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Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
Have you ever wondered why and how something like a paper doll was added to the library collection? If so, please join us for a panel presentation where representatives from Collection Development, SUL Technical Services, and Special Collections Technical Services will explain each step of the acquisition process using the recently acquired Jenny Lind paper doll set as an example. The presentation will explain how the set was discovered and paid for, the considerations that were made before the collection came to Stanford, how the SearchWorks catalog records were prepared, some conservation considerations, and how students interact with and learn from the physical as well as the digital objects. Please join us for a fascinating deep dive into the world of Special Collections acquisitions!
Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
This session will offer an overview of the “whys and hows” of planning, designing, and producing exhibitions for the Library’s Special Collections. For context, my talk will begin with a brief wayback (post-horse and carriage, pre-information superhighway) photo tour of exhibits in Stanford’s Main Library. I’ll describe the current exhibit program’s primary goals and address the question of where ideas for exhibits come from: who proposes them and how and why they are chosen, illustrated with examples. In the last portion of the program I’ll talk about the process of curating and producing a show and ways to approach designing a physical exhibit for display in library cases, offering what I hope will be helpful advice to any of you considering designing an exhibit of your own. Depending on space, the session will end with a hands-on exercise of making a simple caption support.
Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
If you’ve ever wondered what treasures lie in the basement of Green Library - this is the session for you! Media & Microtext is a hidden gem of Stanford Libraries' collections. Our materials are heavily used by a variety of patrons for film viewing & study, videogame play & research, and significant scholarly work. Our vast film and television collection holds over 50,000 titles, in DVD, Blu-ray, VHS and other formats, including rare materials not found elsewhere. Our videogame & software collection is quite fantastic, with over 6000 titles from the 1980s to present day. The new retro game area even allows players to enjoy such classic consoles as the Atari 2600, Vectrex, and SuperNES. Finally, we have other media encompassing a gamut of subjects, including sound recordings and digital archives. Alongside our audio-visual media, the Center boasts an in-depth research collection of over 170,000 microforms. Over several years this collection has grown to encompass materials from many other campus libraries. Students, scholars, and visitors peruse our materials regularly looking for the crucial information to complete their research. In addition, Henry Lowood has spear-headed Stanford Libraries' foray into streaming services, including the popular Kanopy service. Please join Laszlo Jakusovszky, Operations Manager for the Media & Microtext Center, and Henry Lowood, Curator for Film & Media Collections, for an overview of the Center’s wonderful collections and how you and our patrons may use it to best effect.

4. Concierge 46: Articles+ [2018] Online

Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
Stanford Libraries recently launched a new feature within SearchWorks called articles+. This new search feature provides access to hundreds of thousands of academic journal, magazine and news articles, book chapters, some dissertations, conference proceedings, and more from thousands of databases in a single search. The evaluation, selection, development, and launch of SearchWorks articles+ involved highly collaborative efforts with staff across the libraries playing key roles. Join us at one of the two upcoming Concierge sessions to learn more about how this new service was implemented, what it can do for our users, and what’s coming next. Jessie Keck (Software Developer in DLSS), Kathryn Kerns (Cubberley Librarian) and Alexis Manheim (Acquisitions Department) will take us on a virtual tour and field questions.
Archive/Manuscript
2 ms. boxes.
Diaries and notes, relating to Polish-Soviet relations.
Hoover Archives
Digital content
26 items
Archive/Manuscript
28.1 megabytes (26 computer files)
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Includes 3 photographs depicting Stanford Law School students with a banner stating "Racism Lives Here Too," as well as 23 posters bearing quotes attributed to Stanford students and professors. The banner and posters were hung at Stanford Law School in February 2018 by students associated with the Racism Lives Here Too Movement.
Special Collections

7. Schofield, Susan W [2018] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Susan Schofield served as Stanford University’s academic secretary from 1996 to 2002. Describing the role of the academic secretary as a “facilitator of faculty governance,” Schofield provides details on the day-to-day operations of the Office of the Academic Secretary and the Faculty Senate. She describes the election process, the role of the Steering Committee in setting the agenda for the body, meeting procedures and traditions, and the work of the Committee on Committees (or nominating committee). She also offers insights on the manner in which senior administrators interact with the Faculty Senate and describes two key aspects of the academic secretary’s job: persuading faculty members to serve on or chair committees and authoring the minutes of Faculty Senate meetings.
Archive/Manuscript
0.48 linear feet (2 boxes)
Materials include pamphlets, flyers, brochures, and other documents gathered from the Call to Action Alley providing information for marginalized communities, as well as a CD. Also includes memorabilia such as a tote bag, buttons, a pen, a pencil, and wristbands.
Special Collections

9. Abernethy, David B. (2017) [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this oral history, David Abernethy, a professor emeritus of political science who served seventeen terms in the Faculty Senate and chaired the body during the 1981-82 academic year, discusses the role and processes of the Faculty Senate and some of the controversial issues it has grappled with, including the evolution of the Western Culture curricular requirement, the university’s investment in South Africa, the relationship between the university and the Hoover Institution, and the possibility of locating the Ronald Reagan presidential library at Stanford. Briefly describing his academic background in African Studies, Abernethy tells how he was completing doctoral research in Nigeria in 1965 when he received an invitation to come to Stanford University. He shares personal recollections of the campus climate in the late 1960s, including the first teach-in on Vietnam, responses to the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr., and a rowdy session of the Academic Council reviewing Stanford President J. E. Wallace Sterling’s decision to discipline antiwar protestors. Abernethy turns then to the 55-member Faculty Senate, which marks its fiftieth anniversary in 2018, discussing in detail its structure, traditions, and processes, especially the alphabetical assignment of seating and the availability of the university president and provost for questions. First voted chair in 1981-1982, he also describes the workings of the Senate’s principal committees and the role of the academic secretary who administers them. Regarding the Committee on Undergraduate Studies, Abernethy offers an analysis of the Western Culture curricular requirement as it changed to meet the demands of a multicultural university and society, beginning in 1976. As he sees it, to highlight Western cultures is a disservice to all non-Western people, and culture can be used as a code word for issues surrounding race and ethnicity. The Faculty Senate discussion of Stanford’s investments in weapons makers and later companies supporting South Africa under apartheid are his next topics. Abernethy talks about his corporate social responsibility work, including urging the university the participate in shareholder proxy votes related to South Africa and meeting with the chairman of Wells Fargo Bank to express concern about a bank loan to South Africa. Beginning with an appreciation of the resource represented by the Hoover Institution’s library and archives, Abernethy turns to Stanford’s fractious relationship during the 1980s with Hoover and its leader, Glenn Campbell. The critical issue became whether and where a Reagan Presidential Library should be located at Stanford, he says, a proposal initiated by Campbell’s independent contacts with the Reagan White House. Despite the potential resources of such a library, Abernethy notes, faculty were concerned about the consequences for Stanford’s image of adding a second campus landmark honoring a prominent twentieth-century conservative president, the first being the Hoover Tower, and the siting of the project. Ending the controversy, the Reagan Presidential Foundation chose to seek a site in Southern California. A related issue, however, dealt with Campbell’s initiative to grant senior fellows at the Hoover Institution membership in Stanford’s Academic Council, Abernethy notes, which raised issues of qualifications and inequitable exemption from teaching responsibilities. Abernethy concludes the interview with an overall evaluation of Stanford’s Faculty Senate.
Archive/Manuscript
.25 linear feet (1 volume)
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Small album of Stanford University campus buildings produced by Hyde's Book Store of Palo Alto.
Special Collections

11. Amemiya, Takeshi [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program interviews, 1999-2012
In this oral history from 2017, the noted econometrician Takeshi Amemiya, Edward Ames Edmonds Professor of Economics, Emeritus, describes his early life in wartime Japan, his education in economics, and his years on the faculty of the Department of Economics at Stanford University. His wife, Yoshiko Miyaki Amemiya, briefly describes meeting Amemiya in Japan and her experience of life at Stanford. Amemiya begins by describing how Advanced Econometrics, a comprehensive text that is still in print three decades after its initial publication in 1985, evolved from material he used to teach the subject when he first came to Stanford in 1964. About that time, Amemiya explains, microdata on individual households and companies began to become available. Amemiya developed the statistical methods to analyze such data, and he was the first to write a textbook on the subject. Elaborating on his early years at Stanford, Amemiya explains that the faculty of the Department of Economics were assigned to different campus buildings, depending on their interests. He says this tended to deter collaboration until the department was consolidated at Encina Hall in the 1970s. Amemiya jumps ahead to discuss his later interests: sharing his delight in discovering the similarities of Greek and Japanese customs, including the gods they worshipped and their shrines to the dead. In addition, after traveling in China, he began to write poetry in Chinese. Turning to his childhood, Amemiya says he was only seven at the outbreak of World War II, which found his family in Lima, Peru, where his father worked as an executive for a Japanese shipping line. He describes being caught up in an exchange of Japanese and U.S. citizens living abroad at the outbreak of war. Although he was evacuated from Tokyo during the war, he experienced air raids in the area near Mount Fuji to which he had been sent. Amemiya describes his time at the International Christian University in Japan, Guilford College in North Carolina, and the American University in Washington, DC and admits to sometimes being distracted from his studies by American novels and golf. At Johns Hopkins University, Amemiya says a connection with econometrist Carl F. Christ set him on a career course that led him to join the faculty of the Stanford Department of Economics. Stanford then was more comfortable and less pressured than today, Amemiya says, offering his criticism of today’s practice of allowing students to evaluate professors, arguing that this encourages overly rehearsed teaching. Instead, he recalls putting new problems on the board and solving them with the students. Yoshiko Amemiya recounts how she met and married the young professor during a brief period when he left Stanford to teach in Japan. She also shares some of the challenges she experienced adapting to American culture, especially in feeling comfortable with the informality of the English language. Amemiya concludes by briefly describing the anti-Vietnam War protests at Stanford and recalling some memorable faculty rivalries on the tennis court.
Archive/Manuscript
1 print.
Special Collections

13. Bratman, Michael E [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Professor Michael Bratman offers general reflections on the operations of the Stanford Faculty Senate and describes his experience as the chair of the 29th Faculty Senate in 1996-1997. A key topic of the 29th Senate was the reevaluation of the Cultures, Ideas, and Values (CIV) Area One requirement, which attracted a great deal of national attention as to whether Stanford would remain committed to diversity in its curriculum. Bratman describes with pride how the senate handled this complicated issue and put in place a process that all constituencies felt was fair. Bratman also comments on the agenda-setting role of the Senate Steering Committee and the essential role played by the Academic Secretary in providing institutional background, continuity, and preparation for the incoming chair. Other topics covered include the electoral process, the role played by the university president and provost in the senate, the convening of the second Planning and Policy Board, and the way Bratman’s experience as senate chair prepared him for a later role as president of the American Philosophical Association at a challenging time in that organization’s history. The interview ends with Bratman’s reflections on some of the traditions of the senate and his observation that great universities are made in part by the kind of procedures they follow in making important decisions.

14. Chace, William M [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
William M. Chace discusses his involvement with Stanford’s Faculty Senate, including his time as chair during the 1978-1979 term. He discusses the founding of the Faculty Senate, in part, as a response to civil unrest on campus during the Vietnam War. He describes issues that came before the body, its rules and procedures, the Committee on Committees, the Steering Committee, and the role of the Academic Secretary. Chace shares memories of senate colleagues and friends and expresses admiration for Herbert Packer’s intellect and exemplary leadership during the turbulent 1960s. Chace recalls actions the Faculty Senate took in response to the politics of the era, including sending a delegation to Washington DC in response to U.S. bombing in Cambodia. He offers his opinion on debates over the Western Culture course at Stanford, compares Stanford’s Faculty Senate to administrative bodies at other universities, and talks about the founding of Stanford Continuing Studies. Chace also provides information on his early life and education and the circumstances that led him to join the faculty of the Stanford Department of English in 1968.
Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
In advance of the release of the 2017 Copyright Reminder, Mimi Calter will review many of the copyright scenarios that document will address. We’ll talk about library procedures and policies related to copyright, review some basics of copyright law, and talk about working with patrons on copyright issues. Bring your questions!

16. Concierge 39: LOCKSS [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
The LOCKSS (Lots of Copies Keeps Stuff Safe) Program provides distributed digital preservation software and services used by hundreds of institutions across tens of networks. Established as an auxiliary of Stanford University Libraries in 1999, the LOCKSS Program originally helped libraries secure post-cancellation access to subscription electronic resources. Its focus has since expanded to preservation of the digital scholarly record more broadly and enabling communities to preserve digital materials that matter to them. As its founders, Vicky Reich and David Rosenthal, are now retired and the LOCKSS Program joins the Digital Library Systems and Services group, the LOCKSS Program is poised for major new initiatives. Come to this Concierge session to hear from Nicholas Taylor, Program Manager for LOCKSS and Web Archiving, about the present and future of the LOCKSS Program.

17. Concierge 40: Data Stories [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
Providing support for qualitative and quantitative data to the Stanford research community involves a lot of parts and pieces. In this session, Vijoy Abraham, Ashley Jester, Kris Kasianovitz, and Alesia Montgomery will discuss the the landscape of quantitative and qualitative social science data here at Stanford. Each presenter will provide us with a "data story" that exemplifies the complexities of the work they do to manage the life cycle of social science data sets, from acquisition to the researcher. Data covered will be the various flavors of the US Census, the provisioning of the DISQUE DENUNCIA dataset for international policy research, qualitative data, and Corelogic Tax and Deed Public Record Data.
Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
Stanford Libraries’ collection of South Asian materials increased dramatically in the last few years as the focus of the collection expanded to include materials in the regional languages of India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Bhutan, and Sri Lanka. Join us for a presentation by C. Ryan Perkins, South Asian Studies Librarian, on the peculiar challenges of building a collection of vernacular South Asian materials from scratch. Ryan will discuss his experience finding vendors to supply materials when no vendors seem to exist and finding ways to provide metadata for materials in vernacular languages when Stanford Libraries does not have catalogers for those languages. The presentation will also highlight some of the goals Ryan has for the collection, what strategies he uses for determining, in a region with dozens of languages, which languages should be collected comprehensively and which should be excluded, and how a partnership with Library of Congress enables some of the collection building.

19. Concierge 42: CIDR, What? [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
The Center for Interdisciplinary Digital Research (CIDR) is a unique group of technology specialists, software developers, and humanities and social science data and subject librarians who design and develop new digital tools and methods and incorporate technology and information resources to promote scholarship. Meet our team members and learn about our services, workshops and partners, and hear highlights from some of our projects that integrate data visualization, data organization, and data preservation.

20. Drekmeier, Charles [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Professor Emeritus Charles Drekmeier, who served as a member of the Executive Committee of the Academic Council from 1966 to 1968, describes the general climate at Stanford around the time that the Faculty Senate was formed. Drekmeier discusses the circumstances that led to his arrival at Stanford in 1958, including the recommendation of sociologist Talcott Parsons with whom he had worked as a research assistant at Harvard. He recalls how, as a young faculty member with a student following due his involvement in early anti-Vietnam war activism, he was invited to be an at-large member of the Executive Committee of the Academic Council in 1966. He offers recollections of key movers in academic governance at the time, including J.E. Wallace Sterling, Albert Guerard, Richard Lyman, Herb Packard, Ernest Hilgard, and Kenneth Arrow, and provides brief insights on the character of Executive Committee meetings at the time that the Faculty Senate came into being. Drekmeier also recounts memories about organizing the Stanford Teach-In on the Vietnam War in 1965 and the program in Social Thought and Institutions.
Archive/Manuscript
1 poster
Special Collections

22. Franklin, Marc A [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Marc A. Franklin recalls the circumstances, including a chance conversation with Gerald Gunther, that led him to join the faculty of the Stanford Law School in 1962. He offers recollections of the Law School faculty, including Herbert L. Packer, a key mover behind the construction of the Faculty Senate. Franklin speaks in general terms about his service on a subcommittee appointed by the Executive Committee of the Academic Council to work out some of the details regarding the proposed Faculty Senate. He also speaks about chairing the Stanford Judicial Council, the primary judicial body for the campus community, during a time of turmoil as a result of student protests over the Vietnam War.
Archive/Manuscript
1 linear foot (1 box and 1 map folder)
Materials consist of pamphlets, posters, flyers, postcards, a game, and other printed material related to the 2017 French presidential election.
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
21 x 16" image
Special Collections

25. Jamison, Rex L [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
This interview with Professor Rex Jamison focuses on the Faculty Senate from his perspective as academic secretary to the university from 2007 to 2014. He begins by describing his educational background and how he came to Stanford in 1971 as a professor in the School of Medicine. Jamison recalls his two terms of service as an elected senator in the 1980s and describes how his friendship with the previous academic secretary, Ted Harris, led to his being chosen as Harris’s successor. Regarding preparation for the role of academic secretary, Jamison commends Trish Del Pozzo, the assistant academic secretary, for her immense knowledge and support, noting that he did a lot of reading about Stanford’s history of faculty governance. He describes how the fifty-five senators are elected from their respective schools or divisions, and how they then elect the senate chair and the members of the Senate Steering Committee. The senate’s Committee on Committees nominates faculty to serve on the seven Academic Council committees, he says, after which it is the academic secretary’s job to persuade them to serve. Jamison explains that issues within the senate’s purview are brought forward from the relevant Academic Council committee. Other issues come to the senate for important discussion or review even though there is no vote on them. Jamison cites as a prime example the budget plans put in place by the leadership after the financial crisis of 2008, which were carefully explained at the senate as decisions were being made and later implemented; the faculty valued this transparency. Jamison praises each of the senate chairs he worked with: Eamonn Callan (Education), Karen Cook (Sociology), Andrea Goldsmith (Electrical Engineering), David Spiegel (Psychiatry), Rosemary Knight (Geophysics), Ray Levitt (Civil and Environmental Engineering), and David Palumbo-Liu (Comparative Literature). He mentions several important issues dealt with by the senate during his term, including the Study of Undergraduate Education at Stanford (SUES) and the broad range of resulting curricular reforms approved by the senate. He also speaks about the “Stanford in New York” proposal, the consideration of bringing ROTC (Reserve Officers’ Training Corps) back to campus after its discontinuation in the 1960s, and the campus uproar over the Hoover Institution’s appointment of Donald Rumsfeld as a visiting fellow. The interview concludes with Jamison expressing the personal rewards of his service as academic secretary and his admiration for the faculty who take time from their busy academic and personal lives to participate in faculty governance.
Archive/Manuscript
74 digital files.
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Digital interview recordings of Japanese Americans relating to immigration to the United States from Japan, internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, and the postwar Japanese American community. Interviews conducted by Kaoru Ueda. Includes images of diaries, newsletters and other textual material.
Hoover Archives

27. Kajitory: Navigate Your Course [2017] Online

Collection
Learning, Design & Technology 2017
Students in online courses do not usually receive the contextualized feedback on their learning at the appropriate level of “granularity”. Kajitory is a learning dashboard with an interactive map of course topics. These comprehensive topics help students recognize the course’s structure, as well as track which topics they have mastered and which topics they still need to work on. Students with Kajiotry will learn to take the best next actions to overcome their struggles.
Archive/Manuscript
1 ms. box, 1 oversize box.
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Diaries, speeches and writings, relating to Japanese immigration to the United States, and to the Japanese community in the United States.
Hoover Archives
Archive/Manuscript
1 print.
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
1 print.
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
1 print.
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
130 pages : illustrations ; 27 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Archive/Manuscript
1 print.
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
1 print
Special Collections

35. Packer, Nancy H [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Nancy Packer, the Melvin and Bill Lane Professor in the Humanities and Professor of English, Emeritus and a former member of the Faculty Senate, reflects on the career of her husband Herbert L. Packer, who proposed the idea of the Faculty Senate, comments on the campus climate in the 1960s and 1970s and briefly recounts her own experience as a member of the Faculty Senate. Packer begins the interview by recounting some details of her early life in Washington, DC as the daughter of a congressman and her courtship with Herb Packer. She speaks of Herb Packer’s career at the Stanford Law School and his intellectual contributions to a law faculty that had more courtroom or practical experience over scholarship. She remembers the great jurist Learned Hand and the judge for whom Herb Packer clerked, Thomas Walter Swan, as his sources of intellectual influence. Packer discusses political controversies Herb faced at the time of his appointment and the context of protests against the draft and the Vietnam War, which she believes provided the impetus for his writing the memo that laid the foundation for the Faculty Senate. Packer also emphasizes Herb’s contribution in reforming undergraduate education through the Study for Education at Stanford. Packer concludes with brief reminiscences of her own service on the Faculty Senate.
Book
1 sheet : illustrations ; 16 x 23 cm
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
1 print
Special Collections
Digital content
50 items
Archive/Manuscript
6 Linear Feet (2 flat boxes and 1 map folder)
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Posters from protests of Executive Order 13769 held at SFO on January 28-29, 2017.
Special Collections

39. Sheehan, James J [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
James J. Sheehan, the chair of the 24th Faculty Senate (1991-92), offers details about the institution’s routine operational procedures and reflects on its function within the university. He compares Stanford’s mode of governance with what he experienced as a faculty member at Northwestern University, noting especially the distinctive manner in which the Stanford president and provost are incorporated into the body of the senate. Sheehan comments briefly on some of the issues that the senate faced during his term, including the indirect costs controversy. He concludes the interview by reading a portion of a passage he wrote for a book commemorating the fiftieth anniversary of the Faculty Senate. Sheehan also provides some information on his family background, his upbringing in San Francisco, and the circumstances that led him to attend Stanford as an undergraduate.

40. Stansky, Peter [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this interview, Peter D. L. Stansky, Field Professor of History, Emeritus, and a former chair of the Faculty Senate, delves into the establishment of the Faculty Senate, including the initial memo written by Herbert Packer outlining the plan for the body. He explains the roles of the Academic Council and its Executive Committee, the Faculty Senate Steering Committee, and the Committee on Committees, as well as the rules and procedures surrounding elections. Stansky discusses how he became chair of the Faculty Senate, and he reflects on some of the issues that came before the body, including land and buildings, the proposed Reagan Library, the Western Culture curriculum requirement, ROTC, and the involvement of administrators and students in the senate.
Archive/Manuscript
1 print.
Special Collections

42. Trans & Records, 2017 [2017 - ]

Archive/Manuscript
3.5 megabytes (12 files).
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Includes event postcards and email from a listserv managed by Trans &.
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
1 print.
Gift of Susannah Hays.
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
1 print.
Special Collections

45. Walecka, J. Dirk [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
J. Dirk Walecka, a former chair of the Stanford Faculty Senate, recalls the impact of the anti-Vietnam War movement in the 1960s as a factor leading to the creation of the senate. He explains the role of the Senate Steering Committee and how its work facilitated important legislative decisions. He describes the major issues during his term as senate chair from 1973 to 1974: a petition to reinstate ROTC on campus; legislation concerning teaching evaluations; the creation of a statement on academic freedom and a set of grievance procedures; and the implementation of a framework that defines faculty ranks, rights, privileges, responsibilities, and appointment criteria. Walecka also discusses the relationship between the senior administration and the Faculty Senate, as well as the role of the Advisory Board.
Archive/Manuscript
1 print.
Special Collections

47. Arrow, Kenneth J [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Kenneth J. Arrow served on the Executive Committee of the Academic Council around the time that the Faculty Senate was proposed and on a sub-committee appointed by the Executive Committee to consider Herbert Packer's proposal regarding the creation of an academic senate. Arrow later chaired the Faculty Senate during the 1986-87 term. He offers reflections on the function and effectiveness of the Faculty Senate and compares Stanford's mode of faculty governance with what he experienced at Harvard.

48. Baxter, Charles H [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program interviews, 1999-2012
Charles H. “Chuck” Baxter, a biology lecturer emeritus at Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station in Monterey, talks about his role both as a teacher and as a key participant in several endeavors, including the creation of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which have had a deep and lasting impact on both the area and the general public’s perception of our oceans. He begins the interview discussing his background, most notably how a chance invitation to go diving in the Pacific Ocean opened his eyes to the wonders of underwater ecosystems` and caused him to change his major at UCLA from engineering to zoology. From there he traces a path from his graduate work in Ted Bullock’s lab to teaching the undergraduate zoology lab to his recruitment as a lecturer in the Stanford University Department of Biology. Baxter explains the circumstances that resulted in the transfer of his teaching duties to the Hopkins Marine Station and his relocation to the Monterey area. He recalls fondly the community of faculty, staff, and students at the marine station in the mid 1970s that made it such a special place to work. Baxter discusses his classes and the undergraduate research projects he assisted with, including one that resulted in two undergraduates publishing one of the first papers to show the effects of greenhouse gases on the distributions of ocean communities. Beyond his academic life at Hopkins, Baxter relates the notable projects he and his colleagues put into motion. He talks about how the Monterey Bay Aquarium came to be, relating key aspects of the aquarium’s construction, including the kelp forest tank, the aviary, and preservation of the beached grey whale skeleton that now hangs in the reception hall. Peppered throughout the interview are anecdotes about David Packard, who along with his wife, Lucille, was a chief funder of the project. He explains the diving and recording technologies that were central to the formation of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and the media production company Sea Studios Foundation--organizations in which he played an active role. Finally, Baxter recounts the organization and deployment of the Sea of Cortez Expedition and Education Project, which retraced the 1940 journey of John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts, and how conversations with his fellow passengers led to his involvement in Stanford’s holistic biology course and his current interest in cognitive science research.

49. Bryson, Arthur E [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program interviews, 1999-2012
Arthur E. Bryson, Jr., a professor emeritus in the Stanford University Department of Aeronautics & Astronautics, discusses his research and teaching career in aeronautical engineering and his contributions to the fields of flight mechanics and automated control. Bryson begins with a discussion of his childhood in Illinois, recalling impressions of his father’s work as an investment banker in Chicago, his education in the Winnetka Public Schools, and the impact of a high school math teacher on his life path. He describes the beginning of his undergraduate career at Haverford College, which was interrupted by World War II and his participation in the Navy’s V-5 program. He talks about his eventual training assignment at Iowa State College and describes how he met his future wife, Helen Layton, there. The ensuing years found Bryson stationed at the Alameda Naval Station, working in repair and maintenance, and he describes some of his experiences there. Bryson then speaks about his short stint as a paper manufacturing engineer working for the Container Corporation of America and as an aeronautical engineer at United Aircraft, where he began working with wind tunnels. In the late 1940s, Bryson migrated to California to pursue a master’s degree in aeronautical engineering with the help of the GI Bill. He describes his advisor, Hans W. Liepmann, and relates how at Liepmann’s invitation, and with the help of a fellowship from Hughes Aircraft, he stayed on at Cal-tech, completing his PhD in 1951. An important turning point in Bryson’s career was an encounter with Harvard professor Howard Wilson Emmons, who was assigned to be Bryson’s office mate while Emmons was on a short assignment at Hughes. Bryson relates the circumstances that led Emmons to ask him to join the faculty at Harvard as an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering in 1963. He offers a short account of departmental and family life and his research and consulting work while at Harvard, and notes that the increasingly contentious atmosphere surrounding the Vietnam War was one of the factors that led him to accept an invitation to join the Stanford engineering faculty in 1968. Bryson describes some of the opportunities and challenges of his new role as the chair of the Department of Applied Mechanics, and later the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He comments on his approach to teaching engineering and working with graduate students, recalls his work on Waves in Fluids and some of the other films in the Fluid Mechanics Films series, and relates stories about the anti-Vietnam War protests on campus. He concludes the interview with comments on the Gravity Probe B project and reflections on recent directions in biomechanical engineering and flight mechanics.
Archive/Manuscript
2 v. leaves
Facsimile edition of Cambrai, Mediatheque d'Agglomeration,Ms. B 386
Special Collections