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Book
140 p. : ill. ; 21x28 cm
  • Estadísticas Básicas de México, 2015
  • Resumen ejecutivo
  • Evaluación y recomendaciones
  • Seguimiento de las recomendaciones anteriores de la OCDE sobre políticas públicas
  • Hacia una sociedad más incluyente
  • Impulsar la productividad mediante la integración en las cadenas globales de valor.
Las ambiciosas reformas estructurales y las sólidas políticas macroeconómicas han asegurado la resistencia de la economía mexicana, sumamente abierta, ante las desafiantes condiciones mundiales. El crecimiento de la productividad de México repuntó hace poco en los sectores que se beneficiaron de las reformas estructurales: energético, financiero y de telecomunicaciones. La apertura comercial, la inversión extranjera directa, la integración en las cadenas globales de valor y los incentivos a la innovación han impulsado las exportaciones, en especial las de automóviles. Sin embargo, otros sectores se han rezagado, al verse afectados por regulaciones locales demasiado rigurosas, instituciones jurídicas débiles, informalidad arraigada, corrupción y desarrollo financiero insuficiente. Por otra parte, el crecimiento no ha sido suficientemente incluyente para lograr mejores condiciones de vida para todas las familias mexicanas, muchas de las cuales viven en la pobreza; y cuyas oportunidades para los hijos de superar a sus padres podrían mejorarse. Las políticas anteriores ya han empezado a corregir estas tendencias, pero es necesario hacer más en este sentido. El Estudio de 2017 hace recomendaciones clave que podrían ayudar a estimular la productividad y hacer que el crecimiento sea más incluyente. CAPÍTULOS ESPECIALES: CRECIMIENTO INCLUYENTE; PRODUCTIVIDAD
Book
128 p. : ill. ; 21x28 cm.
  • Foreword and acknowledgements
  • Acronyms and abbreviations
  • Executive summary
  • Designing a strategy built on the strengths of Mexico's National Auditing System (SNF)
  • National and sub-national dimensions of auditing in Mexico
  • Mexico's supreme audit institution as a catalyst for better governance.
This report presents the findings and recommendations of the OECD review of Mexico’s national auditing system, with a focus on the Auditoria Superior de la Federación (ASF), the supreme audit institution. Reforms in Mexico have revamped the country’s institutional architecture and created several systems for strengthening accountability, integrity and transparency. The report highlights strategic considerations for the national auditing system and the ASF, examines the national and subnational dimensions of auditing in Mexico, and suggests ways for the ASF to enhance the impact and relevance of its work.
Book
xvi, 321 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 26 cm.
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
1 online resource (ii, 26 pages) : color illustrations
In 2013, GAO placed Limiting the Federal Government's Fiscal Exposure by Better Managing Climate Change Risks on its high-risk list because climate risks and weather-related disasters present a financial risk to the federal government. The 2017 President's Budget estimated that the U.S. government incurred over $357 billion in direct costs because of weather-related disasters in the last decade. The U.S. Global Change Research Program states that climate change and associated weather-related disasters may increase these costs. These impacts call attention to the federal government's role as a leader in coordinating and informing government efforts. Enhancing resilience through hazard mitigation and climate change adaptation, for example, by building flood protections, may help reduce these costs. Other governments face similar risks and have developed strategies for enhancing resilience. This report focuses on fiscal exposure to climate-related risks and describes (1) how selected governments have approached enhancing resilience to weather-related disasters through climate change adaptation and (2) steps the U.S. government has taken to enhance resilience through climate change adaptation. GAO reviewed literature and government documents; interviewed U.S. and other government officials and stakeholders; and selected a nongeneralizable sample of four countries, Mexico, the Netherlands, the Philippines, the United Kingdom, and the European Union for further examination, based on criteria including stakeholder recommendations.
Book
103 pages ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 161 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
414 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 33 cm
Green Library
Book
271 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 29 cm
Green Library
Book
60 p. ; 16x23 cm
The equal inclusion of women in economic life is a key driver of economic growth throughout the world, including the Pacific Alliance countries of Chile, Colombia, Mexico and Peru. Talent is lost, and future growth suffers, when women do not have the same opportunities as men to reach their full potential in the labour market. All countries of the world have work to do to advance the equality agenda, and Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru have much to do. While girls and women in the Pacific Alliance are progressing on the path to gender equality and inclusive growth, significant roadblocks remain.
Book
165 pages ; 28 cm.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (iv, 30 pages) : illustrations (some color) + 4 spreadsheets.
Book
524 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 191 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: Local Loyalties in an Imperial Context
  • Conquest Identities and the Indios Fronterizos of Colotlán
  • Indigenous Autonomy in Late Colonial Mexico
  • The Countess and the "Insolent Indians"
  • The Revolutions of This Canyon
  • Power and Pardon in the Independence of Mexico.
In The Mark of Rebels Barry Robinson offers a new look at Mexican Independence from the perspective of an indigenous population caught in the heart of the struggle. During the conquest and settlement of Mexico's Western Sierra Madre, Spain's indigenous allies constructed an indio fronterizo identity for their ethnically diverse descendants. These communities used their special status to maintain a measure of autonomy during the colonial era, but the cultural shifts of the late colonial period radically transformed the relationship between these indios fronterizos and their neighbors. Marshalling an extensive array of archival material from Mexico, the United States, and Spain, Robinson shows that indio fronterizo participation in the Mexican wars of independence grafted into the larger Hidalgo Revolt through alignment with creole commanders. Still, a considerable gulf existed between the aims of indigenous rebels and the creole leadership. Consequently, the privileges that the indios fronterizos sought to preserve continued to diminish, unable to survive either the late colonial reforms of the Spanish regime or creole conceptions of race and property in the formation of the new nation-state. This story suggests that Mexico's transition from colony to nation can only be understood by revisiting the origins of the colonial system and by recognizing the role of Spain's indigenous allies in both its construction and demolition. The study relates events in the region to broader patterns of identity, loyalty, and subversion throughout the Americas, providing insight into the process of mestizaje that is commonly understood to have shaped Latin America. It also foreshadows the popular conservatism of the nineteenth century and identifies the roots of post-colonial social unrest. This book provides new context for scholars, historians, ethnographers, anthropologists, and anyone interested in the history of Mexico, colonization, Native Americans, and the Age of Revolutions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780817319205 20160822
Green Library
Book
vi, 315 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
  • * Acknowledgments * Introduction: Policies, Dynamics, and Consequences of Mexican Migration to the United States (Harriett D. Romo) * Part 1. Mexico-US Migration Legal Frameworks and Their Implications * Chapter 1. Evolving Migration Responses in Mexico and the United States: Diverging Paths? (Francisco Alba) * Chapter 2. An Economic Perspective on US Immigration Policy vis-a-vis Mexico (Pia M. Orrenius, Jason Saving, and Madeline Zavodny) * Chapter 3. Mexican Migration Dynamics: An Uncertain Future (Jorge Durand) * Chapter 4. Public Insecurity and International Emigration in Northern Mexico: Analysis at a Municipal Level (Liliana Meza Gonzalez and Michael Feil) * Chapter 5. Explaining Unauthorized Mexican Migration and Assessing Its Implications for the Incorporation of Mexican Americans (Frank D. Bean, Susan K. Brown, and James D. Bachmeier) * Part 2. Incorporation into Receiving Communities in the United States * Chapter 6. "Ni de aqui, ni de alla": Undocumented Immigrant Youth and the Challenges of Identity Formation amid Conflicting Contexts (Roberto G. Gonzales, Joanna B. Perez, and Ariel G. Ruiz) * Chapter 7. Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and Student Success in Higher Education (Kandy Mink Salas, Henoc Preciado, and Raquel Torres) * Chapter 8. Who Has the Right to Health Care and Why? Immigration, Health-Care Policy, and Incorporation (Milena Andrea Melo and K. Jill Fleuriet) * Chapter 9. The Role of Elite Mexican Women Immigrants in Maintaining Language and Mexican Identity (Harriett D. Romo and Olivia Mogollon-Lopez) * Part 3. Return Migration and Reincorporation * Chapter 10. Mexican Social Policy and Return Migration (Agustin Escobar Latapi) * Chapter 11. Students We Share Are Also in Puebla, Mexico: Preliminary Findings from a 2009-2010 Survey (Victor Zuniga, Edmund T. Hamann, and Juan Sanchez Garcia) * Epilogue: Continuing Immigration Developments (Janeth Martinez) * Conclusion: Is Mexican Migration to the United States Different from Other Migrations? (Harriett D. Romo) * Contributors * Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477309025 20160619
Borderlands migration has been the subject of considerable study, but the authorship has usually reflected a north-of-the-border perspective only. Gathering a transnational group of prominent researchers, including leading Mexican scholars whose work is not readily available in the United States and academics from US universities, Mexican Migration to the United States brings together an array of often-overlooked viewpoints, reflecting the interconnectedness of immigration policy. This collection's research, principally empirical, reveals significant aspects of labor markets, family life, and educational processes. Presenting recent data and accessible explanations of complex histories, the essays capture the evolving legal frameworks and economic implications of Mexico-US migrations at the national and municipal levels, as well as the experiences of receiving communities in the United States. The volume includes illuminating reports on populations ranging from undocumented young adults to elite Mexican women immigrants, health-care rights, Mexico's incorporation of return migration, the impact of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals on higher education, and the experiences of young children returning to Mexican schools after living in the United States. Reflecting a multidisciplinary approach, the list of contributors includes anthropologists, demographers, economists, educators, policy analysts, and sociologists. Underscoring the fact that Mexican migration to the United States is unique and complex, this timely work exemplifies the cross-border collaboration crucial to the development of immigration policies that serve people in both countries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477309025 20160619
Green Library
Book
129 p.
Mexico is recasting its entire energy system, in line with a far-reaching Energy Reform package adopted by the government in 2013. How might the multiple changes being implemented today change the energy scene of tomorrow? This analysis provides a comprehensive assessment of Mexico’s energy demand and supply outlook to 2040. The report: Maps out the implications of the Reforma Energética across the energy economy. Explores the ambition of a reformed power market to meet rising demand, while tapping Mexico’s abundant renewable resources and reducing the costs of power supply. Assesses how and when the new upstream bid rounds can turn around today’s declines in oil and gas output Identifies the challenges that remain, while also quantifying the value of Mexico’s energy transformation in a “No Reform Case”.
Book
136 p. ; 21x28 cm.
  • Foreword and acknowledgements
  • Acronyms and abbreviations
  • Executive summary
  • Assessment and recommendations
  • Health care needs and organisation of the health system in Mexico
  • Strengthening governance to build a person-centred, data-driven health system
  • Service delivery: Defining an equal benefits package and strengthening primary care
  • Realigning financing to better meet individual health care needs
  • Smarter purchasing of goods and services.
Ten years after the introduction of publically-funded universal health insurance, the Mexican health system finds itself at a critical juncture. Unquestionably, some measures of health and health system performance have improved: those previously uninsured now use health services more often, whilst numbers reporting impoverishing health expenditure having fallen from 3.3% to 0.8%. Other indicators, however, remain worrying. Rates of survival after heart attack or stroke are markedly worse than in other OECD countries. Prevention is a particular concern: with 32% of the adult population obese, Mexico ranks as the second most obese nation in the OECD and almost 1 in 6 adults are diabetic. Other key metrics imply deep-rooted inefficiencies in the system: administrative costs, at 8.9% of total health spending, are the highest in the OECD and have not reduced over the past decade. Likewise, out-of-pocket spending has stuck at nearly 50% of total health spending - the highest in the OECD - and implies that individuals feel the need to visit private clinic despite having health insurance. In short, Mexico’s massive public investment in its health system has failed to translate into better health and health system performance to the extent wished and a programme of continued, extensive reform is needed. This report sets out the OECD’s recommendations on the steps Mexico should take to achieve this.
Book
164 pages ; 28 cm
Green Library
Book
168 p. : ill. ; 21x28 cm.
  • Foreword and acknowledgements
  • Acronyms and abbreviations
  • Executive summary
  • Assessment and recommendations
  • Open government policy implementation in Mexico
  • Governance and policy framework for open data in Mexico
  • Fostering an organisational culture and ecosystem for open government data in Mexico
  • Creating a more dynamic open data ecosystem in Mexico for greater value co-creation
  • Open data at the local level in Mexico: Scaling up initiatives within and across levels of government.
Mexico has developed an ambitious national open data policy to create value from the use and re-use of government data by the public, private and social sectors. Open government data (OGD) has the potential to spur the digital economy, as well as contribute to more efficient public service delivery and greater public engagement. Mexico has demonstrated its commitment to OGD through its close involvement in international open data initiatives. However, it faces challenges in effectively implementing OGD domestically in a way that makes a greater impact on the economy and society. This would require, notably, institutionalizing open data, understanding the demand for government data, reaching out to potential users and working more closely with local governments. To fully realise the potential of open data, it is crucial that public bodies understand the benefits, are fully behind the project and actively participate in its implementation. This report provides an analysis of Mexico’s policies as well as recommendations for achieving its national objectives and making the most of OGD.
Book
1 online resource (6 unnumbered pages, 36 pages) : color illustrations.
Book
x, 192 pages, 4 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps ; 25 cm.
  • Preface: Glory
  • Introduction: Mississippi on the eve of war
  • Mobilizing Mississippi for war
  • Off to war
  • The march to Monterrey
  • The 1st Mississippi Regiment at Monterrey
  • Life under the armistice
  • The Victoria expedition
  • Glory bound
  • The 1st Mississippi Rifles at Buena Vista
  • Homeward bound
  • The 2nd Mississippi Rifles go to Mexico
  • Discontented poor fellows
  • Life in the backwaters of the war
  • Evaluating the role of the Mississippi volunteers
  • Appendix 1: The Model 1841 rifle
  • Appendix 2: County of origin by regiment
  • Appendix 3: County of origin by regiment population
  • Appendix 4: The 1st and 2nd Regiments of Mississippi Rifles: comparison of statistics.
The "Mississippi Rifles, " so called because they were the firstvolunteer force in American history to have been issued riflesrather than smoothbore muskets, served in the war againstMexico that followed the annexation of Texas in 1845. InPanting for Glory, Richard Bruce Winders skillfully uncovers the contrasting wartime experience of two regiments, the 1st and 2ndMississippi Rifles. The 1st Mississippi Rifles were lauded for their service andremain a familiar part of the history of the Mexican War. Underthe leadership of Col. Jefferson Davis-later the President ofthe Confederate States of America-the 1st enjoyed significantvictories at the Battle of Buena Vista and the Battle of Monterey.The 2nd Mississippi Rifles, by contrast, saw little action andreturned home overlooked and largely forgotten. Panting for Glory contrasts these two experiences to show that the contours of history were sometimes arbitrary and that militaryhistorians, in their analysis of failure, should take into account awide range of factors that influence outcomes, not merely recordsof wins and losses. As Winders concludes, "the 1st and 2ndMississippi Rifles ...offer the perfect opportunity to examine twosides of war: glory gained and glory denied. ".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781623494162 20160711
Green Library