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Book
335 pages : illustrations, map ; 25 cm
Green Library
Book
307 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 21 cm.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xiv, 223 pages)
The importance of the banquet in the late Renaissance is impossible to overlook. Banquets showcased a host\u2019s wealth and power, provided an occasion for nobles from distant places to gather together, and even served as a form of political propaganda. But what was it really like to cater to the tastes and habits of high society at the banquets of nobles, royalty, and popes? What did they eat and how did they eat it? In The Banquet, Ken Albala covers the transitional period between the heavily spiced and colored cuisine of the Middle Ages and classical French haut cuisine. This development involved increasing use dairy products, a move toward lighter meats such as veal and chicken, increasing identification of national food customs, more sweetness and aromatics, and a refined aesthetic sense, surprisingly in line with the late Renaissance styles found in other arts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252083075 20180521
Book
792 pages ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
3 volumes ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
334 pages : illustrations, map ; 22 cm.
  • A matter of class : food in the United States, 1870-1900 / by Katherine Leonard Turner
  • Seeing the Gilded Age through its recipes
  • Mrs. Mary F. Henderson, practical cooking and dinner giving (1877)
  • Selected advice on table manners (1870-1903)
  • Handwritten recipe manuscript (1870s ad 1880s)
  • Mrs. Peter A. White, the Kentucky housewife : a collection of recipes for cooking (1885)
  • Christine Terhune Herrick, what to eat, how to serve it (1891)
  • Dietary studies fromn Alabama, New York, Chicago, Virginia, and New Mexico (1895-18997)
  • Gilded Age banquet menus (1880-1899)
  • Fannie Farmer, the Boston Cooking School Cookbook (1896).
Green Library
Book
xii, 199 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Acknowledgements Introduction 1: Food on Trails 2: Walking in a New Continent 3: Polar Explorations 4: Mountain Expeditions 5: Desert Travel 6: Pilgrimage 7: Army Food 8: Street food Afterword.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442255067 20170731
What did great adventurers eat during their expeditions to the far corners of the world? How did they view the role of food in their survival and wellbeing? What about hikers and backpackers today who set out to enjoy nature, pushing their own boundaries of comfort for adventure. How does food impact their experience? And what do they have in common with pilgrims and soldiers? Food is a significant element of our relationship with nature. Whether a historical expedition or a weekend camping trip, a journey made on foot requires sustenance. Without mastering our relationship with food we would have not been to the South Pole or summited Mt. Everest or expanded to the west of America. However, in the reporting of these expeditions so far food has rarely taken a central role. It is possible to take a different stance and look at our time on trails with food as the leading character. Here, Demet Guzey offers a fun and interesting read on the social and cultural history, developments and challenges in food on trails and in the wild. She explores personal accounts, news articles and anecdotes to highlight how food has accompanied us in mountaineering, desert travel, and pilgrimage, in the army or on the street. From tinned foods to foraging in the wild, worm-infested hardtack to palate-dulling army rations, loss of appetite in high altitude to starvation at the trenches, no stone is left unturned in this tour of how we manage food on foot, and how disasters happen when we do not manage it so well. Readers will delight in both the stories of many of the famous explorations and the more current journeys.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442255067 20170731
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
302 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 25 cm.
What do we think about when we think of Greek food? For many, it is the meze and traditional plates of a typical Greek island taverna from summer holidays or from Greek restaurants at home. This book takes us into and beyond the taverna to offer us a unique, comprehensive history of the foods of Greece. Andrew and Rachel Dalby discuss how the land was first settled, what was grown, and how certain fruits, herbs and vegetables came to be identified. Moving through prehistorical and classical Greece, and the Roman, Byzantine and Ottoman empires, they explore the variety of Greek foods among communities outside the national borders as well as the food culture of the regions and islands of Greece itself. Through a synthesis of modern Greek food, with all that it owes to Christianity and to Greeks of the diaspora, they lead us into a discussion of Greek hospitality. Greek food is brimming with thousands of centuries of history, lore and culture. With many superb illustrations, and traditional recipes that blend historical and modern flavours, Gifts of the Gods is a fine account of this rich and ancient cuisine.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780238548 20180122
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 126 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
The modern twenty-first century kitchen has an array of time saving equipment for preparing a meal: a state of the art stove and refrigerator, a microwave oven, a food processor, a blender and a variety of topnotch pots, pans and utensils. We take so much for granted as we prepare the modern meal - not just in terms of equipment, but also the ingredients, without needing to worry about availability or seasonality. We cook with gas or electricity - at the turn of the switch we have instant heat. But it wasn't always so. Just step back a few centuries to say the 1300s and we'd find quite a different kitchen, if there was one at all. We might only have a fireplace in the main living space of a small cottage. If we were lucky enough to have a kitchen, the majority of the cooking would be done over an open hearth, we'd build a fire of wood or coal and move a cauldron over the fire to prepare a stew or soup. A drink might be heated or kept warm in a long-handled saucepan, set on its own trivet beside the fire. Food could be fried in a pan, grilled on a gridiron, or turned on a spit. We might put together a small improvised oven for baking. Regulating the heat of the open flame was a demanding task. Cooking on an open hearth was an all-embracing way of life and most upscale kitchens had more than one fireplace with chimneys for ventilation. One fireplace was kept burning at a low, steady heat at all times for simmering or boiling water and the others used for grilling on a spit over glowing, radiant embers. This is quite a different situation than in our modern era - unless we were out camping and cooking over an open fire. In this book Katherine McIver explores the medieval kitchen from its location and layout (like Francesco Datini of Prato two kitchens), to its equipment (the hearth, the fuels, vessels and implements) and how they were used, to who did the cooking (man or woman) and who helped. We'll look at the variety of ingredients (spices, herbs, meats, fruits, vegetables), food preservation and production (salted fish, cured meats, cheese making) and look through recipes, cookbooks and gastronomic texts to complete the picture of cooking in the medieval kitchen. Along the way, she looks at illustrations like the miniatures from the Tacuinum Sanitatis (a medieval health handbook), as well as paintings and engravings, to give us an idea of the workings of a medieval kitchen including hearth cooking, the equipment used, how cheese was made, harvesting ingredients, among other things. She explores medieval cookbooks such works as Anonimo Veneziano, Libro per cuoco (fourtheenth century), Anonimo Toscano, Libro della cucina (fourteenth century), Anonimo Napoletano (end of thirteenth/early fourteenth century), Liber de coquina, Anonimo Medidonale, Due libri di cucina (fourteenth century), Magninus Mediolanensis (Maino de' Maineri), Opusculum de saporibus (fourteenth century), Johannes Bockenheim, Il registro di cucina (fifteenth century), Maestro Martino's Il Libro de arte coquinaria (fifteenth century) and Bartolomeo Sacchi, called Platina's On Right Pleasure and Good Health (1470). This is the story of the medieval kitchen and its operation from the thirteenth-century until the late fifteenth-century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442248946 20171204
Green Library
Book
xviii, 400 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • 1. Introduction: the social life of food-- Part I. Laying the Groundwork: 2. Framing food investigation-- 3. The practices of a meal in society-- Part II. Current Food Studies in Archaeology: 4. The archaeological study of food activities-- 5. Food economics-- 6. Food politics: power and status-- Part III. Food and Identity: The Potentials of Food Archaeology: 7. Food in the construction of group identity-- 8. The creation of personal identity: food, body and personhood-- 9. Food creates society.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107153363 20170227
This book offers a global perspective on the role food has played in shaping human societies, through both individual and collective identities. It integrates ethnographic and archaeological case studies from the European and Near Eastern Neolithic, Han China, ancient Cahokia, Classic Maya, the Inka and many other periods and regions, to ask how the meal in particular has acted as a social agent in the formation of society, economy, culture and identity. Drawing on a range of social theorists, Hastorf provides a theoretical toolkit essential for any archaeologist interested in foodways. Studying the social life of food, this book engages with taste, practice, the meal and the body to discuss power, identity, gender and meaning that creates our world as it created past societies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107153363 20170227
Green Library
Book
vii, 217 pages : illustrations, map ; 23 cm
During the 17th century, England increasingly saw foreign foods made increasingly available to consumers and featured in recipe books, medical manuals, treatises, travel narratives, even in plays. Yet the public's fascination with these foods went beyond just eating them. Through exotic presentations in popular culture, they were able to mentally partake of products of the colonies they may not have had access to. This book examines the ""body and mind"" consumerism of the early British Empire.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781476668628 20180115
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
255 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm
A Timeline of Australian Food takes readers on a tasty and sometimes surprising culinary journey through 150 years of Australian food. Lavishly illustrated, this tasty book looks at what we've eaten, how we've shopped and how we've produced and prepared our food, decade by decade through depression, war and decades of abundance.Within the lifetime of today's Baby Boomers, there have been revolutionary changes in how we eat. The standard Anglo-Irish staples of meat and potatoes haven't disappeared, but they've been joined by pizza and pho, kimchi and kebabs. And once we had two takeaway options - fish and chips - but now they're endless.Never bland, this is history in digestible chunks with big helpings of tasty trivia and a generous dash of nostalgia. How did Tim Tams get their name? Why was Australia's first commercial olive oil produced in a prison? Why were revolving restaurants so popular? You'll come back wanting a second helping.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781742235349 20180611
Green Library
Book
xii, 241 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
In this entertaining history, Gregory McNamee explores the many ethnic and cultural traditions that have contributed to the food of the Southwest. He traces the origins of the cuisine to the arrival of humans in the Americas, the work of the earliest farmers of Mesoamerica, and the most ancient trade networks joining peoples of the coast, plains, and mountains. From the ancient chile pepper and agave to the comparatively recent fare of sushi and Frito pie, this complex culinary journey involves many players over space and time. Born of scarcity, migration, and climate change, these foods are now fully at home in the Southwest of today-and with the "southwesternization" of the American palate at large, they are found across the globe. McNamee extends that story across thousands of years to the present, even imagining what the southwestern menu will look like in the near future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780826359049 20171204
Green Library
Book
2 volumes (xv, 1090 pages) : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
xiv, 193 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction 1.The Land and Its People: Time and Place 2. Food Production: The Indigenous Kitchen 3. The Kitchen: Transplanting the British Kitchen 4. The Cook and The Help. 5. Colonial Manners at Table 6. The Meal 7. Colonial cookery books.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442249813 20161219
The first Europeans to settle on the Aboriginal land that would become known as Australia arrived in 1788. From the first these colonists were accused of ineptitude when it came to feeding themselves: as legend has it they nearly starved to death because they were hopeless agriculturists and ignored indigenous foods. As the colony developed Australians developed a reputation as dreadful cooks and uncouth eaters who gorged themselves on meat and disdained vegetables. By the end of the nineteenth century the Australian diet was routinely described as one of poorly cooked mutton, damper, cabbage, potatoes and leaden puddings all washed down with an ocean of saccharine sweet tea: These stereotypes have been allowed to stand as representing Australia's colonial food history. Contemporary Australians have embraced 'exotic' European and Asian cuisines and blended elements of these to begin to shape a distinctive "Australian" style of cookery but they have tended to ignore, or ridicule, what they believe to be the terrible English cuisine of their colonial ancestors largely because of these prevailing negative stereotypes. The Colonial Kitchen: Australia 1788- 1901 challenges the notion that colonial Australians were all diabolical cooks and ill-mannered eaters through a rich and nuanced exploration of their kitchens, gardens and dining rooms; who was writing about food and what their purpose might have been; and the social and cultural factors at play on shaping what, how and when they at ate and how this was represented.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442249813 20161219
Green Library
Book
vi, 287 pages ; 24 cm.
"Essays discuss food and drink in Shakespeare's plays, reframing questions about cuisine, eating, and meals in early modern drama and emphasizing the aesthetic, communal, and philosophical aspects of food; many issues in Shakespeare studies are thus considered in terms of the cultural marker of culinary dynamics"-- Provided by publisher.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
6 volumes : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Series Preface Introduction: Food and Commensality in the Ancient Near East Paul Erdkamp, Flemish Free University of Brussels, Belgium 1 Food Production Paul Halstead, University of Sheffield, UK 2 Food Systems in Classical Antiquity Wim Broekaert, and Arjan Zuiderhoek, Ghent University, Belgium 3 Food Security, Safety, and Crises Paul Erdkamp, Flemish Free University of Brussels, Belgium 4 Food and Politics in Classical Antiquity Wim Broekaert, and Arjan Zuiderhoek, Ghent University, Belgium 5 Eating and Drinking Out Steven J. R. Ellis, University of Cincinnati, USA 6 Professional Cooking, Kitchens, and Service Work Robert I. Curtis, Department of Classics, University of Georgia, USA 7 Family and Domesticity Konrad Vossing, Rheinische Friedrich- Wilhelms-Universitat Bonn, Germany 8 Body and Soul Robin Nadeau, University of Exeter, UK 9 Food Representations Hugh Lindsay, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia 10 World Developments Fabio Parasecoli, The New School, NYC, USA Notes Bibliography Notes on Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474269902 20161031
  • Volume 1 A Cultural History of Food in Antiquity, edited by Paul Erdkamp General Introduction 1. Food Production, Paul Halstead, University of Sheffield, UK 2. Food Systems, Arjan Zuiderhoek & Wim Broekaert, University of Ghent, Belgium 3. Food Security, Safety & Crises, Paul Erdkamp, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium 4. Food and Politics, Arjan Zuiderhoek & Wim Broekaert, University of Ghent, Belgium 5. Eating Out, Steven Ellis, University of Cincinnati, USA 6. Professional Cooking, Kitchens and Service Work, Robert Curtis, University of Georgia, USA 7. Family and Domesticity, Konrad Vossing, Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universitat Bonn, Germany 8. Body and Soul, Robin Nadeau, Universite Paris 1, France 9. Food Representations, Hugh Lindsay, University of Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia 10. World Developments, Fabio Parasecoli, New School, New York, USA Index Volume 2 A Cultural History of Food in the Medieval Age, edited by Massimo Montanari General Introduction 1. Food Production, Alfio Cortonesi, University of Tuscia, Italy 2. Food Systems, Pere Benito, Universitat Lleida, Spain 3. Food Security, Safety & Crises, Giuliano Pinto, University of Florence, Italy 4. Food and Politics, Jean-Pierre Devroey, Free University of Brussells, Belgium 5. Eating Out, Alban Gautier, Universite du Littoral-Cote d'Opale, France 6. Professional Cooking, Kitchens & Service Work, Melitta Weiss-Adamson, University of Western Ontario, Canada 7. Family and Domesticity, Gabriella Piccinni, University of Siena, Italy 8. Body and Soul, Allen James Grieco, Harvard University, USA 9. Food Representations, Bruno Andreolli, University of Bologna, Italy 10. World Developments, Fabio Parasecoli, New School, New York, USA Index Volume 3 A Cultural History of Food in the Renaissance, edited by Ken Albala General Introduction 1. Food Production, Allen Grieco, I Tatti, Harvard, USA 2. Food Systems, Michael Krondl, Independent Scholar, USA 3. Food Security, Safety & Crises, Philip Slavin, Yale, USA 4. Food and Politics, Eric Dursteler, Brigham Young University, USA 5. Eating Out, Paul Freedman, Yale, USA 6. Professional Cooking, Kitchens & Service Work, Ken Albala, University of the Pacific, USA 7. Family & Domesticity, Alison Smith, Wagner College, USA 8. Body and Soul, Joan Fitzpatrick, Loughborough University, UK 9. Food Representations, Timothy Tomasik, Valparaiso University, USA 10. World Developments, Fabio Parasecoli, New School, New York, USA Index Volume 4 A Cultural History of Food in the Early Modern Age, edited by Beat Kumin Introduction 1. Food Production. Govind Sreenivasan, Brandeis University, USA 2. Food Systems: Central-Decentral Nertworks, Anne Radeff, University of Bern, Switzerland 3. Food Security, Pier Paolo Viazzo, University of Turin, Italy 4. Food and Politics, Victor Magagna, University of California San Diego, USA 5. Eating Out. Beat, Kumin, University of Warwick, UK 6. Professional Cooking, Kitchens and Service Work: 'Accomplisht' cookery, Sara Pennell, Roehampton University, UK 7. Family and Domesticity, Sara Pennell, Roehampton University, UK 8. Body and Soul: 'Living Physically' in the Kitchen, David Gentilcore, University of Leicester, UK 9. Food Representations: Powerful Appetites, Brian Cowan, McGill University, Canada 10. World Developments, Fabio Parasecoli, New School, New York, USA Index Volume 5 A Cultural History of Food in the Age of Empire, edited by Martin Bruegel General Introduction 1. Food Production, Pierre Saunier, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France 2. Food Systems, Yves Segers, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium 3. Food Security, Vera Hierholzer, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany 4. Food Politics, Martin Bruegel, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France 5. Eating Out, Peter Scholliers, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium 6. Professional Cooking, Kitchens & Service Work, Amy Trubek, University of Vermont, USA 7. Family & Domesticity: Food in Poor Households, Anna Davin, Independent Scholar, UK 8. Body and Soul, Ulrike Thoms, Institut fur Geschichte der Medizin, Berlin, Germany 9. Food Representations, Kolleen Guy, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA 10. World Developments, Fabio Parasecoli, New School, New York, USA Index Volume 6 A Cultural History of Food in the Modern Age, edited by Amy Bentley General Introduction 1. Food Production, Jeffrey Pilcher, University of Minnesota, USA 2. Food Systems, Daniel Block, Chicago State University, USA 3. Food Security, Safety and Crises, Peter Atkins, Durham University, UK 4. Food and Politics, Maya Joseph, The New School for Social Research and Marion Nestle, New York University, USA 5. Eating Out, Priscilla Ferguson, Columbia University, USA 6. Professional Cooking, Kitchens and Service Work, Amy Trubek, University of Vermont, USA 7. Family and Domesticity, Alice Julier, Chatham University, USA 8. Body and Soul, Warren Belasco, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA 9. Food Representations, Signe Rousseau, University of Cape Town, South Africa 10. World Developments, Fabio Parasecoli, New School, New York, USA Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474270755 20161031
  • Series Preface Introduction Beat Kumin, University of Warwick, UK 1 Food Production Govind Sreenivasan, Brandeis University, USA 2 Food Systems: Central-Decentral Networks Anne Radeff, University of Bern, Switzerland 3 Food Security, Safety, and Crises Pier Paolo Viazzo, University of Turin, Italy 4 Food and Politics: The Power of Bread in European Culture Victor Magagna, University of California San Diego, USA 5 Eating Out in Early Modern Europe Beat Kumin, University of Warwick, UK 6 Professional Cooking, Kitchens, and Service Work: Accomplisht Cookery Sara Pennell, Roehampton University, UK 7 Family and Domesticity: Cooking, Eating, and Making Homes Sara Pennell, Roehampton University, UK 8 Body and Soul, or Living Physically in the Kitchen David Gentilcore, University of Leicester, UK 9 Food Representations in Early Modern Europe: Powerful Appetites Brian Cowan, McGill University, Canada 10 World Developments: The Early Modern Age Fabio Parasecoli, The New School, New York City, USA Notes Bibliography Notes on Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474269995 20161031
  • Series Preface Introduction Ken Albala, University of the Pacific, USA 1 Food Production 29 Allen J. Grieco, Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Centre for Italian Renaissance Studies, Italy 2 Food Systems: Pepper, Herring, and Beer Michael Krondl, Independent Scholar, USA 3 Food Security, Safety, and Crises Philip Slavin, McGill University, Canada 4 Food and Politics Eric R. Dursteler, Brigham Young University, USA 5 Eating Out Paul Freedman, Yale University, USA 6 Professional Cooking, Kitchens, and Service Work Ken Albala, University of the Pacific, USA 7 Family and Domesticity Alison A. Smith, Wagner College, USA 8 Body and Soul Joan Fitzpatrick, Loughborough University, UK 9 Food in Painting Gillian Riley, Independent Scholar 10 World Developments Fabio Parasecoli, The New School, NYC, USA Notes Bibliography Notes on Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474269926 20161031
  • Series Preface Introduction Massimo Montanari, University of Bologna, Italy 1 Food Production Alfio Cortonesi, University of Tuscia, Viterbo, Italy 2 Food Systems Pere Benit, Univeristy of Lleida, Spain 3 Food Security Giuliano Pinto, University of Florence, Italy 4 Food and Politics Jean-Pierre Devroey, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium 5 Eating Out in the Early and High Middle Ages Alban Gautier, Universite du Littoral Cote d'Opale, Boulogne-sur-Mer, France 6 Professional Cooking, Kitchens, and Service Work Melitta Weiss Adamson, University of Western Ontario, Canada 7 Family and Domesticity Gabriella Piccinni, University of Siena, Italy 8 Body and Soul Allen J. Grieco, Villa I Tatti, The Harvard University Centre for Italian Renaissance Studies, Italy 9 Food Representations Bruno Andreolli, University of Bologna, Italy 10 World Developments Fabio Parasecoli, The New School, NYC, USA Notes Bibliography Notes on Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474269919 20161031
  • Series Preface Introduction: Locating Foodways in the Nineteenth Century Martin Bruegel, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France 1 Food Production: Industrial Processing Begins to Gain Ground Pierre Saunier, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France 2 Food Systems in the Nineteenth Century Yves Segers, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium 3 Food Security and Safety Vera Hierholzer, Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main, Germany 4 Food and Politics: Policing the Street, Regulating the Market Martin Bruegel, Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique, France 5 Eating Out Peter Scholliers, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Belgium 6 Professional Cooking, Kitchens, and Service Work Amy B. Trubek, University of Vermont, USA 7 Family and Domesticity: Food in Poor Households Anna Davin, Independent Scholar, UK 8 Body and Soul: From Tension to Bifurcation Ulrike Thoms, Institut fur Geschichte der Medizin, Berlin, Germany 9 Food Representations Kolleen M. Guy, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA 10 World Food: The Age of Empire c. 1800-1920 Fabio Parasecoli, , New School, New York, USA Notes Bibliography Notes on Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474270038 20161031
  • Series Preface Introduction Amy Bentley, New York University, USA 1 Food Production Jeffrey M. Pilcher, University of Minnesota, USA 2 Food Systems Daniel Block, Chicago State University, USA 3 Food Security, Safety, and Crises: 1920-2000 Peter J. Atkins, Durham University, UK 4 Food and Politics in the Modern Age: 1920-2012 Maya Joseph, The New School for Social Research, USA and Marion Nestle, New York University, USA 5 Eating Out: Going Out, Staying In Priscilla Parkhurst Ferguson, Columbia University, USA 6 Kitchen Work: 1920-Present Amy B. Trubek, University of Vermont, USA 7 Family and Domesticity Alice Julier, Chatham University, USA 8 Body and Soul Warren Belasco, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, USA 9 Food Representations Signe Rousseau, University of Cape Town, South Africa 10 World Developments Fabio Parasecoli, New School, New York, USA Notes Bibliography Notes on Contributors Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474270045 20161031
"A Cultural History of Food" presents an authoritative survey from ancient times to the present. This set of six volumes covers over 2500 years of food and its physical, spiritual, social and cultural dimensions. 1. A Cultural History of Food in Classical Antiquity (800 BCE - 500 CE) 2. A Cultural History of Food in the Medieval Age (500 - 1300) 3. A Cultural History of Food in the Renaissance (1300 - 1600) 4. A Cultural History of Food in the Early Modern Age (1600 - 1800) 5. A Cultural History of Food in the Age of Empire (1800 - 1900) 6. A Cultural History of Food in the Modern Age (1920 - 2000) Each volume discusses the same themes in its chapters: 1. Food Production 2. Food Systems 3. Food Security, Safety and Crises 4. Food and Politics 5. Eating Out 6. Professional Cooking, Kitchens and Service Work 7. Family and Domesticity 8. Body and Soul 9. Food Representations 10. World Developments This structure means readers can either have a broad overview of a period by reading a volume or follow a theme through history by reading the relevant chapter in each volume. Superbly illustrated, the full six volume set combines to present the most authoritative and comprehensive survey available on food through history.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474270755 20161031
From Archaic Greece until the Late Roman Empire (c. 800 BCE to c. 500 CE), food was more than a physical necessity; it was a critical factor in politics, economics and culture. On the one hand, the Mediterranean landscape and climate encouraged particular crops - notably cereals, vines and olives - but, with the risks of crop failure ever-present, control of food resources was vital to economic and political power. On the other hand, diet and dining reflected complex social hierarchies and relationships. What was eaten, with whom and when was a fundamental part of the expression of one's role and place in society. In addition, symbolism and ritual suffused foodstuffs, their preparation and consumption. A Cultural History of Food in Antiquity presents an overview of the period with essays on food production, food systems, food security, safety and crises, food and politics, eating out, professional cooking, kitchens and service work, family and domesticity, body and soul, representations of food, and developments in food production and consumption globally.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474269902 20161031
Europe was formed in the Middle Ages. The merging of the traditions of Roman-Mediterranean societies with the customs of Northern Europe created new political, economic, social and religious structures and practices. Between 500 and 1300 CE, food in all its manifestations, from agriculture to symbol, became ever more complex and integral to Europe's culture and economy. The period saw the growth of culinary literature, the introduction of new spices and cuisines as a result of trade and war, the impact of the Black Death on food resources, the widening gap between what was eaten by the rich and what by the poor, as well as the influence of religion on food rituals. A Cultural History of Food in the Medieval Age presents an overview of the period with essays on food production, food systems, food security, safety and crises, food and politics, eating out, professional cooking, kitchens and service work, family and domesticity, body and soul, representations of food, and developments in food production and consumption globally.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474269919 20161031
Food and attitudes toward it were transformed in Renaissance Europe. The period between 1300 and 1600 saw the discovery of the New World and the cultivation of new foodstuffs, as well as the efflorescence of culinary literature in European courts and eventually in the popular press, and most importantly the transformation of the economy on a global scale. Food became the object of rigorous investigation among physicians, theologians, agronomists and even poets and artists. Concern with eating was, in fact, central to the cultural dynamism we now recognize as the Renaissance. A Cultural History of Food in the Renaissance presents an overview of the period with essays on food production, food systems, food security, safety and crises, food and politics, eating out, professional cooking, kitchens and service work, family and domesticity, body and soul, representations of food, and developments in food production and consumption globally.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474269926 20161031
In the modern age (1920-2000), vast technological innovation spurred greater concentration, standardization, and globalization of the food supply. As advances in agricultural production in the post-World War II era propelled population growth, a significant portion of the population gained access to cheap, industrially produced food while significant numbers remained mired in hunger and malnutrition. Further, as globalization allowed unprecedented access to foods from all parts of the globe, it also hastened environmental degradation, contributed to poor health, and remained a key element in global politics, economics and culture. A Cultural History of Food in the Modern Age presents an overview of the period with essays on food production, food systems, food security, safety and crises, food and politics, eating out, professional cooking, kitchens and service work, family and domesticity, body and soul, representations of food, and developments in food production and consumption globally.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474270045 20161031
The nineteenth-century West saw extraordinary economic growth and cultural change. This volume explores and explains the birth of the modern world through the food it produced and consumed. Food security vastly improved though malnutrition and famines persisted. Scientific research radically altered the ways in which food and its relation to the body were conceived: efficiency became the watchword, norms the measure, and standardized goods the rule. At the same time, the art of food became a luxury pursuit as interest in gastronomy soared. A Cultural History of Food in the Age of Empire presents an overview of the period with essays on food production, food systems, food security, safety and crises, food and politics, eating out, professional cooking, kitchens and service work, family and domesticity, body and soul, representations of food, and developments in food production and consumption globally.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474270038 20161031
The seventeenth and eighteenth centuries form a very distinctive period in European food history. This was a time when enduring feudal constraints in some areas contrasted with widening geographical horizons and the emergence of a consumer society.While cereal based diets and small scale trade continued to be the mainstay of the general population, elite tastes shifted from Renaissance opulence toward the greater simplicity and elegance of dining a la francaise. At the same time, growing spatial mobility and urbanization boosted the demand for professional cooking and commercial catering. An unprecedented wealth of artistic, literary and medical discourses on food and drink allows fascinating insights into contemporary responses to these transformations. A Cultural History of Food in the Early Modern Age presents an overview of the period with essays on food production, food systems, food security, safety and crises, food and politics, eating out, professional cooking, kitchens and service work, family and domesticity, body and soul, representations of food, and developments in food production and consumption globally.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474269995 20161031
Green Library
Book
xi, 264 pages ; 24 cm.
  • 1. The Luxury of the Aristocracy 2. Nature and Culture in the Peasant World 3. Eating in the City 4. Homemade Meals 5. The Great Transformation 6. Cuisine in the Age of Globalization 7. Eating in the Twenty-First Century.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137569608 20160619
Despite being a universal experience, eating occures with remarkable variety across time and place: not only do we not eat the same things, but the related technologies, rituals, and even the timing are in constant flux. This lively and innovative history paints a fresco of the Italian nation by looking at its storied relationship to food.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137569608 20160619
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (261 pages) : illustrations.
  • Introduction: Food, Cuisine and Society in Prehistoric Greece (Paul Halstead and John C. Barrett) Evidence for Large-scale feasting at Late Neolithic Makriyalos, Northern Greece (Maria Pappa, Paul Halstead, Kostas Kotsakis and Duska Urem-Kotsou) Ceramic change and the practice of eating and drinking in Early Bronzee Age Crete (Peter Day and David Wilson) Ceramic sets in context: one dimension of food preparation and consumption in a Minoan palatial setting (Jeremy B. rutter) Mycenaean drinking services and standards of etiquette (James C. Wright) Fit for a king? Hierarchy, exclusion, aspiration and desire in the social structure of Mycenaean banqueting (Lisa Bendall) Faunal evidence for feasting: burnt offerings from the palace of Nestor at Pylos (Paul Halstead and Valasia Isaakidou) Wheat, barley, flour, olives and figs on Linear B tablets (John Killen) Social meanings of food and drink consumption at LMIII Phaistos (Elisabetta Borgna) Animal husbandry revisited: the social significance of meat consumption in a highland village of Mt Psiloritis, Centra Crete (Elia A. Vardaki).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781842171677 20180709
Food and drink, along with the material culture involved in their consumption, can signify a variety of social distinctions, identities and values. Thus, in Early Minoan Knossos, tableware was used to emphasize the difference between the host and the guests, and at Mycenaean Pylos the status of banqueters was declared as much by the places assigned to them as by the quality of the vessles form which they ate and drank. The ten contributions to this volume highlight the extraordinary opportunity for multi-disciplinary research in this area.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781842171677 20180709
Book
223 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm
Revolution! Conflict! Gluttony! In this eclectic book of food history, Tom Nealon takes on such overlooked themes as carp and the Crusades, brown sauce and Byron, and chillies and cannibalism, and suggests that hunger and taste are the twin forces that secretly defined the course of civilization. Through war and plague, revolution and migration, people have always had to eat. What and how they ate provoked culinary upheaval around the world as ingredients were traded and fought over, and populations desperately walked the line between satiety and starvation. Parallel to the history books, a second, obscurer history was also being recorded in the cookbooks of the time, which charted the evolution of meals and the transmission of ingredients around the world. The history of food is filled with mythical origin stories, dubious recipes, and fierce nationalism. Secret History of Taste explores the mysteries at the intersection of food and society, and attempts to make sense of the curious area between fact and fiction.Beautifully illustrated with material from the collection of the British Library, this wide-ranging book addresses some of the fascinating, forgotten stories behind everyday dishes and processes. Among many conspiracies and controversies, the author meditates on the connections between the French Revolution and table settings, food thickness and colonialism, and lemonade and the Black Plague.Selected for the Guardian's Best Books on Food of 2016.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780712356589 20161219
Green Library

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