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Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
In advance of the release of the 2017 Copyright Reminder, Mimi Calter will review many of the copyright scenarios that document will address. We’ll talk about library procedures and policies related to copyright, review some basics of copyright law, and talk about working with patrons on copyright issues. Bring your questions!

2. Concierge 39: LOCKSS [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
The LOCKSS (Lots of Copies Keeps Stuff Safe) Program provides distributed digital preservation software and services used by hundreds of institutions across tens of networks. Established as an auxiliary of Stanford University Libraries in 1999, the LOCKSS Program originally helped libraries secure post-cancellation access to subscription electronic resources. Its focus has since expanded to preservation of the digital scholarly record more broadly and enabling communities to preserve digital materials that matter to them. As its founders, Vicky Reich and David Rosenthal, are now retired and the LOCKSS Program joins the Digital Library Systems and Services group, the LOCKSS Program is poised for major new initiatives. Come to this Concierge session to hear from Nicholas Taylor, Program Manager for LOCKSS and Web Archiving, about the present and future of the LOCKSS Program.
Archive/Manuscript
6 Linear Feet (2 flat boxes and 1 map folder)
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Posters from protests of Executive Order 13769 held at SFO on January 28-29, 2017.
Special Collections

4. Baxter, Charles H [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Charles H. “Chuck” Baxter, a biology lecturer emeritus at Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station in Monterey, talks about his role both as a teacher and as a key participant in several endeavors, including the creation of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which have had a deep and lasting impact on both the area and the general public’s perception of our oceans. He begins the interview discussing his background, most notably how a chance invitation to go diving in the Pacific Ocean opened his eyes to the wonders of underwater ecosystems` and caused him to change his major at UCLA from engineering to zoology. From there he traces a path from his graduate work in Ted Bullock’s lab to teaching the undergraduate zoology lab to his recruitment as a lecturer in the Stanford University Department of Biology. Baxter explains the circumstances that resulted in the transfer of his teaching duties to the Hopkins Marine Station and his relocation to the Monterey area. He recalls fondly the community of faculty, staff, and students at the marine station in the mid 1970s that made it such a special place to work. Baxter discusses his classes and the undergraduate research projects he assisted with, including one that resulted in two undergraduates publishing one of the first papers to show the effects of greenhouse gases on the distributions of ocean communities. Beyond his academic life at Hopkins, Baxter relates the notable projects he and his colleagues put into motion. He talks about how the Monterey Bay Aquarium came to be, relating key aspects of the aquarium’s construction, including the kelp forest tank, the aviary, and preservation of the beached grey whale skeleton that now hangs in the reception hall. Peppered throughout the interview are anecdotes about David Packard, who along with his wife, Lucille, was a chief funder of the project. He explains the diving and recording technologies that were central to the formation of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and the media production company Sea Studios Foundation--organizations in which he played an active role. Finally, Baxter recounts the organization and deployment of the Sea of Cortez Expedition and Education Project, which retraced the 1940 journey of John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts, and how conversations with his fellow passengers led to his involvement in Stanford’s holistic biology course and his current interest in cognitive science research.
Archive/Manuscript
1 microfilm reel 3 ms. boxes.
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Relates to political and military conditions in China.
Hoover Archives
Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
Meet the folks who keep SUL's website running and learn about new and upcoming features, as well as guiding principles for our website's design and content.
Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
Provides an overview of the process and people who support Stanford University Libraries bibliographers and curators to create or acquire content for the digital library, to preserve it in the digital repository, and to make it discoverable in SearchWorks and accessible in a variety of innovative platforms developed right here at Stanford, including Spotlight and Mirador.
Archive/Manuscript
Commemorative cloths
Special Collections

9. Dreisbach, Robert H [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this oral history, Robert H. Dreisbach, Stanford alumnus (AB Chemistry 1937) and Professor of Pharmacology, Emeritus, discusses growing up in Baker, Oregon. He touches on his father’s work on the farm, at a creamery, and as a grocer and his mother’s beekeeping, and he describes Boy Scout meetings and hiking trips with his troop. He discusses his undergraduate days at Stanford from 1933 to 1937, recalling attending dances, the El Capitan Eating Club, and serving as the manager of the Stanford baseball team. He recalls his chemistry and physics professors and describes how a talk at Stanford given by a researcher from the Department of Agriculture awakened his interest in pharmacology and helped to convince him to pursue the subject while in medical school at the University of Chicago. Dreisbach briefly recounts his experiences during World War II, which included working as an instructor at the Stanford Medical School and military service as a ward officer at Lovell General Hospital in Fort Devens, Massachusetts and at a hospital in the Panama Canal Zone. He describes the Stanford Medical School when it was located in San Francisco and provides his recollections of the rationale behind its move to campus, including Windsor Cutting’s involvement. He recounts the origins and evolution of his work, The Handbook of Poisoning and the way that poison control centers embraced the book. Dreisbach describes the expansion of the Pharmacology Department after Avram Goldstein arrived from Harvard University to assume its chairmanship and its move to the Stanford campus. He remembers Goldstein as a “go-getter” and relates how he secured space in the basement of the Stanford Museum for a laboratory. Dreisbach explains how concern about smog and air pollution led him to pursue research and writing on environmental issues. An avid hiker, he closes the interview, which was conducted on the eve of his 100th birthday, by offering advice for longevity--keep climbing summits.

10. Drekmeier, Charles [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews

11. Edwards, Mark W [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Mark W. Edwards, an emeritus professor in the Department of Classics, spent over two decades serving the Stanford community. Edwards influenced numerous undergraduate and graduate students at Stanford and at other institutions in the United States and Canada. The focus of this two-part interview is the breadth of Edwards’s teaching career and the evolution of his research interests, particularly his work related to Homer. Edwards’s academic success in classical languages began at his English grammar school during his teenage years. He explains how he chose Latin as his major at Bristol University and how, a few years later, he returned to Bristol to earn a second honors degree in Greek. Edwards pursued a master’s degree soon after, where he worked with Thomas Webster of University College London and began studying Homeric formulae. Both Webster and Homer proved to be strong influences on Edwards’s future career. After a year in London, Edwards moved to the United States as a Fulbright fellow at Princeton University and then accepted his first teaching position at Brown University. Edwards describes his impressions of mid-century America, the works of literature he covered in his classes, and his experience as a resident chaperone on campus. Edwards also discusses how not getting tenure at Brown prompted him to apply for a teaching position at Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada, where he taught for another seven years. He draws interesting comparisons between the two countries based on his student interactions, and provides more detailed information and examples about his work on Homeric formulae that developed over those fourteen years. In the second interview, Edwards describes his years at Stanford as a professor, department chair, and researcher. Edwards found many of his former mentors teaching at Stanford when he arrived in 1969. He taught a variety of Classics graduate courses and non-major undergraduate classes. Edwards also served as department chair for seven years. He discusses the highs and lows of the experience and details the two programs he was most proud of implementing: the Stanford in Greece program, which subsidized student travel in Greece, and the Webster Fund, named in honor of his mentor Thomas Webster, which supported the exchange of guest lecturers between Stanford and University College London. Over the course of thirty plus years teaching Homer’s work, Edwards widened his research to include studying the poet’s type scenes and story patterns. He personally appreciated those moments when Homer broke from the pattern and revealed more of himself. To share this expertise, Edwards wrote a well-received reader for the general public called Homer: Poet of the Iliad. After retiring early from Stanford, Edwards accepted an appointment at the University of California, Santa Cruz to teach Homer to undergraduates in Greek. Edwards concludes his interview with thoughts about how classics remains relevant in modern society. He points to his retirement reading group that recently studied the Odyssey. Through vicarious experience, Edwards feels the retirees gained knowledge from studying the text and relating it to the experiences they had during and after World War II. Edwards remarks that he takes great pleasure in these new interactions with classical texts he has studied his entire career.
Archive/Manuscript
1 online resource (1261 unnumbered page) : illustrations, maps

13. Flippen, James H [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this oral history, Stanford alumnus James H. Flippen (MD 1945) recounts family stories and the journey that led him to attend medical school at Stanford University. He relates details of student life at the Stanford School of Medicine when it was located in San Francisco and recalls incidents from his residency at Stanford. He briefly describes his fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital where he learned the replacement transfusion technique for treating hemolytic anemia of the newborn, which he later taught to physicians on the West Coast. He also provides an account of his service in the United States Navy when he was assigned to a clinic for treating tropical skin diseases located at the Tanforan Race Track in San Bruno, California. Flippen describes his work as a private practitioner of pediatrics in Palo Alto and his work as a clinical professor in the pediatric cardiology clinic at Stanford. He recounts his role in leasing land from Stanford in cooperation with other physicians in order to build a cluster of medical offices near Stanford hospital known as the Medical Plaza. He describes his work as the regional chairman of the Accident Prevention Committee of the American Academy of Pediatrics and his advocacy of legislation requiring that cars be equipped with seatbelts, that homes have smoke detectors, and that teenagers who drove while intoxicated receive stiff penalties. He concludes the interview by discussing his determination of the cause of a tragic drowning incident, a phenomenon he branded “silent drowning.”
Digital content
21 items
Archive/Manuscript
56 concepts
56 concepts (objects) form a controlled vocabulary for computer media formats, focused primarily on games. There is no physical compontent to this collection. The images included in this collection are intended to illustrate the concepts.
Archive/Manuscript
memorabilia various materials
Special Collections

16. Gilly, William F [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
William Gilly is a biology professor at Stanford’s Hopkins Marine Station whose research has contributed to our basic understanding of electrical excitability in nerve and muscle cells in a wide variety of organisms ranging from brittle stars to mammals. In this interview, Gilly discusses the path his science career has taken, including measuring gas diffusion across membranes, patch clamping giant squid neurons, and retracing John Steinbeck and Edward Ricketts’s expedition to the Sea of Cortez. Beyond his research, he explains how he has incorporated exploration and discovery into his courses and science outreach. Gilly begins the interview with his affinity for Uncle Wiggly, an aged but adventurous rabbit from a series of children’s stories, and describes his own independent forays into the natural surroundings of Allentown, Pennsylvania when he was a child. He explains his family’s technical background and how his interest in ham radio led him to pursue an electrical engineering degree at Princeton. Gilly details the independent undergraduate research project that landed him in a neurophysiology lab, shifted his focus to biology, and, despite inconclusive results, earned him an award from his engineering department. He describes his acceptance to the PhD program at Washington University in St. Louis and how, when his advisor died suddenly, a network of friends and acquaintances from Yale University, the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, and the University of Washington’s Friday Harbor Laboratories enabled him to complete his research and thesis in physiology and biophysics and to begin a postdoctoral fellowship in Clara Franzini-Armstrong’s lab at the University of Pennsylvania, studying the role of ion channels in electrical signaling in squid axons. This expertise, Gilly explains, resulted in his appointment at Stanford, working at Hopkins Marine Station where he could collect squid specimens directly from the bay. Citing his experiences both as a scientist and fisherman, he opines on the ways that the Monterey Bay has and has not recovered. After discussing the bureaucratic challenges of achieving tenure, he launches into stories about the classes he has taught, including a technical training course on patch clamping squid neurons, a holistic biology class that involved field research in Baja California Big Sur and the Salinas River, and the Steinbeck Summer Institutes program for primary educators. A central text to many of these courses is Steinbeck and Ricketts’s Sea of Cortez: A Leisurely Journal of Travel and Research, and Gilly discusses how he and several colleagues organized their own expedition based on Steinbeck and Ricketts’s sea voyage. He details preparations and sponsorship for the trip and mentions how the original expedition’s ship, the Western Flyer, is being restored for outreach and possible future trips. Gilly talks about his other outreach work, including donating giant squid to primary classrooms for his Squid4Kids program, trying to mount a critter-cam on a squid for National Geographic TV, and serving as a National Geographic Expert on their Lindblad cruises in the Sea of Cortez. He concludes the interview by discussing his current project helping to set up a community-run marine lab in Santa Rosalía, Baja California Sur, Mexico and how it might be used for environmental research and education.
Archive/Manuscript
2 ms. boxes.
Police files, trial transcript, clippings and photographs, relating to the trial and execution of Ksawery Grocholski in Poland for anti-communist activities.
Hoover Archives

18. Macovski, Albert [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Albert Macovski, the Canon USA Professor of Engineering, Emeritus has been affiliated with Stanford since 1960, first as a research engineer and staff scientist at the Stanford Research Institute (SRI) and then as a faculty member with expertise in medical imaging and a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and the Department of Radiology. In this oral history, Macovski talks about his family background and growing up in New York City in the 1930s. Among other things, he describes his father’s work as a jeweler, the impact of the Great Depression on his family, attending the New York World’s Fair, and his interest in ham radio. Macovski recalls his studies in electrical engineering at City College of New York during the immediate post-war period and the significant change in his life occasioned by meeting his future wife, Adelaide “Addie” Paris. He describes obtaining a job at RCA Laboratories upon graduating from college and what it was like to work in the early television industry, including trying to solve problems related to synchronization and color television broadcasting. Macovski talks about pursuing his master’s degrees at the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn and then working as an assistant professor there. He relates the factors that influenced his decision to accept a job at SRI: a desire to get his PhD, wanting to be where the action in electronics was, and the favorable climate. Describing the environment at SRI in the 1960s, Macovski discusses his work on the Nimbus weather satellite and his invention of the single tube color camera. He describes the process of earning his PhD through Stanford’s Honors Coop Program, his dissertation on holography, and a post-doctoral fellowship from the National Institutes of Health that allowed him to study in the Department of Radiology at the University of California San Francisco. He goes on to describe joining the faculty at Stanford and his varied research projects, including work on ultrasonic array, recording images of the beating heart, and developing techniques to differentiate between hard and soft tissue. He also discusses a project to image the coronary arteries. Macovski recounts the story of how a sabbatical year offered him the chance to study magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to work with Godfrey Hounsfield at the Medical Physics Department of Hammersmith Hospital. He describes obtaining an MRI system from General Electric and the process of getting it installed on campus. Macovksi also discusses his approach to working with graduate students and offers reflections on the process of commercializing technology and obtaining patents. He concludes the interview with comments on new directions in the field of medical imaging and on his decision to endow a chair in the Electrical Engineering Department.
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
1 v. (130 p.) (1 folder)
Memoirs relating to conditions in China before and during the Chinese Civil War. Includes printed Chinese version.
Hoover Archives