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Book
292 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • A question and many answers
  • Nature, nurture, culture
  • Starter kit
  • Cultural learning
  • Selective social learning
  • Imitation
  • Mindreading
  • Language
  • Cultural evolutionary psychology.
How did human minds become so different from those of other animals? What accounts for our capacity to understand the way the physical world works, to think ourselves into the minds of others, to gossip, read, tell stories about the past, and imagine the future? These questions are not new: they have been debated by philosophers, psychologists, anthropologists, evolutionists, and neurobiologists over the course of centuries. One explanation widely accepted today is that humans have special cognitive instincts. Unlike other living animal species, we are born with complicated mechanisms for reasoning about causation, reading the minds of others, copying behaviors, and using language. Cecilia Heyes agrees that adult humans have impressive pieces of cognitive equipment. In her framing, however, these cognitive gadgets are not instincts programmed in the genes but are constructed in the course of childhood through social interaction. Cognitive gadgets are products of cultural evolution, rather than genetic evolution. At birth, the minds of human babies are only subtly different from the minds of newborn chimpanzees. We are friendlier, our attention is drawn to different things, and we have a capacity to learn and remember that outstrips the abilities of newborn chimpanzees. Yet when these subtle differences are exposed to culture-soaked human environments, they have enormous effects. They enable us to upload distinctively human ways of thinking from the social world around us. As Cognitive Gadgets makes clear, from birth our malleable human minds can learn through culture not only what to think but how to think it.-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
viii, 229 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Acknowledgments viiIntroductionStephen Macedo 11 Not by Brains Alone: The Vital Role of Culture in Human Adaptation 92 Beyond Kith and Kin: Culture and the Scale of Human Cooperation 63COMMENTS3 Imitation, Hayek, and the Significance of Cultural Learning 125H. Allen Orr4 Adaptation without Insight? 135Kim Sterelny5 Inference and Hypothesis Testing in Cultural Evolution 152Ruth Mace6 Adaptable, Cooperative, Manipulative, and Rivalrous 160Paul SeabrightRESPONSE7 Culture, Beliefs, and Decisions 173Notes 197References 207Contributors 223Index 225.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691177731 20171127
How our ability to learn from each other has been the essential ingredient to our remarkable success as a species Human beings are a very different kind of animal. We have evolved to become the most dominant species on Earth. We have a larger geographical range and process more energy than any other creature alive. This astonishing transformation is usually explained in terms of cognitive ability--people are just smarter than all the rest. But in this compelling book, Robert Boyd argues that culture--our ability to learn from each other--has been the essential ingredient of our remarkable success. A Different Kind of Animal demonstrates that while people are smart, we are not nearly smart enough to have solved the vast array of problems that confronted our species as it spread across the globe. Over the past two million years, culture has evolved to enable human populations to accumulate superb local adaptations that no individual could ever have invented on their own. It has also made possible the evolution of social norms that allow humans to make common cause with large groups of unrelated individuals, a kind of society not seen anywhere else in nature. This unique combination of cultural adaptation and large-scale cooperation has transformed our species and assured our survival--making us the different kind of animal we are today. Based on the Tanner Lectures delivered at Princeton University, A Different Kind of Animal features challenging responses by biologist Allen Orr, philosopher Kim Sterelny, economist Paul Seabright, and evolutionary anthropologist Ruth Mace, as well as an introduction by Stephen Macedo.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691177731 20171127
Green Library
Book
xi, 417 pages : illustrations (some color), color maps ; 22 cm
  • 1. Life History Theory: An Overview in Abstract Part I: Huntington, Crosby, and Baker 2. Ellsworth Huntington's Victorian Climatic Writings3. Alfred W. Crosby: Adapting within a Matrix of Flora and Fauna4. The Historical Geography of Alan R. H. Baker: Scratching Out a Living after the Neolithic Revolution Part II: Price, Malthus, and Landers 5. Richard Price: The Schedules of Mortality6. Thomas Robert Malthus, Stratification, and Subjugation: Closing the Commons and Opening the Factory7. Famine, Pestilence, War, and Death: John Maxwell Landers' Four Horseman Spurring Humans Faster Along the Life History Continuum Part III: Toynbee, McNeill, and Casey 8. Arnold Joseph Toynbee: The Role of Life History in Civilization Cycling9. William H. McNeill: Epidemiological and Biogeographical Perspectives on Civilization10. James Casey: Extrapolating from Early Modern Iberia Part IV: Murdock, Keeley, and Harris 11. George Peter Murdock: Stemming the Tide of Sterility with an Atlas of World Cultures12. Lawrence H. Keeley: Pre-State Societies in the Hobbesian Trap 13. Marvin Harris: Ecological Anthropology and Cultural Materialism Part V: Montesquieu, Mann, and Goldthorpe 14. The Baron de Montesquieu: Towards a Geography of Political Culture15. Michael Mann and Societal Aggregation: From Tribe, to Fief, to City-State, to Nation, to Empire16. John Harry Goldthorpe: Weighing the Biological Ballast Informing Class Structure and Class Mobility Part VI: Cattell, Bowlby, and Bronfenbrenner 17. Raymond B. Cattell: Bequeathing a Dual Inheritance to Life History Theory18. Edward John Mostyn Bowlby: Reframing Parental Investment and Offspring Attachment19. Uri Bronfenbrenner: Towards an Evolutionary Ecological Systems Theory.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319901244 20180910
The social sciences share a mission to shed light on human nature and society. However, there is no widely accepted meta-theory; no foundation from which variables can be linked, causally sequenced, or ultimately explained. This book advances "life history evolution" as the missing meta-theory for the social sciences. Originally a biological theory for the variation between species, research on life history evolution now encompasses psychological and sociological variation within the human species that has long been the stock and trade of social scientific study. The eighteen chapters of this book review six disciplines, eighteen authors, and eighty-two volumes published between 1734 and 2015-re-reading the texts in the light of life history evolution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319901244 20180910
Green Library
Book
x, 359 pages ; 25 cm
A watershed book that masterfully integrates insights from evolutionary biology, genetics, psychology, economics, and more to explore the development and workings of human societies "There is no good reason why human societies should not be described and explained with the same precision and success as the rest of nature." Thus argues evolutionary psychologist Pascal Boyer in this uniquely innovative book. Integrating recent insights from evolutionary biology, genetics, psychology, economics, and other fields, Boyer offers precise models of why humans engage in social behaviors such as forming families, tribes, and nations, or creating gender roles. In fascinating, thought-provoking passages, he explores questions such as, Why is there conflict between groups? Why do people believe low-value information such as rumors? Why are there religions? What is social justice? What explains morality? Boyer provides a new picture of cultural transmission that draws on the pragmatics of human communication, the constructive nature of memory in human brains, and human motivation for group formation and cooperation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300223453 20180806
Green Library
Book
xii, 467 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Chapter 1: A Brief History of Evolutionary Analysis in Sociology PART I: THE CONTINUING SOCIOLOGICAL TRADITION Chapter 2: Can Functionalism Be Saved? Toward a More Viable Form of Evolutionary Theorizing Chapter 3: Stage-Model Theories of Societal Evolution Chapter 4: Inter-societal Models of Societal Evolution Chapter 5: New Forms of Ecological Theorizing in Evolutionary Sociology PART II: DARWINIAN ANALYSIS AND ALTERNATIVES Chapter 6: The Evolution of Social Behavior by Natural Selection Chapter 7: The Rise of Sociobiology Chapter 8: Sociobiology and Human Behavior Chapter 9: Evolutionary Psychology and the Search for the Adapted Mind Chapter 10: The Limitations of Darwinian Analysis Chapter 11: New Models of Natural Selection in Socio-Cultural Evolution PART III: NEW DARWINIAN APPROACHES WITHIN SOCIOLOGY Chapter 12: New Forms of Comparative Sociology: What Primates Can Tell Sociology about Humans? Chapter 13: In Search of Human Nature: Using the Tools of Cross-species Comparative Analysis Chapter 14: The Evolution of the Human Brain: Applications of Neurosociology Chapter 15: Cross-Species Comparative Sociology Chapter 16: Cross-Species Analysis of Megasociality Chapter 17: Behavioral and Interpersonal Basis of Megasociality: Evidence from Primates Epilogue: Prospect for a New Evolutionary Sociology Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815386117 20180604
For decades, evolutionary analysis was overlooked or altogether ignored by sociologists. Fears and biases persisted nearly a century after Comte Auguste gave the discipline its name, as did concerns that its effect would only reduce sociology to another discipline - whether biology, psychology, or economics. Worse, apprehension that the application of evolutionary theory would encourage heightened perceptions of racism, sexism, ethnocentrism and reductionism pervaded. Turner and Machalek argue instead for a new embrace of biology and evolutionary analysis. Sociology, from its very beginnings in the early 19th century, has always been concerned with the study of evolution, particularly the transformation of societies from simple to ever-more complex forms. By comprehensively reviewing the original ways that sociologists applied evolutionary theory and examining the recent renewal and expansion of these early approaches, the authors confront the challenges posed by biology, neuroscience, and psychology to distinct evolutionary approaches within sociology. They emerge with key theoretical and methodological discoveries that demonstrate the critical - and compelling - case for a dramatically enriched sociology that incorporates all forms of comparative evolutionary analysis to its canon and study of sociocultural phenomena.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780815386117 20180604
Green Library
Book
viii, 167 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • The Contributors viiIntroduction 1Michael L PlattPart 1The Social Origins of Language 9Robert M Seyfarth and Dorothy L CheneyPart 21 Linguistics and Pragmatics 37John McWhorter2 Where Is Continuity Likely to Be Found? 46Ljiljana Progovac3 Fluency Effects in Human Language 62Jennifer E Arnold4 Relational Knowledge and the Origins of Language 79Benjamin Wilson and Christopher I Petkov5 Primates, Cephalopods, and the Evolution ofCommunication 102Peter Godfrey-SmithPart 3Conclusion 123Robert M Seyfarth and Dorothy L CheneyNotes 131References 135Index 163.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691177236 20180122
How human language evolved from the need for social communication The origins of human language remain hotly debated. Despite growing appreciation of cognitive and neural continuity between humans and other animals, an evolutionary account of human language--in its modern form--remains as elusive as ever. The Social Origins of Language provides a novel perspective on this question and charts a new path toward its resolution. In the lead essay, Robert Seyfarth and Dorothy Cheney draw on their decades-long pioneering research on monkeys and baboons in the wild to show how primates use vocalizations to modulate social dynamics. They argue that key elements of human language emerged from the need to decipher and encode complex social interactions. In other words, social communication is the biological foundation upon which evolution built more complex language. Seyfarth and Cheney's argument serves as a jumping-off point for responses by John McWhorter, Ljiljana Progovac, Jennifer E. Arnold, Christopher I. Petkov and Benjamin Wilson, and Peter Godfrey-Smith, each of whom draw on their respective expertise in linguistics, neuroscience, philosophy, and psychology. Michael Platt provides an introduction, Seyfarth and Cheney a concluding essay. Ultimately, The Social Origins of Language offers thought-provoking viewpoints on how human language evolved.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691177236 20180122
Green Library
Book
xxiv, 243 pages ; 23 cm
  • Preface Introduction 1. Early Days 2. Basics 3. Social Evolution 4. Veblen's New Theory 5. The Critique Continued 6. Veblen's Theory of Business 7. The Great War 8. Revolution.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138069060 20180820
In his latest book, scholar-historian Murray G. Murphey exhaustively explores the life and theory of Thorstein Veblen (1857-1929), whom, many scholars agree, remains one of the leading social theorists of all time, if not also one of the more confounding. Murphey's account begins with a brief economic history of nineteenth-century America, wherein he examines the conditions that formed Veblen's ideology. With that understanding, the author studies Veblen's personal history and brings to the fore his foundational ideas on human psychology, race, his theory of knowledge, and his analysis of social evolution. In the book's later chapters, Murphey considers Veblen's writing through the scope of his major volumes - The Theory of the Leisure Class, The Theory of Business Enterprise, and Imperial Germany and the Industrial Revolution, among others. Spanning the latter stages of the nineteenth century into the first several decades of the twentieth century, Murphey traces Veblen's radical economics and thinking within the broader context of America's economic theory. In so doing, he upholds Veblen's influence on the canons of economics and social science, and importantly, he attempts to resolve the lingering mystery behind one of America's more puzzling and influential theorists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138069060 20180820
Green Library
Book
xvi, 179 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
ix, 837 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Was the last common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans chimpanzee-like?
  • Introduction: chimpanzees and human evolution / Martin N. Muller
  • Reconstructing the last common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans / David R. Pilbeam and Daniel E. Lieberman
  • Equal, similar, but different: convergent bonobos and conserved chimpanzees / Brian Hare and Richard W. Wrangham
  • Chimpanzees and the evolution of human uniqueness
  • Introduction: chimpanzees and human uniqueness / Martin N. Muller
  • Mortality, senescence, and lifespan / Michael D. Gurven and Cristina M. Gomes
  • Fertility and fecundity / Melissa Emery Thompson and Peter T. Ellison
  • Locomotor ecology and evolution in chimpanzees and humans / Herman Pontzer
  • Evolution of the human dietary niche: initial transitions / Sherry V. Nelson and Marian I. Hamilton
  • Evolution of the human dietary niche: quest for high quality / Rachel N. Carmody
  • From pan to man the hunter: hunting and meat sharing by chimpanzees, humans, and our common ancestor / Brian M. Wood and Ian C. Gilby
  • The evolution of the human mating system / Martin N. Muller and David R. Pilbeam
  • From chimpanzee society to human society: bridging the kinship gap / Bernard Chapais
  • Violent cousins: chimpanzees, humans, and the roots of war / Michael l. Wilson and Luke Glowacki
  • Cooperative and competitive relationships within sexes / Richard W. Wrangham and Joyce Benenson
  • Cooperation between the sexes / Adrian V. Jaeggi, Paul l. Hooper, Ann E. Caldwell Hooper, Michael D. Gurven, Jane B. Lancaster and Hillard S. Kaplan
  • Sexual coercion in chimpanzees and humans / Martin N. Muller
  • Tool use and manufacture in the last common ancestor of pan and homo / Campbell Rolian and Susana Carvalho
  • Cultural evolution in chimpanzees and humans / Joseph Henrich and Claudio Tennie
  • Chimpanzee cognition and the roots of the human mind / Alexandra G. Rosati
  • Ancestral precursors, social control, and social selection in the evolution of morals / Christopher Boehm
  • Communication and language / Katie E. Slocombe and Thom Scott-Philips.
Knowledge of wild chimpanzees has expanded dramatically. This volume, edited by Martin Muller, Richard Wrangham, and David Pilbeam, brings together scientists who are leading a revolution to discover and explain human uniqueness, by studying our closest living relatives. Their conclusions may transform our understanding of human evolution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674967953 20180115
Green Library
Book
1 online resource ( ix, 837 pages) : illustrations.
  • Was the last common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans chimpanzee-like?
  • Introduction: chimpanzees and human evolution / Martin N. Muller
  • Reconstructing the last common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans / David R. Pilbeam and Daniel E. Lieberman
  • Equal, similar, but different: convergent bonobos and conserved chimpanzees / Brian Hare and Richard W. Wrangham
  • Chimpanzees and the evolution of human uniqueness
  • Introduction: chimpanzees and human uniqueness / Martin N. Muller
  • Mortality, senescence, and lifespan / Michael D. Gurven and Cristina M. Gomes
  • Fertility and fecundity / Melissa Emery Thompson and Peter T. Ellison
  • Locomotor ecology and evolution in chimpanzees and humans / Herman Pontzer
  • Evolution of the human dietary niche: initial transitions / Sherry V. Nelson and Marian I. Hamilton
  • Evolution of the human dietary niche: quest for high quality / Rachel N. Carmody
  • From pan to man the hunter: hunting and meat sharing by chimpanzees, humans, and our common ancestor / Brian M. Wood and Ian C. Gilby
  • The evolution of the human mating system / Martin N. Muller and David R. Pilbeam
  • From chimpanzee society to human society: bridging the kinship gap / Bernard Chapais
  • Violent cousins: chimpanzees, humans, and the roots of war / Michael l. Wilson and Luke Glowacki
  • Cooperative and competitive relationships within sexes / Richard W. Wrangham and Joyce Benenson
  • Cooperation between the sexes / Adrian V. Jaeggi, Paul l. Hooper, Ann E. Caldwell Hooper, Michael D. Gurven, Jane B. Lancaster and Hillard S. Kaplan
  • Sexual coercion in chimpanzees and humans / Martin N. Muller
  • Tool use and manufacture in the last common ancestor of pan and homo / Campbell Rolian and Susana Carvalho
  • Cultural evolution in chimpanzees and humans / Joseph Henrich and Claudio Tennie
  • Chimpanzee cognition and the roots of the human mind / Alexandra G. Rosati
  • Ancestral precursors, social control, and social selection in the evolution of morals / Christopher Boehm
  • Communication and language Katie E. Slocombe and Thom Scott Philips.
Knowledge of wild chimpanzees has expanded dramatically. This volume, edited by Martin Muller, Richard Wrangham, and David Pilbeam, brings together scientists who are leading a revolution to discover and explain human uniqueness, by studying our closest living relatives. Their conclusions may transform our understanding of human evolution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780674967953 20171211
Book
xii, 450 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Foreword ix Part I: Foundations of Culture 1 Darwin's Unfinished Symphony 1 2 Ubiquitous Copying 31 3 Why Copy? 50 4 A Tale of Two Fishes 77 5 The Roots of Creativity 99 Part II: The Evolution of the Mind 6 The Evolution of Intelligence 123 7 High Fidelity 150 8 Why We Alone Have Language 175 9 Gene-Culture Coevolution 208 10 The Dawn of Civilization 234 11 Foundations of Cooperation 264 12 The Arts 283 Epilogue: Awe Without Wonder 315 Notes 323 References 385 Index 443.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691151182 20170410
How culture transformed human evolution Humans possess an extraordinary capacity for cultural production, from the arts and language to science and technology. How did the human mind--and the uniquely human ability to devise and transmit culture--evolve from its roots in animal behavior? Darwin's Unfinished Symphony presents a captivating new theory of human cognitive evolution. This compelling and accessible book reveals how culture is not just the magnificent end product of an evolutionary process that produced a species unlike all others--it is also the key driving force behind that process. Kevin Laland shows how the learned and socially transmitted activities of our ancestors shaped our intellects through accelerating cycles of evolutionary feedback. The truly unique characteristics of our species--such as our intelligence, language, teaching, and cooperation--are not adaptive responses to predators, disease, or other external conditions. Rather, humans are creatures of their own making. Drawing on his own groundbreaking research, and bringing it to life with vivid natural history, Laland explains how animals imitate, innovate, and have remarkable traditions of their own. He traces our rise from scavenger apes in prehistory to modern humans able to design iPhones, dance the tango, and send astronauts into space. This book tells the story of the painstaking fieldwork, the key experiments, the false leads, and the stunning scientific breakthroughs that led to this new understanding of how culture transformed human evolution. It is the story of how Darwin's intellectual descendants picked up where he left off and took up the challenge of providing a scientific account of the evolution of the human mind.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780691151182 20170410
Green Library
Book
xvii, 294 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm
  • 1. IntroductionPART I: THE PARADOXES OF HUMANS, CIVILIZATIONS, AND NATIONS2. Culture as an Anti-Darwinian Process3. Good Environment, Bad Environment4. Living in the Lands Threatened5. Are there any Optimal Strategies for Nations?PART II: CULTURAL CYCLICITY AND THE NONLINEAR BEHAVIORS OF NATIONS6. Civilization as a Cyclical Human Process7. China: Short Cycles, Long Cycles8. The Western World: A Longer Cycle9. In Cycles We Trust.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319487717 20170522
This book applies an economic approach to examine the driving forces behind the dynamic behaviors of developing nations. Taking into account initial conditions and environmental and external factors often oversimplified by historians and anthropologists, Guo finds that the rise and fall of civilizations and nations followed an anti-Darwinian process: physical weakness, rather than strength, induced humans to adapt. Cultures facing unfavorable physical and environmental conditions developed complex societies to overcome these challenges, while favorable conditions did not incentivize major economic and cultural change. Over centuries of economic growth and development, nations and civilizations' adaptive behaviors have followed a cyclical path at both the country level and in an international context. This interdisciplinary book incorporates elements of history, anthropology, and development into an astute economic analysis that changes the way we think about the origins and evolutions of civilizations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319487717 20170522
Green Library
Book
xiii, 336 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • Preface-- 1. The evolution of human cooperation-- 2. Economic anthropology of stateless societies: the rise and fall of homo economicus-- 3. Conditional cooperators: the evolutionary game theory revolution-- 4. The role of coercion in social theory-- 5. The ritualized economy: how people in stateless societies cooperate-- 6. An anthropological game theory model for the evolution of ritualized economies-- 7. The evolution of ritualized economies: the archaeological evidence-- 8. Epilogue: 'no beans, no Jesus'.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107180550 20171002
How do people living in small groups without money, markets, police and rigid social classes develop norms of economic and social cooperation that are sustainable over time? This book addresses this fundamental question and explains the origin, structure and spread of stateless societies. Using insights from game theory, ethnography and archaeology, Stanish shows how ritual - broadly defined - is the key. Ritual practices encode elaborate rules of behavior and are ingenious mechanisms of organizing society in the absence of coercive states. As well as asking why and how people choose to co-operate, Stanish also provides the theoretical framework to understand this collective action problem. He goes on to highlight the evolution of cooperation with ethnographic and archaeological data from around of the world. Merging evolutionary game theory concepts with cultural evolutionary theory, this book will appeal to those seeking a transdisciplinary approach to one of the greatest problems in human evolution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107180550 20171002
Green Library
Book
viii, 172 pages ; 25 cm
  • The Human Puzzle The breakdown of self Cooperation and life LifeYour physical self Genes Simple cells - prokaryotes 17 More complex cells - eukaryotes 18 Multi-cellularity 20 Mobile eco-systems 24Your psychological self 27 A soulless existence 29 Majority rule 31 Surely there is something more? 31Easily explicable cooperation and natural selection 35 Mutual gain 36 Natural selection 38 Proximate and ultimate explanations 41 Group selection 42 Behavioral genetics 43Family 46 Warning calls 50 Eusociality - ants, wasps and bees 51 A challenge 54 Eusociality - termites and naked mole rats 57 Kin selection in humans 58Friends 61 The prisoners' dilemma 61 Examples from the animal world? 65 The social brain 69 Other possible genetic explanations of cooperation 71 We are not them: about our closest relatives 73 Reciprocity in humans 75Humanity - the paragon of cooperation? 78 Games of cooperation 81 A huge mistake? 83 Cultural group selection 85 Nature or nurture 86 Cultural explanations for extreme cooperation 89Language 95 The structure of human language 98 The evolution of language 99 The green beards of language 102 The second replicator 105The last piece of the puzzle? - Cooperation over our heads 108< A slow history 111 Cultural evolution 116 Cultural evolutionary explanations of cooperation 125 Networks 127 The software 130Epilogue: The human super organism 133 Characteristics of synergistic cooperation 136 How to harness idea collectives 137References 140Notes 148.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319508733 20180702
This book takes the reader on a journey, navigating the enigmatic aspects of cooperation; a journey that starts inside the body and continues via our thoughts to the human super-organism. Cooperation is one of life's fundamental principles. We are all made of parts - genes, cells, organs, neurons, but also of ideas, or `memes'. Our societies too are made of parts - us humans. Is all this cooperation fundamentally the same process? From the smallest component parts of our bodies and minds to our complicated societies, everywhere cooperation is the organizing principle. Often this cooperation has emerged because the constituting parts have benefited from the interactions, but not seldom the cooperating units appear to lose on the interaction. How then to explain cooperation? How can we understand our intricate societies where we regularly provide small and large favors for people we are unrelated to, know, or even never expect to meet again? Where does the idea come from that it is right to risk one's life for country, religion or freedom? The answers seem to reside in the two processes that have shaped humanity: biological and cultural evolution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319508733 20180702
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
1 online resource : illustrations (black and white)
  • I. FOUNDATIONS-- II. EXTENSIONS.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198733058 20171204
From mitochondria to meerkats, the natural world is full of spectacular examples of social behaviour. In the early 1960s Bill Hamilton changed the way we think about how such behaviour evolves. He introduced three key innovations - now known as Hamilton's rule, kin selection, and inclusive fitness - which have been enormously influential, but which remain the subject of fierce controversy. Hamilton's pioneering work kick-started a research program now known as social evolution theory. This is a book about the philosophical foundations and future prospects of that program. Part I, "Foundations", is a careful exposition and defence of Hamilton's ideas, with a few modifications along the way. In Part II, "Extensions", Jonathan Birch shows how these ideas can be applied to phenomena including cooperation in micro-organisms, cooperation among the cells of a multicellular organism, and culturally evolved cooperation in the earliest human societies. Birch argues that real progress can be made in understanding microbial evolution, evolutionary transitions, and human evolution by viewing them through the lens of social evolution theory, provided the theory is interpreted with care and adapted where necessary. The Philosophy of Social Evolution places social evolution theory on a firm philosophical footing and sets out exciting new directions for further work.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780198733058 20171204
Book
xxiv, 94 pages, 10 unnumbered leaves of plates : illustrations (some color), maps (some color) ; 28 cm
John V. Murra's Lewis Henry Morgan Lectures, originally given in 1969, are the only major study of the Andean "avenue towards civilization." Collected and published for the first time here, they offer a powerful and insistent perspective on the Andean region as one of the few places in which a so-called "pristine civilization" developed. Murra sheds light not only on the way civilization was achieved here which followed a fundamentally different process than that of Mesopotamia and Mesoamerica he uses that study to shed new light on the general problems of achieving civilization in any world region. Murra intermixes a study of Andean ecology with an exploration of the ideal of economic self-sufficiency, stressing two foundational socioeconomic forces: reciprocity and redistribution. He shows how both enabled Andean communities to realize direct control of a maximum number of vertically ordered ecological floors and the resources they offered. He famously called this arrangement a "vertical archipelago, " a revolutionary model that is still examined and debated almost fifty years after it was first presented in these lecture. Written in a crisp and elegant style and inspired by decades of ethnographic fieldwork, this set of lectures is nothing less than a lost classic, and it will be sure to inspire new generations of anthropologists and historians working in South America and beyond.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780997367553 20171211
Green Library
Book
x, 149 pages ; 22 cm
"A provocative and balanced examination of our current social and political situation through the lens of Integral Theory--by a cutting-edge philosopher of our times. The socio-political climate of America is overwhelmingly divisive, and the response to the recent presidential election has been extreme, visceral, and extremely vocal on all sides. With so much hostility, antagonism, cynicism, and discord, how can we mend the ruptures in our society? Leading-edge philosopher Ken Wilber examines current events through the lens of Integral Theory to show what led to these fractures, both in America and around the world--as well as what is needed for humanity to move forward. In his provocative analysis, he explains that the election of Donald Trump is an evolutionary self-correction that has been decades in the making. It is in fact a backlash against the failure of those at the leading edge of consciousness (postmodernism and pluralism) to acknowledge the lie underlying the progress they've pursued: society is not equal, it's not consistent, and it doesn't make room for everyone. But a new Integral force is emerging that can move beyond the narcissism and nihilism of political correctness to offer genuine leadership and move toward a developmental-based wisdom of greater wholeness"-- Provided by publisher.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xix, 532 pages : illustrations, maps ; 26 cm.
New approaches to collapsed complex societies.The Maya. The Romans. The great dynasties of ancient China. It is generally believed that these once mighty empires eventually crumbled and disappeared. A recent trend in archaeology, however, focusing on what happened during and after the decline of once powerful regimes has found social resilience and transformation instead of collapse. In Beyond Collapse: Archaeological Perspectives on Resilience, Revitalization, and Transformation in Complex Societies, editor Ronald K. Faulseit gathers scholars with diverse theoretical perspectives to interpret how ancient civilizations responded to various stresses, including environmental change, warfare, and the fragmentation of political institutions. Contributors discuss not only what makes societies collapse but also why some societies are resilient and others are not, as well as how societies reorganize after collapse. Putting in context issues we face today, such as climate change, social diversity, and the failure of modern states, Beyond Collapse is an essential volume for readers interested in humanenvironment interaction and in the collapse-and subsequent reorganization-of human societies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809333998 20180709
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (553 pages)
New approaches to collapsed complex societies.The Maya. The Romans. The great dynasties of ancient China. It is generally believed that these once mighty empires eventually crumbled and disappeared. A recent trend in archaeology, however, focusing on what happened during and after the decline of once powerful regimes has found social resilience and transformation instead of collapse. In Beyond Collapse: Archaeological Perspectives on Resilience, Revitalization, and Transformation in Complex Societies, editor Ronald K. Faulseit gathers scholars with diverse theoretical perspectives to interpret how ancient civilizations responded to various stresses, including environmental change, warfare, and the fragmentation of political institutions. Contributors discuss not only what makes societies collapse but also why some societies are resilient and others are not, as well as how societies reorganize after collapse. Putting in context issues we face today, such as climate change, social diversity, and the failure of modern states, Beyond Collapse is an essential volume for readers interested in humanenvironment interaction and in the collapse-and subsequent reorganization-of human societies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809333998 20180611
Book
xvii, 315 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm
  • - Introduction: Changing our environment, changing ourselves.- PART I: THE WORK OF PETER DICKENS.- 1. Peter Dickens: Late capitalism, nature and mental life.- 2. Defragmenting nature: Themes in Peter Dickens's work.- PART II: PHILOSOPHICAL AND THEORETICAL DEBATES.- 3. Environmental alienation.- 4. Marx's universal metabolism of nature and the Frankfurt School: Dialectical contradictions and critical syntheses.- PART III: EMERGING ISSUES.- 5. Metabolic rift theory and the crisis of our foodways.- 6. Satellite farming, food and human wellbeing.- 7. Computers and the alienation of thinking: From Deep Blue to the Googlemobile.- 8. Society, nature and experience: Jouissance on the margins.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137569905 20161128
In this book, a celebration of the work of the sociologist Peter Dickens serves as the catalyst for exploring the relationship between human 'internal nature' (our health and psychological well-being) and 'external nature' (the environment on which we depend and which we collectively transform). Across contributions from Ted Benton, James Ormrod, Kate Soper, John Bellamy Foster and Brett Clark, Graham Sharp, James Addicott, Kathryn Dean and Peter Dickens himself, the book draws attention to alienation associated with the promotion of different knowledges in late capitalist production. But it also highlights the possibilities for generating less alienated relations with our environment in the future. As well as discussing the philosophical and theoretical issues involved, the book contains contemporary case studies of ultra-processed food, satellite farming, computerised thinking and dark tourism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137569905 20161128
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