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Book
385 pages ; 21 cm
  • Blinded by political science
  • A game of margins
  • The New Haven experiments
  • The two percent solution
  • "You mean you don't do this in politics?"
  • Geeks versus the gurus
  • When shame pays a house call
  • Showdown at the oasis
  • Models and the matrix
  • The soul of a new machine.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
357 p. ; 25 cm.
"A look how social scientists and renegade thinkers are imposing a new data-driven order on the American political campaign--an industry previously run on gut instinct"-- Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
357 p. ; 25 cm.
  • Prologue: How to win an election without anyone knowing
  • Blinded by political science
  • A game of margins
  • The New Haven experiments
  • The two percent solution
  • "You mean you don't do this in politics?"
  • Geeks versus the gurus
  • When shame pays a house call
  • Showdown at the oasis
  • Models and the matrix
  • The soul of a new machine
  • Epilogue: Pushing the envelope.
"A look how social scientists and renegade thinkers are imposing a new data-driven order on the American political campaign--an industry previously run on gut instinct"-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
iv, 250 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction : redefining the possible / Thomas Streeter
  • Interview with Howard Dean : how the Internet taught me that you have the power / Thomas Streeter and Zephyr Teachout
  • Theories : technology, the grassroots, and network generativity / Thomas Streeter and Zephyr Teachout
  • How a blogger and the Dean campaign discovered each other / Jerome Armstrong
  • Something much bigger than a candidate / Zephyr Teachout
  • Swept up in "the perfect storm" / Bobby Clark
  • A coder becomes a political activist / Aldon Hynes
  • Blogging for America / Mathew Gross
  • The meetup story / Michael Silberman
  • Experiences of a grassroots activist / Pam Paul
  • The lessons of generation Dean / Aminda Michel
  • Fund-raising : hitting home runs on and off the Internet / Larry Biddle
  • A web activist finds Dean / Nicco Mele
  • E-mail : sign your own name / Kelly Nuxoll
  • Participatory political culture : everyone's a kingpin if he or she wants to be / Josh Koenig
  • An organizer's view of the Internet campaign / Zack Exley
  • After New Hampshire / Kelly Nuxoll
  • From media politics to networked politics : the Internet and the political process / Araba Sey and Manuel Castells
  • The legacies of Dean's Internet campaign / Zephyr Teachout and Thomas Streeter.
Howard Dean's campaign for president changed the way in which campaigns are run today. With an unlikely collection of highly talented and motivated staffers drawn from a variety of backgrounds, the Dean campaign transformed the way in which money was raised and supporters galvanized by using the Internet. Surprisingly, many of the campaign staff members were neither computer whizzes nor practiced political operatives, even though that is how some of them are identified today. This book allows key individuals in the campaign the chance to tell their stories with an eye to documenting the Internet campaign revolution and providing lessons to future campaigns. Howard Dean's inspirational statement of what it took for his campaign to get as far as it did - "mousepads, shoe leather, and hope" - holds great wisdom for anyone campaigning today, especially the 2008 presidential candidates.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781594514852 20160528
Green Library
Book
xxiii, 197 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Doing everything wrong
  • Howard Dean and the Killer Ds
  • Activists build a movement, insiders kill it
  • Taking on DeLay, Inc
  • What a difference a year makes
  • Drafting an American hero
  • Win one, lose one
  • Combat boots vs. cowboy boots
  • What's next for the netroots?
This title contains the inside story of the challenge to traditional broadcast politics being made by political bloggers and netroots citizen activists.The U.S. 2006 elections will be remembered as the year when the centre of power in American politics shifted from traditional "top-down" central broadcasters to new "bottom-up" decentralised activists in the blogosphere and netroots. The authors give first-hand accounts of the burgeoning power of the netroots to determine the outcome of political contests, most notably as when the national balance of power was tipped by Jim Webb's "rag-tag army" of bloggers and netroots activists who provoked and exposed the gaffe that proved fatal to George Allen's senatorial bid.As veteran online campaigners, the authors recount and analyse many other political campaigns in which netroots activism was decisive or instructive, including: U.S. House Majority Leader Tom DeLay's downfall; Tim Kaine's election as Virginia govenor; Howard Dean's and Wes Clark's presidential campaigns; Tom Daschle's defeat by John Thune; and, Ned Lamont's primary victory over Joe Lieberman.The authors conclude with an assessment of the prospects for Netroots 2.0 : Will the netroots hordes "crash the party" or will they work out an uneasy cohabitation with the traditional party power elite? The foreword is written by Markos ("Kos") Moulitsas Zuniga, founding editor of the world's biggest political blog, daily Kos.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780313346606 20160527
Green Library

6. Web campaigning [2006]

Book
xxii, 263 p. ; 24 cm.
This work talks about the evolution of electoral politics on the Web, based on extensive analysis of hundreds of campaign sites produced by candidates in U.S. elections in 2000, 2002, and 2004; a practice-based theory approach to understanding the relationship between the Web and electoral politics. The use of the Web in U.S. political campaigns has developed dramatically over the course of the last several election seasons. In "Web Campaigning", Kirsten Foot and Steven Schneider examine the evolution of campaigns' Web practices, based on hundreds of campaign Web sites produced by range of political actors during the U.S. elections of 2000, 2002, and 2004. Their developmental analyses of how and why campaign organizations create specific online structures illuminates the reciprocal relationship between these production practices and the structures of both the campaign organization and the electoral arena. This practice-based approach and the focus on campaigns as Web producers make the book a significant methodological and theoretical contribution to both STS and political communication scholarship. Foot and Schneider explore the inherent tension between the desire of campaigns to maintain control over messages and resources and the generally decentralizing dynamic of Web-based communication. They analyze specific strategies by which campaigns mitigate this, examining the ways that the production techniques, coproducing Web content, online-offline convergence, and linking to other Web sites mediate the practices of informing, involving, connecting, and mobilizing supporters. Their conclusions about the past decade's trajectory of Web campaigning point the way to a political theory of technology and a technologically-grounded theory of electoral politics. A digital installation illustrates core concepts discussed in the text of the book with examples drawn from archived campaign Web sites. Users have the opportunity to search these concepts in the context of fully operational campaign sites, recreating the Web experience of users during the election periods covered in the book.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262062589 20160528
Green Library
Book
xxii, 263 p.
Book
xxi, 131 p. ; 23 cm.
The popularization of the Internet has shepherded in a revolution in business and personal communication. But how has online technology been used in mainstream American politics? Here, Michael Cornfield provides a comprehensive guide to how the Internet has been used in political campaigns. He shows, for example, how candidates such as George W. Bush and John McCain in 2000 - as well as political action committees and the media - struggled to figure out how to fit the Internet into their ongoing operations. Through a series of cases, he examines how candidates use the Web as a campaign tool and as a fund-raising mechanism and how voters use the Internet to become more knowledgable. He finds that while many political pundits have argued that the Internet can be a revolutionary force in politics, citizens and politicians alike have yet to find innovative uses that go beyond conventional political operations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780870784804 20160528
Green Library
Book
319 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 302 p. : ill.
  • Technology and the modern political campaign : the digital pulse of the 2008 campaigns / Costas Panagopoulos
  • The technological development of candidate websites : how and why candidates use web innovations / James N. Druckman, Martin J. Kifer, and Michael Parkin
  • Closing gaps, moving hurdles : candidate web site communication in the 2006 campaigns for Congress / Girish J. "Jeff" Gulati and Christine B. Williams
  • Trickle-down technology? The use of computing and network technology in state legislative campaigns / Chapman Rackaway
  • Do campaign websites really matter in electoral civic engagement? Empirical evidence from the 2004 and 2006 post-election tracking survey / Hun Myoung Park and James L. Perry
  • Clicking for cash : campaigns, donors, and the emergence of online fundraising / Costas Panagopoulos and Daniel Bergan
  • The impact of email campaigns on voter mobilization : evidence from a field experiment / David W. Nickerson
  • Mobilizing the mobiles : text messaging and turnout / Allison Dale and Aaron Strauss
  • Online political advertising / Michael Cornfield and Kate Kaye
  • "Under construction" : weblog campaigning in the German Bundestag election 2005 / Steffen Albrecht, Maren Lübcke, Rasco Hartig-Perschke
  • Mobile democracy : text messages, voter turnout, and the 2004 Spanish general election / Sandra L. Suárez
  • Bloggers at the gates : Ned Lamont, blogs, and the rise of insurgent candidates / Kevin A. Pirch
  • Voters, MySpace, and YouTube : the impact of alternative communication channels on the 2006 election cycle and beyond / Vassia Gueorguieva
  • "Friend" the president : Facebook and the 2008 presidential election / Allison Slotnick
  • The political impact of Facebook : evidence from the 2006 elections and the 2008 nomination contest / Christine B. Williams and Girish J. "Jeff" Gulati
  • Conclusion / Costas Panagopoulos.
Book
viii, 302 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Technology and the modern political campaign : the digital pulse of the 2008 campaigns / Costas Panagopoulos
  • The technological development of candidate websites : how and why candidates use web innovations / James N. Druckman, Martin J. Kifer, and Michael Parkin
  • Closing gaps, moving hurdles : candidate web site communication in the 2006 campaigns for Congress / Girish J. "Jeff" Gulati and Christine B. Williams
  • Trickle-down technology? : the use of computing and network technology in state legislative campaigns / Chapman Rackaway
  • Do campaign websites really matter in electoral civic engagement? : empirical evidence from the 2004 and 2006 post-election tracking survey / Hun Myoung Park and James L. Perry
  • Clicking for cash : campaigns, donors, and the emergence of online fund-raising / Costas Panagopoulos and Daniel Bergan
  • The impact of e-mail campaigns on voter mobilization : evidence from a field experiment / David W. Nickerson
  • Mobilizing the mobiles : text messaging and turnout / Allison Dale and Aaron Strauss
  • Online political advertising / Michael Cornfield and Kate Kaye
  • "Under construction" : weblog campaigning in the German Bundestag election 2005 / Steffen Albrecht, Maren Lübcke, and Rasco Hartig-Perschke
  • Mobile democracy : text messages, voter turnout, and the 2004 Spanish general election / Sandra L. Suárez
  • Bloggers at the gates : Ned Lamont, blogs, and the rise of insurgent candidates / Kevin A. Pirch
  • Voters, MySpace, and YouTube : the impact of alternative communication channels / Vassia Gueorguieva
  • "Friend" the president : Facebook and the 2008 presidential election / Allison Slotnick
  • The political impact of Facebook : evidence from the 2006 elections and the 2008 nomination contest / Christine B. Williams and Girish J. "Jeff" Gulati
  • Conclusion / Costas Panagopoulos.
Of the many groundbreaking developments in the 2008 presidential election, the most important may well be the use of the Internet. In "Politicking Online" contributors explore the impact of technology for electioneering purposes, from running campaigns and increasing representation to ultimately strengthening democracy. The book reveals how social networking sites such as MySpace and Facebook are used in campaigns along with e-mail, SMS text messaging, and mobile phones to help inform, target, mobilize, and communicate with voters. While the Internet may have transformed the landscape of modern political campaigns throughout the world, Costas Panagopoulos reminds readers that officials and campaign workers need to adapt to changing circumstances, know the limits of their methods, and combine new technologies with more traditional techniques to achieve an overall balance.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813544892 20160528
Green Library
Book
xi, 220 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Political web sites and e-mail lists were novelties in 1996. By 2000, they were a news trend. By 2004, they will be a part of every electoral and policy campaign. News-seekers, activists, and decision-makers increasingly turn to the Net as a matter of course. The Civic Web delineates the basic issues, opportunities, and dilemmas posed by the introduction of computer-networked communications into U.S. national politics. Leading scholars from several academic disciplines join pioneer practitioners of online advocacy, discussion, and law in considering how the Internet can host, and even advance, enlightened self-government by a free people in a constitutional republic. Visit our website for sample chapters!.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780742501942 20160528
Green Library
Book
vii, 316 pages ; 26 cm
  • Introduction: Controlling the message in the social media marketplace of ideas / Victoria A. Farrar-Myers and Justin S. Vaughn
  • Strategic communication in a networked age / Daniel Kreiss and Creighton Welch
  • Congressional campaigns' motivations for social media adoption / Girish J. Gulati and Christine B. Williams
  • Surrogates or competitors? : social media use by independent political actors / Julia R. Azari and Benjamin A. Stewart
  • The competition to control campaign messages on YouTube / Robert J. Klotz
  • Campaign news in the time of twitter / Regina G. Lawrence
  • New and traditional media reportage on electoral campaign controversies / Mike Gruszczynski
  • Traditional media, social media, and different presidential campaign messages / Matthew Eshbaugh-Soha
  • The influence of user-controlled messages on candidate evaluations / Joshua Hawthorne and Benjamin R. Warner
  • Terms of engagement : online political participation and the impact on offline political participation / Meredith Conroy, Jessica T. Feezell, and Mario Guerrero
  • Is laughter the best medicine for politics? : commercial versus noncommercial YouTube videos / Todd L. Belt
  • Comment forum speech as a mirror of mainstream discourse / Karen S. Hoffman
  • Sparking debate : campaigns, social media, and political incivility / Daniel J. Coffey, Michael Kohler, and Douglas M. Granger
  • Flaming and blaming : the political effect of Internet news and reader "comments" / Brian R. Calfano
  • Conclusion: Message control at the margins / Victoria A. Farrar-Myers and Justin S. Vaughn.
From the presidential race to the battle for the office of New York City mayor, American political candidates approach to new media strategy is increasingly what makes or breaks their campaign. Targeted outreach on Facebook and Twitter, placement of a well-timed viral ad, and the ability to roll with the memes, flame wars, and downvotes that might spring from ordinary citizens engagement with the issues these skills are heralded as crucial for anyone hoping to get their views heard in a chaotic election cycle. But just how effective are the kinds of media strategies that American politicians employ? And what effect, if any, do citizen-created political media have on the tide of public opinion? InControlling the Message, Farrar-Myers and Vaughn curate a series of case studies that use real-time original research from the 2012 election season to explore how politicians and ordinary citizens use and consume new media during political campaigns. Broken down into sections that examine new media strategy from the highest echelons of campaign management all the way down to passive citizen engagement with campaign issues in places like online comment forums, the book ultimately reveals that political messaging in today s diverse new media landscape is a fragile, unpredictable, and sometimes futile process. The result is a collection that both interprets important historical data from a watershed campaign season and also explains myriad approaches to political campaign media scholarship an ideal volume for students, scholars, and political analysts alike.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781479886357 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 316 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • Introduction: Controlling the Message in the Social Media Marketplace of Ideas / Victoria A. Farrar-Myers and Justin S. Vaughn
  • Part 1: Elite Utilization
  • 1. Strategic Communication in a Networked Age / Daniel Kreiss and Creighton Welch
  • 2. Congressional Campaigns' Motivations for Social Media Adoption / Girish J. Gulati and Christine B. Williams
  • 3. Surrogates or Competitors? Social Media Use by Independent Political Actors / Julia R. Azari and Benjamin A. Stewart
  • 4. The Competition to Control Campaign Messages on YouTube / Robert J. Klotz
  • Part 2: Message Control in the New Media Environment
  • 5. Campaign News in the Time of Twitter / Regina G. Lawrence
  • 6. New and Traditional Media Reportage on Electoral Campaign Controversies / Mike Gruszczynski
  • 7. Traditional Media, Social Media, and Different Presidential Campaign Messages / Matthew Eshbaugh-Soha
  • Part 3: Social Media's Impact on Campaign Politics
  • 8. The Influence of User-Controlled Messages on Candidate Evaluations / Joshua Hawthorne and Benjamin R. Warner
  • 9. Terms of Engagement: Online Political Participation and the Impact on Offline Political Participation / Meredith Conroy, Jessica T. Feezell, and Mario Guerrero
  • 10. Is Laughter the Best Medicine for Politics? Commercial versus Noncommercial YouTube Videos / Todd L. Belt
  • Part 4: Social Media and Civic Relations
  • 11. Comment Forum Speech as a Mirror of Mainstream Discourse / Karen S. Hoffman
  • 12. Sparking Debate: Campaigns, Social Media, and Political Incivility / Daniel J. Coffey, Michael Kohler, and Douglas M. Granger
  • 13. Flaming and Blaming: The Political Effect of Internet News and Reader "Comments" / Brian R. Calfano
  • Conclusion: Message Control at the Margins /Victoria A. Farrar-Myers and Justin S. Vaughn.
From the presidential race to the battle for the office of New York City mayor, American political candidates approach to new media strategy is increasingly what makes or breaks their campaign. Targeted outreach on Facebook and Twitter, placement of a well-timed viral ad, and the ability to roll with the memes, flame wars, and downvotes that might spring from ordinary citizens engagement with the issues these skills are heralded as crucial for anyone hoping to get their views heard in a chaotic election cycle. But just how effective are the kinds of media strategies that American politicians employ? And what effect, if any, do citizen-created political media have on the tide of public opinion? InControlling the Message, Farrar-Myers and Vaughn curate a series of case studies that use real-time original research from the 2012 election season to explore how politicians and ordinary citizens use and consume new media during political campaigns. Broken down into sections that examine new media strategy from the highest echelons of campaign management all the way down to passive citizen engagement with campaign issues in places like online comment forums, the book ultimately reveals that political messaging in today s diverse new media landscape is a fragile, unpredictable, and sometimes futile process. The result is a collection that both interprets important historical data from a watershed campaign season and also explains myriad approaches to political campaign media scholarship an ideal volume for students, scholars, and political analysts alike.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781479886357 20160618
Green Library
Book
1 online resource : illustrations (black and white).
  • Acknowledgements -- Introduction: Constructing Citizens -- Chapter 2: Incremental Innovation -- Chapter 3: Constructing Skeptical Citizens -- Chapter 4: Digital Circulation in Networked Publics -- Chapter 5: Digital Retail Politics and Interpersonal Messaging in Social Media -- Chapter 6: Confounding Control -- Conclusion: Constructions of Citizenship Moving Forward -- Appendix -- Notes -- References -- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190231910 20160618
The days of "revolutionary" campaign strategies are gone. The extraordinary has become ordinary, and campaigns at all levels, from the federal to the municipal, have realized the necessity of incorporating digital media technologies into their communications strategies. Still, little is understood about how these practices have been taken up and routinized on a wide scale, or the ways in which the use of these technologies is tied to new norms and understandings of political participation and citizenship in the digital age. The vocabulary that we do possess for speaking about what counts as citizenship in a digital age is limited. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork in a federal-level election, interviews with communications and digital media consultants, and textual analysis of campaign materials, this book traces the emergence and solidification of campaign strategies that reflect what it means to be a citizen in the digital era. It identifies shifting norms and emerging trends to build new theories of citizenship in contemporary democracy. Baldwin-Philippi argues that these campaign practices foster engaged and skeptical citizens. But, rather than assess the quality or level of participation and citizenship due to the use of technologies, this book delves into the way that digital strategies depict what "good" citizenship ought to be and the goals and values behind the tactics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190231910 20160618
Book
vi, 329 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Contents: Mitchell S. McKinney/Mary Christine Banwart: The Election of a Lifetime - John C. Tedesco: The Complex Web: Young Adults' Opinions about Online Campaign Messages - Monica Ancu: Viral Politics: The Credibility and Effects of Online Viral Political Messages - Leslie A. Rill/Mitchell S. McKinney: Talking Politics: Young Citizens' Interpersonal Interaction during the 2008 Presidential Campaign - Sumana Chattopadhyay/Molly Greenwood: A Different Kind of Inter-media Agenda Setting: How Campaign Ads and Presidential Debates Influenced the Blogosphere in the 2008 U.S. Campaign - Clifford A. Jones: Political Advertising, Digital Fundraising and Campaign Finance in the 2008 Election: A First Amendment Normative Analysis - Hyun Jung Yun/Amy E. Jasperson/Lynda Lee Kaid: The Cumulative Effects of Televised Presidential Debates on Voters' Attitudes across Red, Blue, and Purple Political Playgrounds - Mitchell S. McKinney/Leslie A. Rill/Darin Gully: Political Engagement through Presidential Debates: Attitudes of Political Engagement throughout the 2008 Election - Jerry L. Miller: Can YOU Hear Me Now? Identifying the Audience in 2008 Primary and General Election Presidential Political Advertisements - Alison D. Howard/Donna R. Hoffman: Talking to Millennials: Policy Rhetoric and Rhetorical Narratives in the 2008 Presidential Campaign - Karla M. Hunter/Jessica Lewis/Jerry Overton/Thomas Brandenburger: Snap Judgments: A Study of Newsmagazine Photographs in the 2008 Presidential Campaign - Benjamin R. Warner/Kelly L. Winfrey/Mary Christine Bawnart: Running Down Ballot: Reactions to Female and Male Candidate Messages - Dianne G. Bystrom/Narren J. Brown: Videostyle 2008: A Comparison of Female vs. Male Political Candidate Television Ads - Julia A. Spiker: Motherhood, God & Country: Sarah Palin's 68 Days in 2008 - Lynda Lee Kaid/Zheng Xiang/Ji Young Ki: Perceptions of the U.S. and the 2008 Presidential Election from Young Citizens Around the World - Jesper Stroembaeck/David L. Painter/Juliana Fernandes: International Media's Love Affair with Barack Obama: Anti-Americanism and the Global Coverage of the 2008 U.S. Presidential Campaign - Christina Holtz-Bacha/Reimar Zeh: German Press Coverage of the 2004 and 2008 Presidential Election Campaigns - J. Gregory Payne/Efe Sevin: The Emerson Election Project: Reflections on the Visit to the U.S. by Indonesian Journalists during the 2008 Presidential Election.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781433109898 20160605
The 2008 U.S. election was arguably the most important election of our lifetime: the first African American president was elected to office; the candidacy of Sarah Palin marked only the second time that a major party ticket included a female; and the electoral performance of young citizens - digital natives, greatly attracted by digital media - signaled the highest turnout in a long time.Taking all these issues into consideration, this book offers a landmark examination of the 2008 election from a global perspective, with emphasis on the wide range of digital media utilized by the campaigners and how campaign communication influenced young citizens. The authors argue that the use of digital technologies in the campaign, and the success of Barack Obama in attracting young voters to his cause, provides an excellent case study - perhaps something of a turning point in campaign communication - for carefully examining the emerging role of digital political media, and a continuing renewal in young citizens' electoral engagement. The wide-ranging contributions to this volume provide a comprehensive examination of a historic political campaign and election. The book's findings offer revealing answers regarding the content and effects of various forms of political campaign communication, and raise questions and possibilities for future research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781433109898 20160605
Green Library
Book
6 p. ; 24 cm.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
6 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xxv, 358 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Chapter 1 Consistent and Cautious: Online Congressional Campaigning in the Context of the 2016 Presidential Election Chapter 2 Campaigning in 140 Characters: A Content Analysis of Twitter Use by 2016 U.S. Congressional Candidates Chapter 3 I Beg to Differ: Understanding Political Disagreement Presented By Candidates in Gubernatorial Primaries Chapter 4 The Twitter Election: Analyzing Candidate Use of Social Media in the 2016 Presidential Campaign Chapter 5 Gender and Presidential Elections: How the 2016 Candidates Played the "Woman Card" on Twitter Chapter 6 Digital Ad Expenditures by Outside Groups in the 2016 Presidential Election Chapter 7 Tipping the Balance of Power in Elections? Voters' Engagement in the Digital Campaign Chapter 8 Campaign Messaging During the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election: How Twitter Compares to the Traditional Media Chapter 9 Going Public' in the Age of Twitter and Mistrust of the Media: Donald Trump's 2016 Presidential Campaign Chapter 10 Late Night Talk Moves Online: Political Humor, YouTube, and the 2016 Presidential Election Chapter 11 Issue Emphasis and Agenda Building on Twitter during the 2016 Presidential Primary Season Chapter 12 Picture Perfect?: The Role of Instagram in Issue Agenda Setting during the 2016 Presidential Primary Campaign Chapter 13 Getting the Picture: Issues and the 2016 Presidential Campaign on Instagram.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498542968 20171017
Although many developments surrounding the Internet campaign are now considered to be standard fare, there were a number of new developments in 2016. Drawing on original research conducted by leading experts, The Internet and the 2016 Presidential Campaign attempts to cover these developments in a comprehensive fashion. How are campaigns making use of the Internet to organize and mobilize their ground game? To communicate their message? The book also examines how citizens made use of online sources to become informed, follow campaigns, and participate. Contributions also explore how the Internet affected developments in media reporting, both traditional and non-traditional, about the campaign. What other messages were available online, and what effects did these messages have had on citizen's attitudes and vote choice? The book examines these questions in an attempt to summarize the 2016 online campaign.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498542968 20171017
Green Library
Book
xxv, 358 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Consistent and cautious : online congressional campaigning in the context of the 2016 presidential election / James N. Druckman, Martin J. Kier, and Michael Parkin
  • Campaigning in 140 characters : a content analysis of Twitter use by 2016 U.S. congressional candidates / Casey Frechette and Monica Ancu
  • I beg to differ : understanding political disagreement presented by candidates in gubernatorial primaries / Anne-Bennett Smithson and Emily K. Vraga
  • The Twitter election : analyzing candidate use of social media in the 2016 presidential campaign / Steven Navarra and Mandi Bates Bailey
  • Gender and presidential elections : how the 2016 candidates played the "woman card" on Twitter / Heather K. Evans, Kayla J. Brown and Tiffany Wimberly
  • Digital ad expenditures by outside groups in the 2016 presidential election / Christine B. Williams and Girish J. "Jeff" Gulati
  • Tipping the balance of power in elections? : voters' engagement in the digital campaign / Diana Owen
  • Campaign messaging during the 2016 U.S. presidential election : Twitter compares to traditional media / David S. Morris
  • "Going public" in the age of Twitter and mistrust the media : Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign / Peter L. Francia
  • Late night talk moves online : political humor, YouTube, and the 2016 presidential election / Jody C. Baumgartner
  • Issue emphasis and agenda building on Twitter during the 2016 presidential primary season / Bethany A. Conway-Silva, Christine R. Filer, Kate Kenski and Eric Tetsi
  • Picture perfect? : the role of Instagram in issue agenda setting during the 2016 presidential primary campaign / Terri L. Towner and Caroline Lego Muñoz
  • Getting the picture : issues and the 2016 presidential campaign on Instagram / Mark D. Ludwig.
Although many developments surrounding the Internet campaign are now considered to be standard fare, there were a number of new developments in 2016. Drawing on original research conducted by leading experts, The Internet and the 2016 Presidential Campaign attempts to cover these developments in a comprehensive fashion. How are campaigns making use of the Internet to organize and mobilize their ground game? To communicate their message? The book also examines how citizens made use of online sources to become informed, follow campaigns, and participate. Contributions also explore how the Internet affected developments in media reporting, both traditional and non-traditional, about the campaign. What other messages were available online, and what effects did these messages have had on citizen's attitudes and vote choice? The book examines these questions in an attempt to summarize the 2016 online campaign.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498542968 20171017
Law Library (Crown)

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