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Database topics
Art, Architecture and Design
Dataset
Digital: Excel; csv.
Collection
Electronic Acquisitions
For each format (Excel and .csv) there are two files - one for the buildings (one row per building) and the other for the companies involved (one row per company per role per building). The two files are linked by the Emporis Building Number (EBN), the unique ID for each building record on Emporis database, which can be found in column A of both files.

2. Eviction Lab. [2018]

Database topics
Law; Statistical and Numeric Data
Dataset
1 online resource : color illustrations
"Drawing on tens of millions of records, the Eviction Lab at Princeton University has published the first ever dataset of evictions in America, going back to 2000. We hope you’ll join us in using the tools of this website to discover new facts about how eviction is shaping your community, raising awareness and working toward new solutions."--About page.
Collection
Stanford Research Data
The Fundamental Kinetic Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements Database summarizes the published shock tube experimental work performed under the supervision of Prof. Ronald K. Hanson of the Mechanical Engineering Department at Stanford University. The database covers the years from 1974 to 2013 inclusively. The database is divided into three types of data: ignition delay times, species time-history measurements, and reaction rate measurements. Volumes are in DOCX format and data tables in the volumes can be easily cut and pasted into separate user spread sheets. Volume 1 of the Fundamental Kinetic Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements includes a summary of the ignition delay time data measured and published by the Shock Tube Group in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University. The cut-off date for inclusion into this volume was January 2005. Volume 2 includes a summary of the species concentration time-histories. The cut-off date for inclusion in this volume was December 2005. Some of the figures embedded in this DOCX file can be opened using ORIGIN software. The data in this volume is available in tabular form in the accompanying ZIP file or in this volume. Volume 3 includes a summary of the reaction rate measurements. The cut-off date for inclusion in this volume was January 2009. Volume 4 includes a summary of the ignition delay time data. The start data for inclusion into this volume is January 2005 (the cutoff date for Volume 1) and the cutoff date is January 2014. Volume 5 includes a summary of the species concentration time-histories. The cut-off date for inclusion in this volume was January 2014. The format of this volume differs from that of Volume 2 in that we have not included the data files. Some of this data is available in the relevant papers and some of the data files may be accessible by contacting Dr. David Davidson at dfd@stanford.edu. Much of this data was used for reaction rate constant determinations and the mixtures in the experiments reflect this use; the mixtures were designed to isolate or enhance the sensitivity of the measured species to a particular reaction rate constant. Volume 6 includes a summary of the reaction rate measurements. The cut-off date for inclusion in this volume was January 2014.
Collection
Mapping the Republic of Letters
This dataset includes known, documented attendees of Julie de Lespinasse's salon in Paris from 1764 to 1776.
Collection
Stanford Research Data
This a snapshot of the NeuroVault.org database. It include all public collections of statistical maps deposited in NeuroVault as long as they were linked to an external publication. This snapshot is an attempt to improve chances of long term persistance of data deposited in NeuroVault.org.
Collection
Mapping the Republic of Letters
Data for Giacomo Casanova's network during his first two trips to Paris. The focus is on performers, intellectuals, and elite connections that the Venetian established in Paris to help with his social advancement.
Collection
Stanford Research Data
Replication data for "Large potential reduction in economic damages under UN mitigation targets", Nature, 2018
Collection
Stanford Research Data
Decoys that were generated as part of the RNA-protein structure prediction benchmark in the citation below.
Collection
Stanford Research Data
This data set is a compilation of the historical CMOS technology scaling data presented in the ITRS, journals, and conferences including IEDM and VLSI Technology from 1988 and onward. Chi-Shuen Lee, Jieying Luo, and H.-S. Philip Wong at Stanford University compiled the data; Thomas N. Theis at Columbia University provided the data originally compiled by Robert W. Keyes at IBM T.J. Watson Research Center and published in Figure 1 of Rolf Landauer's 1988 paper. The historical scaling trend of logic switching energy and integration density were published in Figure 1 and 2, respectively in the paper, "The End of Moore’s Law: A New Beginning for Information Technology" by Theis and Wong (see Related Published Work below for the full citation.
Collection
Stanford Research Data
In matrix recovery from random linear measurements, one is interested in recovering an unknown $M$-by-$N$ matrix $X_0$ from $n
Collection
Reproducible Research Support for Statistics of the Microbiome
Complete ribosomal sequence variant abundance data and analysis files for paper entitled: Multidomain Analyses of a Longitudinal Human Microbiome Intestinal Cleanout Perturbation Experiment. This work focuses on the stability, resilience, and response to perturbation of the bacterial communities in the human gut. Informative flash flood-like disturbances that eliminate most gastrointestinal biomass can be induced using a clinically-relevant iso-osmotic agent. We designed and executed such a disturbance in human volunteers using a dense longitudinal sampling scheme extending before and after induced diarrhea. This experiment has enabled a careful multidomain analysis of a controlled perturbation of the human gut microbiota with a new level of resolution. These new longitudinal multidomain data were analyzed using recently developed statistical methods that demonstrate improvements over current practices. By imposing sparsity constraints we have enhanced the interpretability of the analyses and by employing a new adaptive generalized principal components analysis, incorporated modulated phylogenetic information and enhanced interpretation through scoring of the portions of the tree most influenced by the perturbation. Our analyses leverage the taxa-sample duality in the data to show how the gut microbiota recovers this perturbation. Through a holistic approach that integrates phylogenetic, metagenomic and abundance information, we elucidate patterns of taxonomic and functional change that characterize the community recovery process across individuals. We provide complete code and illustrations of new statistical methods for high-dimensional, longitudinal multidomain data that provide greater interpretability than existing methods. Funded by NIH TR01 grant AI112401.
Collection
Payne Paleobiology Lab Data Files
Over the past 3.8 billion years, the maximum size of living organisms has increased by approximately 18 orders of magnitude. Much of this increase is associated with two major evolutionary innovations: the evolution of eukaryotes from prokaryotic cells ~ 1.9 billion years ago (Ga), and multicellular life diversifying from unicellular ancestors ~ 0.6 Ga. However, the quantitative relationship between organismal size and structural complexity remains poorly documented. We assessed this relationship using a comprehensive dataset that includes organismal size and level of biological complexity for 11,172 extant genera. We find that the distributions of sizes within complexity levels are unimodal whereas the aggregate distribution is multimodal. Moreover, both the mean size and the range of size occupied increases with each additional level of vertical complexity. Interestingly, the increase in size range is non-symmetric; the maximum organismal size increases more than the minimum. The majority of the observed increase in organismal size over the Geozoic is accounted for by two discrete jumps in complexity rather than evolutionary trends within levels of complexity. Our results provide quantitative support for an evolutionary expansion away from a minimal size constraint and suggest a fundamental rescaling of the constrains on maximal size as biological complexity increases.
Collection
Stanford Research Data
# Data for Waskom and Wagner (2017) PNAS This repository contains data related to the following paper: Waskom M.L., Wagner A.D. (2017). Distributed representation of context by intrinsic subnetworks in prefrontal cortex. Proceedings of the National Academy of the Sciences, USA. The paper is available on the PNAS website: http://www.pnas.org/cgi/doi/10.1073/pnas.1615269114 Code implementing the results in the paper is included here and is also available on github: https://github.com/WagnerLabPapers/Waskom_PNAS_2017 The datasets in this repository are organized in subdirectories as follows: ## Preprocessed data - roi_cache: Preprocessed/denoised time series data from the ROIs in the paper ## Analysis results - decoding_analysis: Decoding analyses and estimated context preferences - spatial_analysis: Spatial organization analyses - correlation_analysis: Spontaneous correlation analyses ## Supporting data - mesh: Computationally reconstructed cortex models - reg: Functional template and registration relating it to anatomical space ## Analysis code - code: A copy of the analysis code repository available on github ## License Copyright (c) 2017, Michael Waskom and Anthony Wagner Released under a CC-BY 4.0 License
Collection
Stanford University, Program in Science, Technology and Society, Honors Theses
This Excel Spreadsheet includes the data and calculations used in my thesis, titled, "Opening Up Open Access: Investigating Alternate Funding Models to Stimulate Open Access Publishing".
Collection
Stanford Research Data
Background: Intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy (IPTp) with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (IPTp-DP) has been shown to reduce the burden of malaria during pregnancy compared to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (IPTp-SP). However, limited data exist on how IPTp regimens impact malaria risk during infancy. We conducted a double-blinded randomized controlled trial to test the hypothesis that children born to mothers given IPTp-DP would have a lower incidence of malaria during infancy compared to children born to mothers who received IPTp-SP. Methods and Findings: We compared malaria metrics among children in Tororo, Uganda born to women randomized to IPTp-SP given every 8 weeks (SP8w, n=100), IPTp-DP every 8 weeks (DP8w, n=44) or IPTp-DP every 4 weeks (DP4w, n=47). After birth, children were given chemoprevention with DP every 12 weeks from 8 weeks to 2 years of age. The primary outcome was incidence of malaria during the first two years of life. Results are reported after adjustment for clustering (twin gestation) and potential confounders (maternal age, gravidity, and maternal parasitemia status at enrolment).The study took place between June 2014 and May 2017. Compared to children whose mothers were randomized to IPTp-SP8w (0.24 episodes per person year (PPY)), the incidence of malaria was higher in children born to mothers who received IPTp-DP4w (0.42 episodes PPY, adjusted incidence rate ratio (aIRR) 1.92; 95% CI 1.00-3.65, p=0.049) and non-significantly higher in children born to mothers who received IPT-DP8w (0.30 episodes PPY, aIRR 1.44; 95% CI, 0.68-3.05; p=0.34). However, these associations were modified by infant sex. Female children whose mothers were randomized to IPTp-DP4w had an apparently 4-fold higher incidence of malaria compared to female children whose mothers were randomized to IPTp-SP8w (0.65 vs 0.20 episodes PPY, aIRR 4.39, 95% CI 1.87-10.3, P=0.001), but no significant association was observed in male children (0.20 vs. 0.28 episodes PPY, aIRR 0.66, 95% CI 0.25-1.75, P=0.42). Non-significant increases in malaria incidence were observed among female, but not male, children born to mothers who received DP8w vs SP8w. In exploratory analyses, levels of malaria-specific antibodies in cord blood were similar between IPTp groups and sex. However, female children whose mothers were randomized to IPTp-DP4w had lower mean piperaquine levels during infancy compared to female children whose mothers received IPTp-SP8w (coef 0.81, 95% CI 0.65-1.00, P=0.048) and male children whose mothers received IPTp-DP4w (coef 0.72, 95% CI 0.57-0.91, P=0.006). There were no significant sex-specific differences in piperaquine levels among children whose mothers were randomized to IPTp-SP8w or IPTp-DP8w. The main limitations were small sample size and childhood provision of DP every 12 weeks in infancy. Conclusions: Contrary to our hypothesis, preventing malaria in pregnancy with IPTp-DP in the context of chemoprevention with DP during infancy does not lead to a reduced incidence of malaria in childhood; in this setting, it may be associated with an increased incidence of malaria in females. Future studies are needed to better understand the biological mechanisms of in utero drug exposure on drug metabolism and how this may affect the dosing of antimalarial drugs for treatment and prevention during infancy. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02163447.
Collection
Stanford Research Data
The nymphalid groundplan (NGP) is an idealized system used to classify and interpret wing pattern elements of butterflies. Nearly a century ago, the principles of the NGP were applied to the wing patterns of higher moths (Macroheterocera). Recent advances in phylogeny and in the comparative morphology of microlepidopteran wing pattern both suggest promise in revisiting the relevance of the NGP to the more conspicuous and derived groups of large Lepidoptera. In the noctuid subfamily Acronictinae, wing patterns include elements corresponding to the central symmetry system, discal (reniform) spot, and parafocal elements of the NGP. Wing patterns in this lineage are also consistent with the “uniform wing-margin” model, which was hypothesized to explain the relationship between wing venation and color pattern, and which has been corroborated in various lineages of microlepidoptera. The uniform wing-margin model does not appear to hold for butterflies, however, and has not previously been evaluated in Macroheterocera. The finding that NGP-like wing patterns in Macroheterocera share features with microlepidoptera is consistent with convergence, i.e. with independent origins of "the" NGP. Furthermore this finding suggests that such superficially similar (not strictly homologous) "NGP's" may have arisen via different mechanisms corresponding to ancestral differences in the relationships between wing patterns wing venation, and can be differentiated on that basis.
Collection
Stanford Research Data
Recent studies have shown that wing pattern in various lineages of microlepidoptera follows one of two predictive models. In the first, called the “alternating wing-margin” model, dark and light pattern elements straddle alternating veins along the costal margin of the wing. In the second, called the “uniform wing-margin” model, pattern elements of a single color straddle all veins along the costa. However, of the dozens of families and superfamilies of moths, a small minority have been studied in this context. In the present contribution, the relationship between wing pattern and wing venation is examined in Lichenaula Meyrick, 1890 (Gelechioidea: Xyloryctidae). Species of Lichenaula have wing pattern elements ranging from spots to bands to mottled textures, and they all conform to the uniform wing-margin model. No plausible support was found for the alternating wing-margin model. In previous studies, the relationship between pattern and venation along the dorsal wing margin has remained unclear due to loss of wing veins and confluence of pattern elements, but certain species of Lichenaula, especially L. maculosa (Turner, 1898), provide evidence that the uniform wing-margin model holds for the dorsum as well as the costa. Previous studies have found that ancestral wing veins continue to influence the development of wing patterns that follow the alternating wing-margin model, even if not expressed in the adult wing, but the wing patterns of Lichenaula suggest that this is not the case for the uniform wing-margin model. Instead, it appears that the only veins that determine the development of wing pattern in Lichenaula are those that are expressed in the adult wing. Considered in preliminary phylogenetic context, it appears that multiple transitions have occurred between the ancestral alternating wing-margin model and the more derived uniform wing-margin model
Collection
Stanford Research Data
The evolution of wing pattern in Lepidoptera is a popular area of inquiry but few studies have examined microlepidoptera, with fewer still focusing on intraspecific variation. The tineid genus Moerarchis Durrant, 1914 includes two species with high intraspecific variation of wing pattern. A subset of the specimens examined here provide, to my knowledge, the first examples of wing patterns that follow both the ‘alternating wing-margin’ and ‘uniform wing-margin’ models in different regions along the costa. These models can also be evaluated along the dorsum of Moerarchis, where a similar transition between the two models can be seen. Fusion of veins is shown not to effect wing pattern, in agreement with previous inferences that the plesiomorphic location of wing veins constrains the development of colour pattern. The significant correlation between wing length and number of wing pattern elements in Moerarchis australasiella shows that wing size can act as a major determinant of wing pattern complexity. Lastly, some M. australasiella specimens have wing patterns that conform entirely to the ‘uniform wing-margin’ model and contain more than six bands, providing new empirical insight into the century-old question of how wing venation constrains wing patterns with seven or more bands.
Collection
Stanford Research Data
Although the evolution of wing pattern in Lepidoptera is of great importance in various disciplines, potential wing pattern homologies have been examined in very few lineages of microlepidoptera. Psychidae belong to the most early-diverging superfamily of ditrysian moths, and many psychid genera from Australia have wing patterns consisting of bands, spots, and/or reticulated lines. An examination of 35 species of Australian Taleporiinae (Psychidae) revealed that wing patterns most commonly conform to the ‘uniform wing-margin’ model, in which each vein is surrounded by a pattern element of the same colour (usually dark brown) along the costal margin. Wing patterns that follow the ‘uniform wing-margin’ model include bands, spots, and reticulated lines, suggesting that these pattern elements are homologous in some lineages. However, in patterns consisting primarily of spots (belonging to the genus Iphierga Meyrick), the spots can become smaller toward the distal portion of the wing, often disappearing altogether and thus causing an apparent violation of the predictions of the model. The wing patterns of three species clearly violate the ‘uniform wing-margin’ model. Two of these three may conform to the ‘alternating wing-margin’ model, though this is uncertain because some veins are not expressed in the adult wing. Lastly, the findings presented here demonstrate that for the ‘uniform wing-margin’ model, as for the ‘alternating wing-margin’ model, the relative colour of a series of pattern elements (dark vs. light) is not a reliable indicator of homology. Instead, homologies exist among the contrast boundaries that separate pattern elements.
Collection
Marine Biogeochemistry Data
The 2013 US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (GP16) extended from the Peruvian coast to Tahiti, along a line that fell between 10 and 15°S. This transect sampled the Peruvian oxygen deficient zone (ODZ) and the hydrothermal plume extending from the East Pacific Rise (EPR) for a variety of trace elements and isotopes (TEIs). Here we report nutrient and hydrographic measurements collected on this cruise, as well as results from an Optimum Multiparameter Analysis (OMPA) to quantify the fractional contributions of endmember water masses in each sample. In the thermocline, Equatorial Subsurface Water (ESSW) dominated the low oxygen waters of the eastern tropical South Pacific, blending into Eastern South Pacific Intermediate Water (ESPIW) and South Pacific Central Water (SPCW) further west. Below the thermocline, distributions of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) and Equatorial Pacific Intermediate Water (EqPIW) were relatively homogenous along the section between 800 and 1200 m depth. Deeper in the water column, distinct water mass signatures were found on opposite sides of the EPR: southward flowing Pacific Deep Water (PDW) dominated the basin east of the EPR, while the northward flowing Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) and Lower Circumpolar Deep Water (LCDW) had the strongest contributions on the western side of the EPR. These findings support previous studies that indicate the Peruvian ODZ is largely contained within ESSW and that the EPR plays an important role in steering water mass distributions in the deep waters of the tropical Pacific. Overall, these results agree well with previous water mass analyses in this region and are consistent with the general circulation patterns in the eastern tropical Pacific.