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Collection
Undergraduate and Graduate Theses, Department of Anthropology
This thesis explores how central Iowa mid-sized industrial farmers formed and maintain their ties to the agribusiness industry and through this analysis illuminates possibilities for sustainable alternatives. In the context of widespread debate about the best way our agricultural systems can "feed the world" without sacrificing local autonomy, it examines central Iowa as a case study, in order to examine the way global processes situated within late capitalism create particular experiences and affect in daily life. It shows how the agriculture industry became naturalized in farmers' everyday lives and how this produced a set of dispositions that became evident in farmers' affective responses to the "battle for representation" of agriculture. As farmers connected with favorable industry representations of their work and lauded their own efforts for sustainability, they opened the possibility for unlikely alliances with groups advocating for sustainable agriculture.
Book
207 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Collection
Undergraduate Theses, School of Engineering
Poverty eradication is the first of 17 Sustainable Development Goals set by the United Nations to reach by 2030. Measuring poverty is an important step to alleviating poverty, as it helps to inform research studies, target aid efforts, guide policy decisions, and generally monitor the progress of such an initiative. In the developing world, where the need for poverty data is the most pressing, poverty data is particularly scarce due to the resource cost associated with conducting surveys. This data gap is one of the crucial challenges to overcome in order to alleviate poverty. This thesis aims to cover a variety of methods towards closing this poverty data gap using remote sensing and satellite imagery data. We introduce a high-resolution poverty mapping method using only publicly available satellite data. The approach utilizes transfer learning to leverage knowledge from data-rich sources and combat the data gap. We also attempt to reduce the data gap by incorporating additional data, detailed in preliminary work using multiple resolutions of satellite imagery to improve predictive performance. We develop a semi-supervised method which narrows the data gap by utilizing abundant unlabeled satellite imagery. We show that can use this method to also take advantage of spatial correlations of poverty measures to improve our model predictions. Experiments are conducted on a variety of real-world datasets, as well as poverty measure prediction problems for 5 African countries - Malawi, Tanzania, Uganda, Nigeria, and Rwanda - demonstrating that our methods based on only publicly available data can approach the predictive performance of surveys conducted in the field and potentially transform efforts to track and alleviate poverty. Finally, we detail the implementation of a deployment pipeline system designed to support automated production of global scale poverty maps that is flexible enough to incorporate any dataset and model. This represents the first step towards providing up-to-date poverty maps to guide the decision-making process of nonprofit organizations and policymakers.
Book
681 p. ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
394 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxvi, 300 p. : ill., maps ; 30 cm. + 1 CD-ROM.
Earth Sciences Library (Branner)
Book
x, 462 pages : illustrations, maps (some color) ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
204 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
A study of living conditions and survival strategies in semi-arid
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
74 p. ; 21 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
116 p. : ill ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Collection
Undergraduate Theses, School of Engineering
California would be exposing its energy sector to drought risk and locked-in energy losses were it to make major investments in electrolysis-based hydrogen systems. Though a renewable electrolysis-based hydrogen economy could assure dispatchability and energy storage capacity while limiting harmful emissions, many of its benefits are associated with the challenge of patching renewable energy supply into the aging legacy of the current grid system. Faced with the opportunity to redesign energy delivery systems as the grid infrastructure comes to the end of its lifetime, California must recognize that an energy system fundamentally designed around hydrogen rather than electricity as the main energy carrier does not make sense. Not only are significant conversion losses associated with converting electricity into hydrogen and back, but electrolysis demands a substantial amount of very high quality water that is not realistically available in California. Given California's high growth rate, threatened water supply. ecosystems, and delivery infrastructure, and demonstrated need to use scarce energy as efficiently as possible, the combined problems of high losses and water dependence that a hydrogen economy presents assure that long-term hydrogen-dependent infrastructural investments would be, at best, an inefficient use of resources.
Book
xv, 103 leaves.
Green Library
Book
472 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Collection
Undergraduate and Graduate Theses, Department of Anthropology
Ecotourism is an increasingly popular conservation/development strategy being used throughout the tropics. Scholars have shown the positive impact of community run ecotourism lodges throughout Central and South America on conservation efforts, community empowerment, and economic stability within the region. To increase the popularity of ecolodges and by extension their conservation benefits, this research seeks to understand the motivation behind tourists’ expectations for and satisfaction of ecotourism vacations. Previous studies on tourism show the importance of promotional materials and pre-determined destination image on tourist satisfaction. This study is novel in applying this lens to an ecotourism venue. The impact of promotional materials, portrayals of the rainforest by the media and viewings of wild fauna on tourists’ overall satisfaction are investigated. Using Rainforest Expeditions’ ecolodge Refugio Amazonas in Peru as a case study, data collection on tourists’ expectations, observations on tourists’ reactions to charismatic wildlife sightings and ratings of varying trail experience are used to understand tourists’ overall ecotour satisfaction. Results support the hypotheses that tourist motivations for attending the ecolodge as well as their predetermined destination image created a highly correlated relationship between charismatic faunal sightings and tour satisfaction. Materials promoting the lodge have been found to be over-selling the experience resulting in lowered overall satisfaction, especially for those tourists who expected “an adventure of a lifetime.” I also found that popular cultural portrayals of the rainforest did impact tourists’ expectations and resulted in lower satisfaction ratings when an abundance of primates, exotic birds and jaguars were not experienced. Overall, tourist satisfaction was largely dependent on sighting of charismatic fauna throughout their time in the rainforest due to expectations before arrival. This study has led to many concrete steps tropical ecolodges can take to modify promotional materials, increase the frequency of sightings and use popular rainforest media portrayals to increase tourist satisfaction.
Collection
Undergraduate Honors Theses, Graduate School of Education
Starting in the 1980s and 90s, indigenous Mayan communities began to form in the US. Many members of these communities speak a language besides English or Spanish natively and are subject to a number of social barriers and discrimination, including access to a quality education. Situated in a bilingual Spanish-English elementary school in the Pacific Northwest, the study explored the multilinguistic practices of nine 4th grade Mayan Mam speakers using PhotoVoice. After being asked to show “the languages of [their] lives,” students took photos using a disposable camera for a period of three weeks. Afterward, students were asked to select one photo each and participated in PhotoVoice interviews conducted in a group setting. Students were asked about the photo they selected, as well as more about their linguistic practices inside and outside of school. Using a combination of both a-priori and emergent codes, 102 photos in total were coded. The photos as well as recordings and transcripts of the PhotoVoice interviews and participant demographic information informed analysis. Analysis results showed student conceptions of Fishman’s sociolinguistic domains. Actual participant descriptions of place-based linguistic practices complicate this finding somewhat, suggesting that languages described by participants as separate may see considerable overlap in practice. The study also found that although Mam was not described as a language used in school by the students, Mam was incredibly present in the home and with family; furthermore, half of prompted participants expressed some interest in the possibility of using Mam in school in the future. Finally, although some students described the utility of Mam as a common language in order to help those who don’t speak another language, others described a preference for Mam as a motivating factor for use. Building on Martínez’ work on language ideologies, these findings suggest that although students did express attitudes that reflected dominant language ideologies whereby Mam is deemed a non-academic language, student interest in the use of Mam in school simultaneously challenges this notion. Therefore, some students articulated what Martínez refers to as counter-hegemonic language ideologies, in which a language is valorized in spite of its current subordination in society. These findings demonstrate the potential benefits of facilitating autoethnographic exploration of linguistic practices in the classroom, particularly in a culturally responsive context.
Book
1 online resource (xxvi, 398 p.)
dx.doi.org SpringerLink
Book
54 pages, [90] pages in various pagings : illustrations ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xxix, 286 pages) : illustrations.
  • Summary
  • Introduction
  • Chapter One: Introduction, Methodology, Limitations
  • Chapter Two: Towards a Spatial Planning Framework for Climate Adaptation
  • Chapter Three: Developing a Planning Theory for Wicked Problems: Swarm Planning
  • Chapter Four: Incremental Change, Transition or Transformation? Optimising Change Pathways for Climate Adaptation in Spatial Planning
  • Chapter Five: The Use of Spatial Planning to Increase the Resilience for Future Turbulence in the Spatial System of the Groningen Region to Deal with Climate Change
  • Chapter Six: Swarming Landscapes, New Pathways for Resilient Cities
  • Chapter Seven: Quadruple the Potential: Scaling the Energy Supply
  • Chapter Eight: Beyond the Ordinary: Innovative Spatial Energy Framework Offers Perspectives on Increased Energy and Carbon Objectives
  • Chapter Nine: Swarm Planning for Climate Change: An Alternative Pathway for Resilience
  • Chapter Ten: Conclusion, Discussion and Recommendations
  • Index.
This book shows that the problem of climate adaptation, which is described in social planning terms as wicked, is at odds with the contemporary practice of spatial planning. The author proposes a new adjusted framework which is more adaptable to unpredictable, wicked, dynamic and non-linear processes. The inspiration for this new method is the behaviour of swarms: bees, ants, birds and fish are capable of self-organization, which enables the system to become less vulnerable to sudden environmental changes. The framework proposed in Swarm Planning consists of these four elements: Two levels of complexity, the first being the whole system and the second its individual components. Each of these has different attributes for adapting to change. Five layers, consisting of networks, focal points, unplanned space, natural resources and emerging occupation patterns. Each layer has its own spatial dynamic, and each is connected to a spatial scale. Non-linear processes, which emerge in different parts of the framework and include emerging patterns, connectedness and tipping points among others. Two planning processes; the first, from small to large works upward from the slowest changing elements to more rapidly-changing ones. The second, on the list of partners addresses each layer from networks through emerging occupation patterns. Swarm Planning applies this framework to a series of pilot studies, and appraises its performance using criteria for an adaptive landscape. The results show that the use of the Swarm Planning Framework reduces the vulnerability of landscapes as well as the impact of climate hazards and disasters, improves response to unexpected hazards and contains adaptation strategies. This book is a must for planners in government and the private sector as it outlines the concept, strategies and techniques for swarm planning. It is also an important guide for policymakers looking to engage communities in a dialogue about the adaptation planning process.

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