Book
xx, 262 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction Part I Chinese cultural policy * Cultural policy in Republican China * Towards mass culture under Mao Zedong * Beyond propaganda in Reform China * Chinese cultural industries Part II Economic and administrative institutions of control * Nationalisation and the installation of CCP control * The emergence of private production companies * Towards commercialisation with constrained private participation * Piracy and the emerging copyright regime Part III The censorship and propaganda systems * Formation of modern political censorship and propaganda * Erosion of political-ideological control in the 1980s and 1990s * Institutional renovation with private producers' participation * Mass media control Part IV Private film and music production companies as agents of change * Group formation * Business associations and collective lobbying * Individual coping strategies, individual lobbying and political embeddedness Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Economic liberalisation processes and the rapid development of the private sector are widely visible signs of over thirty years of reform policies in the People's Republic of China. Nevertheless, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has managed to preserve the basic political institutions of the Leninist Party-state, including its own unrestrained position of political power. Against this background, this book investigates the interrelationship between processes of marketisation and commercialisation, and the stability of the CCP regime. The aim of the book is to complement existing literature on adaptive governance in China and on the reasons for the CCP regime's relative stability, while providing new information about the relationship between the Chinese party-state and private entrepreneurs. Taking case studies from the film and music industries, the book gives a detailed account of the political and economic history of these industries in China, with special attention given to the role played by private production companies as intermediaries between artistic creation, political and ideological constraints, and the market. A historical institutionalist approach is employed to trace the effect of Chinese policies on popular culture and the institutions of administrative, economic, political and ideological control over the film and music industries back to the 1950s, revealing the mechanisms and prospects of CCP hegemony in the cultural sector. Examining the effects of the marketisation and commercialisation processes on the communist regime and vice versa, this book also offers a fresh perspective on the origins of today's Chinese popular cultural mainstream. It will therefore be of great interest to students and scholars of Chinese politics, Chinese culture and media and Chinese government-business relations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction Part I Chinese cultural policy * Cultural policy in Republican China * Towards mass culture under Mao Zedong * Beyond propaganda in Reform China * Chinese cultural industries Part II Economic and administrative institutions of control * Nationalisation and the installation of CCP control * The emergence of private production companies * Towards commercialisation with constrained private participation * Piracy and the emerging copyright regime Part III The censorship and propaganda systems * Formation of modern political censorship and propaganda * Erosion of political-ideological control in the 1980s and 1990s * Institutional renovation with private producers' participation * Mass media control Part IV Private film and music production companies as agents of change * Group formation * Business associations and collective lobbying * Individual coping strategies, individual lobbying and political embeddedness Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Economic liberalisation processes and the rapid development of the private sector are widely visible signs of over thirty years of reform policies in the People's Republic of China. Nevertheless, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has managed to preserve the basic political institutions of the Leninist Party-state, including its own unrestrained position of political power. Against this background, this book investigates the interrelationship between processes of marketisation and commercialisation, and the stability of the CCP regime. The aim of the book is to complement existing literature on adaptive governance in China and on the reasons for the CCP regime's relative stability, while providing new information about the relationship between the Chinese party-state and private entrepreneurs. Taking case studies from the film and music industries, the book gives a detailed account of the political and economic history of these industries in China, with special attention given to the role played by private production companies as intermediaries between artistic creation, political and ideological constraints, and the market. A historical institutionalist approach is employed to trace the effect of Chinese policies on popular culture and the institutions of administrative, economic, political and ideological control over the film and music industries back to the 1950s, revealing the mechanisms and prospects of CCP hegemony in the cultural sector. Examining the effects of the marketisation and commercialisation processes on the communist regime and vice versa, this book also offers a fresh perspective on the origins of today's Chinese popular cultural mainstream. It will therefore be of great interest to students and scholars of Chinese politics, Chinese culture and media and Chinese government-business relations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
PN1993.5 .C4 M4646 2016 Unknown
Book
xxii, 516 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • First Steps
  • How to pick a team
  • Personal managers
  • Business managers
  • Attorneys
  • Agents
  • Broad-strokes overview of the record business
  • Advances and recoupment
  • Real-life numbers
  • Other major deal points
  • Producer and mixer deals
  • Advanced royalty computations
  • Advanced record deal points
  • Loan-out, independent production, label, and distribution deals
  • Copyright basics
  • Publishing companies and major income sources
  • Secondary publishing income
  • Songwriter deals
  • Copublishing and administration deals
  • Advanced copyright concepts
  • Even more advanced copyright concepts
  • Groups
  • Personal appearances : touring
  • Tour merchandising
  • Retail merchandising
  • Classical music
  • Overview of motion picture music
  • Performer deals
  • Film songwriter deals
  • Composer agreements
  • Licensing existing recordings and existing songs
  • Music supervisors
  • Soundtrack album deals.
"For more than twenty years, All You Need to Know About the Music Business has been universally regarded as the definitive guide to the music industry. Now in its ninth edition, this latest edition leads novices and experts alike through the crucial, up-to-the-minute information on the industry's major changes in response to today's rapid technological advances and uncertain economy, " -- Amazon.com.
  • First Steps
  • How to pick a team
  • Personal managers
  • Business managers
  • Attorneys
  • Agents
  • Broad-strokes overview of the record business
  • Advances and recoupment
  • Real-life numbers
  • Other major deal points
  • Producer and mixer deals
  • Advanced royalty computations
  • Advanced record deal points
  • Loan-out, independent production, label, and distribution deals
  • Copyright basics
  • Publishing companies and major income sources
  • Secondary publishing income
  • Songwriter deals
  • Copublishing and administration deals
  • Advanced copyright concepts
  • Even more advanced copyright concepts
  • Groups
  • Personal appearances : touring
  • Tour merchandising
  • Retail merchandising
  • Classical music
  • Overview of motion picture music
  • Performer deals
  • Film songwriter deals
  • Composer agreements
  • Licensing existing recordings and existing songs
  • Music supervisors
  • Soundtrack album deals.
"For more than twenty years, All You Need to Know About the Music Business has been universally regarded as the definitive guide to the music industry. Now in its ninth edition, this latest edition leads novices and experts alike through the crucial, up-to-the-minute information on the industry's major changes in response to today's rapid technological advances and uncertain economy, " -- Amazon.com.
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
ML3790 .P35 2015 Unknown
Book
387 pages ; 22 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
Stacks Request
PR9199.4 .T3865 B67 2015 Available
Book
viii, 119 pages ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Status of items at SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SAL3 (off-campus storage) Status
In process Request
ML355 .C36 F47 2015 Available
Book
xi, 239 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction 1. The South African Recording Industry 2. Recent Industry Developments 3. A Segmented Music Market and Attempts to Capture it 4. The Wholesaling and Retailing of Music 5. Negotiating Value in the Music Chain 6. Organizing Relationships in the Recording Industry 7. Continuities in Patronage Arrangements Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Contracts, Patronage and Mediation studies the long-term developments in the South African recording industry. It adds to the existing literature an understanding of the prevalence of informal negotiations over rights, rewards and power in the recording industry. The book is original in that it uses several disciplines' approaches and methods. It combines a wide array of different industry participants' -often vividly expressed- views and experiences with statistical information and the existing literature's findings. The book argues that alongside the global contract model, in South Africa there exists another mode of organizing recording industry relationships, which is based on the patronage model. Furthermore, the book states that such features are probably not unique to South Africa, but can also be found in recording industries elsewhere, even though they have not previously been thoroughly investigated.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction 1. The South African Recording Industry 2. Recent Industry Developments 3. A Segmented Music Market and Attempts to Capture it 4. The Wholesaling and Retailing of Music 5. Negotiating Value in the Music Chain 6. Organizing Relationships in the Recording Industry 7. Continuities in Patronage Arrangements Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Contracts, Patronage and Mediation studies the long-term developments in the South African recording industry. It adds to the existing literature an understanding of the prevalence of informal negotiations over rights, rewards and power in the recording industry. The book is original in that it uses several disciplines' approaches and methods. It combines a wide array of different industry participants' -often vividly expressed- views and experiences with statistical information and the existing literature's findings. The book argues that alongside the global contract model, in South Africa there exists another mode of organizing recording industry relationships, which is based on the patronage model. Furthermore, the book states that such features are probably not unique to South Africa, but can also be found in recording industries elsewhere, even though they have not previously been thoroughly investigated.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
ML3790 .P54 2015 Unknown
Book
1 online resource (xxv, 293 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • How direct licensing increased competition. Introduction
  • Music licensing process
  • Copyright law and natural monopolies
  • Traditional blanket license
  • Direct licensing as an alternative to the traditional blanket license
  • Conclusion
  • Why putting music content creators first is important. Introduction
  • Roles of publishers, record labels, and producers
  • Possible new entrant
  • Why the merger could be a viable option
  • Conclusion.
This book discusses the economics of the music industry in the context of the changing landscape brought about by innovation, technological change, and rapid digitization. The ability of digital technology to reduce the transaction costs of music copyright licensing has all but destroyed the traditional media business models of incumbent Performance Rights Organizations (PROs), music publishers, record labels, and radio and television stations. In a climate where streaming services are rapidly proliferating and consumers prefer subscription models over direct ownership, new business models, such as direct licensing, are developing. This book provides an overview of the economics of the traditional music industry, the technology-induced changes in business models and copyright law, and the role of publishers, copyright holders and songwriters in the emerging direct licensing model. In Part One, the author examines the economic aspects of direct licensing as an alternative to the traditional blanket license for copyrighted musical compositions, with an emphasis on the often monopolistic nature of PROs. In Part Two, the author focuses on the music publisher and the role direct licensing and competition may play in the changing business models in the music industry and the potential benefits this may bring to copyright holders, such as songwriters. To compliment this model, the author proposes a maximum statutory fixed-rate for musical performances to further streamline the royalty process, especially where distributors such as Google and YouTube are concerned. This book adds to the growing body of literature on the economics of music licensing in the digital age. It will be useful to those in the fields of economics and law, as well as music executives, musicians, songwriters, composers, and other industry professionals who are interested in understanding how technology, innovation and competition have reshaped the music industry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • How direct licensing increased competition. Introduction
  • Music licensing process
  • Copyright law and natural monopolies
  • Traditional blanket license
  • Direct licensing as an alternative to the traditional blanket license
  • Conclusion
  • Why putting music content creators first is important. Introduction
  • Roles of publishers, record labels, and producers
  • Possible new entrant
  • Why the merger could be a viable option
  • Conclusion.
This book discusses the economics of the music industry in the context of the changing landscape brought about by innovation, technological change, and rapid digitization. The ability of digital technology to reduce the transaction costs of music copyright licensing has all but destroyed the traditional media business models of incumbent Performance Rights Organizations (PROs), music publishers, record labels, and radio and television stations. In a climate where streaming services are rapidly proliferating and consumers prefer subscription models over direct ownership, new business models, such as direct licensing, are developing. This book provides an overview of the economics of the traditional music industry, the technology-induced changes in business models and copyright law, and the role of publishers, copyright holders and songwriters in the emerging direct licensing model. In Part One, the author examines the economic aspects of direct licensing as an alternative to the traditional blanket license for copyrighted musical compositions, with an emphasis on the often monopolistic nature of PROs. In Part Two, the author focuses on the music publisher and the role direct licensing and competition may play in the changing business models in the music industry and the potential benefits this may bring to copyright holders, such as songwriters. To compliment this model, the author proposes a maximum statutory fixed-rate for musical performances to further streamline the royalty process, especially where distributors such as Google and YouTube are concerned. This book adds to the growing body of literature on the economics of music licensing in the digital age. It will be useful to those in the fields of economics and law, as well as music executives, musicians, songwriters, composers, and other industry professionals who are interested in understanding how technology, innovation and competition have reshaped the music industry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Book
xxv, 293 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm
  • How direct licensing increased competition. Introduction
  • Music licensing process
  • Copyright law and natural monopolies
  • Traditional blanket license
  • Direct licensing as an alternative to the traditional blanket license
  • Conclusion
  • Why putting music content creators first is important. Introduction
  • Roles of publishers, record labels, and producers
  • Possible new entrant
  • Why the merger could be a viable option
  • Conclusion.
This book discusses the economics of the music industry in the context of the changing landscape brought about by innovation, technological change, and rapid digitization. The ability of digital technology to reduce the transaction costs of music copyright licensing has all but destroyed the traditional media business models of incumbent Performance Rights Organizations (PROs), music publishers, record labels, and radio and television stations. In a climate where streaming services are rapidly proliferating and consumers prefer subscription models over direct ownership, new business models, such as direct licensing, are developing. This book provides an overview of the economics of the traditional music industry, the technology-induced changes in business models and copyright law, and the role of publishers, copyright holders and songwriters in the emerging direct licensing model. In Part One, the author examines the economic aspects of direct licensing as an alternative to the traditional blanket license for copyrighted musical compositions, with an emphasis on the often monopolistic nature of PROs. In Part Two, the author focuses on the music publisher and the role direct licensing and competition may play in the changing business models in the music industry and the potential benefits this may bring to copyright holders, such as songwriters. To compliment this model, the author proposes a maximum statutory fixed-rate for musical performances to further streamline the royalty process, especially where distributors such as Google and YouTube are concerned. This book adds to the growing body of literature on the economics of music licensing in the digital age. It will be useful to those in the fields of economics and law, as well as music executives, musicians, songwriters, composers, and other industry professionals who are interested in understanding how technology, innovation and competition have reshaped the music industry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • How direct licensing increased competition. Introduction
  • Music licensing process
  • Copyright law and natural monopolies
  • Traditional blanket license
  • Direct licensing as an alternative to the traditional blanket license
  • Conclusion
  • Why putting music content creators first is important. Introduction
  • Roles of publishers, record labels, and producers
  • Possible new entrant
  • Why the merger could be a viable option
  • Conclusion.
This book discusses the economics of the music industry in the context of the changing landscape brought about by innovation, technological change, and rapid digitization. The ability of digital technology to reduce the transaction costs of music copyright licensing has all but destroyed the traditional media business models of incumbent Performance Rights Organizations (PROs), music publishers, record labels, and radio and television stations. In a climate where streaming services are rapidly proliferating and consumers prefer subscription models over direct ownership, new business models, such as direct licensing, are developing. This book provides an overview of the economics of the traditional music industry, the technology-induced changes in business models and copyright law, and the role of publishers, copyright holders and songwriters in the emerging direct licensing model. In Part One, the author examines the economic aspects of direct licensing as an alternative to the traditional blanket license for copyrighted musical compositions, with an emphasis on the often monopolistic nature of PROs. In Part Two, the author focuses on the music publisher and the role direct licensing and competition may play in the changing business models in the music industry and the potential benefits this may bring to copyright holders, such as songwriters. To compliment this model, the author proposes a maximum statutory fixed-rate for musical performances to further streamline the royalty process, especially where distributors such as Google and YouTube are concerned. This book adds to the growing body of literature on the economics of music licensing in the digital age. It will be useful to those in the fields of economics and law, as well as music executives, musicians, songwriters, composers, and other industry professionals who are interested in understanding how technology, innovation and competition have reshaped the music industry.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Law Library (Crown)
Status of items at Law Library (Crown)
Law Library (Crown) Status
Basement
ML3790 .P58 2015 Unknown
Book
195 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3790 .B38 2015 Unknown
Book
xviii, 461 pages ; 24 cm
Song publishing is the one constant in the carousel of recorded music now spanning the past century, and has been the way that song-credits and publishing revenue have caused ructions and recriminations, and inspired writers by making them poor and lawyers rich. Whether it be Procul Harum going to court to decide who really wrote 'Whiter Shade of Pale' or the Moody Blues wanting their fair share of 'Nights of White Satin', when the song-credits get divvied up, a parting of the ways citing 'musical differences' is almost inevitable. So here are some choice examples of poplore held up to the light, some familiar to music fans others not, designed to prove that Dylan knew of what he wrote when he suggested, 'Money doesn't talk, it swears'. Between them, they provide the unvarnished story of popular song from the days jukeboxes and radio replaced wax cylinders and piano rolls to the era of digital downloads, legal and illegal...
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Song publishing is the one constant in the carousel of recorded music now spanning the past century, and has been the way that song-credits and publishing revenue have caused ructions and recriminations, and inspired writers by making them poor and lawyers rich. Whether it be Procul Harum going to court to decide who really wrote 'Whiter Shade of Pale' or the Moody Blues wanting their fair share of 'Nights of White Satin', when the song-credits get divvied up, a parting of the ways citing 'musical differences' is almost inevitable. So here are some choice examples of poplore held up to the light, some familiar to music fans others not, designed to prove that Dylan knew of what he wrote when he suggested, 'Money doesn't talk, it swears'. Between them, they provide the unvarnished story of popular song from the days jukeboxes and radio replaced wax cylinders and piano rolls to the era of digital downloads, legal and illegal...
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
MT67 .H49 2015 Unknown
Book
263 pages : illustrations, charts, plans ; 24 cm.
  • L'oeuvre musicale et sa représentation -- Introduction -- Au début était le musicien. -- Apprentissage de l'entrepreneuriat -- Collectivisation et virtuosité -- Consécration des droits des musiciens -- Perfectionnement technique et industrialisation -- Formation d'un public -- Spécialisation et multiplication des salles de spectacles -- Premières entreprises musicales -- Le bien musical -- La nature du bien musical -- D'improbables gains de productivité -- La valeur du bien musical -- Le poids économique et social des biens musicaux -- Une pluralité de biens -- L'oeuvre -- L'interprète -- Une chaîne de coopération -- La production de spectacles musicaux -- Des fabriques à musique -- Programmer, au carrefour de l'artistique et de l'économique -- La musique vivante : un écosystème -- Introduction -- Les entreprises musicales -- Les entreprises dans l'écosystème -- Classer les entreprises musicales -- La structure de l'offre musicale -- Les oeuvres -- Les interprètes -- Les salles -- Les concerts et les représentations -- L'animation du marché -- L'éditeur -- L'agent de concert -- La régulation du marché -- Fonction des politiques culturelles -- Un arsenal juridique incitatif et répressif -- La fixation des prix -- Éléments réglementés -- Éléments fixés par accord collectif -- Éléments fixés par le marché -- Le prix des places de concert et d'opéra -- Le prix comme critère de classement des marchés -- La question de la gratuité -- Les marchés de la musique vivante au XXIe siècle -- Introduction -- Et pourtant, le spectacle continue. -- Que devient la loi de Baumol? -- Maîtriser le risque -- Comment justifier la dépense culturelle? -- Une politique de l'offre et ses limites -- La relativité des frontières musicales -- Les nouveaux visages du bien musical -- Une nouvelle place pour le musicien dans la société -- La figure réunifiée du musicien -- Les métamorphoses du concert -- De nouvelles frontières géographiques -- Multiples aspects de l'internationalisation -- Essai de cartographie de la musique vivante.
"Ce livre constitue la première approche de la musique vivante entendue comme un bien au sens économique du terme, ou plutôt comme la combinaison de différents biens (oeuvres, interprètes, salles, etc.) concourant à la production des concerts et des représentations. Au travers d'analyses à la fois historiques, juridiques et économiques, il permet de saisir le rôle de chacun au sein de cet écosystème, ainsi que leurs interactions et les mécanismes de fixation des prix. Les agences de concert, leur fonctionnement et leurs missions n'avaient jamais fait l'objet d'une étude de cette nature, qui prend également en compte leur rôle macroéconomique au niveau mondial. Enfin, l'ouvrage fait le point sur les grandes mutations que vit la musique vivante en ce début de siècle, tant en France, pays aux fortes singularités, qu'au niveau international. Écrit par un musicologue doté d'une expérience de près de vingt ans dans des entreprises musicales de premier plan, ce livre offre une approche innovante d'une question moins étudiée que les politiques culturelles ou l'économie de la musique enregistrée. En cela, il constitue un outil précieux pour l'étudiant ou l'universitaire qu'intéresse l'avenir de la musique dans sa forme représentée, mais aussi pour les professionnels (musiciens, agents, entrepreneurs de spectacles) auxquels il offre une vision détaillée et stratégique de leur environnement."--P. [4] of cover.
  • L'oeuvre musicale et sa représentation -- Introduction -- Au début était le musicien. -- Apprentissage de l'entrepreneuriat -- Collectivisation et virtuosité -- Consécration des droits des musiciens -- Perfectionnement technique et industrialisation -- Formation d'un public -- Spécialisation et multiplication des salles de spectacles -- Premières entreprises musicales -- Le bien musical -- La nature du bien musical -- D'improbables gains de productivité -- La valeur du bien musical -- Le poids économique et social des biens musicaux -- Une pluralité de biens -- L'oeuvre -- L'interprète -- Une chaîne de coopération -- La production de spectacles musicaux -- Des fabriques à musique -- Programmer, au carrefour de l'artistique et de l'économique -- La musique vivante : un écosystème -- Introduction -- Les entreprises musicales -- Les entreprises dans l'écosystème -- Classer les entreprises musicales -- La structure de l'offre musicale -- Les oeuvres -- Les interprètes -- Les salles -- Les concerts et les représentations -- L'animation du marché -- L'éditeur -- L'agent de concert -- La régulation du marché -- Fonction des politiques culturelles -- Un arsenal juridique incitatif et répressif -- La fixation des prix -- Éléments réglementés -- Éléments fixés par accord collectif -- Éléments fixés par le marché -- Le prix des places de concert et d'opéra -- Le prix comme critère de classement des marchés -- La question de la gratuité -- Les marchés de la musique vivante au XXIe siècle -- Introduction -- Et pourtant, le spectacle continue. -- Que devient la loi de Baumol? -- Maîtriser le risque -- Comment justifier la dépense culturelle? -- Une politique de l'offre et ses limites -- La relativité des frontières musicales -- Les nouveaux visages du bien musical -- Une nouvelle place pour le musicien dans la société -- La figure réunifiée du musicien -- Les métamorphoses du concert -- De nouvelles frontières géographiques -- Multiples aspects de l'internationalisation -- Essai de cartographie de la musique vivante.
"Ce livre constitue la première approche de la musique vivante entendue comme un bien au sens économique du terme, ou plutôt comme la combinaison de différents biens (oeuvres, interprètes, salles, etc.) concourant à la production des concerts et des représentations. Au travers d'analyses à la fois historiques, juridiques et économiques, il permet de saisir le rôle de chacun au sein de cet écosystème, ainsi que leurs interactions et les mécanismes de fixation des prix. Les agences de concert, leur fonctionnement et leurs missions n'avaient jamais fait l'objet d'une étude de cette nature, qui prend également en compte leur rôle macroéconomique au niveau mondial. Enfin, l'ouvrage fait le point sur les grandes mutations que vit la musique vivante en ce début de siècle, tant en France, pays aux fortes singularités, qu'au niveau international. Écrit par un musicologue doté d'une expérience de près de vingt ans dans des entreprises musicales de premier plan, ce livre offre une approche innovante d'une question moins étudiée que les politiques culturelles ou l'économie de la musique enregistrée. En cela, il constitue un outil précieux pour l'étudiant ou l'universitaire qu'intéresse l'avenir de la musique dans sa forme représentée, mais aussi pour les professionnels (musiciens, agents, entrepreneurs de spectacles) auxquels il offre une vision détaillée et stratégique de leur environnement."--P. [4] of cover.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML457 .D46 2015 Unavailable On order Request
Book
250 pages ; 24 cm
  • 1. Introduction 2. Adele-o-nomics 3. The Never Ending Death of Music 4. Does Anyone Know Anything About Anything? 5. The Production and Supply of Music 6. Consumption of Music 7. Age 8. Gender 9. Race and Ethnicity 10. International Trade 11. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Much recent economic work on the music industry has been focused on the impact of technology on demand, with predictions being made of digital copyright infringement leading to the demise of the industry. In fact, there have always been profound cyclical swings in music media sales owing to the fact that music always has been, and continues to be, a discretionary purchase. This entertaining and accessible book offers an analysis of the production and consumption of music from a social economics approach. Locating music within the economic analysis of social behaviour, this books guides the reader through issues relating to production, supply, consumption and trends, wider considerations such as the international trade in music, and in particular through divisions of age, race and gender. Providing an engaging overview of this fascinating topic, this book will be of interest and relevance to students and scholars of cultural economics, management, musicology, cultural studies and those with an interest in the music industry more generally.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • 1. Introduction 2. Adele-o-nomics 3. The Never Ending Death of Music 4. Does Anyone Know Anything About Anything? 5. The Production and Supply of Music 6. Consumption of Music 7. Age 8. Gender 9. Race and Ethnicity 10. International Trade 11. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Much recent economic work on the music industry has been focused on the impact of technology on demand, with predictions being made of digital copyright infringement leading to the demise of the industry. In fact, there have always been profound cyclical swings in music media sales owing to the fact that music always has been, and continues to be, a discretionary purchase. This entertaining and accessible book offers an analysis of the production and consumption of music from a social economics approach. Locating music within the economic analysis of social behaviour, this books guides the reader through issues relating to production, supply, consumption and trends, wider considerations such as the international trade in music, and in particular through divisions of age, race and gender. Providing an engaging overview of this fascinating topic, this book will be of interest and relevance to students and scholars of cultural economics, management, musicology, cultural studies and those with an interest in the music industry more generally.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3790 .C26 2015 Unknown

12. Original Rockers [2015]

Book
252 p. ; 22 cm
Twenty years ago every town had one. From Bangor to Bradford, Bognor Regis to Bournemouth, independent record shops could be found on every high street and many back streets, across the length and breadth of the land. But as the principal format for music switched from vinyl to CD, these places - synonymous with the thrill of discovery experienced by every serious fan and collector - started to disappear. Vinyl has recovered but its natural environment - the record store - is a rare and precious beast. Richard King's book about several years spent working in Bristol's Revolver, is a clear-eyed yet romantic account of life behind the counter in a business run from the heart not the head with a tendency towards dysfunction. In ten chapters of elegiac prose, King brings this lost environment back to life: the smells, the people, and of course the sounds. We see the landscape of a young person's taste come into view with magnificent passages on CAN, Captain Beefheart, Augustus Pablo, Rod Stewart, Sun Ra Arkestra and the free jazz of Cornelius Cardew. And we see the development of Bristol as one of the key musical cities, from its roots sound systems, through the parties run by the Wild Bunch collective, to the emergence of Massive Attack. Original Rockers evokes a golden moment about to turn to dust in the history of British record stores and celebrates the abandon with which we hear music, and it does so magically, without recourse to nostalgia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Twenty years ago every town had one. From Bangor to Bradford, Bognor Regis to Bournemouth, independent record shops could be found on every high street and many back streets, across the length and breadth of the land. But as the principal format for music switched from vinyl to CD, these places - synonymous with the thrill of discovery experienced by every serious fan and collector - started to disappear. Vinyl has recovered but its natural environment - the record store - is a rare and precious beast. Richard King's book about several years spent working in Bristol's Revolver, is a clear-eyed yet romantic account of life behind the counter in a business run from the heart not the head with a tendency towards dysfunction. In ten chapters of elegiac prose, King brings this lost environment back to life: the smells, the people, and of course the sounds. We see the landscape of a young person's taste come into view with magnificent passages on CAN, Captain Beefheart, Augustus Pablo, Rod Stewart, Sun Ra Arkestra and the free jazz of Cornelius Cardew. And we see the development of Bristol as one of the key musical cities, from its roots sound systems, through the parties run by the Wild Bunch collective, to the emergence of Massive Attack. Original Rockers evokes a golden moment about to turn to dust in the history of British record stores and celebrates the abandon with which we hear music, and it does so magically, without recourse to nostalgia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Archive of Recorded Sound
Status of items at Archive of Recorded Sound
Archive of Recorded Sound Status
Reference
ML3790 .K4648 2015 In-library use
Book
xiv, 265 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • List of Figures Acknowledgments Introduction: The Digital Music Commodity 1. Music as a Digital File 2. Making Technology Behave 3. This Business of Napster 4. Click to Buy: Music in Digital Stores 5. Music in the Cloud Conclusion: Exceptional Objects Notes Works Cited Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Selling Digital Music, Formatting Culture documents the transition of recorded music on CDs to music as digital files on computers. More than two decades after the first digital music files began circulating in online archives and playing through new software media players, we have yet to fully internalize the cultural and aesthetic consequences of these shifts. Tracing the emergence of what Jeremy Wade Morris calls the "digital music commodity, " Selling Digital Music, Formatting Culture considers how a conflicted assemblage of technologies, users, and industries helped reformat popular music's meanings and uses. Through case studies of five key technologies - Winamp, metadata, Napster, iTunes, and cloud computing - this book explores how music listeners gradually came to understand computers and digital files as suitable replacements for their stereos and CD. Morris connects industrial production, popular culture, technology, and commerce in a narrative involving the aesthetics of music and computers, and the labor of producers and everyday users, as well as the value that listeners make and take from digital objects and cultural goods. Above all, Selling Digital Music, Formatting Culture is a sounding out of music's encounters with the interfaces, metadata, and algorithms of digital culture and of why the shifting form of the music commodity matters for the music and other media we love.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • List of Figures Acknowledgments Introduction: The Digital Music Commodity 1. Music as a Digital File 2. Making Technology Behave 3. This Business of Napster 4. Click to Buy: Music in Digital Stores 5. Music in the Cloud Conclusion: Exceptional Objects Notes Works Cited Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Selling Digital Music, Formatting Culture documents the transition of recorded music on CDs to music as digital files on computers. More than two decades after the first digital music files began circulating in online archives and playing through new software media players, we have yet to fully internalize the cultural and aesthetic consequences of these shifts. Tracing the emergence of what Jeremy Wade Morris calls the "digital music commodity, " Selling Digital Music, Formatting Culture considers how a conflicted assemblage of technologies, users, and industries helped reformat popular music's meanings and uses. Through case studies of five key technologies - Winamp, metadata, Napster, iTunes, and cloud computing - this book explores how music listeners gradually came to understand computers and digital files as suitable replacements for their stereos and CD. Morris connects industrial production, popular culture, technology, and commerce in a narrative involving the aesthetics of music and computers, and the labor of producers and everyday users, as well as the value that listeners make and take from digital objects and cultural goods. Above all, Selling Digital Music, Formatting Culture is a sounding out of music's encounters with the interfaces, metadata, and algorithms of digital culture and of why the shifting form of the music commodity matters for the music and other media we love.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3790 .M618 2015 Unknown
Book
x, 338 pages ; 24 cm
  • Hook: The bliss point. You spin me round ; A continuity of hits
  • First verse: Cheiron : Mr. Pop: and the Metalhead. Inside the box ; "The sign" ; Big Poppa ; Martin Sandberg's terrible secret ; Britney Spears : hit me baby ; "I want it that way"
  • Chorus The money note : the ballad of Kelly and Clive. My ancestral hit parade ; The dragon's teeth ; The doldrums ; American Idol ; "Since u been gone"
  • Second verse: Factory girls : cultural technology and the making of K-pop. "Gee"
  • Chorus: Rihanna : track-and-hook. "Umbrella" ; "Ester Dean: On the hook" ; Stargate: those lanky Norwegian dudes ; "Rude boy"
  • Bridge: Dr. Luke : teenage dream. Speed chess ; Katy Perry : altar call ; Melodic math ; Kesha : teenage nightmare
  • Chorus: Spotify. The moment space
  • Outro: Songworm. "Roar".
Over the last two decades a new type of hit song has emerged, one that is almost inescapably catchy. Pop songs have always had a "hook, " but today's songs bristle with them: a hook every seven seconds is the rule. Painstakingly crafted to tweak the brain's delight in melody, rhythm, and repetition, these songs are highly processed products. Like snack-food engineers, modern songwriters have discovered the musical "bliss point." And just like junk food, the bliss point leaves you wanting more. In The Song Machine, longtime New Yorker staff writer John Seabrook tells the story of the massive cultural upheaval that produced these new, super-strength hits. Seabrook takes us into a strange and surprising world, full of unexpected and vivid characters, as he traces the growth of this new approach to hit-making from its obscure origins in early 1990s Sweden to its dominance of today's Billboard charts. Journeying from New York to Los Angeles, Stockholm to Korea, Seabrook visits specialized teams composing songs in digital labs with new "track-and-hook" techniques. The stories of artists like Katy Perry, Britney Spears, and Rihanna, as well as expert songsmiths like Max Martin, Stargate, Ester Dean, and Dr. Luke, The Song Machine shows what life is like in an industry that has been catastrophically disrupted-spurring innovation, competition, intense greed, and seductive new products. Going beyond music to discuss money, business, marketing, and technology, The Song Machine explores what the new hits may be doing to our brains and listening habits, especially as services like Spotify and Apple Music use streaming data to gather music into new genres invented by algorithms based on listener behavior. Fascinating, revelatory, and original, The Song Machine will change the way you listen to music.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Hook: The bliss point. You spin me round ; A continuity of hits
  • First verse: Cheiron : Mr. Pop: and the Metalhead. Inside the box ; "The sign" ; Big Poppa ; Martin Sandberg's terrible secret ; Britney Spears : hit me baby ; "I want it that way"
  • Chorus The money note : the ballad of Kelly and Clive. My ancestral hit parade ; The dragon's teeth ; The doldrums ; American Idol ; "Since u been gone"
  • Second verse: Factory girls : cultural technology and the making of K-pop. "Gee"
  • Chorus: Rihanna : track-and-hook. "Umbrella" ; "Ester Dean: On the hook" ; Stargate: those lanky Norwegian dudes ; "Rude boy"
  • Bridge: Dr. Luke : teenage dream. Speed chess ; Katy Perry : altar call ; Melodic math ; Kesha : teenage nightmare
  • Chorus: Spotify. The moment space
  • Outro: Songworm. "Roar".
Over the last two decades a new type of hit song has emerged, one that is almost inescapably catchy. Pop songs have always had a "hook, " but today's songs bristle with them: a hook every seven seconds is the rule. Painstakingly crafted to tweak the brain's delight in melody, rhythm, and repetition, these songs are highly processed products. Like snack-food engineers, modern songwriters have discovered the musical "bliss point." And just like junk food, the bliss point leaves you wanting more. In The Song Machine, longtime New Yorker staff writer John Seabrook tells the story of the massive cultural upheaval that produced these new, super-strength hits. Seabrook takes us into a strange and surprising world, full of unexpected and vivid characters, as he traces the growth of this new approach to hit-making from its obscure origins in early 1990s Sweden to its dominance of today's Billboard charts. Journeying from New York to Los Angeles, Stockholm to Korea, Seabrook visits specialized teams composing songs in digital labs with new "track-and-hook" techniques. The stories of artists like Katy Perry, Britney Spears, and Rihanna, as well as expert songsmiths like Max Martin, Stargate, Ester Dean, and Dr. Luke, The Song Machine shows what life is like in an industry that has been catastrophically disrupted-spurring innovation, competition, intense greed, and seductive new products. Going beyond music to discuss money, business, marketing, and technology, The Song Machine explores what the new hits may be doing to our brains and listening habits, especially as services like Spotify and Apple Music use streaming data to gather music into new genres invented by algorithms based on listener behavior. Fascinating, revelatory, and original, The Song Machine will change the way you listen to music.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Business Library
Status of items at Business Library
Business Library Status
Stacks
ML3790 .S382 2015 Unknown
Book
x, 338 pages ; 24 cm
  • Hook: The bliss point. You spin me round
  • A continuity of hits
  • First verse: Cheiron : Mr. Pop: and the Metalhead. Inside the box ; "The sign"
  • Big Poppa ; Martin Sandberg's terrible secret
  • Britney Spears : hit me baby
  • "I want it that way"
  • Chorus: The money note: the ballad of Kelly and Clive. My ancestral hit parade
  • The dragon's teeth
  • The doldrums
  • American Idol
  • "Since u been gone"
  • Second verse: Factory girls : cultural technology and the making of K-pop. "Gee"
  • Chorus: Rihanna : track-and-hook. "Umbrella"
  • "Ester Dean: On the hook"
  • Stargate: those lanky Norwegian dudes
  • "Rude boy"
  • Bridge: Dr. Luke : teenage dream. Speed chess ; Katy Perry : altar call ; Melodic math ; Kesha : teenage nightmare
  • Chorus: Spotify. The moment space
  • Outro: Songworm. "Roar".
There's a reason hit songs offer such guilty pleasure--they're designed that way. Over the last two decades a new type of hit song has emerged, one that is almost inescapably catchy. Pop songs have always had a "hook, " but today's songs bristle with them: a hook every seven seconds is the rule. Painstakingly crafted to tweak the brain's delight in melody, rhythm, and repetition, these songs are highly processed products. Like snack-food engineers, modern songwriters have discovered the musical "bliss point." And just like junk food, the bliss point leaves you wanting more. In The Song Machine, longtime New Yorker staff writer John Seabrook tells the story of the massive cultural upheaval that produced these new, super-strength hits. Seabrook takes us into a strange and surprising world, full of unexpected and vivid characters, as he traces the growth of this new approach to hit-making from its obscure origins in early 1990s Sweden to its dominance of today's Billboard charts. Going beyond music to discuss money, business, marketing, and technology, The Song Machine explores what the new hits may be doing to our brains and listening habits, especially as services like Spotify and Apple Music use streaming data to gather music into new genres invented by algorithms based on listener behavior. Revelatory and original, this book will change the way you listen to music.--Adapted from book jacket.
  • Hook: The bliss point. You spin me round
  • A continuity of hits
  • First verse: Cheiron : Mr. Pop: and the Metalhead. Inside the box ; "The sign"
  • Big Poppa ; Martin Sandberg's terrible secret
  • Britney Spears : hit me baby
  • "I want it that way"
  • Chorus: The money note: the ballad of Kelly and Clive. My ancestral hit parade
  • The dragon's teeth
  • The doldrums
  • American Idol
  • "Since u been gone"
  • Second verse: Factory girls : cultural technology and the making of K-pop. "Gee"
  • Chorus: Rihanna : track-and-hook. "Umbrella"
  • "Ester Dean: On the hook"
  • Stargate: those lanky Norwegian dudes
  • "Rude boy"
  • Bridge: Dr. Luke : teenage dream. Speed chess ; Katy Perry : altar call ; Melodic math ; Kesha : teenage nightmare
  • Chorus: Spotify. The moment space
  • Outro: Songworm. "Roar".
There's a reason hit songs offer such guilty pleasure--they're designed that way. Over the last two decades a new type of hit song has emerged, one that is almost inescapably catchy. Pop songs have always had a "hook, " but today's songs bristle with them: a hook every seven seconds is the rule. Painstakingly crafted to tweak the brain's delight in melody, rhythm, and repetition, these songs are highly processed products. Like snack-food engineers, modern songwriters have discovered the musical "bliss point." And just like junk food, the bliss point leaves you wanting more. In The Song Machine, longtime New Yorker staff writer John Seabrook tells the story of the massive cultural upheaval that produced these new, super-strength hits. Seabrook takes us into a strange and surprising world, full of unexpected and vivid characters, as he traces the growth of this new approach to hit-making from its obscure origins in early 1990s Sweden to its dominance of today's Billboard charts. Going beyond music to discuss money, business, marketing, and technology, The Song Machine explores what the new hits may be doing to our brains and listening habits, especially as services like Spotify and Apple Music use streaming data to gather music into new genres invented by algorithms based on listener behavior. Revelatory and original, this book will change the way you listen to music.--Adapted from book jacket.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3790 .S382 2015 Unavailable On order Request
Book
154 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction 1. The Technology of Music 2. Rise of the Machine 3. Digital Music 4. The New Intermediaries 5. Star Wars 6. What about Me? 7. Shaking the Foundations 8. It's the Music, Stupid Appendix 1 Bibliography Discography Filmography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Description The music industry, as with most other media forms, is in the middle of a period of enormous transformation. Digital technologies have empowered producers and consumers of music - traditional ways of making and distributing music are under threat as musicians and their audiences embrace new opportunities, many of which bypass the incumbent middlemen. Whilst it is clear that the music industry is thriving, the traditional recording industry, dominated by a handful of multinational corporations is struggling to stay relevant. The changes are so dramatic that the term "Music 2.0" has become commonly used to delineate old and new business models and approaches. But the demise of the traditional music industry is overstating things - the reality is that (whilst their profits may be diminishing) they still dominate a multi-billion dollar marketplace and exercise unprecedented control over the star-making process. And, of course, they have the resources to be able to reinvent themselves. The actual future of music is a complex and contested one. This book aims to unpack that complexity, map the changes and explain the causes and motivations surrounding an industry undergoing change. It explores the world of popular music from three distinct perspectives. Firstly, it examines the new opportunities available to consumers of music - interrogating how the lines between production and consumption are blurring, creating fans who do much more than just listen to music. Secondly, it draws on interviews with a diverse range of musicians explaining their place in the brave new world and trying to articulate their newly defined roles. Finally, it examines the industry itself, and unpack the responses to current challenges from new and old players alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Introduction 1. The Technology of Music 2. Rise of the Machine 3. Digital Music 4. The New Intermediaries 5. Star Wars 6. What about Me? 7. Shaking the Foundations 8. It's the Music, Stupid Appendix 1 Bibliography Discography Filmography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Description The music industry, as with most other media forms, is in the middle of a period of enormous transformation. Digital technologies have empowered producers and consumers of music - traditional ways of making and distributing music are under threat as musicians and their audiences embrace new opportunities, many of which bypass the incumbent middlemen. Whilst it is clear that the music industry is thriving, the traditional recording industry, dominated by a handful of multinational corporations is struggling to stay relevant. The changes are so dramatic that the term "Music 2.0" has become commonly used to delineate old and new business models and approaches. But the demise of the traditional music industry is overstating things - the reality is that (whilst their profits may be diminishing) they still dominate a multi-billion dollar marketplace and exercise unprecedented control over the star-making process. And, of course, they have the resources to be able to reinvent themselves. The actual future of music is a complex and contested one. This book aims to unpack that complexity, map the changes and explain the causes and motivations surrounding an industry undergoing change. It explores the world of popular music from three distinct perspectives. Firstly, it examines the new opportunities available to consumers of music - interrogating how the lines between production and consumption are blurring, creating fans who do much more than just listen to music. Secondly, it draws on interviews with a diverse range of musicians explaining their place in the brave new world and trying to articulate their newly defined roles. Finally, it examines the industry itself, and unpack the responses to current challenges from new and old players alike.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3790 .C665 2014 Unknown
Book
xi, 202 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • Musicians and the segregated city : Chicago in the early 1900s-1930s
  • From south to south side : musicians in 1940s Chicago
  • Redefining the music industry : independent music in Chicago, 1948-1953
  • From south side to the south and the nation, 1954-1963
  • Dissonance and the desegregation of Chicago's musicians' union, 1963-1967.
  • Musicians and the segregated city : Chicago in the early 1900s-1930s
  • From south to south side : musicians in 1940s Chicago
  • Redefining the music industry : independent music in Chicago, 1948-1953
  • From south side to the south and the nation, 1954-1963
  • Dissonance and the desegregation of Chicago's musicians' union, 1963-1967.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3479 .A26 2014 Unknown
Book
336 p. ; 23 cm.
Green Library
Status of items at Green Library
Green Library Status
Stacks Find it
ML3535.5 .T32 2014 Unknown
Book
427 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 cm
  • Vorwort
  • Einleitung
  • Einführung : das Label
  • Definition
  • Aufgaben eines Labels
  • Struktur eines Labels
  • Unterschiede Indie vs. Majors : Spezialisten vs. Allrounder
  • Über die Notwendigkeit von Labels
  • Die Musikindustrie
  • Die Entstehung und Entwicklung der Musikindustrie
  • Der Musikmarkt in Deutschland
  • Orientierungsinstrumente der Musikindustrie
  • Das Konzept Genre
  • Die Marke
  • Genres und Marken in der Musikindustrie
  • Zwischenbilanz : die Beziehungen zwischen Genres und Marken in der Musik
  • Die Bedeutung des Medienumbruchs für die Musikb6ranche
  • Die Time-Konvergenz
  • Das Tsunami-Modell
  • Merkmale und Eigenschaften der Neuen Medien
  • Auswirkungen auf die Musikbranche
  • Genres und Marken in der digitalen Musikwelt
  • Orientierungsinstrumente in der heutigen Musikindustrie
  • Das Konzept Genre bei Labels in der Praxis
  • Markenführungsansätze bei Labels in der Praxis
  • Labels und die Orientierungsinstrumente Genre und Marke
  • Ausblick
  • Quellen und Literatur.
  • Vorwort
  • Einleitung
  • Einführung : das Label
  • Definition
  • Aufgaben eines Labels
  • Struktur eines Labels
  • Unterschiede Indie vs. Majors : Spezialisten vs. Allrounder
  • Über die Notwendigkeit von Labels
  • Die Musikindustrie
  • Die Entstehung und Entwicklung der Musikindustrie
  • Der Musikmarkt in Deutschland
  • Orientierungsinstrumente der Musikindustrie
  • Das Konzept Genre
  • Die Marke
  • Genres und Marken in der Musikindustrie
  • Zwischenbilanz : die Beziehungen zwischen Genres und Marken in der Musik
  • Die Bedeutung des Medienumbruchs für die Musikb6ranche
  • Die Time-Konvergenz
  • Das Tsunami-Modell
  • Merkmale und Eigenschaften der Neuen Medien
  • Auswirkungen auf die Musikbranche
  • Genres und Marken in der digitalen Musikwelt
  • Orientierungsinstrumente in der heutigen Musikindustrie
  • Das Konzept Genre bei Labels in der Praxis
  • Markenführungsansätze bei Labels in der Praxis
  • Labels und die Orientierungsinstrumente Genre und Marke
  • Ausblick
  • Quellen und Literatur.
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3790 .S561 2014 Unknown
Book
xiv, 306 pages, 28 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Herbert's victory
  • Buck stops here
  • Radio waves
  • TV vs. rock 'n' roll
  • The comeback
  • Seeding the garden of creativity
  • New blood, Nashville, and Capitol Hill
  • Gridlock, grants, and gigabytes
  • A common cause
  • Follow the dollar
  • Playback and fast forward.
On February 13, 1914, a group of the nation's most distinguished and popular songwriters gathered together in New York City to support the mission of ASCAP, a new organization for publishers and songwriters. A few years later, ASCAP received its mandate from the Supreme Court to collect royalties for the public performance of copyrighted material. Over the course the next century, ASCAP has been as prominent a force for the advancement and nurture and financial well-being of songwriters as any record label or publishing outfit one would care to name. With a responsive board of directors made up entirely of songwriter/composer and publisher members, ASCAP has defended creators' rights at every turn against those who would seek to devalue music. Today, with copyright under renewed assault, its mission is as resonant and vital as ever, along with its relatively new role as a nurturer of the young artists who represent the future of music. Award-winning music writer Bruce Pollock explores the growth and changes within this complex society and its relationship to emerging technologies, in the context of 100 years of an ever-evolving music business, to see how ASCAP has become, for those who hope to make a living making music, now more than ever, a friend in the music business.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
  • Herbert's victory
  • Buck stops here
  • Radio waves
  • TV vs. rock 'n' roll
  • The comeback
  • Seeding the garden of creativity
  • New blood, Nashville, and Capitol Hill
  • Gridlock, grants, and gigabytes
  • A common cause
  • Follow the dollar
  • Playback and fast forward.
On February 13, 1914, a group of the nation's most distinguished and popular songwriters gathered together in New York City to support the mission of ASCAP, a new organization for publishers and songwriters. A few years later, ASCAP received its mandate from the Supreme Court to collect royalties for the public performance of copyrighted material. Over the course the next century, ASCAP has been as prominent a force for the advancement and nurture and financial well-being of songwriters as any record label or publishing outfit one would care to name. With a responsive board of directors made up entirely of songwriter/composer and publisher members, ASCAP has defended creators' rights at every turn against those who would seek to devalue music. Today, with copyright under renewed assault, its mission is as resonant and vital as ever, along with its relatively new role as a nurturer of the young artists who represent the future of music. Award-winning music writer Bruce Pollock explores the growth and changes within this complex society and its relationship to emerging technologies, in the context of 100 years of an ever-evolving music business, to see how ASCAP has become, for those who hope to make a living making music, now more than ever, a friend in the music business.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Status of items at Music Library
Music Library Status
Stacks
ML3790 .P66 2014 Unknown

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