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Book
x, 177 pages : maps ; 24 cm.
  • 1.Introduction: Legitimation & Authoritarianism 2. The Authoritarian Public Sphere: 'We Always Had Complaints But Only in Our Minds' 3. Authoritarian Power & Legitimating Messages: A Framework for Analysis 4. Manipulating the Public Sphere in North Korea, Burma/Myanmar, and China 5. Unsettling an Authoritarian Public Sphere? Shadow Markets, Independent Journalism, and the Internet 6. Beyond Post-Cold War Asia: Explorations in the Authoritarian Public Sphere 7. Conclusion: The Authoritarian Public Sphere and Contemporary Autocracies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138210356 20170321
Authoritarian regimes craft and disseminate reasons, stories, and explanations for why they are entitled to rule. To shield those legitimating messages from criticism, authoritarian regimes also censor information that they find threatening. While committed opponents of the regime may be violently repressed, this book is about how the authoritarian state keeps the majority of its people quiescent by manipulating the ways in which they talk and think about political processes, the authorities, and political alternatives. Using North Korea, Burma (Myanmar) and China as case studies, this book explains how the authoritarian public sphere shapes political discourse in each context. It also examines three domains of potential subversion of legitimating messages: the shadow markets of North Korea, networks of independent journalists in Burma, and the online sphere in China. In addition to making a theoretical contribution to the study of authoritarianism, the book draws upon unique empirical data from fieldwork conducted in the region, including interviews with North Korean defectors in South Korea, Burmese exiles in Thailand, and Burmese in Myanmar who stayed in the country during the military government. When analyzed alongside state-produced media, speeches, and legislation, the material provides a rich understanding of how autocratic legitimation influences everyday discussions about politics in the authoritarian public sphere. Explaining how autocracies manipulate the ways in which their citizens talk and think about politics, this book will be of interest to students and scholars of Asian politics, comparative politics and authoritarian regimes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138210356 20170321
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 226 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction-- 1. A brief political history and cast of characters-- 2. Building blocks of a moral universe-- 3. On human nature and the nature of politics-- 4. Order and freedom/liberation: purposes of politics-- 5. What is 'politics' and what constitutes 'participation'?-- 6. Discipline, rights, and morality: 'democracy' in contemporary Myanmar-- Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107155695 20170130
This is the first book to provide a broad overview of the ways in which Buddhist ideas have influenced political thinking and politics in Myanmar. Matthew Walton draws extensively on Burmese language sources from the last 150 years to describe the 'moral universe' of contemporary Theravada Buddhism that has anchored most political thought in Myanmar. In explaining multiple Burmese understandings of notions such as 'democracy' and 'political participation', the book provides readers with a conceptual framework for understanding some of the key dynamics of Myanmar's ongoing political transition. Some of these ideas help to shed light on restrictive or exclusionary political impulses, such as anti-Muslim Buddhist nationalism or scepticism towards the ability of the masses to participate in politics. Walton provides an analytical framework for understanding Buddhist influences on politics that will be accessible to a wide range of readers and will generate future research and debate.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107155695 20170130
Green Library
Book
viii, 270 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Series Editors Preface ix Acknowledgments x 1 Sparks of Resistance 1 2 Rethinking Movements from the Bottom Up 13 Part I The Birth of Immigrant Rights Activism 37 3 Making Space for Immigrant Rights Activism in Los Angeles 39 4 Radical Entanglements in Paris 54 5 Placing Protest in Amsterdam 71 Part II Urban Landscapes of Control and Contention 89 6 The Laissez ]Faire State: Re ]politicizing Immigrants in Los Angeles 91 7 The Uneven Reach of the State: The Partial Pacification of Paris 116 8 The Cooptative State: The Pacification of Contentious Immigrant Politics in Amsterdam 138 Part III New Geographies of Immigrant Rights Movements 157 9 Los Angeles as a Center of the National Immigrant Rights Movement 161 10 Paris as Head of Splintering Resistances 188 11 Divergent Geographies of Immigrant Rights Contention in the Netherlands 209 12 Conclusion: Sparks into Wildfires 227 Notes 239 References 245 Index 262.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118750650 20170227
Through historical and comparative research on the immigrant rights movements of the United States, France and the Netherlands, Cities and Social Movements examines how small resistances against restrictive immigration policies do or don t develop into large and sustained mobilizations. * Presents a comprehensive, comparative analysis of immigrant rights politics in three countries over a period of five decades, providing vivid accounts of the processes through which immigrants activists challenged or confirmed the status quo * Theorizes movements from the bottom-up, presenting an urban grassroots account in order to identify how movement networks emerge or fall apart * Provides a unique contribution by examining how geography is implicated in the evolution of social movements, discovering how and why the networks constituting movements grow by tracing where they develop * Demonstrates how efforts to enforce national borders trigger countless resistances and shows how some environments provide the relational opportunities to nurture these small resistances into sustained mobilizations * Written to appeal to a broad audience of students, scholars, policy makers, and activists, without sacrificing theoretical rigor.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118750650 20170227
Green Library
Book
x, 320 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 25 cm.
  • About the Authors List of Illustrations 1. Introduction: Citizenship and Democratization in Postcolonial Southeast Asia, Ward Berenschot, Henk Schulte Nordholt and Laurens Bakker Part I: Clientelism and Citizenship 2. Citizen Participation and Decentralization in the Philippines, Emma Porio 3. Everyday Citizenship in Village Java, Takeshi Ito 4. Elections and Emerging Forms of Citizenship in Cambodia, Astrid Noren-Nilsson 5. Sosialisasi, Citizenship and Street Vendors in Yogyakarta, Sheri Lynn Gibbings Part II: Identity and Citizenship 6. Militias, Security and Citizenship in Indonesia, Laurens Bakker 7. Custom and Citizenship in the Philippine Uplands, Oona Thommes Paredes 8. Citizenship and Islam in Malaysia and Indonesia, David Kloos and Ward Berenschot Part III: Middle Classes Engaging the State 9. Digital Media and Malaysia's Electoral Reform Movement, Merlyna Lim 10. Citizenship, Rights and Adversarial Legalism in Thailand, Wolfram Schaffar 11. Defending Indonesia's Migrant Domestic Workers, Mary Austin 12. The Yellow Shirts versus the Red Shirts and the Rise of a New Middle Class in Thailand, Apichat Satitniramai.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004327771 20170130
This title is available in its entirety in Open Access. By providing various fascinating first-hand accounts of how citizens negotiate their rights in the context of weak state institutions, Citizenship and Democratization in Southeast Asia offers a unique bottom-up perspective on the evolving character of public life in democratizing Southeast Asia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789004327771 20170130
Green Library
Book
x, 207 pages ; 24 cm
  • Chapter 1: Sowing the Seeds of Civic Failure Chapter 2: A Primer on Republican Democracy Chapter 3: Taking the Parties Out Chapter 4: The Effects of Partisan Decline Chapter 5: The Semi-Sovereign Media Chapter 6: The State of the American Voter Chapter 7: The Dream and the Nightmare of Term Limits Chapter 8: The Promise and the Despair of Campaign Finance Reform Chapter 9: Leading By Following, or The Unreasonable Expectations on the Political Class Chapter 10: Look Forward, Angel Chapter 11: A Pathway to American Revival.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498514194 20170213
The greatest threat to American democracy is the voting public. Candidates for political office, organized interests, and political parties are often blamed for the ills of American democracy, but this book places the focus on the core issue in American politics: a disengaged, demanding, and often contradictory voting public. Structural reforms such as the direct primary, term limits, and campaign finance regime reforms make the problems worse rather than better because these structural reforms fail to address core issues that disengage the voting public from republican politics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498514194 20170213
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (421 pages) : illustrations.
  • Globalization and human rights: how globalization can be a tool to protect the human rights / Soumi Banerjee
  • Globalization as a new framework for human rights protection / Reannon Navaratnam, Isabelle Yeeun Lee
  • Human rights conditionality in the EU's newly concluded association agreements with the eastern partners / Szilárd Gáspár-Szilágyi
  • The evolution of cyberspace, the blogo-sphere, and their impact on political autonomy and political participation / Michael Wabomba Masinde
  • Free media and democracy in the age of globalization: an analysis of Turkish leading newspaper / Moazzam Naseer, Celalettin Aktas, Hassan Shehzad
  • Democracy and child rights protection: the problem of the Nigerian constitution / Oluwafifehan Ogunde
  • Environmentally forced migration and human rights / J. M. M. van der Vliet-Bakker
  • Refoulement and refugees / Jasper MacLennan Sugars
  • Recent developments in international relations in the light of the Syrian crisis / Alexia-Nefeli Douma
  • Rights of nature to protect human rights in times of environmental crisis / Susana Borràs
  • Language human rights: a new right rising in the era of globalization / Hossein Davari
  • Farmer suicides in India: a case of globalisation compromising on human rights / Saloni Jain, Khushboo Sukhwani
  • States' procedural obligations regarding private military and security companies' activities / Zafeiris Tsiftzis
  • Sports and human rights from an ethical perspective: the relevance of human rights for sports / Peter G. Kirchschlaeger.
The era of technology in which we reside has ushered in a more globalized and connected world. While many benefits are gained from this connectivity, possible disadvantages to issues of human rights are developed as well. Defending Human Rights and Democracy in the Era of Globalization is a pivotal resource for the latest research on the effects of a globalized society regarding issues relating to social ethics and civil rights. Highlighting relevant concepts on political autonomy, migration, and asylum, this book is ideally designed for academicians, professionals, practitioners, and upper-level students interested in the ongoing concerns of human rights.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781522507239 20161213
Book
xv, 237 pages ; 25 cm
  • Democracy, domination, and the challenge of economic governance
  • Managerialism and the new deal legacy
  • The progressive critique of the market
  • Economic domination and democratic action
  • Structuring democratic agency
  • Anti-domination as regulatory strategy
  • Democratic agency as regulatory process
  • Democratic freedom in the new gilded age.
In 2008, the collapse of the US financial system plunged the economy into the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. In its aftermath, the financial crisis pushed to the forefront fundamental moral and institutional questions about how we govern the modern economy. What are the values that economic policy ought to prioritize? What institutions do we trust to govern complex economic dynamics? Much of popular and academic debate revolves around two competing approaches to these fundamental questions: laissez-faire defenses of self-correcting and welfare-enhancing markets on the one hand, and managerialist turns to the role of insulated, expert regulation in mitigating risks and promoting growth on the other. In Democracy Against Domination, K. Sabeel Rahman offers an alternative vision for how we should govern the modern economy in a democratic society. Drawing on a rich tradition of economic reform rooted in the thought and reform politics of early twentieth century progressives like John Dewey and Louis Brandeis, Rahman argues that the fundamental moral challenge of economic governance today is two-fold: first, to counteract the threats of economic domination whether in the form of corporate power or inequitable markets; and second, to do so by expanding the capacity of citizens themselves to exercise real political power in economic policymaking. This normative framework in turn suggests a very different way of understanding and addressing major economic governance issues of the post-crisis era, from the challenge of too-big-to-fail financial firms, to the dangers of regulatory capture and regulatory reform. Synthesizing a range of insights from history to political theory to public policy, Democracy Against Domination offers an exciting reinterpretation of progressive economic thought; a fresh normative approach to democratic theory; and an urgent hope for realizing a more equitable and democratically accountable economy through practical reforms in our policies and regulatory institutions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190468538 20170130
Green Library
Book
xv, 237 pages ; 25 cm
  • Democracy, domination, and the challenge of economic governance
  • Managerialism and the new deal legacy
  • The progressive critique of the market
  • Economic domination and democratic action
  • Structuring democratic agency
  • Anti-domination as regulatory strategy
  • Democratic agency as regulatory process
  • Democratic freedom in the new gilded age.
In 2008, the collapse of the US financial system plunged the economy into the worst economic downturn since the Great Depression. In its aftermath, the financial crisis pushed to the forefront fundamental moral and institutional questions about how we govern the modern economy. What are the values that economic policy ought to prioritize? What institutions do we trust to govern complex economic dynamics? Much of popular and academic debate revolves around two competing approaches to these fundamental questions: laissez-faire defenses of self-correcting and welfare-enhancing markets on the one hand, and managerialist turns to the role of insulated, expert regulation in mitigating risks and promoting growth on the other. In Democracy Against Domination, K. Sabeel Rahman offers an alternative vision for how we should govern the modern economy in a democratic society. Drawing on a rich tradition of economic reform rooted in the thought and reform politics of early twentieth century progressives like John Dewey and Louis Brandeis, Rahman argues that the fundamental moral challenge of economic governance today is two-fold: first, to counteract the threats of economic domination whether in the form of corporate power or inequitable markets; and second, to do so by expanding the capacity of citizens themselves to exercise real political power in economic policymaking. This normative framework in turn suggests a very different way of understanding and addressing major economic governance issues of the post-crisis era, from the challenge of too-big-to-fail financial firms, to the dangers of regulatory capture and regulatory reform.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xi, 293 pages ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction: Dissent, Protest and Dispute Africa, Emmanuel M. Mbah and Toyin Falola 2. The Music of Heaven, the Music of Earth, and the Music of Brats: Tuareg Islam, the Devil, and Musical Performance, Susan J. Rasmussen 3. Finding Social Change Backstage and Behind the Scenes in South African Theatre, Nathanael Vlachos 4. Soccer and Political (Ex)pression in Africa: The Case of Cameroon, Alain Lawo-Sukam 5. "Child Labor Resistance in Southern Nigeria, 1916 - 1938", Adam Paddock 6. M'Fam Goes Home: African Soldiers in the Gabon Campaign of 1940, Mark Reeves 7. "Disgraceful Disturbances": TANU, the Tanganyikan Rifles, and the 1964 Mutiny, Charles Thomas 8. The Role of Ethnicity in Political Formation in Kenya: 1963-2007, Tade O. Okediji and Wahutu J. Siguru 9. Land, Boundaries, Chiefs and Wars, Toyin Falola 10. Borders and boundaries within Ethiopia: dilemmas of group identity, representation and agency, Alexander Meckelburg 11. Rural Agrarian Land Conflicts in Postcolonial Nigeria's Central Region, Sati Fwatshak 12. The Evolution of the Mungiki Militia in Kenya, 1990 to 2010, Felix Kiruthu 13. Refugee-Warriors and Other People's Wars in Post-Colonial Africa: The Experience of Rwandese and South African Military Exiles (1960-94), Tim Stapleton 14. Oiling the Guns and Gunning for Oil: The Youth and Niger Delta Oil Conflicts in Nigeria, Christian C. Madubuko.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138220034 20170220
This book provides unique and detailed perspectives on different aspects of dissent, protest and disputes and how these have, in turn, continued to pose challenges in Africa. The contributors argue that, dissent, protest and most forms of disputes in Africa are the result of daily challenges that its people have faced and continue to encounter to this day. These challenges include, amongst others, demands for transparency, good governance and accountability; waves of instability that have created insecurity in most parts of the continent, an unsustainable level of youth unemployment, rapid population growth, a continent-wide healthcare and poverty crises and numerous environmental challenges. The chapters elevate the debates on dissent, protest and disputes/conflict in Africa by adding new ideas and introducing new and useful interpretations. The book's strength lies in the contributors' ability to conflate colonial and postcolonial tendencies to show how challenges of the past are not so different from those of today, while also presenting important historical issues from various scholarly perspectives. Dissent, Protest and Dispute in Africa will be of interest for students and scholars of African history, politics, and culture as well as those interested in social movements and civil society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138220034 20170220
Green Library
Book
xvii, 275 pages : illustrations (some color), color map ; 24 cm
  • Acknowledgments-- Part I. Introductory Themes: 1. Introduction-- Part II. The Discussion Tradition: 2. On 'strongly fortified minds': self-restraint and cooperation in the discussion tradition-- 3. The Knightian moment-- 4. The rise of new welfare economics: an end to endogenous goals?-- Part III. When Linear Models Fail: Two Cases: 5. Experts and eugenics: 'science' privileges a social goal-- 6. Expert judgment and Soviet growth-- Part IV. An End to Discussion: Secrecy and the Temptation to Bias: 7. Experts and the philosopher's stone: John Law's secret financial alchemy-- 8. The consequence of suppressing discussion: imprudence with biased experts-- Part V. Getting the Best out of Experts: 9. A revised code of ethics for experts-- 10. Mitigating the consequences of factional expertise-- 11. Inducing greater transparency-- Part VI. Conclusion: 12. Vox populi?
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107142398 20170220
The orthodox view of economic policy holds that public deliberation sets the goals or ends, and then experts select the means to implement these goals. This assumes that experts are no more than trustworthy servants of the public interest. David M. Levy and Sandra J. Peart examine the historical record to consider cases in which experts were trusted with disastrous results, such as eugenics, the regulatory use of security ratings, and central economic planning. This history suggests that experts have not only the public interest but also their own interests to consider. The authors then recover and extend an alternative view of economic policy that subjects experts' proposals to further discussion, resulting in transparency and ensuring that the public obtains the best insights of experts in economics while avoiding pitfalls such as expert bias.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107142398 20170220
Green Library
Book
280 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 144 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm.
  • 01. Chapter 1: Intangible Cultural Heritage in Contemporary Hong Kong and China: An Introductory Overview (KUAH Khun Eng and LIU Zhaohui ) 02. Chapter 2: Heritagizing Lifestyle in Modern Hong Kong: Cultural Memories and Social Capital of the Tai O Fishing Community (KUAH Khun Eng) 03. Chapter 3: Cheung Chau Bun Festival: Durability of an Intangible Cultural Heritage in Contemporary Hong Kong (GAO Chong) 04. Chapter 4: Hong Kong's Urban Earth God Shrines: An Evolving Intangible Tradition in a Modern Urban Setting (LEE Ho Yin, DISTEFANO Lynn D. and CUMMER Katie) 05. Chapter 5: Song Ning Ritual: Practice Memory of the Buyi People (LUO Zhengfu and XIAO Tangjin) 06. Chapter 6: Place Attachment and the Remaking Cultural Space with the Place Attachment in a Lijiang Resettlement Community (LIU Zhaohui) 07. Chapter 7: From 'Folk Culture' to 'Great Cultural Heritage of China': The Aporia of the Quest for the Essence of Chinese Culture (CHANG Jung-a).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138644182 20170227
This edited book examines the significance of intangible cultural heritage to local communities and the state in Hong Kong and China. Through ethnographic studies, the various chapters in this edited book argue for the role of the local community in the creation and conservation of the intangible cultural heritage and traditions. Irrespective of whether they are selected and listed as regional, national or UNESO intangible cultural heritage, they are part of the living traditions unique to that particular local community. This edited book argues that there are threefold significance of intangible cultural heritage to the local community and the state. First, intangible cultural heritage is seen as a social prestige. Second, it acts as socio-cultural and economic capital for members of the community to tap into to ensure socio-cultural and economic sustainability of the community. Finally, the intangible cultural heritage serves as a depository of the collective memories of the community, linking the past to the present and the future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138644182 20170227
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv, 224 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Preface PART I research foundations 1. The Study of Social Activism 2. Research Methodologies 3. Qualitative Methods PART II research sites 4. Activist Organizations 5. Activist Networks 6. Activist Events 7. Alternative Media Concluding Remarks References Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780823274147 20170327
Academic study of social activism and social movements has become increasingly prevalent over the years; this is due in large part to the fact that activists have captured public imagination and gained substantial influence in political discourse. For instance, Occupy Wall Street activists, Tea Party activists, and activists affiliated with the Arab Spring have transformed political debates and have become the focus of mainstream news media coverage about a variety of different political topics. Journey into Social Activism explicates the philosophical foundations of the study of activism and illustrates four different research sites in which activism can be observed and studied: organizations, networks, events, and alternative media. The book will introduce students and scholars to important qualitative approaches to the study of social activism within these four research sites, which is based entirely on successful research projects that have been conducted and published in recent years. Ultimately, this book will prove integral to any students and scholars who wish to use qualitative methods for their research endeavors concerning social activism in contemporary society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780823274147 20170327
Green Library
Book
xvi, 316 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • Chapter 1 An Introduction to Latino Politics Chapter 2 Community Building in Latin America Chapter 3 Culture and Demographics Chapter 4 Latino Subgroups in the United States Chapter 5 The Politics of Interest and Culture Chapter 6 Latino Political Participation Chapter 7 Latinos in the Electoral Arena Chapter 8 Latino Organizations and Leadership Chapter 9 Immigration and Latino Immigrants Chapter 10 Education and Voting Rights Chapter 11 Building Political Alliances Chapter 12 The Latino Community: Beyond Recognition Politics.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442259898 20161124
Latino Politics in America: Community, Culture, and Interests provides an in-depth look at how the various sub-groups of the Latino community influence the political landscape. In this third edition, Garcia discusses how topics such as voting, immigration, Latinos' own mobilization efforts, partisanship, and political engagement are all impacted by Latino leadership, activated communities, and advocacy groups.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442259898 20161124
Green Library
Book
xx, 234 pages ; 25 cm.
The biggest contemporary challenge to democratic legitimacy gravitates around the crisis of democratic representation. To tackle this problem, a growing number of established and new democracies included direct democratic instruments in their constitutions, enabling citizens to have direct influence on democratic decision-making. However, there are many different empirical manifestations of direct democracy, and their diverse consequences for representative democracy remain an understudied topic. Let the People Rule? aims to fill this gap, analysing the multifaceted consequences of direct democracy on constitutional reforms and issues of independence, democratic accountability mechanisms, and political outcomes. Chapters apply different methodological approaches to study the consequences of direct democracy on democratic legitimacy. These range from single in-depth cases studies, like the Scottish independence referendum in 2014, to cross-national comparative studies, such as the direct democratic experience within the European Union.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781785522574 20170306
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 302 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xii, 172 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Sustaining Social Movements 2. Background of the Occupy Movement 3. Movement Legitimacy and Governement Response 4. Determined Participants and Movement Sustaining 5. Leadership of the Movement 6. Tactical Escalation and Its Limitations 7. Sustained Movement and the Consequences 8. Appendix: Data Collection 9. Notes.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138692299 20161213
The Occupy movement in Hong Kong was sustained for about 80 days because of government tolerance, the presence of determined participants, and a weak leadership. The government tolerated the occupation because its initial use of force, in particular teargas, was counterproductive and provoked large-scale participation. Unlike other social movements, such as the 1989 Tiananmen movement, the Occupy movement reached its peak of participation at the very beginning, making it difficult to sustain the momentum. The presence of determined participants who chose to stay until the government responded was crucial to the sustaining of the movement. These self-selected participants were caught in a dilemma between fruitless occupation and reluctance to retreat without a success. The movement lasted also because the weak leadership was unable to force the government to concede or devise approaches for making a "graceful exit." Consequently, site clearance became the common choice of both the government and the protestors. This book develops a new framework to explain the sustaining of decentralized protest in the absence of strong movement organizations and leadership. Sustained protests are worth research because they not only reveal the broad social context in which the protests arise and persist but also point out the dynamics of the escalation or the decline of the protests. In addition, sustained protest may not only lead to more dramatic action, but they also result in the diffusion of protests or lead to significant policy changes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138692299 20161213
Green Library
Book
xiv, 231 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • 1. Good reasons not to run
  • 2. Political ambition: what it means and why we should care
  • 3. The costs of running
  • 4. The rewards of running
  • 5. Weighing the costs and rewards of political careers
  • 6. Inefficient and unappealing politics: women and candidate deterrence
  • 7. Not our kind of game: women of color and the impact of high costs and low rewards
  • 8. Change the system, change the candidates.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiv, 231 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
An inside look into why Millennials are rejecting careers in politics, and what this means for the future of America's political system Millennials are often publically criticized for being apathetic about the American political process and their lack of interest in political careers. But what do millennials themselves have to say about the prospect of holding political office? Are they as uninterested in political issues and the future of the American political system as the media suggests? Out of the Running goes directly to the source and draws from extensive research, including over 50 interviews, with graduate students in elite institutions that have historically been a direct link for their graduates into state or federal elected office: Harvard Law, Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, and Boston's Suffolk University Law School. Shauna Shames, herself a young graduate of Harvard University, suggests that millennials are not uninterested; rather, they don't believe that a career in politics is the best way to create change. Millennials view the system as corrupt or inefficient and are particularly skeptical about the fundraising, frenzied media attention, and loss of privacy that have become staples of the American electoral process. They are clear about their desire to make a difference in the world but feel that the "broken" political system is not the best way to do so-a belief held particularly by millennial women and women of color. The implications of Shames' argument are crucial for the future of the American political system-how can a system adapt and grow if qualified, intelligent leaders are not involved? An engaging and accessible resource for anyone who follows American politics, Out of the Running highlights the urgent need to fix the American political system, as an absence of diverse millennial candidates leaves its future in a truly precarious position. Instructor's Guide.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781479877485 20170313
Green Library
Book
xxi, 213 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • List of figures and tables Contributors Introduction: what is participatory heritage PART 1: Participants 1. A communal rock: sustaining a community archives in Flat Rock, Georgia - JoyEllen Freeman 2. The Bethel AME Church Archive: partners and participants - Andrea Copeland 3. Creating an authentic learning environment for school children: a case study of digital storytelling programs at the Mudgeeraba Light Horse Museum - Janis Hanley 4. Viking re-enactment - Lars Konzack 5. Learning, loving and living at the Australian Country Music Hall of Fame - Sarah Baker 6. The contributions of family and local historians to British history online - Mia Ridge 7. Forgotten history on Wikipedia - Henriette Roued-Cunliffe PART 2: Challenges 8. Custodianship and online sharing in Australian community archives - Courtney Ruge, Tom Denison, Steve Wright, Graham Willett, Joanne Evans 9. Who is the expert in participatory culture? - Lysa Westberg Gabriel and Thessa Jensen 10. Social inequalities in the shaping of cultural heritage infrastructure - Noah Lenstra 11. No Gun Ri Digital Archive: challenges in archiving memory for a historically marginalized incident - Donghee Sinn 12. Giving voice to the community: digitizing Jeffco oral histories - Krystyna K. Matusiak, Padma Polepeddi, Allison Tyler, Catherine Newton and Julianne Rist 13. Issues with archiving community data - Lydia Spotts and Andrea Copeland PART 3: Solutions 14. Ethiopian stories in an English landscape - Shawn Sobers 15. Having a lovely time: localized crowdsourcing to create a 1930s street view of Bristol from a digitized postcard collection - Nicholas Nourse, Peter Insole and Julian Warren 16. Digital ARChiving in Canadian Artist-Run Centres - Shannon Lucky 17. New approaches to the community recording and preservation of burial space - Gareth Beale, Nicole Smith and St Mary the Virgin Embsay with Eastby Churchyard survey team 18. A case for collaboration: solving practical problems in cultural heritage digitization projects - Craig Harkema and Joel Salt 19. Open heritage data and APIs - Henriette Roued-Cunliffe Further Reading Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781783301232 20170327
The internet as a platform for facilitating human organization without the need for organizations has, through social media, created new challenges for cultural heritage institutions. Challenges include but are not limited to: how to manage copyright, ownership, orphan works, open data access to heritage representations and artefacts, crowdsourcing, cultural heritage amateurs, information as a commodity or information as public domain, sustainable preservation, attitudes towards openness and much more. Participatory Heritage uses a selection of international case studies to explore these issues and demonstrates that in order for personal and community-based documentation and artefacts to be preserved and included in social and collective histories, individuals and community groups need the technical and knowledge infrastructures of support that formal cultural institutions can provide. In other words, both groups need each other. Divided into three core sections, this book explores: . Participants in the preservation of cultural heritage; exploring heritage institutions and organizations, community archives and group . Challenges; including discussion of giving voices to communities, social inequality, digital archives, data and online sharing . Solutions; discussing open access and APIs, digital postcards, the case for collaboration, digital storytelling and co-designing heritage practice. Readership: This book will be useful reading for individuals working in cultural institutions such as libraries, museums, archives and historical societies. It will also be of interest to students taking library, archive and cultural heritage courses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781783301232 20170327
Green Library

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