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Book
iii, 75 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Green Library
Green Library
Book
40 pages : color charts ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (20 unnumbered pages) : color illustrations.
Book
1 online resource (7 pages) : color illustrations.
Book
651 pages : illustration ; 27 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 84 pages ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
112 p. : ill. ; 16x23 cm.
  • Foreword
  • Acronyms and abbreviations
  • Executive summary
  • Assessment and recommendations
  • Job displacement in New Zealand and its consequences
  • Easing the impact of economic restructuring on displaced workers in New Zealand
  • Re-employment support for displaced workers in New Zealand who struggle to find a new job.
Job displacement (involuntary job loss due to firm closure or downsizing) affects many workers over their lifetime. Displaced workers may face long periods of unemployment and, even when they find new jobs, tend to be paid less and have fewer benefits than in their prior jobs. Helping them get back into good jobs quickly should be a key goal of labour market policy. This report is part of a series of reports looking at how this challenge is being tackled in a number of OECD countries. It shows that in New Zealand most displaced workers find a new job again, largely due to a strong economy and a highly flexible labour market. But many of them face large losses in terms of job quality and especially wages. And displaced workers facing difficulties in New Zealand are largely left on their own to find a new job, as the means-tested public benefit system only provides for people in need and employment services concentrate on helping people off benefit with limited focus on those not receiving a benefit. Nine countries are participating in the review: Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Sweden and the United States. Contents Chapter 1. Job displacement in New Zealand and its consequences Chapter 2 Easing the impact of economic restructuring on displaced workers in New Zealand Chapter 3 Re-employment support for displaced workers in New Zealand who struggle to find a new job www.oecd.org/employment/displaced-workers.htm
Book
39 p.
There is vigorous debate about reforms to address the balance between investor protection and the right to regulate in the over 3000 existing investment treaties. This paper first notes the growing trend to analyse particular treaty rules rather than treaties as a whole and the importance of comparative analysis of balancing under other regimes. It then outlines issues in four areas: (i) the types of regulation potentially at issue in investment treaty claims by covered investors; (ii) the types and levels of investor protection; (iii) the degree of impact of treaties on regulation; and (iv) the processes and institutions that may be involved in balancing interests in investor protection and the right to regulate. While the paper recognises that dispute resolution institutions have a significant impact on the balance and the right to regulate, it focuses primarily on substantive issues in light of other ongoing work on dispute settlement.
Book
iv, 28 pages ; 28 cm
Green Library
Green Library
Map
1 online resource (1 map) : color.
Map
1 online resource (1 map) : color.
Map
1 online resource (1 map) : color + 1 pamphlet (iv, 27, [16] pages).
Book
46 p.
The G20/OECD Task Force on Financial Consumer Protection has highlighted that "regulators and supervisors can use the insights gained through behavioural economics research to inform their approach to potential remedies to help consumers". This paper, prepared under the aegis of the G20/OECD Task Force, first provides some historical context for the development of the field of behavioural economics and its increased application to policy. It then looks more specifically at the application of behavioural economics in the area of financial consumer protection. Common biases that individuals demonstrate in the context of making financial decisions are identified, and an overview of how numerous governments are testing and implementing the application of behavioural economics for policies promoting financial consumer protection is provided. The paper concludes by highlighting the opportunity for behavioural economics to help provide cost-efficient ways of making policy more effective at promoting positive outcomes for consumers, and stressing the need to continue an open dialogue with policy makers, regulators and supervisors to exchange experiences and good practices.
Book
404 p. : ill. ; 21x28 cm
  • Foreword and acknowledgements
  • Acronyms and abbreviations
  • Executive summary
  • Why bother? Context and approach
  • What's going on? Insights from the behavioural insight case studies
  • Where to go next? Shaping a policy and research agenda
  • Behavioural insights case studies: Consumer protection
  • Behavioural insights case studies: Education
  • Behavioural insights case studies: Energy
  • Behavioural insights case studies: Environment
  • Behavioural insights case studies: Financial products
  • Behavioural insights case studies: Health and safety
  • Behavioural insights case studies: Labour market
  • Behavioural insights case studies: Public service delivery
  • Behavioural insights case studies: Tax
  • Behavioural insights case studies: Telecommunications
  • Additional behavioural insights case studies
  • Glossary.
“Behavioural insights”, or insights derived from the behavioural and social sciences, including decision making, psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience, organisational and group behaviour, are being applied by governments with the aim of making public policies work better. As their use has become more widespread, however, questions are being raised about their effectiveness as well as their philosophical underpinnings. This report discusses the use and reach of behavioural insights, drawing on a comprehensive collection of over 100 applications across the world and policy sectors, including consumer protection, education, energy, environment, finance, health and safety, labour market policies, public service delivery, taxes and telecommunications. It suggests ways to ensure that this experimental approach can be successfully and sustainably used as a public policy tool.