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SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
v. ill. 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
v. ill. 23 cm.
Media & Microtext Center
Book
x, 188 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Introduction
  • Two modes of prestige film
  • Hollywood as popular sociology
  • Hollywood and the public sphere
  • A genre out of cycles
  • Realist melodrama
  • Epilogue.
After World War II, Hollywood's "social problem films" - tackling topical issues that included racism, crime, mental illness, and drug abuse - were hits with critics and general moviegoers alike. In an era of film famed for its reliance on pop psychology, these movies were a form of popular sociology, bringing the academic discipline's concerns to a much broader audience. Sociology on Film examines how the postwar "problem film" translated contemporary policy debates and intellectual discussions into cinematic form in order to become one of the preeminent genres of prestige drama. Chris Cagle chronicles how these movies were often politically fractious, the work of progressive directors and screenwriters who drew scrutiny from the House Un-American Activities Committee. Yet he also proposes that the genre helped to construct an abstract discourse of "society" that served to unify a middlebrow American audience. As he considers the many forms of print media that served to inspire social problem films, including journalism, realist novels, and sociological texts, Cagle also explores their distinctive cinematic aesthetics. Through a close analysis of films like Gentleman's Agreement, The Lost Weekend, and Intruder in the Dust, he presents a compelling case that the visual style of these films was intimately connected to their more expressly political and sociological aspirations. Sociology on Film demonstrates how the social problem picture both shaped and reflected the middle-class viewer's national self-image, making a lasting impact on Hollywood's aesthetic direction.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813576947 20170213
Green Library
Journal/Periodical
v. : ill. ; 28-35 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxv, 350 p., [8] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
Most widely noted for his acclaimed Let Us Now Praise Famous Men and his Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, A Death in the Family, Tennessee native James Agee was also a journalist, film critic, poet, and screenwriter. More than fifty years after Agee's untimely death, his canon of work continues to grow in popularity, and his ability to capture the human condition in all its forms remains unparalleled. Agee Agonistes is a compilation of seventeen essays from the James Agee Celebration hosted by the University of Tennessee in April 2005. The collection includes some of the best interpretations of Agee's work and explores the influences on his art, delineates the connections and syntheses he makes within his texts, and examines his involvement in music, ethics, surrealism, local and national history, cinema, television, poetry, literature, sociology, and journalism. The volume features never-before-seen pictures of Agee, previously unknown correspondence, and a remembrance by his oldest daughter, Deedee. The volume also includes the most extensive bibliography of secondary sources on Agee assembled to date.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781572335745 20160527
Green Library
Book
xx, 352 p. ; 24 cm.
In "Gary Snyder and the Pacific Rim", Timothy Gray draws upon previously unpublished journals and letters, as well as his own close readings of Gary Snyder's well-crafted poetry and prose to track the early career of a maverick intellectual whose writings powered the San Francisco Renaissance of the 1950s and 1960s. Exploring various aspects of cultural geography, Gray asserts that this west coast literary community seized upon the idea of a Pacific Rim regional structure, in part to recognize their Orientalist desires and in part to consolidate their opposition to America's cold war ideology, which tended to divide East from West. The geographical consciousness of Snyder's writing was particularly influential, Gray argues, because it gave San Francisco's Beat and hippie cultures a set of physical coordinates by which they could chart their utopian visions of peace and love. Gray's introduction tracks the increased use of "Pacific Rim discourse" by politicians and business leaders following World War II. Ensuing chapters analyze Snyder's countercultural invocation of this regional idea, concentrating on the poet's migratory or "creaturely" sensibility, his gift for literary translation, his physical embodiment of trans-Pacific ideals, his role as tribal spokesperson for Haight-Ashbury hippies, and his burgeoning interest in environmental issues. Throughout, Gray's citations of such writers as Allen Ginsberg, Philip Whalen, and Joanne Kyger shed light on Snyder's communal role, providing an amazingly intimate portrait of the west coast counterculture. An interdisciplinary project that utilizes models of ecology, sociology, and comparative religion to supplement traditional methods of literary biography, "Gary Snyder and the Pacific Rim" offers a unique perspective on Snyder's life and work. This book will fascinate literary and Asian studies scholars, as well as the general reader interested in the Beat movement and multicultural influences on poetry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780877459767 20160528
Green Library
Book
xv, 297 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction: A Short History of Macho Criticism-- 1. "Healthy Nerves And Sturdy Physiques": Remaking the Male Body of Literary Culture in the 1930s-- 2. Doughfaces, Eggheads, and Softies: On the Evolution of Gendered Epithets and Literary Culture in the 1940s-- 3. High-Brows and Low-Brows: Squares, Beats, Hipsters, White Negroes, New Critics, and American Literary Culture in the 1950s-- 4. Reforming the Hard Body: The Old Left, the Counter Culture, and the Masculine Kulturkampf of the 1960s-- 5. The Gender Upheavals of the Late 1960s: The Black Panther Movement, Gay Liberation, and Radical Feminism Epilogue-- Notes-- Works Cited.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253355478 20160603
Masculinity was both a subtext and an explicit concern in the literary and political debates of the mid-20th century. In Pinks, Pansies, and Punks, James Penner charts the construction of masculinity within American literary culture from the 1930s to the 1970s. He examines the macho criticism that originated in the 1930s within the high modernist New York intellectual circle and tracks the issues of class struggle, anti-communism, and the clash between the Old and New Left in the 1960s. By extending literary culture to include not just novels, plays, and poetry, but diaries, journals, manifestos, essays, literary criticism, journalism, non-fiction, essays on psychology and sociology, and screenplays, Penner foregrounds the multiplicity of gender attitudes available in each of the historical moments he addresses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253355478 20160603
Pinks, Pansies, and Punks charts the construction of masculinity within American literary culture from the 1930s to the 1970s. Penner documents the emergence of "macho criticism, " and explores how debates about "hard" and "soft" masculinity influenced the class struggles of the 1930s, anti-communism in the 1940s and 1950s, and the clash between the Old Left and the New Left in the 1960s. By extending literary culture to include not just novels, plays, and poetry, but diaries, journals, manifestos, screenplays, and essays on psychology and sociology, Penner unveils the multiplicity of gender attitudes that emerge in each of the decades he addresses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253222510 20160603
Green Library
Book
xii, 484 p. ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction : rethinking the secularization of American public life / Christian Smith
  • 2. Secularizing American higher education : the case of early American sociology / Christian Smith
  • 3. Educational elites and the movement to secularize public education : the case of the National Education Association / Kraig Beyerlein
  • 4. The positivist attack on Baconian science and religious knowledge in the 1870s / Eva Marie Garroutte
  • 5. Power, ridicule, and the destruction of religious moral reform politics in the 1920s / P.C. Kemeny
  • 6. My own salvation : the Christian century and psychology's secularizing of American Protestantism / Keith G. Meador
  • 7. From Christian civilization to individual civil liberties : framing religion in the legal field, 1880-1949 / David Sikkink
  • 8. Reforming education, transforming religion, 1876-1931 / George M. Thomas, Lisa R. Peck, and Channin G. De Haan
  • 9. Promoting a secular standard : secularization and modern journalism, 1870-1930 / Richard W. Flory
  • 10. After the fall : attempts to establish an explicitly theological voice in debates over science and medicine after 1960 / John H. Evans.
An examination of power struggles and ideological shifts in various social sectors where the public authority of religion has diminished, in particular, education, science, law and journalism. Together the essays depict a cultural and institutional revolution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520230002 20160528
Green Library
Book
ix, 268 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
An examination of the fireworks and folderol that erupt when folklore and current events collide Newslore is folklore that comments on and hinges on knowledge of current events. These expressions come in many forms: jokes, urban legends, digitally altered photographs, mock news stories, press releases or interoffice memoranda, parodies of songs, poems, political and commercial advertisements, movie previews and posters, still or animated cartoons, and short live-action films. In Newslore: Contemporary Folklore on the Internet, author Russell Frank offers a snapshot of the items of newslore disseminated via the Internet that gained the widest currency around the turn of the millennium. Among the newsmakers lampooned in e-mails and on the Web were Bill and Hillary Clinton, George W. Bush and Dick Cheney, Osama bin Laden and Saddam Hussein, and such media celebrities as Princess Diana and Michael Jackson. The book also looks at the folk response to the September 11 attacks and Hurricane Katrina, as well as the presidential elections of 2000 and 2004. Frank analyzes this material by tracing each item back to the news story it refers to in search of clues as to what, exactly, the item reveals about the public's response. His argument throughout is that newslore is an extremely useful and revelatory gauge for public reaction to current events and an invaluable screen capture of the latest zeitgeist. Russell Frank, State College, Pennsylvania, is associate professor of communications at Penn State University and a columnist for StateCollege.com, as well as a former reporter and columnist for several newspapers. His work has been published in the Journal of American Folklore, Western Folklore, New Media and Society, Journal of Mass Media Ethics, Journalism, Contemporary Legend, Rural Sociology, Los Angeles Times, San Jose Mercury News, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and Hartford Courant, among other newspapers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781604739282 20160605
Green Library
Database topics
General and Reference Works; American History; Statistical and Numeric Data; Economics and Business; Sociology; Law; Communication and Journalism; Government Information: International and Foreign; Government Information: United States; Government Information: State and Local; Political Science
Provides statistical data from U.S. government publications from 1973, state and private sources from 1980, and international organizations from 1983.
Book
xxiii, 308 pages, [16] p. of plates : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
  • Camp Mills, New York, June 1918
  • Crossing the Atlantic, June 1918
  • England, June 1918
  • Arrival in France, June 1918
  • Training in Humberville, July 1918
  • Up to the front, August 1918
  • The St. Mihiel offensive, September 1918
  • The Meuse-Argonne offensive, October 1918
  • War's end, November 1918
  • Through Belgium and Luxembourg, November-December 1918
  • Germany, December 1918-March 1919
  • Back to France, March 1919
  • School in Montpellier, March-April 1919
  • Notes, April-August 1919.
Nels Anderson's World War I Diary provides a rare glimpse into the wartime experiences of one of the most well-respected sociologists of the twentieth century, the renowned author of "The Hobo "(1920) and "Desert Saints: The Mormon Frontier in Utah "(1942). Anderson, a keen observer of people, places, and events his entire life, joined the U.S. Army in 1918 at the age of 29 and was sent to Europe to fight as part of the Allied Expeditionary Force (AEF) under General Pershing. Because keeping a journal was strongly discouraged among American forces during WWI, particularly among the rank-and-file soldiers, Anderson's diary stands as a rare gem. Furthermore, it is the only known account of war service during WWI by a member of the LDS Church. Anderson joined the Mormon faith after accepting the hospitality of an extended Mormon ranching family during his travels throughout the American West as a working hobo.Anderson's accounts of the St. Mihiel and Meuse-Argonne offensives are particularly remarkable given the challenges of keeping a detailed journal amidst the chaos and suffering of the war's Western Front. His insights into the depravity and callousness of war are buttressed with intimate human portraits of those to whom he was closest. The war years provided many formative experiences that would prove to have a lasting influence on Anderson's views regarding the working poor, authority, and human values; this would come to bear heavily on his later work as a pioneering sociologist at the University of Chicago, where he helped establish participant observation as a research method. The many introspective entries contained in this volume will be of reat interest to military historians and history buffs as well as to those in the social sciences looking to find the intellectual origins of Anderson's later work in the burgeoning field of sociology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781607812555 20160612
Green Library
Book
x, 376 p. ; 24 cm.
  • Ulrich Bonnell Phillips and the beginnings of southern history / Junius P. Rodriguez
  • Broadus Mitchell: economic historian of the South / Jacquelyn Dowd Hall
  • E. Merton Coulter and the political culture of southern historiography / Fred Arthur Bailey
  • Frank L. Owsley's plain folk of the old South after fifty years / Anthony Gene Carey
  • W.E.B. du Bois: ambiguous journey to the Black working class / Joe W. Trotter
  • Rupert B. Vance: a sociologist's view of the South / John Shelton Reed and Daniel Joseph Singal
  • Charles S. Sydnor's quest for a suitable past / Fred Arthur Bailey
  • W.J. Cash: a native son confronts the past / Bruce Clayton
  • Defining t̓he South's number one problem:̓ V.O. Key, Jr., and the study of twentieth-century southern politics / Kari Frederickson
  • C. Vann Woodward, southern historian / John Herbert Roper
  • John Hope Franklin: southern history in black and white / John White
  • A. Elizabeth Taylor: searching for southern suffragists / Judith N. Mcarthur
  • David M. Potter: Lincoln, abundance, and sectional crisis / David S. Heidler and Jeanne T. Heidler
  • David Herbert Donald: southerner as historian of the nation / Jean H. Baker
  • Kenneth Stampp's peculiar reputation / James Oakes
  • Continuity and change: George Brown Tindall and the post-reconstruction South / Susan Youngblood Ashmore
  • Anne Firor Scott: writing women into southern history / Anastatia Sims
  • Ethos without ethic:̓ Samuel S. Hill and southern religious history / Ted Ownby.
Historian Glenn Feldman gathers together a group of essays that examine the efforts of important scholars to discuss and define the South's distinctiveness. The volume includes 18 chapters on such notable historians as John Hope Franklin, Anne Firor Scott, Frank L. Owsley, W. J. Cash, and C. Vann Woodward, written by 19 different researchers, both senior historians and emerging scholars, including Jacquelyn Dowd Hall, John Shelton Reed, Bruce Clayton, and Ted Ownby. The essays examine the major work or works of each scholar under consideration as well as that scholar's overall contribution to the study of southern history. Reading Southern History will enlighten readers on the more compelling themes currently and traditionally explored by southern historians. It will appeal greatly to professors and students as a valuable multidisciplinary introduction to the study of southern history, since several of the essays are on scholars who are working outside the discipline of history proper, in the fields of political science, sociology, journalism, and economics. Feldman's collection, therefore, sheds light on a broad spectrum of themes important in southern history, including the plight of poor whites, race, debates over race and class, the "reconstruction syndrome, " continuity versus discontinuity in relation to blacks and whites, and regional culture and distinctiveness. Reading Southern History will be valuable to students and scholars of women's studies, African American history, working-class history, and ethnic studies, as well as traditional southern history. Most important, the publication makes a significant contribution to the development and ongoing study of the historiography of the South.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817310998 20160528
Green Library
Book
xxiii, 232 p. : 1 map ; 23 cm.
"How is one to explain the sudden reappearance of genocide on European soil less than a half century after the Nazi Holocaust and after three gen-erations of Europeans and Americans had come of age accepting the motto 'never again'?"-Roy Gutman, author of A Witness to Genocide. Alexandra Stiglmayer interviewed survivors of the continuing war in Bosnia-Herzegovina in order to reveal, to a seemingly deaf world, the horrors of the ongoing war in the former Yugoslavia. The women-primarily of Muslim but also of Croatian and Serbian origin-have endured the atrocities of rape and the loss of loved ones. Their testimony, published in the 1993 German edition, is bare, direct, and its cumulative effect overwhelming. The first English edition contains Stiglmayer's updates to her own two essays, one detailing the historical context of the current conflict and the other presenting the core of the book, interviews with some twenty victims of rape as well as interviews with three Serbian perpetrators. Essays investi-gating mass rape and war from ethnopsychological, sociological, cultural, and medical perspectives are included. New essays by Catharine A. MacKinnon, Rhonda Copelon, and Susan Brownmiller address the crucial issues of recognizing the human rights of women and children. A foreword by Roy Gutman describes war crimes within the context of the UN Tribunal, and an afterword by Cynthia Enloe relates the mass rapes of this war to developments and reactions in the international women's movement. Accounts of torture, murder, mutilation, abduction, sexual enslavement, and systematic attempts to impregnate-all in the name of "ethnic cleansing"-make for the grimmest of reading. However brutal and appalling the information conveyed here, this book cannot and should not be ignored. Alexandra Stiglmayer studied journalism at the University of Dortmund. Since 1992 she has been a freelance correspondent in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia for German and American radio and television. Marion Faber, the translator, is a professor of comparative literature at Swarthmore College and the translator of Nietzsche's Human, All Too Human (Nebraska 1984) and Sarah Kirsch's The Panther Woman (Nebraska 1989).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803292291 20160528
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xxiii, 232 p. : 1 map ; 23 cm.
"How is one to explain the sudden reappearance of genocide on European soil less than a half century after the Nazi Holocaust and after three gen-erations of Europeans and Americans had come of age accepting the motto 'never again'?"-Roy Gutman, author of A Witness to Genocide. Alexandra Stiglmayer interviewed survivors of the continuing war in Bosnia-Herzegovina in order to reveal, to a seemingly deaf world, the horrors of the ongoing war in the former Yugoslavia. The women-primarily of Muslim but also of Croatian and Serbian origin-have endured the atrocities of rape and the loss of loved ones. Their testimony, published in the 1993 German edition, is bare, direct, and its cumulative effect overwhelming. The first English edition contains Stiglmayer's updates to her own two essays, one detailing the historical context of the current conflict and the other presenting the core of the book, interviews with some twenty victims of rape as well as interviews with three Serbian perpetrators. Essays investi-gating mass rape and war from ethnopsychological, sociological, cultural, and medical perspectives are included. New essays by Catharine A. MacKinnon, Rhonda Copelon, and Susan Brownmiller address the crucial issues of recognizing the human rights of women and children. A foreword by Roy Gutman describes war crimes within the context of the UN Tribunal, and an afterword by Cynthia Enloe relates the mass rapes of this war to developments and reactions in the international women's movement. Accounts of torture, murder, mutilation, abduction, sexual enslavement, and systematic attempts to impregnate-all in the name of "ethnic cleansing"-make for the grimmest of reading. However brutal and appalling the information conveyed here, this book cannot and should not be ignored. Alexandra Stiglmayer studied journalism at the University of Dortmund. Since 1992 she has been a freelance correspondent in Bosnia-Herzegovina and Croatia for German and American radio and television. Marion Faber, the translator, is a professor of comparative literature at Swarthmore College and the translator of Nietzsche's Human, All Too Human (Nebraska 1984) and Sarah Kirsch's The Panther Woman (Nebraska 1989).
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803292291 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)

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