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Book
xix, 695 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Preface xiii Part 1 Strategies of Affinity Materials 1 Recent Molecularly Imprinted Polymer-based Methods for Sample Preparation 3 Antonio Martin-Esteban 1.1 Introduction 3 1.2 Molecularly Imprinted Solid-phase Extraction 6 1.3 Molecularly Imprinted Solid-phase Microextraction 14 1.4 Molecularly Imprinted Stir Bar Sorptive Extraction 17 1.5 Other Formats 18 1.6 Conclusions 20 References 21 2 A Genuine Combination of Solvent-free Sample Preparation Technique and Molecularly Imprinted Nanomaterials 29 Santanu Patra, Ekta Roy, Rashmi Madhuri and Prashant K. Sharma 2.1 Introduction 30 2.2 Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Modified Fiber for Solid-phase Microextraction 40 2.3 In-tube Solid-phase Microextraction Technique 55 2.4 Monolithic Fiber 58 2.5 Micro-solid-phase Extraction 70 2.6 Stir-bar Sorptive Extraction 73 2.7 Conclusion and Future Scope 76 Acknowledgments 76 Abbreviations 77 References 78 3 Fluorescent Molecularly Imprinted Polymers 89 Kornelia Gawlitza, Wei Wan, Sabine Wagner and Knut Rurack 3.1 Introduction 89 3.2 Classes of Emitters to Endow MIPs with Fluorescence 91 3.3 Fluorescent Molecularly Imprinted Silica 108 3.4 Post-imprinting of MIPs 111 3.5 fMIPs as Labels 113 3.6 Formats for fMIPs 115 3.7 Conclusion 119 References 120 4 Molecularly Imprinted Polymer-based Micro- and Nanotraps for Solid-phase Extraction 129 R dvan Say, Rustem Kecili and Arzu Ersoz 4.1 Introduction 130 4.2 MIPs as SPE Materials 130 4.3 Conclusions 149 References 153 5 Imprinted Carbonaceous Nanomaterials: A Tiny Looking Big Thing in the Field of Selective and Secific Analysis 165 Ekta Roy, Santanu Patra, Rashmi Madhuri and Prashant K. Sharma 5.1 Introduction 166 5.2 Graphene-modified Imprinted Polymer 179 5.3 Carbon Nanotubes-modified Imprinted Polymer 190 5.4 Combination of graphene, CNTs, and MIPs 197 5.5 Graphene Quantum Dots and/or Carbon Dots 198 5.6 Fullerene 201 5.7 Activated carbon 202 5.8 Conclusions 203 Acknowledgments 204 List of abbreviations 204 References 205 6 Molecularly Imprinted Materials for Fiber-optic Sensor Platforms 217 Yavuz Orhan Yaman, Necdet Ba aran, Kubra Karayagiz, Zafer Vatansever, Cengiz Yegin, Onder Haluk Tekba and Mufrettin Murat Sari 6.1 Introduction 218 6.2 Material Aspect: Morphology and Physical Forms of MIPs in FO Sensors 223 6.3 Molecularly Imprinting Technology for Fiber-optic Sensors 231 6.4 State-of-the-art Fiber-optic Sensors Applications Using Molecularly Imprinted Materials 268 6.5 Conclusion 273 References 274 Part 2 Rational Design of MIP for Advanced Applications 7 Molecularly Imprinted Polymer-based Sensors for Biomedical and Environmental Applications 285 Anca Florea, Oana Hosu, Bianca Ciui and Cecilia Cristea 7.1 Introduction 285 7.2 Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Analytes of Biomedical Interest 296 7.3 Molecularly Imprinted Polymers for Analytes of Environmental Interest 306 7.4 Conclusion 314 Acknowledgments 316 References 316 8 Molecularly Imprinted Polymers: The Affinity Adsorbents for Environmental Biotechnology 327 Bo Mattiasson and Gizem Erturk 8.1 Introduction 327 8.2 Molecularly Imprinted Polymers 329 8.3 Monomers 329 8.4 Cross-linking Agents 331 8.5 Mode of Polymerization 332 8.6 Cryogels 334 8.7 Process Technology 336 8.8 Applications 338 References 345 9 Molecular Imprinting Technology for Sensing and Separation in Food Safety 353 Baran Onal Ulusoy, Mehmet Odaba i and Ne e Hayat Aksoy 9.1 Food Safety 354 9.2 Food Analysis 355 9.3 Current Separation Methods Used for Food Safety Purposes 356 9.4 What Is MIP? 357 9.5 MIP Applications Used for Food Safety Purposes 359 References 377 10 Advanced Imprinted Materials for Virus Monitoring 389 Zeynep Altintas 10.1 Introduction 390 10.2 Virus Imprinting 393 10.3 Artificial MIP Receptors for Viruses 398 10.4 Virus Monitoring and Detection Using Biomimetic Sensors 399 10.5 Virus Imprinting for Separation Technologies 401 10.6 Conclusions 405 References 406 11 Design and Evaluation of Molecularly Imprinted Polymers as Drug Delivery Systems 413 Andre Luis Morais Ruela and Gislaine Ribeiro Pereira 11.1 Introduction 414 11.2 Synthesis and Characterization of MIPs Intended for Drug Release Using Non-covalent Approaches 418 11.3 Design and Evaluation of Drug Delivery Systems Based on MIPs 436 11.4 Conclusions 445 References 446 12 Molecularly Imprinted Materials for Controlled Release Systems 455 Yagmur Yegin, Gokhan Yilmaz, Omer Karakoc, Cengiz Yegin, Servet Cete, Mustafa Akbulut and Mufrettin Murat Sari 12.1 Introduction 456 12.2 Selectivity, Release Mechanism and Functionality of MIPs-based CR Systems 459 12.3 Molecularly Imprinted Polymers Production for Controlled Release 482 12.4 Controlled Release Applications Using Molecularly Imprinted Materials-based Controlled Release 491 12.5 Conclusion 506 References 507 13 Molecular Imprinting: The Creation of Biorecognition Imprints on the Biosensor Surfaces 523 Gizem Erturk and Bo Mattiasson 13.1 Introduction 523 13.2 Molecular Imprinting 524 13.3 Microcontact Imprinting 525 13.4 Capacitive Biosensors 529 13.5 Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors 541 13.6 Concluding Remarks 549 References 550 14 Molecular Imprinted Polymers for Sensing of Volatile Organic Compounds in Human Body Odor 561 Sunil Kr. Jha 14.1 Introduction 562 14.2 MIP-QCM Sensor Array Preparation 573 14.3 Chemical Vapor Sensing 576 14.4 Analysis Outcomes 603 14.5 Conclusion 624 Acknowledgments 624 References 624 15 Development of Molecularly Imprinted Polymer-based Microcantilever Sensor System 637 Meltem Okan and Memed Duman 15.1 Introduction to Mass Sensors 637 15.2 Principles of Mass Sensors 640 15.4 Molecularly Imprinted Polymer Technology 655 15.5 Molecularly Imprinted Polymer-based QCM Sensors 658 15.6 Ongoing Studies on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers-based Microcantilevers 661 Acknowledgments 669 References 669.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119336297 20161213
Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) are an important functional material because of their potential implications in diverse research fields. The materials have been developed for a range of uses including separation, environmental, biomedical and sensor applications. In this book, the chapters are clustered into two main sections: Strategies to be employed when using the affinity materials, and rational design of MIPs for advanced applications. In the first part, the book covers the recent advances in producing MIPs for sample design, preparation and characterizations. In the second part, the chapters demonstrate the importance and novelty of creation of recognition imprinted on the materials and surfaces for a range of microbial detection sensors in the biomedical, environmental and food safety fields as well as sensing human odor and virus monitoring systems. Part 1: Strategies of affinity materials * Molecularly imprinted polymers * MIP nanomaterials * Micro- and nanotraps for solid phase extraction * Carbonaceous affinity nanomaterials * Fluorescent MIPs * MIP-based fiber optic sensors Part 2: Rational design of MIP for advanced applications * MIP-based biomedical and environmental sensors * Affinity adsorbents for environmental biotechnology * MIP in food safety * MIP-based virus monitoring * MIP-based drug delivery and controlled release * Biorecognition imprints on the biosensor surfaces * MIP-based sensing of volatile organic compounds in human body odour * MIP-based microcantilever sensor system.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119336297 20161213
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
1 online resource (358 pages) : illustrations.
  • Ion channels, nanomechanics, and nanomedicine / Keka Talukdar
  • Analysis of the bacterial vesicles' enhanced toxicological threat via electron microscopy / Roberta Curia [and 5 others]
  • Applications of polymeric micro- and nano-particles in dentistry / Balasankar Meera Priyadarshini, Nileshkumar Dubey
  • Sensing the presence and amount of microbes using double walled carbon nanotubes / Anand Y Joshi, Ajay M Patel
  • CNS targeted nanoparticle drug delivery: CNS drug delivery / Dimple Sethi Chopra
  • Silver oxide-copper oxide nanocomposite preparation and antimicrobial activity as a source for the treatment of fish diseases: silver oxide-copper oxide nanocomposite preparation and antimicrobial activity / Sayed Reza Shaffiey, Sayedeh Fatemeh Shaffiey
  • Performance analysis of FET-based nanoiosensors by computational method / Keka Talukdar, Anil Shantappa Malipatil
  • Self-setting calcium phosphate bone cement preparation, characterization and drug delivery for skeletal system / Sayed Reza Shaffiey, Sayedeh Fatemeh Shaffiey
  • Mineralized nanofibers for bone tissue engineering / Ozan Karaman
  • Recent advances in synthesis and biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles: magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications / Irshad Ahmad Wani
  • Stratagems of nanotechnology augmenting the bioavailability and therapeutic efficacy of traditional medicine to formulate smart herbal drugs combating / Anita Margret.
The application of nanotechnology within the medical sphere has had a significant influence on how diseases and conditions are treated and diagnosed. While many strides have been made, there is still continuous research on nanotechnology being performed in the field. Advancing Medicine through Nanotechnology and Nanomechanics Applications highlights emergent trends and empirical research on technological innovations in medicine and healthcare. Investigating the impact of nanotechnology and nanomechanics on the treatment of diseases, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery systems, this publication is a vital reference source for professionals, researchers, medical students, and engineering students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781522510437 20161213
Book
1 online resource.
  • Introduction.- Trans-Cis Isomerization.- Azo Polymer Syntheses.- Photoinduced Orientation and Anisotropy.- Photoinduced Mass Transport.- Photoresponsive Liquid Crystal Elastomers.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783662534229 20170515
This book explores functional polymers containing aromatic azo chromophores in side-chain, main-chain and other parts of their structures, known as azo polymers and which share common photoresponsive properties. It focuses on the molecular architecture of azo polymers, the synthetic methods and their most important functions, such as photoinduced birefringence and dichroism, surface-relief-grating (SRG) formation, and light-driven deformation of liquid crystal elastomers. It combines a general survey of the subject and in-depth discussions of each topic, including numerous illustrations, figures, and photographs. Offering a balance between an introduction to the core concepts and a snapshot of hot and emerging topics, it is of interest to graduate students and researchers working in this and related fields. Xiaogong Wang is a Professor at the Department of Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, China.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783662534229 20170515
EBSCOhost Access limited to 1 user
Book
xiv, 210 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Polymer Chemistry-- Polymerisation Reactions-- Polymer Structure-- Crosslinking-- Polymer Solutions-- Methods of Determining Relative MolarMass-- Mechanical Properties of Polymers-- Polymer Degradation-- Dendrimers-- Special Topics in Polymer Chemistry-- Polymers and the Environment--.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782628323 20170515
The Chemistry of Polymers, 5th Edition, is fully updated with the latest developments in polymer science providing a highly readable textbook for those requiring a broad overview of the subject. Like previous editions, the book continues to explore the subject from an applications point of view, providing a comprehensive introduction to all aspects of polymer science including synthesis, structure, properties, degradation and dendrimers. Recent advances in special topics in polymer chemistry and polymers and the environment are also discussed in an informative and up-to-date manner. The new edition features additional content on recent developments in new polymer synthesis techniques including reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP). The book also contains new content on the latest developments in polymer characterisation methods as well as applications of polymers including co-ordination polymers and lithium-polymer batteries. The book is essential reading for university students, teachers and scientists who wish to acquire an up-to-the-minute overview of polymer science and its many specialised topics in an informative and easy to read style.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782628323 20170515
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Polymer restructuring at plastic deformation 2. Modification of synthetic fibers 3. Antimicrobial fibers 4. Fibers of reduced combustibility 5. Scented and repellent fibers 6. Novel crazing technology applications.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780081012710 20170612
Crazing Technology for Polyester Fibers reviews PET fibers crazing in surface-active liquids and the use of the crazing mechanism for fiber modification by functional additives. The first chapter reviews existing literature, and subsequent chapters present the research of the authors, with an emphasis on how these techniques can be used to create textiles for a wide variety of purposes. With two highly regarded and very experienced authors bringing together the latest information on polyester crazing technology, this book is essential reading for scientific researchers, engineers, and R&D professionals working on the development of fibers for improving the properties of textiles.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780081012710 20170612
Book
1 online resource (155 p.) : digital, PDF file.
Neutron experiments coupled with computational components have resulted in unprecedented understanding of the factors that impact the behavior of ionic structured polymers. Additionally, new computational tools to study macromolecules, were developed. In parallel, this DOE funding have enabled the education of the next generation of material researchers who are able to take the advantage neutron tools offer to the understanding and design of advanced materials. Our research has provided unprecedented insight into one of the major factors that limits the use of ionizable polymers, combining the macroscopic view obtained from the experimental techniques with molecular insight extracted from computational studies leading to transformative knowledge that will impact the design of nano-structured, materials. With the focus on model systems, of broad interest to the scientific community and to industry, the research addressed challenges that cut across a large number of polymers, independent of the specific chemical structure or the transported species.
Book
1 online resource.
  • Functional Nanocomposites Based on Fibrous Clays-- Fibrillar Attapulgite-Rubber Nanocomposites-- Rubber-Rectorite Composites with High Gas Barrier Properties-- Design and Physiochemical Characterization of Novel Organic-Inorganic Hybrids from Natural Aluminosilicate Nanotubes-- Surface Modification of Halloysite-- Halloysite Based Smart Hybrid Nanomaterials for the Solubilization of Hydrophobic Compounds in Aqueous Media-- Halloysite and Related Mesoporous Carriers for Advanced Catalysis and Drug Delivery-- Application of Clay Materials as Nanocontainers for Self-Healing Coatings-- Flame Retardant Polymer-Halloysite Nanocomposites-- Polymer-Halloysite Composite Membranes for Ultrafiltration and Proton Exchange Applications-- Rubber Functionalized with Halloysite Loaded with Antioxidants and Antibacterials-- Halloysite-Dopamine Hybrid Nanotubes to Immobilize Biomacromolecules-- Halloysite Clay Nanotubes for Long Acting Controlled Release of Drugs and Proteins-- Biocompatible Electrospun Polymer-Halloysite Nanofibers for Sustained Release-- Toxicological Evaluation of Clay Nanomaterials and Polymer-Clay Nanocomposites.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782624226 20170213
Polymer-clay nanocomposites have flame-retardant, antimicrobial, anticorrosion and self-healing properties, they are biocompatible and environmentally benign. Multiple types of clay minerals may be exfoliated or individually dispersed and then used as natural nanoparticle additives of different size and shape for composite formation. Loading polymers with clays increases their strength, however, it is only recently that such composites were prepared with controlled nanoscale organization allowing for the enhancement of their mechanical properties and functionality. Edited by pioneers in the field, this book will explain the great potential of these materials and will bring together the combined physico-chemical, materials science and biological expertise to introduce the reader to the vibrant field of nanoclay materials. This book will provide an essential text for materials and polymers scientists in industry and academia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782624226 20170213
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Introduction 2. Plastic Film Production 3. Plastic Mulches for the Production of Vegetable Crops 4. Row Covers 5. Drip Irrigation 6. High Tunnels 7. Plastics in Greenhouse Production 8. Horticulture Plastics 9. Plastics in Animal Production 10. Disposal of Plastics.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780081021705 20170515
The use of plastics in agriculture - to increase crop output, improve food quality and improve sustainability - has grown substantially in both quantity and the range of applications. Many of the early researchers that conducted field research in the use of plastics in agriculture have either retired or are deceased. These early pioneers in plasticulture research, the basis of plant production using plastics, were very creative and persistent in discovering uses of plastics in agricultural applications. A Guide to the Manufacture, Performance, and Potential of Plastics in Agriculture contains both references not only to their accomplishments but also their publications. The book discusses plasticulture-the basis of plant production using plastics - including topics such as plastic mulch, row covers, drip irrigation, and high/low tunnels. It covers the process of producing polyethylene and polypropylene plastics that are used in plant and animal production agriculture, and the many uses of plastics in all aspects of agriculture, including plastic greenhouses, rigid mold plastics, disposal of plastics, and plastics in animal production. This book introduces a range of academics and industrial practitioners to the impact of plastics in agriculture, both historically and in a range of current applications. It also provides new perspectives on future developments to enable further research and application. It is an invaluable reference on the use of polyethylene, polypropylene films, and such products in all aspects of agricultural production.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780081021705 20170515
Book
1 online resource.
  • Brief introduction to the field of conducting polymers and allied areas.- Redox transformation of CPs, and the coupled phenomena (changes in: mass, volume, conductance, color, morphology etc.).- Overview of in situ electrochemical methods to follow the redox transformations.- Combined in situ methods.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319535135 20170502
This book outlines methods to improve functioning of these polymer based devices - in particular, the multi-faceted cognition of these materials. In situ electrochemical techniques are studied to elucidate redox switching between non-conducting and conducting states. The book examines the advantages of combinations of in situ electrochemical techniques in a hyphenated mode for analyzing conducting polymers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319535135 20170502
EBSCOhost Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource ( pages ; cm.) :
  • Introduction to Polymers.Polymer Structure (Morphology).Molecular Weight of Polymers.Naturally Occurring Polymers.Step Reaction Polymerization (Polycondensation Reactions).Ionic Chain-Reaction and Complex Coordination Polymerization (Addition Polymerization).Free Radical Chain Polymerization (Addition Polymerization).Copolymerization.Organometallic and Metalloid Polymers.Inorganic Polymers.Reactions of Polymers.Testing and Spectrometric Characterization of Polymers.Rheology and Physical Tests.Additives.Synthesis of Reactants and Intermediates for Polymers.Polymer Technology.Structures of Common Polymers.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498737852 20170502
Introduction to Polymer Chemistry provides undergraduate students with a much-needed, well-rounded presentation of the principles and applications of natural, synthetic, inorganic, and organic polymers. With an emphasis on the environment and green chemistry and materials, this fourth edition continues to provide detailed coverage of natural and synthetic giant molecules, inorganic and organic polymers, elastomers, adhesives, coatings, fibers, plastics, blends, caulks, composites, and ceramics. Building on undergraduate work in foundational courses, the text fulfills the American Chemical Society Committee on Professional Training (ACS CPT) in-depth course requirement .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498737852 20170502
EBSCOhost Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource (p. F306-F320 ): digital, PDF file.
Long-term stability of nanostructured thin film (NSTF) catalysts at operating potentials has been investigated. Compared to high surface area Pt/C catalysts, NSTF electrodes show 20–50x smaller F<sup>–</sup> emission rates (FER) because of their high specific activity for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), but are susceptible to poisoning by the products of membrane degradation because of their low electrochemically active surface area (ECSA). The observed voltage degradation rates at potentials corresponding to 1–1.5 A/cm<sup>2</sup> current density are much higher than the allowable 13–14 μV/h. Although F<sup>–</sup> is not itself responsible for performance decay, cumulative fluoride release (CFR) is a good marker for catalyst surface contamination. The observed performance decay is not only due to loss of active Pt sites but also adsorbed impurities impeding ORR kinetics. There is a strong correlation between measured CFR and observed decrease in specific ORR activity and limiting current density and increase in mass transfer overpotentials. Furthermore, the correlations indicate that the target of <10% lifetime performance degradation can be achieved by restricting CFR in NSTF electrodes to 0.7 μg/cm<sup>2</sup>, as may be possible with more stable membranes, higher surface area NSTF catalysts, and cell operation at lower temperatures and higher relative humidities.
Book
1 online resource.
  • Preface xi 1 Introduction to Coordination Polymers 1 1.1 Coordination Space 1 1.2 Coordination Polymer 3 1.3 Development of Coordination Polymer 7 1.4 Synthetic Methods 9 1.5 Design of Coordination Polymer 13 References 18 2 Application of Coordination Polymers 23 2.1 Introduction 23 2.2 Gas Storage 24 2.3 Catalysis 26 2.4 Luminescence 28 2.5 Redox Activity 29 2.6 Magnetism 29 2.6.1 Long-range Magnetic Ordering 29 2.6.1.1 Molecule-based Magnets 32 2.6.1.2 Single-chain Magnets 33 2.6.2 Spin Crossover 33 2.7 Acentric and Chiral Networks 35 References 39 3 Zinc(II) Coordination Polymers 43 3.1 Introduction to Zinc(II) Coordination Polymers 43 3.1.1 Coordination Polymers Constructed from Rigid Two-connecting Ligands 45 3.1.1.1 Rod-type Ligands 45 3.1.1.2 Angular, Rigid Two-connectors 49 3.1.2 Coordination Polymers Constructed from Rigid, Trigonal Three-connectors 52 3.1.3 Coordination Polymers Constructed from Carboxylates, Pyridine Carboxylates and Pyrazine Carboxylates 54 3.1.4 Coordination Polymers Constructed from Secondary Building Blocks (SBUs) 57 3.1.5 Coordination Polymers Constructed from Conformational Flexible Ligands 59 3.1.6 Coordination Polymers Constructed from Phosphate and Phosphonate Ligands 63 3.2 Nano Zinc(II) Coordination Polymers 64 3.3 Conclusion 70 References 71 4 Cadmium(II) Coordination Polymers 81 4.1 Introduction to Cadmium (II) Coordination Polymers 81 4.1.1 One-dimensional Coordination Polymers 82 4.1.2 Two-dimensional Coordination Polymers 86 4.1.3 Three-dimensional Coordination Polymers 93 4.2 Nano Cadmium(II) Coordination Polymers 96 4.3 Conclusion 102 References 103 5 Mercury(II) Coordination Polymers 113 5.1 Introduction Mercury(II) Coordination Polymers 113 5.1.1 One-dimensional Coordination Polymers 115 5.1.2 Two-dimensional Coordination Polymers 120 5.1.3 Three-dimensional Coordination Polymers 124 5.2 Nano Mercury(II) Coordination Polymers 126 5.3 Conclusion 131 References 131 6 Lead(II) Coordination Polymers 137 6.1 Introduction 137 6.2 Mono-donor Coordination Mode 139 6.2.1 Discrete Complexes 139 6.2.2 One-dimensional Coordination Polymers 141 6.2.3 Two-dimensional Coordination Polymers 142 6.2.4 Three-dimensional Coordination Polymers 142 6.3 Bi-donor Coordination Polymers 143 6.3.1 Bridging ( 2 1: 1) Mode 143 6.3.1.1 Discrete Complexes 143 6.3.1.2 One-dimensional Coordination Polymers 144 6.3.1.3 Two-dimensional Coordination Polymers 144 6.3.1.4 Three-dimensional Coordination Polymers 145 6.4 Tri-donor Coordination Polymers 148 6.4.1 Bridging ( 3 1: 2) Mode 148 6.4.1.1 Two-dimensional Coordination Polymer 148 6.4.1.2 Three-dimensional Coordination Polymers 148 6.5 Tetra-donor Coordination 148 6.5.1 Chelating, Bridging ( 3 1: 2: 1) Mode 148 6.5.1.1 One-dimensional Coordination Polymers 150 6.5.1.2 Two-dimensional Coordination Polymers 151 6.5.1.3 Three-dimensional Coordination Polymers 152 6.6 Nano Lead(II) Coordination Polymers 152 6.7 Conclusion 164 References 165 7 Thallium(I) Coordination Polymers 177 7.1 Introduction to Thallium(I) Coordination Polymers 177 7.2 Thallium(I) Coordination Polymers 182 7.2.1 One-dimensional Coordination Polymers with Secondary Interactions in TlI Coordination Sphere 183 7.2.2 One-dimensional Coordination Polymers without Secondary Interactions in TlI Coordination Sphere 186 7.2.3 Two-dimensional Coordination Polymers with Secondary Interactions in TlI Coordination Sphere 187 7.2.4 Two-dimensional Coordination Polymers without Secondary Interactions in TlI Coordination Sphere 189 7.2.5 Three-dimensional Coordination Polymers with Secondary Interactions in TlI Coordination Sphere 190 7.2.6 Three-dimensional Coordination Polymers without Secondary Interactions in TlI Coordination Sphere 192 7.3 Nano Thallium(I) Coordination Polymers 193 7.4 Conclusion 198 References 199 8 Bismuth(III) Coordination Polymers 207 8.1 Introduction to Bismuth Coordination Polymers 207 8.2 Bismuth(III) Complexes with Monoaminopoly Carboxylate 211 8.2.1 Bi(III) Complexes with Iminodiacetate Ligands 211 8.2.2 Bi(III) Complexes with Nitrilotriacetate 212 8.2.3 Bi(III) Complexes with 2-hydroxy- ethyliminodiacetate 214 8.2.4 Bi(III) complexes with Pyridinedicarboxylate Ligands 215 8.3 Bismuth(III) Complexes with Diaminopolycarboxylate Ligands 217 8.3.1 Bi(III) Complexes with Ethylenediaminetetraacetate 217 8.3.1.1 Protonated Bi(III) Ethylenediaminetetraacetate Complexes 217 8.3.1.2 Bi(III) Ethylenediaminetetraacetate Complexes with Alkali Metal and Ammonium Cations 218 8.3.1.3 Bi(III) Ethylenediaminetetraacetate Complexes with Divalent Metal Cations 221 8.3.1.4 Bi(III) Ethylenediaminetetraacetate Complexes with Protonated Organic Base Cations 222 8.3.1.5 Bi(III) Ethylenediaminetetraacetates with Metal Complex Cations 222 8.3.1.6 Mixed-ligand Bi(III) Ethylenediaminetetraacetate Complexes 224 8.3.2 Bi(III) Complexes with other than edta4 diaminopolycarboxylate Ligands 226 8.4 Bismuth Complexes with Polyaminopolycarboxylate Ligands 228 8.4.1 Bi(III) Complexes with Diethylenetriaminepentaacetate Ligands and its Analogues 228 8.4.2 Bi(III) Complexes with Triethylenetetraaminehexaacetate Ligands 229 8.4.3 Bi(III) Complexes with Macrocyclic Polyaminopolycarboxylate Ligands 231 8.5 Applications 232 8.6 Nano Bismuth(III) Coordination Polymers 232 8.7 Conclusion 238 References 240 9 Porous Main Group Coordination Polymers 247 References 270 10 S-block Coordination Polymers (Group1) 279 10.1 Introduction 279 10.2 Group 1(Alkali) Metal Coordination Polymers 280 10.2.1 Neutral Oxygen Donor Lligands 280 10.2.2 Anionic Oxygen Donor Ligands 283 10.2.2.1 Alkoxides and Aryloxides 283 10.2.2.2 Carboxylates 284 10.2.2.3 Sulfonates and Nitro-derivatives 284 10.2.2.4 Amino Acids 285 10.2.2.5 Mixed O- and N-donors 286 10.2.3 N-donor Ligands 287 10.2.4 Carbon Donor Ligands 288 10.2.5 Sulfur Donor Ligands 289 10.3 Conclusion 291 References 292 11 S-block Coordination Polymers (Group2) 297 11.1 Introduction 297 11.2 Group 2(Alkaline Earth) Metal Coordination Polymers 299 11.2.1 Neutral Oxygen Donor Ligands 300 11.2.2 Anionic Oxygen Donor Ligands 301 11.2.2.1 Beta-diketonates 301 11.2.2.2 Alkoxides 302 11.2.2.3 Carboxylates 302 11.2.2.4 Phosphonates 304 11.2.2.5 Sulfonates 305 11.2.3 Mixed N- and O-donors 305 11.2.4 N-donor Ligands 306 11.2.5 Carbon Donor Ligands 308 11.2.6 Sulfur Donor Ligands 309 11.3 Conclusion 310 References 311.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119370239 20170403
Coordination polymer is a general term used to indicate an infinite array composed of metal ions which are bridged by certain ligands among them. This incorporates a wide range of architectures including simple one-dimensional chains with small ligands to large mesoporous frameworks. Generally, the formation process proceeds automatically and, therefore, is called a self-assembly process. In general, the type and topology of the product generated from the self-assembly of inorganic metal nodes and organic spacers depend on the functionality of the ligand and valences and the geometric needs of the metal ions used. In this book the authors explain main group metal coordination polymer in bulk and nano size with some of their application, synthesis method and etc, The properties of these efficient materials are described at length including magnetism (long-range ordering, spin crossover), porosity (gas storage, ion and guest exchange), non-linear optical activity, chiral networks, reactive networks, heterogeneous catalysis, luminescence, multifunctional materials and other properties.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119370239 20170403
Book
1 online resource.
  • Permeability of Polymers / Yuri Yampolskii
  • Organosiloxanes (Silicones), Polyorganosiloxane Block Copolymers / Igor Raygorodsky, Victor Kopylov, Alexander Kovyazin
  • Polysilalkylenes / Nikolay V Ushakov, Stepan Guselnikov, Eugene Finkelshtein
  • Polyvinylorganosilanes / Nikolay V Ushakov
  • Substituted Polyacetylenes / Toshikazu Sakaguchi, Yanming Hu, Toshio Masuda
  • Polynorbornenes / Eugene Finkelshtein, Maria Gringolts, Maksim Bermeshev, Pavel Chapala, Yulia Rogan
  • Polycondensation Materials Containing Bulky Side Groups / Susanta Banerjee, Debaditya Bera
  • Gas and Vapor Transport Properties of Si-Containing and Related Polymers / Yuri Yampolskii
  • Modeling of Si-Containing Polymers / Joel R Fried, Timothy Dubbs, Morteza Azizi
  • Pervaporation and Evapomeation with Si-Containing Polymers / Tadashi Uragami
  • Si-Containing Polymers in Membrane Gas Separation / Adele Brunetti, Leonardo Melone, Enrico Drioli, Giuseppe Barbieri.
Book
1 online resource (xv, 215 pages).
  • Introduction: modifiable characteristics and applications
  • Filled polymer composites
  • Nanofillers in polymers
  • Additives in polymers
  • Surface modification of polymers: chemical, physical, and biological routes
  • Smart polymers
  • Blends and alloys
  • Gradients in homopolymers, blends, and copolymers.
Book
1 online resource (xv, 215 pages).
  • Introduction: modifiable characteristics and applications
  • Filled polymer composites
  • Nanofillers in polymers
  • Additives in polymers
  • Surface modification of polymers: chemical, physical, and biological routes
  • Smart polymers
  • Blends and alloys
  • Gradients in homopolymers, blends, and copolymers.
Book
online resource (xix, 538 pages) : illustrations (some color)
  • Encapsulating proteins in nanoparticles: batch by batch or one by one
  • Enzyme adsorption on nanoparticle surface probed by highly sensitive second harmonic light scattering
  • Armoring enzymes by metal-organic frameworks by the coprecipitation method
  • Enzyme armoring by an organosilica layer: synthesis and characterization of hybrid organic/inorganic nanobiocatalysts
  • Strategies for biophysical characterization of protein-polymer conjugates
  • Guide to the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for protein recognition by solid-phase synthesis
  • Armored urease: enzyme-bioconjugated poly(acrylamide) hydrogel as a storage and sensing platform
  • Armored enzyme-nanohybrids and their catalytic function under challenging conditions
  • Approaches for conjugating tailor-made polymers to proteins
  • Nanoarmoring of enzymes by polymer-functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles
  • Expression of cellulytic enzyme as a fusion protein that reacts specifically with a polymeric scaffold
  • Nanoarmoring of proteins by conjugation to block copolymer micelles
  • Semisynthetic enzymes by protein-peptide site-directed covalent conjugation: methods and applications
  • Transgultaminase-mediated nanoarmoring of enzymes by PEGylation
  • Polymer-based protein engineering: synthesis and characterization of armored, high graft density polymer-protein conjugates
  • Nano-armoring of enzymes: rational design of polymer-wrapped enzymes
  • Nanoarmored enzymes for organic enzymology: synthesis and characterization of poly(2-alkyloxazoline)-enzyme conjugates
  • Preparation and applications of dendronized polymer-enzyme conjugates
  • Nanoarmoring of enzymes by interlocking in cellulose fibers with poly(acrylic acid)
  • Author index
  • Subject Index.
Medical Library (Lane)
Book
1 online resource.
  • List of contributors, xiii Preface, xix Topic 1: Characterization of modified polymers and their use in encapsulation processes, 1 1 Tailor made novel polymers for hydrogel encapsulation processes, 3 Artur Bartkowiak, Katarzyna Sobecka, and Agnieszka Krudos 1.1 Introduction, 3 1.2 Well known and commonly used polymers, 16 1.3 Novel polymers, 16 Acknowledgments, 29 References, 29 2 High pressure treated corn starch as an alternative carrier of molecules of nutritional interest for food systems, 35 Lorena Deladino, Aline Schneider Teixeira, Antonio Diego Molina Garcia, and Alba Sofia Navarro 2.1 Introduction, 35 2.2 Trends in nutraceutical foods, 36 2.3 Starch as a carrier for bioactive compounds, 40 2.4 Conclusions, 52 References, 53 3 Protein based nanoparticles as matrices for encapsulation of lipophilic nutraceuticals, 59 Adrian A. Perez, Osvaldo E. Sponton, and Liliana G. Santiago 3.1 General aspects of encapsulating lipophilic nutraceuticals, 59 3.2 Polyunsaturated fatty acid encapsulation systems, 60 3.3 Conclusions, 67 Acknowledgments, 68 References, 68 4 Surface modifications that benefit protein based nanoparticles as vehicles for oral delivery of phenolic phytochemicals, 73 Zheng Li 4.1 Overview, 73 4.2 Fabrication of protein based nanoparticles, 75 4.3 Obstacles to protein based nanoparticles as oral delivery vehicles, 79 4.4 Surface modifications of protein based nanoparticles for better delivery, 84 4.5 Summary, 92 References, 92 Topic 2: Stability of nutraceutical compounds encapsulated with modified polymers, 97 5 Novel polymer systems and additives to protect bioactive substances applied in spray drying, 99 Artur Bartkowiak, Wioletta Krawczyn ska, and Alicja Federowicz 5.1 Introduction, 99 5.2 Spray drying process, 100 5.3 Nutraceuticals in the food industry, 107 5.4 Polymers and novel polymers used in the spray drying process, 109 Acknowledgements, 115 References, 115 6 The use of encapsulation to guarantee the stability of phenolic compounds, 121 Maria Ines Dias, Cristina Caleja, Isabel C. F. R. Ferreira, and Maria Filomena Barreiro 6.1 Introduction, 121 6.2 Phenolic compounds, 122 6.3 Microencapsulation process, 126 6.4 Concluding remarks and future perspectives, 135 References, 136 7 Fortification of dairy products by microcapsules of polyphenols extracted from pomegranate peels, 145 Wissam Zam 7.1 Extraction procedure, 145 7.2 Formulation of pomegranate peels polyphenol microbeads and their in vitro release, 146 7.3 Fortification of dairy products with polyphenol microcapsules, 153 References, 156 Topic 3: Application of encapsulated compounds with modified polymers in functional food systems, 159 8 Encapsulation technologies for resveratrol in functional food, 161 Maria Chavarri and Maria Carmen Villaran 8.1 Introduction, 161 8.2 Functional foods, 162 8.3 Resveratrol, 163 8.4 Encapsulation technology, 165 8.5 Microencapsulation, 168 8.6 Nanoencapsulation, 172 8.7 Conclusions, 182 References, 183 9 Nutraceutical compounds encapsulated by extrusion spheronization, 195 Thi Trinh Lan Nguyen, Nicolas Anton, and Thierry F. Vandamme 9.1 Extrusion spheronization process application for nutraceuticals, 195 9.2 Nanoemulsions for nutraceutical applications, 207 9.3 Nano size nutraceutical emulsion encapsulated by extrusion spheronization, 211 9.4 Conclusion, 223 References, 223 10 Biopolymeric archetypes for the oral delivery of nutraceuticals, 231 Mershen Govender, Miles C. Braithwaite, Pradeep Kumar, Yahya E. Choonara, and Viness Pillay 10.1 Introduction, 231 10.2 Monolithic matrix based systems, 232 10.3 Encapsulated systems, 238 10.4 Conclusion, 247 Acknowledgments, 247 References, 247 11 Application of microencapsulated vitamins in functional food systems, 251 Siew Young Quek and Cheng Peng 11.1 Introduction, 251 11.2 Common microencapsulation techniques for vitamins, 254 11.3 Applications of incorporating encapsulated vitamins in dairy products, 255 11.4 Application of microencapsulated vitamins in beverages, 259 11.5 Application of encapsulated vitamins in bakery products, 263 11.6 Conclusions, 264 References, 265 12 Application of encapsulated compounds in functional food systems, 269 M. K. Tripathi and S. K. Giri 12.1 Introduction, 269 12.2 Microencapsulation technologies and bioactive food ingredients, 270 12.3 Delivery of bioactive ingredients into foods and to the gastrointestinal tract, 272 12.4 Techniques of microencapsulation, 275 12.5 Materials used for encapsulation, 279 12.6 Selection and safety evaluation of encapsulation materials, 279 12.7 Nutritional and nutraceutical compounds and microencapsulation, 280 12.8 Spray drying in microencapsulation of food ingredients, 287 12.9 Nanoencapsulation of food ingredients using lipid based delivery systems, 290 12.10 New techniques and ingredients that improve effectiveness of encapsulation, 292 References, 294 13 Encapsulation of polyunsaturated omega 3 fatty acids for enriched functional foods, 301 Jorge Carlos Ruiz Ruiz and Maira Rubi Segura Campos 13.1 Introduction, 301 13.2 Functional effects of omega 3 fatty acids, 303 13.3 Susceptibility to oxidation, 304 13.4 Methods for encapsulating oil, 304 13.5 Nonconventional wall materials for encapsulating oil, 305 13.6 Properties of oil as omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids capsules, 309 13.7 Oxidation stability and fatty acid composition of encapsulated vegetable oils, 311 13.8 Incorporation of long chain omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in foods, 313 13.9 Conclusion, 314 Acknowledgments, 315 References, 315 Index, 321.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119228790 20170403
The incorporation of functional ingredients in a given food system and the processing and handling of such foods are associated with nutritional challenges for their healthy delivery. The extreme sensitivity of some components cause significant loss of product quality, stability, nutritional value and bioavailability, and the overall acceptability of the food product. Consequently, encapsulation has been successfully used to improve stability and bioavailability of functional ingredients. Encapsulation is one example of technology that has the potential to meet the challenge of successfully incorporating and delivering functional ingredients into a range of food types. The book will cover topics about 1) Characterization of novel polymers and their use in encapsulation processes. 2) Stability of nutraceutical compounds encapsulated with novel polymers. 3) Application of encapsulated compounds with novel polymers in functional food systems. This book provides a detailed overview of technologies for preparing and characterisation of encapsulates for food active ingredients using modified polymers. The use of modified polymers as coating materials it is a field that still needs study. The book is aimed to inform students and researchers in the areas of food science and food technology, and professionals in the food industry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119228790 20170403
Book
1 online resource.
  • List of contributors, xiii Preface, xix Topic 1: Characterization of modified polymers and their use in encapsulation processes, 1 1 Tailor made novel polymers for hydrogel encapsulation processes, 3 Artur Bartkowiak, Katarzyna Sobecka, and Agnieszka Krudos 1.1 Introduction, 3 1.2 Well known and commonly used polymers, 16 1.3 Novel polymers, 16 Acknowledgments, 29 References, 29 2 High pressure treated corn starch as an alternative carrier of molecules of nutritional interest for food systems, 35 Lorena Deladino, Aline Schneider Teixeira, Antonio Diego Molina Garcia, and Alba Sofia Navarro 2.1 Introduction, 35 2.2 Trends in nutraceutical foods, 36 2.3 Starch as a carrier for bioactive compounds, 40 2.4 Conclusions, 52 References, 53 3 Protein based nanoparticles as matrices for encapsulation of lipophilic nutraceuticals, 59 Adrian A. Perez, Osvaldo E. Sponton, and Liliana G. Santiago 3.1 General aspects of encapsulating lipophilic nutraceuticals, 59 3.2 Polyunsaturated fatty acid encapsulation systems, 60 3.3 Conclusions, 67 Acknowledgments, 68 References, 68 4 Surface modifications that benefit protein based nanoparticles as vehicles for oral delivery of phenolic phytochemicals, 73 Zheng Li 4.1 Overview, 73 4.2 Fabrication of protein based nanoparticles, 75 4.3 Obstacles to protein based nanoparticles as oral delivery vehicles, 79 4.4 Surface modifications of protein based nanoparticles for better delivery, 84 4.5 Summary, 92 References, 92 Topic 2: Stability of nutraceutical compounds encapsulated with modified polymers, 97 5 Novel polymer systems and additives to protect bioactive substances applied in spray drying, 99 Artur Bartkowiak, Wioletta Krawczyn ska, and Alicja Federowicz 5.1 Introduction, 99 5.2 Spray drying process, 100 5.3 Nutraceuticals in the food industry, 107 5.4 Polymers and novel polymers used in the spray drying process, 109 Acknowledgements, 115 References, 115 6 The use of encapsulation to guarantee the stability of phenolic compounds, 121 Maria Ines Dias, Cristina Caleja, Isabel C. F. R. Ferreira, and Maria Filomena Barreiro 6.1 Introduction, 121 6.2 Phenolic compounds, 122 6.3 Microencapsulation process, 126 6.4 Concluding remarks and future perspectives, 135 References, 136 7 Fortification of dairy products by microcapsules of polyphenols extracted from pomegranate peels, 145 Wissam Zam 7.1 Extraction procedure, 145 7.2 Formulation of pomegranate peels polyphenol microbeads and their in vitro release, 146 7.3 Fortification of dairy products with polyphenol microcapsules, 153 References, 156 Topic 3: Application of encapsulated compounds with modified polymers in functional food systems, 159 8 Encapsulation technologies for resveratrol in functional food, 161 Maria Chavarri and Maria Carmen Villaran 8.1 Introduction, 161 8.2 Functional foods, 162 8.3 Resveratrol, 163 8.4 Encapsulation technology, 165 8.5 Microencapsulation, 168 8.6 Nanoencapsulation, 172 8.7 Conclusions, 182 References, 183 9 Nutraceutical compounds encapsulated by extrusion spheronization, 195 Thi Trinh Lan Nguyen, Nicolas Anton, and Thierry F. Vandamme 9.1 Extrusion spheronization process application for nutraceuticals, 195 9.2 Nanoemulsions for nutraceutical applications, 207 9.3 Nano size nutraceutical emulsion encapsulated by extrusion spheronization, 211 9.4 Conclusion, 223 References, 223 10 Biopolymeric archetypes for the oral delivery of nutraceuticals, 231 Mershen Govender, Miles C. Braithwaite, Pradeep Kumar, Yahya E. Choonara, and Viness Pillay 10.1 Introduction, 231 10.2 Monolithic matrix based systems, 232 10.3 Encapsulated systems, 238 10.4 Conclusion, 247 Acknowledgments, 247 References, 247 11 Application of microencapsulated vitamins in functional food systems, 251 Siew Young Quek and Cheng Peng 11.1 Introduction, 251 11.2 Common microencapsulation techniques for vitamins, 254 11.3 Applications of incorporating encapsulated vitamins in dairy products, 255 11.4 Application of microencapsulated vitamins in beverages, 259 11.5 Application of encapsulated vitamins in bakery products, 263 11.6 Conclusions, 264 References, 265 12 Application of encapsulated compounds in functional food systems, 269 M. K. Tripathi and S. K. Giri 12.1 Introduction, 269 12.2 Microencapsulation technologies and bioactive food ingredients, 270 12.3 Delivery of bioactive ingredients into foods and to the gastrointestinal tract, 272 12.4 Techniques of microencapsulation, 275 12.5 Materials used for encapsulation, 279 12.6 Selection and safety evaluation of encapsulation materials, 279 12.7 Nutritional and nutraceutical compounds and microencapsulation, 280 12.8 Spray drying in microencapsulation of food ingredients, 287 12.9 Nanoencapsulation of food ingredients using lipid based delivery systems, 290 12.10 New techniques and ingredients that improve effectiveness of encapsulation, 292 References, 294 13 Encapsulation of polyunsaturated omega 3 fatty acids for enriched functional foods, 301 Jorge Carlos Ruiz Ruiz and Maira Rubi Segura Campos 13.1 Introduction, 301 13.2 Functional effects of omega 3 fatty acids, 303 13.3 Susceptibility to oxidation, 304 13.4 Methods for encapsulating oil, 304 13.5 Nonconventional wall materials for encapsulating oil, 305 13.6 Properties of oil as omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids capsules, 309 13.7 Oxidation stability and fatty acid composition of encapsulated vegetable oils, 311 13.8 Incorporation of long chain omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in foods, 313 13.9 Conclusion, 314 Acknowledgments, 315 References, 315 Index, 321.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119228790 20170403
The incorporation of functional ingredients in a given food system and the processing and handling of such foods are associated with nutritional challenges for their healthy delivery. The extreme sensitivity of some components cause significant loss of product quality, stability, nutritional value and bioavailability, and the overall acceptability of the food product. Consequently, encapsulation has been successfully used to improve stability and bioavailability of functional ingredients. Encapsulation is one example of technology that has the potential to meet the challenge of successfully incorporating and delivering functional ingredients into a range of food types. The book will cover topics about 1) Characterization of novel polymers and their use in encapsulation processes. 2) Stability of nutraceutical compounds encapsulated with novel polymers. 3) Application of encapsulated compounds with novel polymers in functional food systems. This book provides a detailed overview of technologies for preparing and characterisation of encapsulates for food active ingredients using modified polymers. The use of modified polymers as coating materials it is a field that still needs study. The book is aimed to inform students and researchers in the areas of food science and food technology, and professionals in the food industry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119228790 20170403
Book
1 online resource : illustrations (some color). Digital: text file. PDF.
Stanford University Libraries

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