics. Each of the book's chapters focuses on a recognized shortcoming of popular government, such as inefficiency, self-interestedness, and non-participation. Each section begins by focusing on current events and tracing issues back through history-through to the American founding, and in many instances, to antiquity. In the conclusion, the author proposes a series of thought-provoking fixes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781440802829 20160612
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxviii, 442 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Elections and political parties
  • Campaign finance apoliticalcal action committees
  • Public opinion and voting
  • The media
  • Congress
  • The Presidency and executive branch
  • The judiciary
  • Federalism
  • Foreign and military policy
  • Social policy
  • Economic policy.
There is no other print source, online source or Web search engine that provides the wide range and depth of insight found in Vital Statistics on American Politics. This new edition is updated with the most recent information available. What sets this book apart is the experience of editors Harold Stanley and Richard Niemi. These scholars consult hundreds of sources to calculate and locate the data, facts and figures that offer a vivid and multifaceted portrait of the broad spectrum of United States politics and policies. In over 230 tables and figures, students, professional researchers, and interested citizens will find chapters devoted to key subject areas such as elections and political parties, public opinion and voting, the media, the three branches of U.S. government, foreign, military, social and economic policy, and much more. For depth of information and ease of use, this volume is the best resource of its kind available and should be a key component of all academic and large public library collections.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781608717378 20160607
Green Library
Book
253 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Conservatism's big idea
  • Tradition : the imaginary fortress
  • Self-reliance : conservative snake oil
  • Deliver us from evil
  • How liberalism lost its mojo
  • The unbearable lightness of being liberal
  • American dreams
  • You put the load right on me
  • A culture of care
  • Changing the moral paradigm.
In this fresh assessment of the liberal perspective on politics, philosopher Dwight Furrow explains how liberalism lost its moral credentials in the face of challenges from conservatives. He articulates a new way of understanding the moral foundations of liberalism that will restore its political fortunes along with America's shattered moral authority. A work of popular philosophy, this book is written in a serious but lively, engaging, and often polemical style. Furrow begins by noting that political ideologies have the power to motivate people because they embody conceptions of how to live. Conservatives have understood this more clearly than liberals, who for too long have relied on bureaucratic solutions and interest-group politics, which have lacked moral credibility and passion. Now more than ever, says Furrow, progressive politics, if it is to move people hungry for change, needs a new vision that will give birth to a more substantial liberal moral identity. Furrow takes conservatism to task for promoting what he labels 'a culture of cynical, violent narcissism'. But rather than praising the liberalism of the past, he argues that liberals must radically revise their conception of moral value in order to reverse the damage left behind by many years of conservative rule. "Reviving the Left" argues that liberals must build a culture of caring from the ground up by giving social institutions incentives to encourage a more prominent role in public life for empathy, compassion, and responsibility. Only in such a culture will liberal political initiatives have a chance to succeed in the long run. Unlike many books on reviving liberalism, which emphasise economics, policy debates, or political strategies, Furrow's "Reviving the Left" uniquely focuses on moral values and their philosophical underpinnings. Furrow's extensive use of references to popular culture, especially well-known films, and also topics of current political discourse makes for an exciting, contemporary rethinking of the liberal perspective with widespread appeal.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781591027034 20160528
Green Library
Book
xi, 309 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction Chapter 1: McConnell's Power Play Chapter 2: In the Shadow of Mansfield's Great Senate Chapter 3: From Baker and Dole to Gingrich and Lott Chapter 4: Bipartisanship Tried, Lost and Found Chapter 5: Mitch McConnell's Senate Chapter 6: McConnell and Schumer Face President Trump Chapter 7: The Confirmation Process Chapter 8: The Gorsuch Nomination: When No Compromise is Possible Chapter 9: Investigating the Russian Connection Chapter 10: In Sickness and in Health Chapter 11: Immigration and Border Security Chapter 12: Moderating Economic Nationalism Chapter 13: Climate Change Denial Chapter 14: Reconceiving the Senate A Note on Sources.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781538105825 20180423
While the hyper-partisanship in Washington that has stunned the world has been building for decades, Ira Shapiro argues that the U.S. Senate has suffered most acutely from the loss of its political center. In Broken, Ira Shapiro, a former senior Senate staffer and author of the critically-acclaimed book The Last Great Senate, offers an expert's account of some of the most prominent battles of the past decade and lays out what must be done to restore the Senate's lost luster. Shapiro places the Senate at "ground zero for America's political dysfunction"--the institution that has failed the longest and the worst. Because the Senate, at its best, represented the special place where the Democrats and Republicans worked together to transcend ideological and regional differences and find common ground, its decline has intensified the nation's polarization, by institutionalizing it at the highest level. Shapiro documents this decline and evaluates the prospects of restoration that could provide a way out of the polarized morass that has engulfed Congress. With a narrative that runs right through the first year of the Trump presidency, Broken will be essential reading for all concerned about the state of American politics and the future of our country.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781538105825 20180423
Green Library

10. How democracy ends [2018]

Book
249 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
'Scintillating ... thought-provoking ... one of the very best of the great crop of recent books on the subject.' Andrew Rawnsley, Observer Democracy has died hundreds of times, all over the world. We think we know what that looks like: chaos descends and the military arrives to restore order, until the people can be trusted to look after their own affairs again. However, there is a danger that this picture is out of date. Until very recently, most citizens of Western democracies would have imagined that the end was a long way off, and very few would have thought it might be happening before their eyes as Trump, Brexit and paranoid populism have become a reality. David Runciman, one of the UK's leading professors of politics, answers all this and more as he surveys the political landscape of the West, helping us to spot the new signs of a collapsing democracy and advising us on what could come next.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781781259740 20180717
Green Library
Book
xxii, 262 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Part One: Etiology 1, Transparency International's "Corruption Perceptions Index"-- April K. Clark 2, The Price of Corruption in Congress-- Michael J. Pomante Ii and Scot Schraufnagel Part Two: Permeation of Corruption in Governance 3, Legislative Scandals in the United States-- Kerri Milita and Jaclyn Bunch 4, Campaign Contributions and Vote Buying-- Renee Prunty and Mandy Swartzendruber 5, Do Contributions to Judicial Campaigns Create the Appearance of Corruption?-- Thomas E. Mcclure 6, Media Coverage of Corruption and Scandal in the 2016 Presidential Election: Fantasy Themes of Crooked Hillary and Corrupt Businessman Trump-- John P. McHale Part Three: Policy Issues 7, Crime, Injustice and Politics-- Cara E. Rabe-Hemp, Philip Mulvey and Morgan Foster 8, Mayors' and Citizen Attitudes Toward Sexual Harassment in Police Departments-- Eric E. Otenyo and Earlene A. Smith 9, Wars in Iraq and Afghanistan: Contractor Corruption and Election Campaigns-- Eric E. Otenyo and Parwez Besmel Part Four: Oversight and Accountability 10, Citizens United and Political Accountability-- Benjamin Bricker 11, Judicial Review-- Elizabeth Erin Wheat 12, National Security Whistleblowers and the Journalists who tell their Stories: A Dangerous Policy Dance of Truth-Finding, Truth-Telling, And Consequence-- Maria A. Moore, John Huxford, and Jennifer B. Bethmann.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781787435568 20180213
The corruption of public officials in the United States and its corrosive impact on public policy, political stability and democratic institutions, earns it a spot among the most critical public crises of the last decade. There have been scandals involving elected officials across the political spectrum from local elected officials up to the White House, involving conflicts of interest, campaign fundraising and political elections. At the heart of many scandals is the discretionary power of public officials to make decisions based on personal interest, often leading to corruption. Understanding the nature and etiology of corruption is important to drafting controls on discretion and rules for accountability. While strict regulation and oversight mechanisms have previously been designed to encourage ethical decision-making and punish violators, it is the media and citizens that have increasingly become modern mechanisms of accountability. Corruption of public governance not only undermines the effectiveness of the political system; it also results in corrupt public policymaking on the most pressing issues facing Americans today. This timely and insightful book provides the key elements needed to understand the nature and prevalence of corruption in public governance, as well as the devastating public policy consequences. The chapters explore the implications of public governance corruption on political stability, public trust, and policymaking, as well as recommendations for how to establish controls on discretion and strict regulation to increase accountability and corruption control in public governance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781787435568 20180213
Green Library
Video
1 online resource (streaming video file) (72 minutes) : digital, .flv file, sound Sound: digital. Digital: data file.
The Great White Hoax, featuring acclaimed anti-racist educator and author Tim Wise, explores how American political leaders of both parties have been tapping into white anxiety, stoking white grievance, and scapegoating people of color for decades to divide and conquer working class voters and shore up political support. The film's primary focus is Donald Trump's race-baiting 2016 campaign for the presidency. But it also widens its scope to show how Trump's charged rhetoric about African-Americans, Latinos, and Muslims fits within a longstanding historical pattern, offering a stunning survey of how racism and racial scapegoating have shaped American politics for centuries. The Great White Hoax is an ideal resource for courses that look at race relations, white privilege, the intersectionality of race, class, and gender identities, presidential politics, and political propaganda.
Book
x, 211 pages ; 21 cm
Green Library
Book
xv, 304 pages ; 21 cm
  • What's wrong with capitalism?
  • Imagining socialism
  • Getting there : how to make a socialist America.
The polar ice caps are melting, hurricanes and droughts ravish the planet, and the earth's population is threatened by catastrophic climate change. Millions of American jobs have been sent overseas and aren't coming back. Young African-American men make up the majority of America's prison population. Half of the American population are poor or near poor, living precariously on the brink, while the top one percent own as much as the bottom eighty. Government police-state spying on its citizens is pervasive. Consequently, as former President Jimmy Carter has said, "we have no functioning democracy." Imagine: Living In a Socialist U.S.A., edited by Francis Goldin, Debby Smith, and Michael Steven Smith, is at once an indictment of American capitalism as the root cause of our spreading dystopia and a cri de coeur for what life could be like in the United States if we had economic as well as a real political democracy. This anthology features essays by revolutionary thinkers, activists, and artists--including Academy Award-winning filmmaker Michael Moore, civil rights activist Angela Davis, incarcerated journalist Mumia Abu Jamal, and economist Rick Wolff--addressing various aspects of a new society and, crucially, how to get from where we are now to where we want to be, living in a society that is truly fair and just.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
pages 937-1,191 ; 26 cm
  • Dedication: Dedication to Congressman Neal Smith / David S. Walker
  • Symposium articles: Foreword / Mark S. Kende
  • The United States and political dysfunction : "what are elections for?" / Sanford Levinson
  • Essay : political dysfunction and constitutional change / Richard L. Hasen
  • Functioning just fine : the unappreciated value of the Supreme Court confirmation process / Lori A. Ringhand, Paul M. Collins, Jr.
  • The Constitution and information politics / John O. McGinnis
  • Essay : practical observations on politics and the Constitution / Brenna Findley
  • Symposium remarks: Why "it's even worse than it looks" : parliamentary parties in the American constitutional system / Norman J. Ornstein.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 199 pages ; 24 cm
  • Part I. The Challenge of American Politocracy: 1. Hard times-- 2. Democracy-- 3. Politocracy-- 4. Silver lining?-- 5. Road to ruin-- 6. Burden and spoils-- 7. Treadmill of reform-- Part II. How Politocracy Drives American Policy: 8. Subprime mortgage crisis-- 9. Foreign imbroglios-- 10. Transnationalism-- Part III. Democratic Retreat and Revival: 11. Global retreat-- 12. Recovering lost ground.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107012653 20160612
Democracy and its Elected Enemies reveals that American politicians have usurped their constitutional authority, substituting their economic and political sovereignty for the people's. This has been accomplished by creating an enormous public service sector operating in the material interest of politicians themselves and of their big business and big social advocacy confederates to the detriment of workers, the middle class and the non-political rich, jeopardizing the nation's security in the process. Steven Rosefielde and Daniel Quinn Mills contend that this usurpation is the source of America's economic decline and fading international power, and provide an action plan for restoring 'true' democracy in which politicians only provide the services people vote for within the civil and property rights protections set forth in the constitution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107012653 20160612
Green Library
Book
227 pages ; 22 cm
  • Introduction
  • Deregulation
  • Speculation
  • Fundamentalism
  • The assault on liberty
  • Militarization
  • Incarceration
  • Manufactured consent
  • Epilogue: Occupy.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 251 pages ; 24 cm
  • 1. Introduction-- 2. Consensus issues: amidst polarization, shared goals-- 3. The measure and meaning of issue ownership-- 4. Ruling out the policy and performance hypotheses-- 5. Partisan priorities: the source of issue ownership-- 6. How issue ownership distorts American politics-- 7. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107617278 20160612
Americans consistently name Republicans as the party better at handling issues like national security and crime, while they trust Democrats on issues like education and the environment - a phenomenon called 'issue ownership'. Partisan Priorities investigates the origins of issue ownership, showing that in fact the parties deliver neither superior performance nor popular policies on the issues they 'own'. Rather, Patrick J. Egan finds that Republicans and Democrats simply prioritize their owned issues with lawmaking and government spending when they are in power. Since the parties tend to be particularly ideologically rigid on the issues they own, politicians actually tend to ignore citizens' preferences when crafting policy on these issues. Thus, issue ownership distorts the relationship between citizens' preferences and public policies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107617278 20160612
Green Library
Book
xi, 137 p. ; 23 cm.
  • 1. The Modern Campaign 2. Communicating with Voters: The New Media 3. Communicating with Voters: The Old Media 4. Fundraising 5. Independent Voices 6. Taking the Pulse of the Electorate 7. Voter Identification, Contact, and Mobilization 8. Campaigning in the Next Decade.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415800389 20160605
So much has changed during the past decade in political campaigning that we can almost say "it's a whole new ball game." This book analyzes the way campaigns were traditionally run and the extraordinary changes that have occurred in the last decade. Dennis W. Johnson looks at the most sophisticated techniques of modern campaigning-micro-targeting, online fundraising, digital communication, the new media-and examines what has changed, how those changes have dramatically transformed campaigning, and what has remained fundamentally the same despite new technologies and communications. Campaigns are becoming more open and free-wheeling, with greater involvement of activists and average voters alike. But they can also become more chaotic and difficult to control. Campaigning in the Twenty-First Century presents daunting challenges for candidates and professional consultants as they try to get their messages out to voters. Ironically, the more open and robust campaigns become, the greater is the need for seasoned, flexible and imaginative professional consultants.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415800389 20160605
Green Library
Book
pages 305-776 ; 25 cm
  • Technology in a democratic age Laws for learning in an age of acceleration / John O. McGinnis
  • Regulating governmental data mining in the United States and Germany : constitutional courts, the state, and new technology / Paul M. Schwartz
  • Constitutional sovereignty & the politics of presidential power Partisan conflicts over presidential authority / Jide Nzelibe
  • Globalization and structure / Julian Ku, John Yoo
  • Contractual civil procedure & the current state of federalism Contracting for procedure / Kevi E. Davis, Helen Hershkoff
  • Federalism under Obama / Gillian E. Metzger
  • Individual rights Disparate impact realism / Amy L. Wax
  • Tragic rights : the rights critique in the age of Obama / Robin L. West
  • Technologies of control and the future of the First Amendment / Christopher S. Yoo.
Law Library (Crown)

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