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Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
In advance of the release of the 2017 Copyright Reminder, Mimi Calter will review many of the copyright scenarios that document will address. We’ll talk about library procedures and policies related to copyright, review some basics of copyright law, and talk about working with patrons on copyright issues. Bring your questions!

2. Concierge 39: LOCKSS [2017] Online

Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
The LOCKSS (Lots of Copies Keeps Stuff Safe) Program provides distributed digital preservation software and services used by hundreds of institutions across tens of networks. Established as an auxiliary of Stanford University Libraries in 1999, the LOCKSS Program originally helped libraries secure post-cancellation access to subscription electronic resources. Its focus has since expanded to preservation of the digital scholarly record more broadly and enabling communities to preserve digital materials that matter to them. As its founders, Vicky Reich and David Rosenthal, are now retired and the LOCKSS Program joins the Digital Library Systems and Services group, the LOCKSS Program is poised for major new initiatives. Come to this Concierge session to hear from Nicholas Taylor, Program Manager for LOCKSS and Web Archiving, about the present and future of the LOCKSS Program.
Archive/Manuscript
1 poster
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
21 x 16" image
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
74 digital files.
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Digital interview recordings of Japanese Americans relating to immigration to the United States from Japan, internment of Japanese Americans during World War II, and the postwar Japanese American community. Interviews conducted by Kaoru Ueda. Includes images of diaries, newsletters and other textual material.
Hoover Archives
Archive/Manuscript
1 ms. box, 1 oversize box.
Diaries, speeches and writings, relating to Japanese immigration to the United States, and to the Japanese community in the United States.
Hoover Archives
Archive/Manuscript
6 Linear Feet (2 flat boxes and 1 map folder)
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Posters from protests of Executive Order 13769 held at SFO on January 28-29, 2017.
Special Collections

8. Baxter, Charles H [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Charles H. “Chuck” Baxter, a biology lecturer emeritus at Stanford University’s Hopkins Marine Station in Monterey, talks about his role both as a teacher and as a key participant in several endeavors, including the creation of the Monterey Bay Aquarium, which have had a deep and lasting impact on both the area and the general public’s perception of our oceans. He begins the interview discussing his background, most notably how a chance invitation to go diving in the Pacific Ocean opened his eyes to the wonders of underwater ecosystems` and caused him to change his major at UCLA from engineering to zoology. From there he traces a path from his graduate work in Ted Bullock’s lab to teaching the undergraduate zoology lab to his recruitment as a lecturer in the Stanford University Department of Biology. Baxter explains the circumstances that resulted in the transfer of his teaching duties to the Hopkins Marine Station and his relocation to the Monterey area. He recalls fondly the community of faculty, staff, and students at the marine station in the mid 1970s that made it such a special place to work. Baxter discusses his classes and the undergraduate research projects he assisted with, including one that resulted in two undergraduates publishing one of the first papers to show the effects of greenhouse gases on the distributions of ocean communities. Beyond his academic life at Hopkins, Baxter relates the notable projects he and his colleagues put into motion. He talks about how the Monterey Bay Aquarium came to be, relating key aspects of the aquarium’s construction, including the kelp forest tank, the aviary, and preservation of the beached grey whale skeleton that now hangs in the reception hall. Peppered throughout the interview are anecdotes about David Packard, who along with his wife, Lucille, was a chief funder of the project. He explains the diving and recording technologies that were central to the formation of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and the media production company Sea Studios Foundation--organizations in which he played an active role. Finally, Baxter recounts the organization and deployment of the Sea of Cortez Expedition and Education Project, which retraced the 1940 journey of John Steinbeck and Ed Ricketts, and how conversations with his fellow passengers led to his involvement in Stanford’s holistic biology course and his current interest in cognitive science research.

9. Bryson, Arthur E [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Arthur E. Bryson, Jr., a professor emeritus in the Stanford University Department of Aeronautics & Astronautics, discusses his research and teaching career in aeronautical engineering and his contributions to the fields of flight mechanics and automated control. Bryson begins with a discussion of his childhood in Illinois, recalling impressions of his father’s work as an investment banker in Chicago, his education in the Winnetka Public Schools, and the impact of a high school math teacher on his life path. He describes the beginning of his undergraduate career at Haverford College, which was interrupted by World War II and his participation in the Navy’s V-5 program. He talks about his eventual training assignment at Iowa State College and describes how he met his future wife, Helen Layton, there. The ensuing years found Bryson stationed at the Alameda Naval Station, working in repair and maintenance, and he describes some of his experiences there. Bryson then speaks about his short stint as a paper manufacturing engineer working for the Container Corporation of America and as an aeronautical engineer at United Aircraft, where he began working with wind tunnels. In the late 1940s, Bryson migrated to California to pursue a master’s degree in aeronautical engineering with the help of the GI Bill. He describes his advisor, Hans W. Liepmann, and relates how at Liepmann’s invitation, and with the help of a fellowship from Hughes Aircraft, he stayed on at Cal-tech, completing his PhD in 1951. An important turning point in Bryson’s career was an encounter with Harvard professor Howard Wilson Emmons, who was assigned to be Bryson’s office mate while Emmons was on a short assignment at Hughes. Bryson relates the circumstances that led Emmons to ask him to join the faculty at Harvard as an assistant professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering in 1963. He offers a short account of departmental and family life and his research and consulting work while at Harvard, and notes that the increasingly contentious atmosphere surrounding the Vietnam War was one of the factors that led him to accept an invitation to join the Stanford engineering faculty in 1968. Bryson describes some of the opportunities and challenges of his new role as the chair of the Department of Applied Mechanics, and later the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He comments on his approach to teaching engineering and working with graduate students, recalls his work on Waves in Fluids and some of the other films in the Fluid Mechanics Films series, and relates stories about the anti-Vietnam War protests on campus. He concludes the interview with comments on the Gravity Probe B project and reflections on recent directions in biomechanical engineering and flight mechanics.
Archive/Manuscript
2 v. leaves
Facsimile edition of Cambrai, Mediatheque d'Agglomeration, Ms. B 386
Special Collections
Archive/Manuscript
1 microfilm reel 3 ms. boxes.
Finding aid
Online Archive of California
Relates to political and military conditions in China.
Hoover Archives

12. Chu, Jean H. (Athletics, 2016) [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this oral history, Jean (Fetter) Chu, who served as Dean of Undergraduate Admissions at Stanford for seven years, discusses the relationship between admissions and athletics at the university. Chu begins with an account of her own athletic career at Oxford University, playing “attack” on the varsity “net ball” team--a basketball forward in American English. She says it was a highlight of her time at Oxford, where women’s sports were not regarded as highly as men’s teams. She describes the distinction between men’s and women’s sports by noting that male athletes were awarded a Blue letter, while women got a half-letter or Half Blue. At Stanford, Chu found herself in the athletics spotlight when she was named Dean of Undergraduate Admissions in 1984. Athletics coaches and alumni were extremely concerned that having a woman--and a British woman who had a PhD in physics--in the admissions role would negatively affect the athletic program. Chu recalls that one faculty member even felt the need to take her aside to explain--unnecessarily, of course--what the Pac-10 was. Chu describes her great respect for the athletic coaches at Stanford as well as her determination to admit only students she was confident would succeed academically. That resolve, she says, led her to refuse admission to prized basketball recruit, Chris Munk. Her decision led directly to the angry resignation of basketball coach, Thomas Davis. She recalls the wave of criticism she received and reviews the factors she weighed when making her decision. Chu turns from the Munk incident to describe her strong belief in the need to maintain the integrity of the admissions process. She provides a sense of the constant observation she was under from coaches, high school counselors, faculty, and alumni; the unfounded rumors that tended to swirl around the admissions process at Stanford; and both the opposition and support she experienced in the role. She describes the important role that the admissions liaisons to the Department of Athletics played in screening potential recruits and addresses concerns that these staff members might become too closely personally with coaches they befriended. The emotional agony of the admissions decision-making process, she confesses, and the changes it was making in her personal outlook, were important factors in her decision to resign the position. She credits faculty athletic representatives with helping her navigate the occasionally stormy seas and discusses her service on a committee that selected football coach Denny Green. Chu concludes with some kudos for the many star athletes who spent time at Stanford and shares some remarks and anecdotes related to the Stanford Band.

13. Chu, Jean H. (Staff, 2016) [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this oral history, Jean H. Chu (formerly Jean H. Fetter) discusses her twenty-five-year career at Stanford University where she served as Dean of Undergraduate Admissions, as assistant to two university presidents (Richard W. Lyman and Gerhard Casper), and in other administrative capacities. Chu begins with an account of her childhood in Wales during World War II, when German bombings demolished nearby Swansea and frequently sent her scrambling for shelter. Raised by a great-aunt and great-uncle, she recalls how her youthful interest in mathematics and physics was fostered at a rigorous all-women’s high school. Her excellence there helped gain admission to Oxford University’s all-women’s college, St. Hugh’s. In vivid detail, Chu recounts her experiences as one of six women, compared to 120 men, studying physics at Oxford. She was awarded a first in physics, among the best in her class. During her Oxford years, she met and married American Alexander (Sandy) Fetter (now Professor Emeritus of Physics at Stanford), and she discusses accompanying him to successive faculty appointments at Harvard, Berkeley, and finally Stanford. Describing life as a faculty wife and mother of small children, she recalls a brief job with William Shockley that led to a teaching position and then assistant professorship in physics at San Jose State. Turning to her employment at Stanford, Chu discusses her work with David Halliburton of the English Department on two grant-funded projects that she used to promote recruitment of women in sciences. She credits the broad perspective of Stanford that she gained during that project with helping her win appointment as assistant to Stanford President Richard W. Lyman. She recalls a heavy workload filtering the barrage of mail and in-person complaints brought to the president. Described as a “cog between big wheels,” she says, she learned about how the university operated at the highest level. Chu offers a brief account of her time as Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Research under Jerry Lieberman where she oversaw the recruitment of women and minorities into graduate programs at Stanford and worked to develop grievance procedures for graduate students. Much of the oral history involves the many challenges she faced as Dean of Admissions. She describes the conflict she confronted between those who supported recruiting “well-rounded” students and others who favored “angular” students (“nerds” with extraordinary talents). Chu tells how she enabled the Department of Mathematics and later the departments of Music, Art, Drama, and Dance to review outstanding applicants in their fields, using the model created for athletes. She explains other policies she initiated and provides a detailed description of the review process, recounting some unusual cases as well as special efforts to recruit minorities and women. Chu outlines her service on the search committee that selected Gerhard Casper to be the new university president and the circumstances that led her to accept the role as his assistant. She contrasts her experiences as assistant to Lyman and Casper. Concluding her remarks, Chu recalls her experiences with her second husband, Steven Chu, when he received the Nobel Prize in physics.
Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
Meet the folks who keep SUL's website running and learn about new and upcoming features, as well as guiding principles for our website's design and content.
Collection
Stanford University Libraries Concierge Project
Provides an overview of the process and people who support Stanford University Libraries bibliographers and curators to create or acquire content for the digital library, to preserve it in the digital repository, and to make it discoverable in SearchWorks and accessible in a variety of innovative platforms developed right here at Stanford, including Spotlight and Mirador.
Archive/Manuscript
Commemorative cloths
Special Collections

17. Dreisbach, Robert H [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
In this oral history, Robert H. Dreisbach, Stanford alumnus (AB Chemistry 1937) and Professor of Pharmacology, Emeritus, discusses growing up in Baker, Oregon. He touches on his father’s work on the farm, at a creamery, and as a grocer and his mother’s beekeeping, and he describes Boy Scout meetings and hiking trips with his troop. He discusses his undergraduate days at Stanford from 1933 to 1937, recalling attending dances, the El Capitan Eating Club, and serving as the manager of the Stanford baseball team. He recalls his chemistry and physics professors and describes how a talk at Stanford given by a researcher from the Department of Agriculture awakened his interest in pharmacology and helped to convince him to pursue the subject while in medical school at the University of Chicago. Dreisbach briefly recounts his experiences during World War II, which included working as an instructor at the Stanford Medical School and military service as a ward officer at Lovell General Hospital in Fort Devens, Massachusetts and at a hospital in the Panama Canal Zone. He describes the Stanford Medical School when it was located in San Francisco and provides his recollections of the rationale behind its move to campus, including Windsor Cutting’s involvement. He recounts the origins and evolution of his work, The Handbook of Poisoning and the way that poison control centers embraced the book. Dreisbach describes the expansion of the Pharmacology Department after Avram Goldstein arrived from Harvard University to assume its chairmanship and its move to the Stanford campus. He remembers Goldstein as a “go-getter” and relates how he secured space in the basement of the Stanford Museum for a laboratory. Dreisbach explains how concern about smog and air pollution led him to pursue research and writing on environmental issues. An avid hiker, he closes the interview, which was conducted on the eve of his 100th birthday, by offering advice for longevity--keep climbing summits.

18. Drekmeier, Charles [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Charles Drekmeier is Professor of Political Science, Emeritus at Stanford University. He came to Stanford in 1958 and spent forty years teaching at the university during an era of great social and political change. In this interview, Drekmeier discusses his academic training with Talcott Parsons and others, his interests in political theory and social thought, the development of the Stanford Program in Social Thought, and civil rights and anti-Vietnam War activism on the Stanford campus during the 1960s and 1970s. Drekmeier touches briefly on his hometown of Beloit, Wisconsin where his parents owned a drugstore. He describes his first exposure to college at the University of Chicago where he was admitted to the innovative two-year bachelors degree program conceived by Robert Maynard Hutchins. Drekmeier describes meeting communist political activists there, his struggle to acclimate, and his eventual transfer to the University of Wisconsin. He discusses his induction into the army towards the end of World War II and relates stories from basic training and other postings. Upon returning to the University of Wisconsin after the war, Drekmeier’s interest in political science and sociology grew. He explains how he took an internship with the State Department to study the European Recovery Program and details his travels through Europe. He relates his decision to pursue a master’s degree in history at Columbia University and describes some of the professors he worked with there, including Henry Steele Commager. Drekmeier discusses his early academic career, first at the University of Wisconsin where he taught economics and political geography in the Integrated Liberal Studies Program (ILS), and then at Boston University where he taught human relations and political economy before receiving a Fulbright scholarship to study the history of law and politics in India. He relates stories from his time in India and explains how he came to enroll in a graduate program at Harvard where he worked as a research assistant to Talcott Parsons. Drekmeier describes the circumstances that led him to join the Stanford faculty. He couches the discussion of his teaching experience at Stanford and his reputation as a “liberal” professor in terms of the social and political movements of the time. He describes the twenty-four hour teach-in hosted by the campus Peace in Vietnam committee in 1965 and discusses the ideas and impact of Bruce Franklin, a tenured professor of English who was fired from Stanford for his role in anti-war campus protests. Drekmeier discusses the development and evolution of a social science honors seminar called Social Thought and Institutions. This long-running program studied a single topic, such as “community,” for an entire academic year. Drekmeier credits his students with sharing fresh ideas that affected his perspective. Drekmeier explains his first public appearance as a “political figure” during a campus event about the civil rights movement. He recalls the day of John F. Kennedy’s assassination and the emotional address he gave to students that evening, and he describes how he became involved in the Resurrection City program at the request of students who desired to participate in the encampment in Washington DC. He concludes the interview with reflections on Stanford as an institution and the story of the Drekmeier Drugs bowling team.

19. Edwards, Mark W [2016] Online

Collection
Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program Interviews
Mark W. Edwards, an emeritus professor in the Department of Classics, spent over two decades serving the Stanford community. Edwards influenced numerous undergraduate and graduate students at Stanford and at other institutions in the United States and Canada. The focus of this two-part interview is the breadth of Edwards’s teaching career and the evolution of his research interests, particularly his work related to Homer. Edwards’s academic success in classical languages began at his English grammar school during his teenage years. He explains how he chose Latin as his major at Bristol University and how, a few years later, he returned to Bristol to earn a second honors degree in Greek. Edwards pursued a master’s degree soon after, where he worked with Thomas Webster of University College London and began studying Homeric formulae. Both Webster and Homer proved to be strong influences on Edwards’s future career. After a year in London, Edwards moved to the United States as a Fulbright fellow at Princeton University and then accepted his first teaching position at Brown University. Edwards describes his impressions of mid-century America, the works of literature he covered in his classes, and his experience as a resident chaperone on campus. Edwards also discusses how not getting tenure at Brown prompted him to apply for a teaching position at Queen’s University in Ontario, Canada, where he taught for another seven years. He draws interesting comparisons between the two countries based on his student interactions, and provides more detailed information and examples about his work on Homeric formulae that developed over those fourteen years. In the second interview, Edwards describes his years at Stanford as a professor, department chair, and researcher. Edwards found many of his former mentors teaching at Stanford when he arrived in 1969. He taught a variety of Classics graduate courses and non-major undergraduate classes. Edwards also served as department chair for seven years. He discusses the highs and lows of the experience and details the two programs he was most proud of implementing: the Stanford in Greece program, which subsidized student travel in Greece, and the Webster Fund, named in honor of his mentor Thomas Webster, which supported the exchange of guest lecturers between Stanford and University College London. Over the course of thirty plus years teaching Homer’s work, Edwards widened his research to include studying the poet’s type scenes and story patterns. He personally appreciated those moments when Homer broke from the pattern and revealed more of himself. To share this expertise, Edwards wrote a well-received reader for the general public called Homer: Poet of the Iliad. After retiring early from Stanford, Edwards accepted an appointment at the University of California, Santa Cruz to teach Homer to undergraduates in Greek. Edwards concludes his interview with thoughts about how classics remains relevant in modern society. He points to his retirement reading group that recently studied the Odyssey. Through vicarious experience, Edwards feels the retirees gained knowledge from studying the text and relating it to the experiences they had during and after World War II. Edwards remarks that he takes great pleasure in these new interactions with classical texts he has studied his entire career.
Archive/Manuscript
1 online resource (1261 unnumbered page) : illustrations, maps