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Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
In advance of the release of the 2017 Copyright Reminder, Mimi Calter will review many of the copyright scenarios that document will address. We’ll talk about library procedures and policies related to copyright, review some basics of copyright law, and talk about working with patrons on copyright issues. Bring your questions!

2. Concierge 39: LOCKSS [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
The LOCKSS (Lots of Copies Keeps Stuff Safe) Program provides distributed digital preservation software and services used by hundreds of institutions across tens of networks. Established as an auxiliary of Stanford University Libraries in 1999, the LOCKSS Program originally helped libraries secure post-cancellation access to subscription electronic resources. Its focus has since expanded to preservation of the digital scholarly record more broadly and enabling communities to preserve digital materials that matter to them. As its founders, Vicky Reich and David Rosenthal, are now retired and the LOCKSS Program joins the Digital Library Systems and Services group, the LOCKSS Program is poised for major new initiatives. Come to this Concierge session to hear from Nicholas Taylor, Program Manager for LOCKSS and Web Archiving, about the present and future of the LOCKSS Program.
Archive/Manuscript
1 poster
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
21 x 16" image
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
74 digital files.
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Digital interview recordings of Japanese Americans relating to immigration to the United States from Japan, internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, and the postwar Japanese American community. Interviews conducted by Kaoru Ueda. Includes images of diaries, newsletters and other textual material.
Hoover Archives
Archive/Manuscript
1 ms. box, 1 oversize box.
Diaries, speeches and writings, relating to Japanese immigration to the United States, and to the Japanese community in the United States.
Hoover Archives
Archive/Manuscript
6 Linear Feet (2 flat boxes and 1 map folder)
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Posters from protests of Executive Order 13769 held at SFO on January 28-29, 2017.
Special Collections

8. Baxter, Charles H [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Charles H. “Chuck” Baxter, a biology lecturer emeritus at Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station in Monterey, talks about his role both as a teacher and as a key participant in several endeavors, including the creation of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which have had a deep and lasting impact on both the area and the general public’s perception of our oceans. He begins the interview discussing his background, most notably how a chance invitation to go diving in the Pacific Ocean opened his eyes to the wonders of underwater ecosystems` and caused him to change his major at UCLA from engineering to zoology. From there he traces a path from his graduate work in Ted Bullock’s lab to teaching the undergraduate zoology lab to his recruitment as a lecturer in the Stanford University Department of Biology. Baxter explains the circumstances that resulted in the transfer of his teaching duties to the Hopkins Marine Station and his relocation to the Monterey area. He recalls fondly the community of faculty, staff, and students at the marine station in the mid 1970s that made it such a special place to work. Baxter discusses his classes and the undergraduate research projects he assisted with, including one that resulted in two undergraduates publishing one of the first papers to show the effects of greenhouse gases on the distributions of ocean communities. Beyond his academic life at Hopkins, Baxter relates the notable projects he and his colleagues put into motion. He talks about how the Monterey Bay Aquarium came to be, relating key aspects of the aquarium’s construction, including the kelp forest tank, the aviary, and preservation of the beached grey whale skeleton that now hangs in the reception hall. Peppered throughout the interview are anecdotes about David Packard, who along with his wife, Lucille, was a chief funder of the project. He explains the diving and recording technologies that were central to the formation of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and the media production company Sea Studios Foundation--organizations in which he played an active role. Finally, Baxter recounts the organization and deployment of the Sea of Cortez Expedition and Education Project, which retraced the 1940 journey of John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts, and how conversations with his fellow passengers led to his involvement in Stanford’s holistic biology course and his current interest in cognitive science research.
Archive/Manuscript
2 v. leaves
Facsimile edition of Cambrai, Mediatheque d'Agglomeration, Ms. B 386
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
1 microfilm reel 3 ms. boxes.
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Relates to political and military conditions in China.
Hoover Archives

11. Chu, Jean H. (Athletics, 2016) [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this oral history, Jean (Fetter) Chu, who served as Dean of Undergraduate Admissions at Stanford for seven years, discusses the relationship between admissions and athletics at the university. Chu begins with an account of her own athletic career at Oxford University, playing “attack” on the varsity “net ball” team--a basketball forward in American English. She says it was a highlight of her time at Oxford, where women’s sports were not regarded as highly as men’s teams. She describes the distinction between men’s and women’s sports by noting that male athletes were awarded a Blue letter, while women got a half-letter or Half Blue. At Stanford, Chu found herself in the athletics spotlight when she was named Dean of Undergraduate Admissions in 1984. Athletics coaches and alumni were extremely concerned that having a woman--and a British woman who had a PhD in physics--in the admissions role would negatively affect the athletic program. Chu recalls that one faculty member even felt the need to take her aside to explain--unnecessarily, of course--what the Pac-10 was. Chu describes her great respect for the athletic coaches at Stanford as well as her determination to admit only students she was confident would succeed academically. That resolve, she says, led her to refuse admission to prized basketball recruit, Chris Munk. Her decision led directly to the angry resignation of basketball coach, Thomas Davis. She recalls the wave of criticism she received and reviews the factors she weighed when making her decision. Chu turns from the Munk incident to describe her strong belief in the need to maintain the integrity of the admissions process. She provides a sense of the constant observation she was under from coaches, high school counselors, faculty, and alumni; the unfounded rumors that tended to swirl around the admissions process at Stanford; and both the opposition and support she experienced in the role. She describes the important role that the admissions liaisons to the Department of Athletics played in screening potential recruits and addresses concerns that these staff members might become too closely personally with coaches they befriended. The emotional agony of the admissions decision-making process, she confesses, and the changes it was making in her personal outlook, were important factors in her decision to resign the position. She credits faculty athletic representatives with helping her navigate the occasionally stormy seas and discusses her service on a committee that selected football coach Denny Green. Chu concludes with some kudos for the many star athletes who spent time at Stanford and shares some remarks and anecdotes related to the Stanford Band.

12. Chu, Jean H. (Staff, 2016) [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this oral history, Jean H. Chu (formerly Jean H. Fetter) discusses her twenty-five-year career at Stanford University where she served as Dean of Undergraduate Admissions, as assistant to two university presidents (Richard W. Lyman and Gerhard Casper), and in other administrative capacities. Chu begins with an account of her childhood in Wales during World War II, when German bombings demolished nearby Swansea and frequently sent her scrambling for shelter. Raised by a great-aunt and great-uncle, she recalls how her youthful interest in mathematics and physics was fostered at a rigorous all-women’s high school. Her excellence there helped gain admission to Oxford University’s all-women’s college, St. Hugh’s. In vivid detail, Chu recounts her experiences as one of six women, compared to 120 men, studying physics at Oxford. She was awarded a first in physics, among the best in her class. During her Oxford years, she met and married American Alexander (Sandy) Fetter (now Professor Emeritus of Physics at Stanford), and she discusses accompanying him to successive faculty appointments at Harvard, Berkeley, and finally Stanford. Describing life as a faculty wife and mother of small children, she recalls a brief job with William Shockley that led to a teaching position and then assistant professorship in physics at San Jose State. Turning to her employment at Stanford, Chu discusses her work with David Halliburton of the English Department on two grant-funded projects that she used to promote recruitment of women in sciences. She credits the broad perspective of Stanford that she gained during that project with helping her win appointment as assistant to Stanford President Richard W. Lyman. She recalls a heavy workload filtering the barrage of mail and in-person complaints brought to the president. Described as a “cog between big wheels,” she says, she learned about how the university operated at the highest level. Chu offers a brief account of her time as Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Research under Jerry Lieberman where she oversaw the recruitment of women and minorities into graduate programs at Stanford and worked to develop grievance procedures for graduate students. Much of the oral history involves the many challenges she faced as Dean of Admissions. She describes the conflict she confronted between those who supported recruiting “well-rounded” students and others who favored “angular” students (“nerds” with extraordinary talents). Chu tells how she enabled the Department of Mathematics and later the departments of Music, Art, Drama, and Dance to review outstanding applicants in their fields, using the model created for athletes. She explains other policies she initiated and provides a detailed description of the review process, recounting some unusual cases as well as special efforts to recruit minorities and women. Chu outlines her service on the search committee that selected Gerhard Casper to be the new university president and the circumstances that led her to accept the role as his assistant. She contrasts her experiences as assistant to Lyman and Casper. Concluding her remarks, Chu recalls her experiences with her second husband, Steven Chu, when he received the Nobel Prize in physics.
Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
Meet the folks who keep SUL's website running and learn about new and upcoming features, as well as guiding principles for our website's design and content.
Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
Provides an overview of the process and people who support Stanford University Libraries bibliographers and curators to create or acquire content for the digital library, to preserve it in the digital repository, and to make it discoverable in SearchWorks and accessible in a variety of innovative platforms developed right here at Stanford, including Spotlight and Mirador.
Archive/Manuscript
Commemorative cloths
Special Collections

16. Dreisbach, Robert H [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this oral history, Robert H. Dreisbach, Stanford alumnus (AB Chemistry 1937) and Professor of Pharmacology, Emeritus, discusses growing up in Baker, Oregon. He touches on his father’s work on the farm, at a creamery, and as a grocer and his mother’s beekeeping, and he describes Boy Scout meetings and hiking trips with his troop. He discusses his undergraduate days at Stanford from 1933 to 1937, recalling attending dances, the El Capitan Eating Club, and serving as the manager of the Stanford baseball team. He recalls his chemistry and physics professors and describes how a talk at Stanford given by a researcher from the Department of Agriculture awakened his interest in pharmacology and helped to convince him to pursue the subject while in medical school at the University of Chicago. Dreisbach briefly recounts his experiences during World War II, which included working as an instructor at the Stanford Medical School and military service as a ward officer at Lovell General Hospital in Fort Devens, Massachusetts and at a hospital in the Panama Canal Zone. He describes the Stanford Medical School when it was located in San Francisco and provides his recollections of the rationale behind its move to campus, including Windsor Cutting’s involvement. He recounts the origins and evolution of his work, The Handbook of Poisoning and the way that poison control centers embraced the book. Dreisbach describes the expansion of the Pharmacology Department after Avram Goldstein arrived from Harvard University to assume its chairmanship and its move to the Stanford campus. He remembers Goldstein as a “go-getter” and relates how he secured space in the basement of the Stanford Museum for a laboratory. Dreisbach explains how concern about smog and air pollution led him to pursue research and writing on environmental issues. An avid hiker, he closes the interview, which was conducted on the eve of his 100th birthday, by offering advice for longevity--keep climbing summits.

17. Drekmeier, Charles [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews

18. Edwards, Mark W [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Mark W. Edwards, an emeritus professor in the Department of Classics, spent over two decades serving the Stanford community. Edwards influenced numerous undergraduate and graduate students at Stanford and at other institutions in the United States and Canada. The focus of this two-part interview is the breadth of Edwards’s teaching career and the evolution of his research interests, particularly his work related to Homer. Edwards’s academic success in classical languages began at his English grammar school during his teenage years. He explains how he chose Latin as his major at Bristol University and how, a few years later, he returned to Bristol to earn a second honors degree in Greek. Edwards pursued a master’s degree soon after, where he worked with Thomas Webster of University College London and began studying Homeric formulae. Both Webster and Homer proved to be strong influences on Edwards’s future career. After a year in London, Edwards moved to the United States as a Fulbright fellow at Princeton University and then accepted his first teaching position at Brown University. Edwards describes his impressions of mid-century America, the works of literature he covered in his classes, and his experience as a resident chaperone on campus. Edwards also discusses how not getting tenure at Brown prompted him to apply for a teaching position at Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada, where he taught for another seven years. He draws interesting comparisons between the two countries based on his student interactions, and provides more detailed information and examples about his work on Homeric formulae that developed over those fourteen years. In the second interview, Edwards describes his years at Stanford as a professor, department chair, and researcher. Edwards found many of his former mentors teaching at Stanford when he arrived in 1969. He taught a variety of Classics graduate courses and non-major undergraduate classes. Edwards also served as department chair for seven years. He discusses the highs and lows of the experience and details the two programs he was most proud of implementing: the Stanford in Greece program, which subsidized student travel in Greece, and the Webster Fund, named in honor of his mentor Thomas Webster, which supported the exchange of guest lecturers between Stanford and University College London. Over the course of thirty plus years teaching Homer’s work, Edwards widened his research to include studying the poet’s type scenes and story patterns. He personally appreciated those moments when Homer broke from the pattern and revealed more of himself. To share this expertise, Edwards wrote a well-received reader for the general public called Homer: Poet of the Iliad. After retiring early from Stanford, Edwards accepted an appointment at the University of California, Santa Cruz to teach Homer to undergraduates in Greek. Edwards concludes his interview with thoughts about how classics remains relevant in modern society. He points to his retirement reading group that recently studied the Odyssey. Through vicarious experience, Edwards feels the retirees gained knowledge from studying the text and relating it to the experiences they had during and after World War II. Edwards remarks that he takes great pleasure in these new interactions with classical texts he has studied his entire career.
Archive/Manuscript
1 online resource (1261 unnumbered page) : illustrations, maps

20. Flippen, James H [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this oral history, Stanford alumnus James H. Flippen (MD 1945) recounts family stories and the journey that led him to attend medical school at Stanford University. He relates details of student life at the Stanford School of Medicine when it was located in San Francisco and recalls incidents from his residency at Stanford. He briefly describes his fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital where he learned the replacement transfusion technique for treating hemolytic anemia of the newborn, which he later taught to physicians on the West Coast. He also provides an account of his service in the United States Navy when he was assigned to a clinic for treating tropical skin diseases located at the Tanforan Race Track in San Bruno, California. Flippen describes his work as a private practitioner of pediatrics in Palo Alto and his work as a clinical professor in the pediatric cardiology clinic at Stanford. He recounts his role in leasing land from Stanford in cooperation with other physicians in order to build a cluster of medical offices near Stanford hospital known as the Medical Plaza. He describes his work as the regional chairman of the Accident Prevention Committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics and his advocacy of legislation requiring that cars be equipped with seatbelts, that homes have smoke detectors, and that teenagers who drove while intoxicated receive stiff penalties. He concludes the interview by discussing his determination of the cause of a tragic drowning incident, a phenomenon he branded “silent drowning.”
Digital content
21 items
Archive/Manuscript
56 concepts
56 concepts (objects) form a controlled vocabulary for computer media formats, focused primarily on games. There is no physical compontent to this collection. The images included in this collection are intended to illustrate the concepts.
Archive/Manuscript
memorabilia various materials
Special Collections

23. Gilly, William F [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
William Gilly is a biology professor at Stanford’s Hopkins Marine Station whose research has contributed to our basic understanding of electrical excitability in nerve and muscle cells in a wide variety of organisms ranging from brittle stars to mammals. In this interview, Gilly discusses the path his science career has taken, including measuring gas diffusion across membranes, patch clamping giant squid neurons, and retracing John Steinbeck and Edward Ricketts’s expedition to the Sea of Cortez. Beyond his research, he explains how he has incorporated exploration and discovery into his courses and science outreach. Gilly begins the interview with his affinity for Uncle Wiggly, an aged but adventurous rabbit from a series of children’s stories, and describes his own independent forays into the natural surroundings of Allentown, Pennsylvania when he was a child. He explains his family’s technical background and how his interest in ham radio led him to pursue an electrical engineering degree at Princeton. Gilly details the independent undergraduate research project that landed him in a neurophysiology lab, shifted his focus to biology, and, despite inconclusive results, earned him an award from his engineering department. He describes his acceptance to the PhD program at Washington University in St. Louis and how, when his advisor died suddenly, a network of friends and acquaintances from Yale University, the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, and the University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Laboratories enabled him to complete his research and thesis in physiology and biophysics and to begin a postdoctoral fellowship in Clara Franzini-Armstrong’s lab at the University of Pennsylvania, studying the role of ion channels in electrical signaling in squid axons. This expertise, Gilly explains, resulted in his appointment at Stanford, working at Hopkins Marine Station where he could collect squid specimens directly from the bay. Citing his experiences both as a scientist and fisherman, he opines on the ways that the Monterey Bay has and has not recovered. After discussing the bureaucratic challenges of achieving tenure, he launches into stories about the classes he has taught, including a technical training course on patch clamping squid neurons, a holistic biology class that involved field research in Baja California Big Sur and the Salinas River, and the Steinbeck Summer Institutes program for primary educators. A central text to many of these courses is Steinbeck and Ricketts’s Sea of Cortez: A Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research, and Gilly discusses how he and several colleagues organized their own expedition based on Steinbeck and Ricketts’s sea voyage. He details preparations and sponsorship for the trip and mentions how the original expedition’s ship, the Western Flyer, is being restored for outreach and possible future trips. Gilly talks about his other outreach work, including donating giant squid to primary classrooms for his Squid4Kids program, trying to mount a critter-cam on a squid for National Geographic TV, and serving as a National Geographic Expert on their Lindblad cruises in the Sea of Cortez. He concludes the interview by discussing his current project helping to set up a community-run marine lab in Santa Rosalía, Baja California Sur, Mexico and how it might be used for environmental research and education.
Archive/Manuscript
2 ms. boxes.
Police files, trial transcript, clippings and photographs, relating to the trial and execution of Ksawery Grocholski in Poland for anti-communist activities.
Hoover Archives

25. Macovski, Albert [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Albert Macovski, the Canon USA Professor of Engineering, Emeritus has been affiliated with Stanford since 1960, first as a research engineer and staff scientist at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) and then as a faculty member with expertise in medical imaging and a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Radiology. In this oral history, Macovski talks about his family background and growing up in New York City in the 1930s. Among other things, he describes his father’s work as a jeweler, the impact of the Great Depression on his family, attending the New York World’s Fair, and his interest in ham radio. Macovski recalls his studies in electrical engineering at City College of New York during the immediate post-war period and the significant change in his life occasioned by meeting his future wife, Adelaide “Addie” Paris. He describes obtaining a job at RCA Laboratories upon graduating from college and what it was like to work in the early television industry, including trying to solve problems related to synchronization and color television broadcasting. Macovski talks about pursuing his master’s degrees at the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn and then working as an assistant professor there. He relates the factors that influenced his decision to accept a job at SRI: a desire to get his PhD, wanting to be where the action in electronics was, and the favorable climate. Describing the environment at SRI in the 1960s, Macovski discusses his work on the Nimbus weather satellite and his invention of the single tube color camera. He describes the process of earning his PhD through Stanford’s Honors Coop Program, his dissertation on holography, and a post-doctoral fellowship from the National Institutes of Health that allowed him to study in the Department of Radiology at the University of California San Francisco. He goes on to describe joining the faculty at Stanford and his varied research projects, including work on ultrasonic array, recording images of the beating heart, and developing techniques to differentiate between hard and soft tissue. He also discusses a project to image the coronary arteries. Macovski recounts the story of how a sabbatical year offered him the chance to study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to work with Godfrey Hounsfield at the Medical Physics Department of Hammersmith Hospital. He describes obtaining an MRI system from General Electric and the process of getting it installed on campus. Macovksi also discusses his approach to working with graduate students and offers reflections on the process of commercializing technology and obtaining patents. He concludes the interview with comments on new directions in the field of medical imaging and on his decision to endow a chair in the Electrical Engineering Department.
Archive/Manuscript
1.5 linear feet (1 box)
Collection includes ephemera from 2016 inauguration event.
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
1 v. (130 p.) (1 folder)
Memoirs relating to conditions in China before and during the Chinese Civil War. Includes printed Chinese version.
Hoover Archives

28. Noddings, Nel [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Nel Noddings, the Lee Jacks Professor Emerita of Education at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Education, is a philosopher and educational researcher best known for her ethics of care theory which she described in her 1984 book, Caring: A Feminine Approach to Ethics and Moral Education. Her care theory and educational philosophy is informed both by her graduate studies at Stanford in the 1970s and her long career, beginning in 1949, as a teacher and school administrator. She returned to Stanford as an associate professor in 1979 where, in addition to teaching and her research, she ran the Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP) and filled in as acting dean of the Graduate School of Education in the mid 1990s. In this interview she speaks about her professional and research career, set against the backdrop of her life as a wife and mother of ten during a time of tremendous cultural shifts in the country. Noddings begins the interview describing her working-class upbringing in New Jersey during the Great Depression and World War II. She confides that as a seven-year-old, she identified more with her school than home, despite being raised in a loving and safe environment. She reminisces about her elementary and high school experiences, the classes she took, the school culture, and uses her academic training to assess how progressive they really were. She contrasts the substance of her high school education with the redundancy in her undergraduate education at Montclair State Teachers College. Noddings describes her relationship with her husband, James Noddings, whom she met in high school, their courtship that began after they graduated, and early marriage after he returned from military service in Korea. She explains the ease with which they became parents and the reasons, after having three biological children, that they chose to adopt several Korean-American children. Noddings describes the educational and professional compromises she had to make because of motherhood and her husband’s profession. To balance this out, she shares several examples when her children participated in the educational programs she administered, as well as recollections of when the family moved so she could pursue her career goals. She spends some time describing her first teaching position in Woodbury, New Jersey, where she spent three years with the same class of middle school students, and how this unique experience profoundly shaped her thinking on teaching, educational administration and academic research. She gives the example of how later, during the civil rights movement, if a protest or other incident affected the lives of her student, she’d take time off from her math lesson plan to help them understand and process the events. Noddings explains how she initially approached her graduate school at Rutgers and Stanford as a means to advance as a school administrator. While she found pursuing math at Rutgers frustrating because of gender imbalances in the department, she describes her time at Stanford as transformative. Noddings explains why she switched from the educational administration track to philosophy of education after taking two philosophy courses. She notes how the learning and collaborative environment at Stanford supported her research and focus. She discusses her thesis on constructivism in education and how her care theory became entwined with feminist theory. She expands on education theory, her frustration with the current emphasis on standardized testing, the pros and cons of high concept-based math programs like “new math,” the difficulties of teaching atheism, and the benefits of a more holistic approach to education. Noddings describes the jobs she held after graduating: an academic position at Penn State, consulting in the Menlo Park area, and directing the Laboratory School at the University of Chicago. She explains how she landed the position of associate professor at Stanford running the STEP program in 1983 and later the Upward Bound summer program. She gives her impression of these programs and the changes they underwent. She describes her roles in Stanford’s administration: serving as the first female acting dean of the School of Education (now Graduate School of Education), working on Stanford’s Institutional Review Board for human subject research and serving on the faculty senate. It was in this last position that she argued for leniency towards a group of students who had barricaded themselves in the Dean’s office, an episode for which she explains her reasoning and results of her efforts. She describes her work after leaving Stanford, serving as president for the Philosophy of Education Society and chairing the ethics committee for the American Educational Research Association. She closes the interview by discussing her life after returning to the East Coast and the direction of her current research.
Archive/Manuscript
6 volumes : illustrated, portraits ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Archive/Manuscript
1 v. (94 p.) (1 folder)
Relates to Zhongguo guo min dang propaganda and information operations in China, Taiwan and Hong Kong. Includes photographs.
Hoover Archives

31. Pixel Art Academy [2016] Online

Collection
Learning, Design & Technology 2016
Internet and digital mediums are catalyzing the creation of unprecedented amounts of affordable learning resources. Yet few follow through with their aspirations to learn from them. How might we empower learners with skills for self-directed, self-regulated learning? I explore this challenge in the domain of video game developers learning how to draw. Even though learning resources are available, self-directed learning doesn't come with advantages of formal education; art schools provide structure, assignments, feedback, community, a motivating physical space, and a fast pace that brings students to competent levels in a short amount of time. I set to design alternative ways to experience these within the constraints of our target learners. Starting from learning goals on the task, process and self-regulation level, I applied learning theories to extract the properties of a learning environment that would facilitate reaching these goals. I arrived to a solution of a video game that focuses on instruction and feedback at the self-regulation level, situated into a virtual world rich with legitimate peripheral participation so that self-regulation naturally leads to acquiring required processes and production of artworks. During user testing of learning materials I've established a baseline for measuring user retention. However, the game design resulting from that research is yet to be proven in practice. We'll know we are on the right path when we see increased participation rates, learners taking choices that lead to more efficient learning, and reports that they feel more self-efficacious.

32. Pizzo, Philip A [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In his 2016 oral history, Philip A. Pizzo, MD, former dean of Stanford’s School of Medicine, describes the long career in pediatrics and AIDS treatment that led him to California in 2001 and his mission to reinvigorate the university’s medical establishment. Pizzo begins his narrative in New York City, where he was the first in his working-class family to graduate from high school. Like many first-generation Americans, Pizzo says, his family encouraged him to become a doctor and to “become something.” His reading, especially the book Microbe Hunters by Paul de Kruif and biographies of great scientists and thinkers, also drew him to the field of medicine, as did the historical context of the Vietnam War. Recounting the challenges and contributions of his years at Fordham University, the University of Rochester Medical School, and the elite Boston Children’s Hospital, Pizzo outlines how his career embraced both research and clinical practice in pediatric oncology and infectious disease. Pizzo describes receiving a summons to join the National Institutes of Health in 1973 and devotes considerable attention to his two decades there and especially to the young patients who influenced the direction of his research. First came ten-year-old Ted DeVita, who was confined to an isolation room because of a severely compromised immune system. That relationship, Pizzo points out, prepared him for the challenges of HIV and AIDS. By then the NIH chief of pediatrics, Pizzo explains that research in pediatric AIDS led to the development of continuous infusion therapy, which “made a pretty big splash” at the International AIDS Meeting in Stockholm in 1988. His growing reputation drew Elizabeth Glaser to Pizzo and NIH. He describes treating her two AIDS-infected children, as well as collaboration with Elizabeth and his admiration for her work as founder of the Pediatric AIDS Foundation. Seeking a new direction for his career as he turned 50, Pizzo discusses his brief return to Boston Children’s Hospital before Stanford made an irresistible offer in 2000. Pizzo recalls the long deliberative process that resulted in his acceptance of the job as dean of the School of Medicine. The school and the two hospitals were experiencing considerable divisiveness at the time because of the failed merger with the University of California, San Francisco. Healing the wounds of that venture is what Pizzo sees as his first major challenge at Stanford, and he identifies the faculty’s revolt against the UCSF project as the most important element in its failure. He recounts in detail the issues involved in reconciling the School’s academic and clinical perspectives and his successful efforts to rebuild faculty morale and create an agenda to focus their energy toward the future. Pizzo also discusses outreach to the other academic schools at Stanford, resulting in the founding of the Department of Bioengineering. He describes initiatives that brought needed resources to the medical facilities and revitalized the way they worked together, including the beginning of the institutes, diversity initiatives, and fundraising programs. Pizzo declares himself proud of the community that now exists in Stanford’s medical establishment, the care it provides to patients, and the national recognition it has achieved.
Archive/Manuscript
5 posters
  • Koripsion azir sinonou pou sibir
  • Nou tou panse ki nou konn enn dimounn ki pou tir nou dan dife
  • Pa rod sime fasil...
  • Pa rod faver pou grinpe dan lavi.
Special Collections

35. Rosenberg, Saul A [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Saul A. Rosenberg pioneered treatments for lymphoma and other cancers in the early 1960s, and his work helped to establish the field of medical oncology. He collaborated with Henry Kaplan to run the first random clinical trials for lymphoma and Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Rosenberg gives a candid interview about the setbacks and serendipitous opportunities in his pursuit of a medical career in internal medicine and oncology that culminated in a decades-long career at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He begins the interview by describing his background as a poor Jewish kid growing up in Cleveland, Ohio, the first of his family to go to college. Rosenberg recounts his plan to enter medical school at the age of 18 to avoid being drafted for World War II and the personal and bureaucratic obstacles that caused him to drop out as an undergrad. This apparent misfortune, he explains, led to a lab technician position in Hymer Friedell’s Atomic Energy Medical Research Project, which in turn gave him unique and sought-after skills in radiology and put him in contact with numerous researchers when he did enter medical school at Western Reserve University. He recalls another seeming setback--being drafted to serve as a marine doctor--which interfered with his pursuit of a PhD but made him realize that he wanted to practice clinical medicine. He discusses his residency at Peter Bent Brigham Hospital, where he was made chief resident and spent a year researching lymphomas in Lloyd Craver’s lab. He goes into detail about an influential paper he wrote: a statistical analysis of 1,269 lymphomas, which was made possible by an early IBM punch-card computer. Rosenberg discusses how, despite these accomplishments, he had a difficult time finding an academic position that would allow him to work with radiotherapies and internal medicine until Kaplan and Halsted Holman made a place for him at Stanford where he eventually held professorships in both medicine and radiation. He began working at Stanford just as the medical school was relocating from San Francisco to the Stanford campus. He describes how his hospital experience was put to use by Holman as they developed their clinical program and how he eventually took over the role of physician-in-chief. He opines about what made the new medical school such a delight to work in and how more recent changes have diminished it. He talks about job offers he did not take and the failed merger with the University of California San Francisco, as well as his position on Stanford’s Advisory Board. Rosenberg then goes into detail about the work that made him famous: his collaboration with Kaplan that revolutionized lymphoma--and specifically Hodgkin’s lymphoma--treatments, turning a terminal diagnosis to one of hope. He describes how Kaplan’s cutting- edge linear accelerator, as well as his own clinical expertise, improved patient care and allowed them to begin randomized clinical trials. Rosenberg muses on his personal relationship with Kaplan and mentions Kaplan’s children and their careers. Finally, Rosenberg deliberates about what he feels are his real contributions: his children, his students, and his patients. He describes himself as a tree trunk that supports the beautiful leaves and flowers that are his former students’ accomplishments and careers. And he takes humble joy in knowing that through his medical administrations, his patients have lived longer, and often remarkable, lives.

36. Scott, W. Richard [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this oral history, W. Richard Scott, Stanford Professor of Sociology, Emeritus, discusses his early years in Kansas, graduate education at the University of Chicago, his academic career in the Stanford Department of Sociology, and his pioneering work in the field of organizational studies. Scott describes his childhood and teenage years in Parsons, Kansas. He cites the stability provided by his father’s work at the post office during the Great Depression, his mother’s influence, and childhood bouts with asthma as formative factors in his life. He discusses his extracurricular interests during high school, his two years of junior college in Parsons, and his early interest in becoming a minister. Scott describes entering Kansas University as a junior, discovering his love of sociology, and earning his PhD at the University of Chicago, where he worked with Otis Dudley Duncan, Peter Blau, and Everett Hughes Cherrington. Scott recalls his path to joining the Stanford Department of Sociology in 1959 shortly after Fred Terman had recruited Sanford Dornbusch as a promising junior faculty member to chair and “restart” the department, which had been granted additional billets to fill. He describes the highly collaborative nature of the department, as five newly-hired, young sociologists crafted the curriculum, designed a new graduate training program, and worked together on an NSF grant. By the end of the 1960s, Scott recalls, it felt like things were really happening academically at Stanford. Turning to his research on organizations, Scott recounts seeking out faculty from across the university who were studying different aspects of organizations. They formed a community, secured critical funding from the National Institute of Mental Health, and proceeded to develop an exciting new field of organizational studies. Organizational studies flourished at Stanford for twenty years and three of the most important theories in the field were developed here during that period. Describing the trajectory of his research, Scott explains that he has worked on widely divergent topics over his career: authority and control systems in multiple settings, the effectiveness and quality of care in hospitals, organizational structures in K-12 education, changing health care delivery systems, global infrastructure construction projects, and the San Francisco Bay Area system of higher education. He also mentions serving on government grant peer review panels for many years, an experience which he found intellectually rewarding. Scott, who won the H&S Dean’s Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1987, stresses the importance of teaching and extolls the virtues of the doctoral oral examination. He relates the thinking that went into the writing of his three core textbooks on organization studies and the influence the books have had. He comments on four of his most meaningful professional awards and reflects on some of the Stanford leaders he knew and admired: Dick Lyman, Al Hastorf, Ray Bacchetti, and Ken Cuthbertson. As an observer of Stanford as a bureaucracy for over fifty years, Scott notes a recent movement away from the collegial structure in which departments serve as the primary units, setting a disciplinary-centered agenda. Scott closes the interview by commenting on the benefits of living on the Stanford campus since 1962 and his active involvement with Avenidas Village, a system that supports seniors who want to stay in their own homes as they age.

37. Seaver, Paul S [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Paul S. Seaver, Professor of Early Modern English History, Emeritus, begins his interview by discussing his childhood on his family’s dairy farm in a Quaker community in rural Pennsylvania. He discusses being a conscientious objector, refusing to register for the draft for the Korean War, and consequently serving time in prison in Danbury, CT. He recalls his years as an undergraduate at Haverford College and as a graduate student at Harvard University. He recounts his early career at Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and how he later came to Stanford University. He describes evolutions in the Stanford undergraduate curriculum related to the teaching of western civilization and changes in the faculty in the Department of History, as it slowly became more inclusive of women and minorities. He pays particular attention to the radicalism on campus during the civil rights movement and Vietnam War, and his involvement as a draft counselor, which causes Seaver to segue into further reflection on his time at Danbury penitentiary. Seaver comments on the exclusion of minorities in admission processes until 1964 when, with the hiring of a new dean of admissions, he immediately began to see changes in the student population. Seaver discusses his research for the book Wallington’s World and his fascination with working-class and urban life in seventeenth-century England. He briefly relates his research to the radicalization of societies more generally and comments on modern politics. He also touches on what he appreciates about his career at Stanford and raising his family in Palo Alto. Seaver concludes his interview by discussing his Jewish immigrant heritage, his parents’ early life and eventual conversion to the Quaker religion, and his father’s work with the American Friends Service Committee.

38. Shapiro, Lucy [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Lucy Shapiro, a renowned developmental biologist, begins her oral history interview by discussing her childhood in New York City, her early educational focus on the arts, and the importance of her family life and Jewish heritage in shaping her character. She explains her transition to scientific research after graduating from Brooklyn College, attributing much of the credit to her mentor, Ted Shedlovsky. Shapiro details her time as a lab technician and a graduate student and describes her rise in the field, from her graduate school discovery of what viruses in double-stranded RNA look like to how she came to research the Caulobacter bacterium, the defining research of her career. Throughout the interview, Shapiro discusses the importance of science and how vital it is to encourage young people to pursue science. She believes both science and the humanities are valuable and beautiful, and she explains how her two passions--biology and painting--inform each other. Shapiro discusses the role of family in her life extensively, explaining how she has balanced her working life and her family life throughout her career. She also discusses the importance of mentors and how she incorporates the lessons she has learned from those who guided her into her own mentoring. Shapiro, the first woman to chair a department in the Stanford University School of Medicine, comments on how her identity as a woman has affected her work. She recalls some previous sexist incidents, but she concludes that the confidence she has in her work and herself, along with the strategies she has developed to command respect, have caused gender to have very little effect on her ability to achieve success. Shapiro discusses leaving Columbia University for Stanford University in 1989 when she was invited to establish the Department of Developmental Biology. She explains what she believes sets Stanford apart from and above other peer institutions, particularly its non-hierarchical atmosphere of communication and collaboration. She describes the research she and Harley McAdams completed together and her passion for interdisciplinary scientific research, as exemplified by the establishment of Stanford Bio-X. Shapiro discusses the development of her career since arriving at Stanford, including improving her ability to speak to non-scientific audiences in a comprehensible manner. She explains how this has served her in meetings with high-ranking political figures, including Bill Clinton and George Shultz. She also discusses advising pharmaceutical companies, becoming the director of the Beckman Center, and winning the Canada Gairdner International Award and the National Medal of Science. In conclusion, Shapiro reflects on how her personal background has influenced her professional accomplishments and explains why she is passionate about science.

39. Smith, Marshall S [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Marshall Smith, professor and dean of Stanford University’s School of Education from 1986 to 1993, helped shape American education policy through his broad academic research and his service in three presidential administrations. At Stanford, he guided the school through a budget crisis, augmented its academic curriculum with practical applications, and increased the diversity of both faculty and students. Smith begins the interview with a brief overview of his childhood spent moving between New Jersey and several other states due to his father’s job as a military psychologist during World War II. He relates how an early stint as a computer programmer gave him the technical expertise to perform the automated analysis of textual content, which became his initial research focus as a graduate student at the Harvard School of Education. Smith describes his shift into the study of education policy. He explains his role in the review of the Coleman Report, a massive survey of educational conditions in the United States undertaken in the mid-1960’s, and how he joined the project through his connection with Pat Moynihan, then a professor at Harvard. Smith speaks about his faculty appointment at Harvard, founding the Center for Education Policy Research with Christopher Jencks and David Cohen, and the work he did to analyze the initial results from the Head Start program. Smith then explains his entry into government work, discussing how he ran the reading program at the National Institute of Education and then advised on educational policy in the Carter administration. He explains how his advancement to a senior leadership position in the newly formed Department of Education was initially derailed by the conclusion drawn in his book, Inequality, that there was not a strong correlation between student achievement and school desegregation. While he defends his statistical finding, he relates his own personal distaste for school segregation, formed during his youth when his father took him to see the rundown conditions in a nearby African American school, when his family lived in Georgia. After touching on his time as a professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and his participation in an educational delegation to China in 1980, Smith details how he was recruited to Stanford in 1986 to be dean of the School of Education. Ruminating on his deanship, Smith talks about efforts to increase student diversity in the Stanford School of Education and at the university level through his work with the University Committee on Minority Issues. He discusses efforts to improve faculty diversity as well. Smith recalls some of his other goals as dean including expanding the school’s influence in policy and practical applications. He explains how establishing national and state level policy centers at the university facilitated these changes, and he runs through the many retirements and hires during his tenure. He discusses how budget issues in 1989 involved him in a university-wide administrative reorganization and drove him to implement changes to his own school, including starting a financially lucrative master’s program and a training program for school principals. He talks about his research work with Jennifer O’Day on primary education standards and testing, the results of which eventually made their way into national standard discussions. Smith explains the events that again drew him into government: his work with the Democratic-controlled Congress under the first Bush administration and his friendship with then Arkansas governor Bill Clinton. He speaks about requesting a break from Stanford to serve on Clinton’s presidential transitional team, which became permanent when he was given the job of Under Secretary of the Department of Education, and tells the story of his return to Stanford in 2000. Smith then speaks about his later career and projects: directing the Education Program at the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, developing resources for early online courses, advising the Obama administration on distributing primary education stimulus money, and his non-profit work in Pakistan. He gives his impressions of the political environment when he worked with different administrations. Smith closes the interview talking about cooperative learning theory, his optimism that programs like Common Core and Social Emotional Learning will improve educational outcomes, and his thoughts on charter schools.

40. Somero, George N [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
George Somero’s pioneering research with marine animals living in extreme conditions revealed the biochemical and genetic changes that allow them to thrive under these conditions and has increased our understanding of how a changing climate could affect marine life. In this interview he discusses his career at various research facilities including Stanford’s Hopkins Marine Station. He begins the interview by briefly recalling his childhood and undergraduate education at Carleton College in Minnesota before describing his graduate studies at Stanford University. Somero details his time as one of the first researchers at the Antarctic McMurdo station where he studied fish that could survive in near-freezing water. He explains how he became a postdoctoral fellow at the University of British Columbia and his relationship with his lab’s primary investigator, Peter Hochachka. Somero discusses his work as a professor at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, how he met his second wife, and their work exploring newly discovered hydrothermal vents as part of an Alpha Helix expedition. He relates why he left Scripps for the University of Oregon and why he then chose to go to Stanford. Somero talks about his experiences at the Hopkins Marine Station, both as a graduate student and as a professor. He relates the unhappy circumstances that required him to take over directorship from his friend Dennis Powers, as well as career highlights, such as when he found out he had been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. He describes his own unsuccessful retirement, his current position at Hopkins, and his current interests -- working with the Big Sur Land Trust, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, and writing his third book. Throughout the interview, Somero touches on how his research, teaching, and outreach are important to understanding the effects of global warming. He maintains that it is a balancing act between recognizing scientific realities while maintaining hope that humans can change our present trajectory.

41. Thompson, George A [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
George A. Thompson, Otto N. Miller Professor of Earth Sciences and Dean of the School of Earth Sciences, Emeritus, begins his interview describing his early life in Swissvale, Pennsylvania, his family, and early inclinations toward science. He continues on to his time as an undergraduate and master’s student at Penn State and MIT respectively, his work with the U.S. Geological Survey in West Texas, and his time spent in the navy before coming to Stanford to pursue his PhD under the mentorship of Professor Aaron Waters. Thompson also discusses his early teaching experiences at Stanford and the atmosphere of the newly formed Geophysics Department. Thompson goes on to describe going back to work with the U.S. Geological Survey in Nevada after graduating and later returning to Stanford as a professor. He further discusses his approach to teaching and his role in shaping the School of Earth Sciences as chair of the Department of Geophysics and Department of Geology. He notes his interactions with the administration after succeeding Allan Cox as dean of the School of Earth Sciences, appointing and evaluating junior faculty, and working with university donors such as Cecil Green. Thompson also discusses Earth Sciences’ connections with the oil industry and his memories of the Loma Prieta earthquake. He speaks of the consolidation of departments and changes in the School of Earth Sciences under new dean Gary Ernst. He then delves into his research in transition between the Sierra Nevada and the basin ranges, his time at Lamont Geological Observatory of Columbia University, fieldwork experiences in New Zealand, and the evolution of the disciplines of geology and geophysics. He describes his time on the USGS Advisory Panel and discusses issues of nuclear waste disposal and fracking. Thompson reflects on his involvement with geophysics and geology organizations, including the Geological Society of America and American Geophysical Union, and speaks about the notable awards he has received in his career. Thompson concludes the interview by discussing his family life, forestry work, and continued involvement at Stanford as an emeritus professor.

42. Trimpi, Helen A. Pinkerton [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this oral history, the writer Helen Pinkerton Trimpi recounts the path that led her to study English and poetry at Stanford University in the late 1940s and describes her experiences as a student of Ivor Winters and a lecturer in the Stanford Department of English. She reads her poem Autumn Drought (1976), which she wrote about Stanford and Winters. Trimpi begins with an account of her childhood in Butte, Montana and Mount Vernon, Washington. She recounts how Ray Cowell, her high school teacher and a Stanford alum, sparked her interest in journalism and encouraged her to apply to Stanford. Trimpi describes how her interest in English and creative writing, especially poetry, evolved at Stanford as she studied with the poets Ivor Winters and J. V. Cunningham. She describes being a student in Winters’ classes and speaks about the early days of the Stanford Creative Writing Program, which was founded by Wallace Stegner. Trimpi also describes student life at Stanford during the post-WWII period, including her experience writing columns for both the Stanford Daily and the Palo Alto Times while an undergraduate. Trimpi talks about meeting fellow Stanford student, Wesley Trimpi, whom she married in 1950. She recounts details of their travels in Europe, attending graduate school at Harvard, and their return to Stanford when Wesley joined the faculty of the Stanford English Department. Trimpi describes the culture of the department and talks about being a faculty wife and a lecturer in the English Department from 1962 to 1975. She discusses her opinion of curricular changes at Stanford and the women’s movement of the 1970s.
Archive/Manuscript
2 linear feet (1 box)
Posters, programs, ephemera.
Special Collections

44. Weiler, Hans N [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Hans N. Weiler, Professor of Education and Political Science Emeritus and the current Academic Secretary to the University, has had a distinguished career as an educator and administrator. In addition to his work at Stanford, Weiler served as the first president of Viadrina European University Frankfurt/Oder in Germany, and he also conceptualized the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin and served as its first leader. Weiler begins the interviews by clarifying that, although he began his career as a political scientist with a particular interest in Africa, he has had a foot in two camps at Stanford--the School of Education (later renamed the Graduate School of Education) and the Department of Political Science. He describes how he came to Stanford, citing the efforts of Professor of Education Paul Hanna, a visionary in international development education, and what Stanford was like in the mid-1960s. Weiler talks about Hanna’s role in the creation of the Stanford International Development Education Center (SIDEC) and the change in its leadership. He describes the interesting and significant work he did at SIDEC and the influential educators the center produced when its students went back to their home countries in Africa and Asia. He notes the connections that he developed in the field when he was on leave from Stanford for three years to direct the International Institute for Educational Planning, a UNESCO organization in Paris. He discusses his involvement with the Center for European Studies at Stanford and the challenge to area studies as a legitimate field. Weiler recounts other career milestones, including two very critical years in the 1980s as Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the School of Education, when he placed graduate student funding in Education on a firm footing for the first time. Another milestone was his gradual transition out of African studies and into European studies amidst post-colonial reverberations in Africa and the reunification of Germany in 1989. Weiler recalls his work in remaking higher education in what had been East Germany, which eventually led to his early retirement from Stanford and becoming the first president of Viadrina. There, during two terms and in the face of various challenges, he tried to apply lessons regarding best practices in university education and administration he had learned at Stanford and in his research. Weiler goes on to talk about his retirement from Viadrina and taking on a unique task--the conceptualization and realization of the Hertie School of Governance, the first privately funded public policy institution in Germany. He recalls his decision, after nurturing the Hertie School to prominence, to come back to Stanford, and to the challenge/opportunity that he is still discharging, that of Stanford’s Academic Secretary. In addition to explaining his own role, Weiler discusses the origin and development of Stanford’s strong faculty governance system, the Faculty Senate, though he muses that it may be in need of redefinition at this point. He comments on the changes at Stanford since the 1960s, in particular the expansion of the university’s administration, the “gentrification” of the university, changing campus architecture, and the re-emergence of student activism. Having shared recollections of his career, Weiler talks about what it was like to grow up in Nazi Germany, describes his initial pursuit of Jesuit priesthood, and recounts his experience in the newly independent countries of Africa in the late 1950s that culminated in his devotion to African studies. Finally, Weiler compares Stanford and US higher education to European higher education, noting the ironic decline of liberal arts education in America at a time when it is gaining popularity in Europe and commenting on recent efforts in American postsecondary education.

46. Abrams, Herbert L [2015] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Herbert Abrams was an emeritus professor of radiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, a senior research fellow at Stanford’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, and a prolific author of books and scholarly articles. He contributed greatly to the Stanford community through his interests in diagnostic radiology and nuclear weapons. In this three-part interview, Abrams discussed his youth in New York, his residency and teaching experience at Stanford’s medical school, and how his interest shifted from radiology to nuclear weapons research and activism. Abrams described his childhood in Brooklyn, centering his discussion on his family and his high school years. His family’s love of language seemingly influenced Abrams to pursue an English major and to work for a variety of newspapers and journals at Cornell University, ultimately taking a job after graduation as a newsreel media analyst for the government. Although his interest in Freudian literature prompted Abrams to apply to medical school, once enrolled at SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, he quickly redirected his efforts from psychiatry to radiology. Abrams provided valuable details about Stanford’s original medical school in San Francisco. From 1948 until 1959, Abrams served first as a resident and then as a professor at San Francisco General Hospital and Stanford Lane Hospital. Abrams found the experience both challenging and exciting because, due to the small-staff environment, faculty acted as both administrators and clinicians. Abrams also discussed the increasing importance of faculty research efforts after the medical school moved to the Stanford campus in 1959, highlighting developments in biplane imagery, catheter procedures, and radiation effect studies. Against the backdrop of his move from Stanford to Harvard, Abrams turned his attention to his longstanding interest in social activism and growing concern regarding nuclear weapons. Although he previously worked with the Physicians for Social Responsibility group, Abrams’ efforts pivoted towards promoting a more international organization called the International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War. This group studied all matters related to nuclear weapons, worked to raise awareness, and educated Congress about the effects of nuclear war. Abrams went on to discuss his return to Stanford in 1985 and his continued shift from a focus on diagnostic radiology to nuclear weapons research and activism. Increasingly, Abrams spent time at Stanford’s Center for International Security and Cooperation studying the effects of nuclear weapons exposure and the intersection of weapons access and mental health. In conclusion, Abrams addressed the need to educate the public about present-day nuclear threats and discussed the various leisure interests he pursued in this post-retirement period.

47. Additional course material [2015] Online

Collection
Multimedia Files for Digital Image Processing Class at Stanford
Visual information plays an important role in almost all areas of our life. Today, much of this information is represented and processed digitally. Digital image processing is ubiquitous, with applications ranging from television to tomography, from photography to printing, from robotics to remote sensing. EE368/CS232 is a graduate-level introductory course to the fundamentals of digital image processing. It emphasizes general principles of image processing, rather than specific applications. We expect to cover topics such as point operations, color processing, image thresholding/segmentation, morphological image processing, image filtering and deconvolution, eigenimages, noise reduction and restoration, scale-space techniques, feature extraction and recognition, image registration, and image matching. Lectures will be complemented by computer exercises where students develop their own image processing algorithms. For the term project, students will have the option of designing and implementing image processing algorithms on an Android mobile device.
Archive/Manuscript
1 roll of posters
Special Collections
Collection
Terry Smythe AMICA Collection
AMICA Bulletin is a bi-monthly journal devoted to mechanical music. The Bulletin includes new articles about artists and events related to mechanical music, technical pieces, reprints of ads from the heyday of the player piano, reports on chapter activities and other information.
Collection
Terry Smythe AMICA Collection
AMICA Bulletin is a bi-monthly journal devoted to mechanical music. The Bulletin includes new articles about artists and events related to mechanical music, technical pieces, reprints of ads from the heyday of the player piano, reports on chapter activities and other information.