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Database topics
American History
"The Adams Papers Digital Edition comprises John Adams's complete diaries, selected legal papers, and the ongoing series of family correspondence and state papers. This XML edition presents in a searchable online environment all 30 volumes of The Adams Papers from the founding generation that have so far appeared in print. The contents are fully annotated, feature linked cross-references, and may be accessed by date, series, author, or recipient ... "
Database topics
Music
Physical extent
1 online resource.
The database lists all of the letters to and from Johannes Brahms, and many of the letters are presented as digital facsimiles of the original manuscripts.

3. Correspondance [2017]

Database topics
French and Italian Studies; Language
Book
1 online resource.
A database of all of Gustave Flaubert's known correspondence, from public and private collections and sales catalogs. Searchable by keyword, correspondant, locations, and date. 4448 letters, spanning the years 1828-1880.
Database topics
Spanish, Portuguese and Latin American Studies
Physical extent
1 online resource (4,771 images).
"The collection contains correspondence addressed to Emiliano Zapata; combat reports; relations with troop commanders and officers; promotion and appointment requests; allegations of abuses committed by military personnel; applications for food, uniforms and ammunition; letters and telegrams on the transfer of prisoners. Document types include: transcripts, journals, laws and draft laws on land, drafts of circulars and manifestos by General Emiliano Zapata; and documents relating to the signing and ratification of the Plan de Ayala organizations."
Database topics
General and Reference Works; American History
  • General introduction
  • Biographical introduction
  • Introduction to the digital edition.
Dolley Payne Madison was the most important First Lady of the nineteenth century. The DMDE will be the first-ever complete edition of all of her known correspondence, gathered in an XML-based archive. It will ultimately include close to 2,500 letters. From the scattered correspondence were gathered letters that have never been previously published. The range and scope of the collection makes this edition an important scholarly contribution to the literature of the early republic, women's history, and the institution of the First Lady. These letters present Dolley Madison's trials and triumphs and make it possible to gain admittance to her mind and her private emotions and to understand the importance of her role as the national capital's First Lady.
Database topics
American Literary Studies
Unpublished in book form in her lifetime, the poems of Emily Dickinson nonetheless enjoyed an extensive distribution - through her letters. More than one-third of her poems appeared in her letters to family and friends. Emily Dickinson's Correspondences brings these letters together in a single XML-based archive. The initial installment will contain more than 400 letters, covering Emily's correspondence with her sister Susan, with 1,300 letters to follow in future installments. Search by date, genre, manuscript features, linked publications, and full text; Each letter presented with complete transcription and digitized scan of the holograph manuscript; Complete editorial and bibliographical notes; Regular updates to content and functionality; 24/7 online access, with no special hardware or hosting required; This is an opportunity to read the poems as they first appeared, and to examine more deeply than ever the life from which they sprang.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)

7. In Mozart's words [2011 - ]

Database topics
Uncategorized
Physical extent
1 online resource : HTML
"In Mozart's Words provides multilingual access to an annotated version of the voluminous correspondence of Mozart and his family - approximately 1,400 letters - that will progressively be made available online on this website. The website offers i) a univocal database of all references to people, places and musical works contained in the letters, facilitating the systematic search of all cited occurrences, and ii) access to background materials such as reviews, newspapers, documents, objects, paintings, engravings, and books as a corollary to the historical-critical annotations."--Home page
Database topics
British and Commonwealth Literary Studies
Book
6 v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • v. 1. 1829-1859
  • v. 2. 1860-1865
  • v. 3. 1866-1870
  • v. 4. 1871-1878
  • v. 5. 1879-1884
  • v. 6. 1885-1888.
Volume 2 of this six volume set covers the years 1860-65, when Arnold emerged as a critic and went on to consolidate his reputation. His letters record his impressions of Europe on an official school study, with observations of nature within and nature without.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813917061 20160528
The publication of all the known letters of Matthew Arnold (1822-1888), when complete in seven volumes, will present close to 4000 letters, nearly five times the number in G.W.E. Russell's two-volume compilation of 1895, many of which appear in their entirety here for the first time. Renowned as a poet and critic, Arnold will be celebrated now as a letter writer. In his introduction, Cecil Y. Lang writes that the letters "may well be the finest portrait of an age and of a person, representing the main movements of mind and of events of nearly half a century and at the same time revealing the intimate life of the participant-observer, in any collection of letters in the 19th century, possibly in existence". Volume 1 begins in 1829 with an account of the Arnold children by their father, the notable headmaster of Rugby School, and closes in 1859, when already a poet and literary critic, Matthew Arnold returned to England after several months on a government educational commission in Europe to find himsef acquiring a European reputation. The letters show him as a child; a schoolboy at Winchester and Rugby; a foppish Oxonian; a worldly young main in a perfect, undemanding job; then as a new husband in an imperfect, too-demanding job; Professor of Poetry at Oxford; and finally as an emergent European critic. The letters, with a consecutiveness rare in such editions, contain a great deal of new information about Arnold and his family, both personal (somtimes intimate) and professional. Two new diaries are included, a long, boyish travelogue-letter and a mature essay-letter on architecture, never before recognized as Arnold's, as well as a handful of letters written to Arnold. Matthew Arnold wrote with wit, humour and warmth of his poetry, his work, his travels throughout Europe and America, and his large and loving family. But most of all, what comes across in these letters, writes Lang, is that "Arnold loved to live - the world within and the world without chiming togther...And he learned to live with a boring, demanding, underpaid, unrewarding occupation largely because - questing intellectual, husband and father, school inspector, clubbable man-about-town and cosmopolite-about-Europe and America, fisherman, skater, voracious reader - he learned to live".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813916514 20160528
The letters in this volume show Arnold, now midway in his professional career, publishing his first volume of poems in a decade and emerging as a critic - simultaneously - of society, of education, of religion, and, as always, of politics. In 1867 he publishes "New Poems", containing several of his best-known and most beloved works, "Dover Beach, "Thyrsis", "Stanzas from the Grande Chartreuse", and many others, including the first reprint since 1852 of "Empedocles on Etna", and in 1869 "Culture and Anarchy", of which the germ is visible in a remarkable letter to his mother in 1867, as well as the influential reports on continental schools, and the seminal "St. Paul and Protestantism". The letters to his mother and other family members continue unabated; two of his sons die, their deaths recorded in wrenching accents; his essays, possibly by design, draw flak from all directions, which Arnold evades (any poet to any critic) as adroitly or disarmingly as usual; for two years he takes into his home an Italian prince; and he is awarded an honourary Oxford degree. He remains in every way both Establishment and anti-Establishment, both courteous, as has been said, and something better than courteous: honest.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813917658 20160528
In this final volume of the Virginia edition of Arnold's letters, Arnold joins for the last time a Royal Commission on Education, travelling first to Germany, and then on to Switzerland and Paris. Following his wife and younger daughter, Arnold also makes his second American visit, this time to see "the Midget", his first grandchild. Both missions reveal his well-known and characteristic zest for people and places - new acquaintances, new scenery, the total experience of living - observing, absorbing, recording and moving on. Finally, with maximum nostalgia and minimum regret, he resigned the inspectorship of schools in which he had spent nearly all of his adult existence and settles down, in sweet, bucolic content, to the life of a country squire. Then, tragically, abruptly and predictably, it screeches to a halt. Manifestly, he had lived daily with intimations of mortality. The series-cumulative index included with this volume is a valuable resource for tracking Arnold's records of his active life.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813920283 20160528
The emotional and moral centre of this collection is the series of letters written during Arnold's first American visit, during which he ranged from New York and New England to Madison, Chicago, Richmond, Washington, Toronto, Montreal and Quebec. Like most visiting British luminaries, he meets everyone, everywhere, including the president and former president, the Delanos, the Roosevelts, the Vanderbilts and especially Andrew Carnegie. But the visit - a lecture tour taken to pay off his sons debts - had other and far more significant repercussions, for Arnold was accompanied by his wife and by his elder daughter, who met the man she was to marry - the direct cause of a second American visit and, in due course, of a flourishing branch of Arnold descendants in the United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813919997 20160528
This is the fourth in a series of six volumes collecting together all the known letters of Matthew Arnold. In his writings, Arnold ranges from religion to literature; "St Paul and Protestantism" in 1870 is followed by "Literature and Dogma, God and the Bible", and "Last Essays on Church and Religion". These books have all more or less been forgotten, but in the 1870s they were an integral part of intellectual culture, as was "Friendship's Garland". Equally, the letters here contribute to chronicle Arnold's personal life in the characteristically intimate note of all his correspondence. Arnold loses a son, a brother and his mother (as well as his mother-in-law), and he moves seamlessly from the marvellous letters to his sister remaining at Fox How almost as of he had been writing all along not merely to an individual but also to a spiritual anchor, or even to his moral centre. Arnold travels to France, Switzerland and Italy, recording as always his incomparable impressions. He settles, finally, in Surrey, and poignantly says farewell to his youth in "George Sand".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813918969 20160528
Green Library
Database topics
Medieval Studies; British and Commonwealth History
Medieval Family Life contains full-color images of the original medieval manuscripts that comprise the Paston, Cely, Plumpton, Stonor, and Armburgh family letter collections, along with full-text searchable transcripts from printed editions. Also includes family trees, chronology, a map, and a glossary.
Database topics
American History
Physical extent
1 online resource
Database topics
American History; Political Science
The complete electronic edition of the Papers of Dwight D. Eisenhower combines the full text of all 21 volumes of the print edition, including letters, memoranda, cables, and directives--many of them previously classified--from private collections and public archives in the U.S. and U.K., as well as papers from the Eisenhower Presidential Library, written or dictated by Eisenhower from the years prior to World War II through full term of his presidency.
Database topics
American History
  • Introductory and explanatory materials
  • Original documents. Correspondence, legal and financial documents ; Travel journals of Harriott Pinckney Horry ; Recipe books.
"The papers of Eliza Lucas Pinckney (1722-1793) and her daughter Harriott Pinckney Horry (1748-1830) document the lives of two observant and articulate founding-era women who were members of one of South Carolina's leading families. Their letters, diaries, and other documents span nearly a century (1739-1830) and provide a window on politics, social events, and people of the late colonial and early national periods. They richly detail the daily life of maintaining family ties and managing households and plantations. Pinckney's correspondence illustrates the importance of women's social connections and transatlantic friendships. Horry's correspondence documents the strength of personal ties that linked the elite families of the North and the South to each other even as connections were threatened by disputes over slavery, commercial differences, and political and constitutional conflict."
Database topics
American History
  • 1. 1748-August 1755 -- 2. August 1755-April 1756 -- 3. April-November 1756 -- November 1756-October 1757 -- 5. October 1757-September 1758 -- 6. September 1758-December 1760 -- 7. January 1761-June 1767 -- 8. June 1767-December 177 -- 9. January 1772-March 1774 -- 10. March 1774-June 1775.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Letters written to Washington as well as letters and documents written by him will be published in the complete edition that consists of approximately 85 volumes.
Contains excerpts from Washington's letters, as well as maps, images, and exhibit catalogs relating to George Washington.
Database topics
American History
  • Congressional series (1751-1801)
  • Secretary of State series (1801-1805)
  • Presidential series (1809-1813)
  • Retirement series (1817-1820).
The Papers of James Madison documents the life and work of one of the most important political and constitutional thinkers in our nation's history. As chief author of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, secretary of state during the Louisiana Purchase, and the fourth president of the United States, Madison played a central role in the American founding and the growth of the early Republic. This online resource contains all of the content of the print edition and adds to this a powerful XML-based search functionality, linked cross-references, and the ability to navigate chronologically or by series volume.
Database topics
American History
Book
p. ; cm.
This digital edition covers the complete papers of John Marshall, the longest-serving chief justice on the United States Supreme Court. Under his direction, the judicial branch achieved equality with the other branches of government and constitutionality was established as the crucial element in court decisions. This edition brings together all twelve printed volumes published from 1974 to 2006 into one searchable online resource.
Database topics
American History
This digital edition covers the collected papers of the third president, author of the Declaration of Independence, a chief figure of the Enlightenment. It brings together all thirty-three volumes published through 2006 into one searchable online resource.
Database topics
American History
Book
v. illus., facsims., maps, ports. ; 26 cm.
  • v. 1. 1837-1861 -- v. 2. April-September 1861 -- v. 3. October 1, 1861-January 7, 1862 -- v. 4. January 8-March 31, 1862 -- v. 5. April 1-August 31, 1862 -- v. 6. September 1-December 8, 1862 -- v. 7. December 9, 1862-March 31, 1863 -- v. 8. April 1-July6, 1863 -- v. 9. July 7-December 31, 1863 -- v. 10. January 1-May 31, 1864 -- v. 11. June 1-August 15, 1864 -- v. 12. August 16-November 15, 1864 -- v. 13. November 16, 1864-February 20, 1865 -- v. 14. February 21-April 30, 1865 -- v. 15. May 1-December 31, 1865 -- v. 16. 1866 -- v. 17. January 1-September 30, 1867 -- v. 18. October 1, 1867-June 30, 1868 -- v. 19. July 1, 1868-October 31, 1869 -- v. 20. November 1, 1869-October 31, 1870 -- v. 21. November 1, 1870-May 31, 1871 -- v. 22. June 1, 1871-January 31, 1872 -- v. 23. February 1-December 31, 1872 -- v. 24. 1873.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809311170 20160528
Presenting papers pertaining to Grant's first term in office, this volume covers areas such as his climb-down over the annexation of Santo Domingo, legislation to facilitate federal intervention in the persecution of blacks in the South, his Indian policy and the Treaty of Washington.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809321971 20160528
Ulysses S. Grant faced numerous political challenges during 1874. In the south, the Republican party steadily receded from power. As the year opened, Grant conceded Texas to the Democrats, counseling the recently defeated Republican governor to "yield to the verdict of the people as expressed by their ballots." Throughout the spring, Grant monitored an explosive situation in Arkansas, where rival governors set up contending governments. And in Louisiana, the emergence of the White League led to a pitched battle on the streets of New Orleans. All over the south, what Grant called "atrocities" led blacks to petition him, as did a group in Louisiana: "Give us peace or give a Territory to ourselves Mr. President." The nation also reeled from the aftermath of a financial panic. A bill generally considered inflationary passed Congress in April. Indecisive, Grant prepared two messages on the bill. In the first, never sent, he gave grudging approval. His ringing veto sent Congress back to work: "I am not a believer in any artificial method of making paper money equal to coin when the coin is not owned or held ready to redeem the promises to pay." In June, Grant signed a compromise bill that eased inflation fears. Appointments continued to cause turmoil. He selected the largely unknown Ohio lawyer Morrison R. Waite for chief justice after a revelation from Caleb Cushing's past undermined his first nomination. Unable to persuade Elihu B. Washburne to replace an overwhelmed William A. Richardson as secretary of the treasury, Grant nominated another second choice, Benjamin H. Bristow. A frequently slighted Secretary of State Hamilton Fish stayed in the cabinet only after Grant's special pleading. Despite these difficulties, many discussed a third term for Grant, who remained discreetly silent on the issue. In October, Grant made his first visit to Indian Territory, where he saw "on every side evidence of prosperity." As he toured, troops completed a four-month campaign against Comanche, Kiowa, and Cheyenne raiders on the southern plains. Further north, Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer led a party to survey the Black Hills, sacred to the Sioux. Ostensibly scouting sites for military posts, the expedition discovered gold, and the arrival of prospectors by year's end threatened peace in that region. Family and friends had always eased Grant's burdens, but in 1874 the White House seemed a gloomier place after daughter Ellen (Nellie) married in May and left for a new life with her husband in England. Less distressing was the October wedding of eldest son Frederick, who married into an American family. The year closed with Grant quite conscious of public and private uncertainties looming in his future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809324989 20160528
In this volume of Grant's papers, he is nominated for a second term, accepts and carries most states. He wins favour with the public by continuing his efforts to quell violence in the South and encouraging embattled Republicans, hoping to replace military protection with political legitimacy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809322763 20160528
In his eighth and final annual message to Congress, Ulysses S. Grant reminded the nation that it was his fortune or misfortune, to be called to the office of Chief Executive without any previous political training? The electoral crisis that dominated Grant's last months in office left little room for political error. On November 7, 1876, Democrat Samuel J. Tilden won the popular vote, but Republican Rutherford B. Hayes would claim the presidency by a single electoral vote if he captured all disputed electors from Florida, Louisiana South Carolina, and Oregon. Uncertainty gave way to deadlock as the crisis deepened. Grant's mail included a steady trickle of anonymous threats. In late January 1877, Grant signed a bill creating an electoral commission to end the dispute. Hayes won all disputed electors and succeeded Grant without incident. Out of the White House, without a settled home, the Grants spent two months visiting family and friends before embarking on their long-planned European tour. On May 17, Grant left Philadelphia aboard the steamer Indiana. When he arrived at Liverpool, crowds thronged the docks and streets to give him a hero's welcome, and Londoners welcomed Grant with similar enthusiasm. In July, the Grants crossed to Belgium, traveled through Germany, and summered in the Swiss Alps and the lakes of northern Italy. Back in Great Britain, they toured Scotland and northern England, then visited daughter Ellen Grant Sartoris at Warsash, the Sartoris country home near Southampton. Grant spent November in Paris, later writing "no American would stay in Paris if he found himself the only one of his countrymen there." The Grants wintered in the Mediterranean, sailing down the Italian coast to Sicily, where they spent Christmas, then to Alexandria, and a long trip up the Nile. The party toured the Holy Land, visited Constantinople and Athens, and spent a month in Italy. After another month in Paris, the Grants were off to Holland, Germany, Scandinavia, Russia, Austria, and Switzerland, exploring the Alps again before returning to Paris in September, 1878, to ponder their next move. Abroad and out of office, Grant freely talked about the war and his presidency. Several interviews stirred controversy in America and stoked talk of a third term in 1880, despite Grant's own protestation: "I never wanted to get out of a place as much as I did to get out of the Presidency." The Grants had seen Europe. Now they faced a choice between home and a journey to distant Asia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809326327 20160528
Grant's second administration begins with trouble as rival governments squabble over Louisiana. Violence in California threatens his policy of peace with indigenous people, and in November, the execution by Spanish authorities of 53 sailors falsely flying the US flag shocked America.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809322770 20160528
This volume of Grant's papers, pertaining to his administration, covers areas such as the Enforcement Act, prompted by political murders in the South, the fire that swept through Chicago in 1871, British ratification of the Washington Treaty, civil war in Cuba and opposition within his own party.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809321988 20160528
On May 10, 1876, Ulysses S. Grant pulled a lever to start the mighty 1,400-horsepower Corliss Steam Engine, powering acres of machinery for the nation's Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. Grant summed up a century of American progress by saying, "Whilst proud of what we have done, we regret that we have not done more. Our achievements have been great enough however to make it easy for our people to acknowledge superior merit wheresoever found." That summer, Fourth of July celebrations coincided with early reports that Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer and his Seventh Cavalry had been wiped out by Sioux. Grant resisted the subsequent clamor for volunteers to crush the Sioux, but his peace policy lay in shambles, and he later criticized Custer's unnecessary "sacrifice of troops." Soldiers sent to subdue Indians meant fewer available to help ensure a fair election in November. Grant's correspondents described a pattern of physical and economic intimidation throughout the South, as Democrats sought to keep blacks from the polls. After whites massacred black militia in South Carolina, Grant warned that unchecked persecution would lead to "bloody revolution." As violence spread, Grant struggled to position limited forces where they could do the most good. Scandals diverted Grant's attention from larger policy questions. A series of Whiskey Ring prosecutions culminated in the February trial of Orville E. Babcock, Grant's private secretary. A new scandal erupted in March when Secretary of War William W. Belknap resigned, hoping in vain to avoid impeachment for selling post traderships. Grant drew fire for having accepted the resignation, a move that ultimately led to Belknap's acquittal by the Senate. An investigation also linked Grant's brother Orvil to the scandal. Grant battled a Democratic House of Representatives until late that summer over issues as vital as the budget and as symbolic as the president's absences from the capital. He welcomed Rutherford B. Hayes as the Republican choice for his successor, despite private irritation at Hayes's pointed pledge to serve only one term. As his presidency waned, Grant planned a trip to Europe when he left office. Investments would finance his travels, and he staked his fortunes on western mining stocks. In June, a granddaughter born at the White House brought the family joy in an otherwise trying year.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809326310 20160528
In this book, Ulysses S. Grant's life story reaches its end. Mexico had interested Ulysses S. Grant since the young lieutenant fought there. Now, as president of the Mexican Southern Railroad, he emerged as a strong advocate of increased trade and investment. Appointed by President Chester A. Arthur to negotiate a commercial treaty, Grant spent most of January 1883, working on the project. For months, Grant promoted the resulting treaty, granting interviews, giving speeches, and toasting visiting Mexican statesman Porfirio Diaz. The Senate ultimately rejected the treaty amid charges that Grant had crafted provisions to benefit his moribund railroad. As Grant lost influence in the White House and in Congress, he turned his attention and energy elsewhere. In September 1883, Grant joined a tour to celebrate the completion of the Northern Pacific Railroad, begun during his first presidential term. From Minnesota to Oregon, Grant saw firsthand the rapid growth of the northwest. 'I was not prepared to see so rich a country or one so rapidly developing'. Grant wrote a series of articles about his Civil War campaigns, and then began his "Memoirs". In February 1885, he was diagnosed with cancer. Newspapers published daily updates as Grant's health steadily declined. Fading health spurred Grant to finish his "Memoirs". He completed the first of two volumes by March. The second was nearly done in June, when the Grants left sweltering New York City for upstate Mount McGregor. Here Grant finished his work and faced his end, unable to speak, communicating by notes to his doctors and friends. 'There never was one more willing to go than I am'. Grant died on July 23, his family at his side.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809328796 20160528
Pressured in 1875 to declare himself for or against a third term as president, Ulysses S. Grant found it equally difficult to decide what he wanted and to explain himself to the nation. In May, he pronounced the idea of a third term both constitutional and potentially expedient, and defended the right of the people to choose their own leaders. Grant disavowed any desire to continue as president but expressed gratitude at being chosen twice already. As he pondered a third term, Grant's second term came under increased scrutiny. The first signs of the Whiskey Ring scandal emerged early in 1875. Investigations uncovered several well-established "rings" of distillers and officials conspiring to skim tax revenues. Indictments were handed down in May, notably in Milwaukee, Chicago, and St. Louis. Those indicted in St. Louis included some of Grant's own friends. Evidence soon connected the scandal to the capital, and ultimately to Grant's longtime aide and secretary, Orville E. Babcock. Warned in July, Grant brusquely ordered prosecutors to "Let no guilty man escape, " even those "who insinuate that they have high influence to protect, or to protect them." But in December, when Babcock made a questionable demand for a military court of inquiry to clear his name, Grant backed him up. The idea soon fizzled, and by year's end Babcock faced trial in St. Louis. Grant faced further tribulation in the south. In Louisiana, supporters of rival legislatures clashed on the streets of New Orleans. Lieutenant General Philip H. Sheridan, accused of interfering on behalf of the Republican legislature, described armed Democrats as "banditti, " a remark that became a rallying cry for southerners and those northerners opposed to federal intervention. Grant did recognize the limits of northern patience. In September, after violence flared again in Mississippi, he hesitated to intervene, noting that "the great majority are ready now to condemn any interference on the part of the government." Rumors of gold in the Black Hills signaled a new threat to Grant's Indian policy. Prospectors flocked to Dakota Territory, and many slipped past military patrols ordered to stop them. Grant sent an emissary to the Sioux with a proposal to buy the Black Hills. In May, Sioux leaders traveled to the capital, where Grant renewed efforts to persuade them to relocate to Indian Territory. The Sioux refused, returned home, and rebuffed a commission sent out to resume negotiations. In November, Grant tacitly dropped the military patrols. Grant left in September for an extensive western trip. In St. Louis, he arranged to sell assets at his farm, which he had resolved to lease after persistent losses. Traveling as far west as Salt Lake City, where he met Mormon leader Brigham Young, Grant could not have relished the prospect of returning to Washington, D.C. The Democrats who controlled the House of Representatives prepared to challenge his administration at every turn.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809324996 20160528
By late 1878, after a year and a half abroad, Ulysses S. Grant had visited every country in Europe, and he was homesick. "I have seen nothing to make me regret that I am an American. Our country: its resources; energy, ingenuity and intelligence of the people, &c. is more appreciated abroad than at home." Grant decided to return through Asia. After "a delightful run" to Dublin and northern Ireland, he left Paris with his wife Julia, son Frederick, and a few friends in January, 1879.Heading east, Grant kept a travel diary. On the voyage to Bombay, travelers socialized on deck. "Four of the lady passengers and one of the gentlemen Amateur Artists, amused themselves by sketching me." Crossing India overland, the Grant party rode elephants, visited the Taj Mahal, and witnessed Hindu ceremonies. From Calcutta, Grant sailed for Burma, Singapore, and Siam. After stops at Hong Kong and Canton, Grant wrote, "I am satisfied that the Chinese are badly treated at home by Europeans as well as when they emigrate." At Tientsin, Grant befriended Viceroy Li Hung-chang, "probably the most intelligent and most advanced ruler - if not man - in China, " and at Peking he agreed to mediate a dispute with Japan over the Ryukyu Islands.During a "very delightful" ten weeks in Japan, Grant met the Emperor, visited shrines and hot springs, attended a play and a lantern parade in his honor, and held talks on the Ryukyu dispute.Throngs welcomed Grant to San Francisco on September 20, 1879. Grant assured all that the United States stood second to none in the world in its people, institutions, and ideals. He told Confederate veterans, "I have an abiding faith that we will remain together in future harmony." Grant toured Yosemite and visited scenes from his army days in Oregon and Washington Territory, then headed east again, his train cheered at every stop. At Galena and Chicago he basked in the warmth of ovations and old friends. Another series of crowds and banquets culminated in December at Philadelphia, where Grant completed his circuit of the globe.As 1880 began, Grant headed south. He marveled at Florida's potential and groused at Cuba's heat, then reached Mexico, a country he had long ago admired as part of an occupying army. Grant met influential leaders, toured silver mines and old battlefields, and encouraged development.Grant returned to New Orleans and more banquets and speeches, touting reconciliation and praising black advancement. His progress north took on the air of a campaign as the Republican convention loomed. Newspapers debated a third term while Grant kept silent. In June, at Chicago, delegates split between Grant and James G. Blaine, and settled on dark horse James A. Garfield. Grant expressed relief at avoiding a "most violent campaign."Grant spent the summer in the Rocky Mountains inspecting mines, sometimes by pack mule, for possible investments. In September, back in Galena, he rejoined the political fray, attacking Garfield's opponent, Major General Winfield S. Hancock, in an interview. "He is the most selfish man I know...He can not bear to hear anyone else praised, but can take any amount of flattery." With the election weeks away, and the outcome in doubt, Grant took to the stump. "I am a Republican, " he told an Ohio crowd, "because the Republican Party is a national party seeking the greatest good for the greatest number of citizens.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809327751 20160528
In the final weeks of the 1880 campaign, Ulysses S. Grant left Galena and headed east to stump for the Republican ticket. At rallies in New England, upstate New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, and New York City, sometimes several times a day, the reticent Grant warmed to his role. Sounding a familiar postwar theme, he repeatedly condemned voter harassment in the South, asserting the right of "our fellow-citizens of African descent, to go to the polls, even though they are in the minority, and put in their ballot without being burned out of their homes, and without being threatened or intimidated." James A. Garfield won a narrow victory over Major General Winfield S. Hancock and welcomed Grant's advice on matters ranging from cabinet choices to foreign policy.Rootless since their White House days and unsatisfied with backwater Galena, the Grants now decided to settle in New York City and took rooms at the Fifth Avenue Hotel. In January, 1881, Grant accepted the presidency of the 1883 World's Fair Commission, charged with bringing an exposition to New York City. Initial enthusiasm soon gave way to rancor, as factions split over where to place the fair. Grant favored Central Park, but public sentiment intervened, and funding evaporated. By March, Grant resigned.Grant's business interests reflected the international stage he now occupied. Competing plans for an isthmian canal through Panama, Mexico, and Nicaragua jockeyed for support, with Grant strongly favoring Nicaragua. He published an article championing Nicaragua even as momentum swung behind Panama. But Grant's attention was drawn more to railroads and to Mexico. When his friend Matias Romero promoted a new line through Oaxaca, Grant jumped on board. A speech to American capitalists in November, 1880, led a few months later to the incorporation of the Mexican Southern Railroad, with Grant as president. By April, 1881, he was in Mexico City, where he told lawmakers, "I predict, with the building of these roads, a development of the country will take place such as has never been witnessed in any country before...There is nothing, in my opinion, to stand in the way of Mexican progress and grandeur, and wealth, but the people themselves."In June, Grant returned from Mexico with a new charter in hand. But his mind was on Garfield and Secretary of State James G. Blaine, two men who had thwarted him at the Republican convention one year earlier. Grant supported his Stalwart ally, Roscoe Conkling, in a power struggle with Garfield and Blaine. From New Orleans to New York City, Grant spoke candidly, complaining of Conkling's mistreatment by Garfield and others. The feud ended after Garfield was shot on July 2. When he died in September, Grant wept with the nation.Fitz John Porter had sought restoration to the army since his dismissal after the Second Battle of Bull Run. Grant had previously rebuffed Porter but now reversed course. Taking up a case that divided former commanders now in Congress, Grant forcefully argued for Porter's vindication.Grant and wife Julia bought a home just off Fifth Avenue in New York City. In the summer, he commuted from his seaside cottage at Long Branch, New Jersey, to his office on Wall Street, where he greeted a steady stream of admirers and influence-seekers. A silent partner in the brokerage firm his son Ulysses, Jr., formed with Ferdinand Ward, Grant left finances in Ward's hands. Surveys for the Mexican Southern proceeded. Banquets and parties filled many evenings. The Grants settled into Manhattan society.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780809327768 20160528
Green Library
Database topics
American History
  • v. 1. 1856-1880
  • v. 2. 1881-1884
  • v. 3. 1884-1885
  • v. 4. 1885
  • v. 5. 1885-1888
  • v. 6. 1888-1890
  • v. 7. 1890-1892
  • v. 8. 1892- 1894
  • v. 9. 1894-1896
  • v. 10. 1896-1898
  • v. 11. 1898-1900
  • v. 12. 1900-1902
  • v. 13. Contents and index, volumes 1-12: 1856-1902
  • v. 14. 1902-1903
  • v. 15. 1903-1905
  • v. 16. 1905-1907
  • v. 17. 1907-1908-- v. 18. 1908-1909
  • v. 19. 1909-1910
  • v. 20-21. 1910
  • v. 22. 1910-1911
  • v. 23. 1911-1912
  • v. 24-25. 1912
  • v. 26. Contents and index, volumes 14-25: 1902-1912
  • v. 27-28. 1913
  • v. 29. 1913-1914
  • v. 30-31. 1914
  • v. 32-34. 1915
  • v. 35. 1915-1916
  • v. 36-38. 1916.
  • v. 39. Contents and index, volumes 27-38: 1913-1916
  • v. 40. November 20, 1916-January 23, 1917
  • v. 41. January 24-April 6, 1917
  • v. 42. April 7-June 23, 1917
  • v. 43. June 25-August 20, 1917
  • v. 44. August 21-November 10, 1917
  • v. 45. November 11, 1917-January 15, 1918
  • v. 46. January 16-March 12, 1918
  • v. 47. March 13-May12, 1918
  • v. 48. May 13-July 17, 1918
  • v. 49. July 18-September 13, 1918
  • v. 50. The complete press conferences, 1913-1919
  • v. 51. September14-November 8, 1918
  • v. 52. Contents and index, volumes 40-49, 51: 1916-1918
  • 1916-1918
  • v. 53. November 9, 1918-January 11, 1919 --v.54. January 11-February 7, 1919
  • v. 55. February 8-March 16, 1919.
  • v. 56. March 17-April 4, 1919
  • v. 57. April5-22, 1919
  • v. 58. April 23-May 9, 1919
  • v. 59. May 10-31, 1919
  • v. 60. June 1-17, 1919
  • v. 61. June 18-July 25, 1919
  • v. 62. July 26-September 3, 1919
  • v. 63. September 4-November 5, 1919
  • v. 64. November 6, 1919-February 27, 1920
  • v. 65. February 28-July 31, 1920
  • v. 66. August 2-December 23, 1920
  • v. 67. December 24, 1920-April 7, 1922
  • v. 68. April 8, 1922-February 6, 1924
  • v. 69. Contents and index, volumes 53-68: 1918-1924.
"The Rotunda Digital Edition includes the complete contents of the landmark letterpress edition of the papers, with nearly 35,000 documents across 69 volumes, with new material forthcoming from the Library of Congress and the Wilson Presidential Library."

20. Spohr Briefe [2010 - ]

Database topics
Music
Physical extent
1 online resource.
Transcripts of the correspondence and related documents of the composer, violinist, and conductor Louis Spohr.