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Book
vi, 296 pages : illustrations, music ; 24 cm
  • IntroductionBruce JohnsonCultural Contexts1. Demons of Discord Down Under: "Jump Jim Crow" and "Australia's First Jazz Band"John Whiteoak, Monash University2. Early Jazz in Australia as Oriental ExoticaAline Scott-Maxwell, Monash University3. Got a Little Rhythm: The Australian Influence on Swing in New Zealand during the 1930s and 1940sAleisha Ward, jazz writer4. Jazz in Adelaide and Melbourne in the Angry Penguins DecadeBruce Clunies-Ross, University of Copenhagen5. Cuba Street Parade: Identity, Authenticity and Self-expression in Contemporary Australasian Jazz ScenesNick Tipping, musicianInfrastructures6. How Jazz was Taken Out of the History of Australian Music TelevisionLiz Giuffre, University of Technology, Sydney7. Shotgun Weddings and Bohemian Dreams: Jazz, Family Values and Storytelling in Australian FilmChristopher Coady, Sydney Conservatorium of Music, University of Sydney8. Perspectives on the Melbourne International Women's Jazz FestivalMarjorie Louise Denson, Queensland Conservatorium, Brisbane 9. A Tale of Five Festivals: A Study of Five Australian Jazz Festivals from 2004 to 2014Brent Keogh, Macquarie University and University of Technology, SydneyMusicians10. 'I Wouldn't Change Skins with Anybody': Dulcie Pitt/Georgia Lee, a Pioneering Indigenous Australian Jazz, Blues and Community SingerKarl Neuenfeldt, musician11. Lydia in Oz: The Reception of George Russell in 1960s AustraliaPierre-Emmanuel Seguin, musician12. Examining the Legend and Music of Australian Saxophonist, Frank SmithRalph Whiteoak, doctoral student13. Expressive Ientity in the Voices of Three Australian Saxophonists: McGann, Sanders and Gorman Sandy Evans, Sydney Conservatorium of Music, University of Sydney14. Sex and the Sonic Smorgasbord - The NecksJane Galbraith, jazz musician.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Antipodean Riffs is a collection of essays on Australian jazz and jazz in Australia. Chronologically they range from what could be called the 'prehistory' of the music - the tradition of US-sourced African-American music that predated the arrival of music billed as 'jazz' - to the present. Thematically they include studies of framing infrastructural mechanisms including the media. The volume also incorporates case studies of particular musicians or groups that reflect distinctive aspects of the Australian jazz tradition.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Book
224 pages : illustrations (some color); 32 cm
Music Library
Book
xvi, 261 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Performing jazz diaspora with Sidney Bechet
  • Jazz at home in France: French jazz musicians on the war path to "authentic" jazz
  • Inez Cavanaugh: creating and complicating jazz community
  • Boris Vian & James Baldwin in Paris: are we a blues people too?
  • Kenny Clarke's journey between "black" and "universal" music
  • Coda: beyond color-blind narratives: reading behind the scenes of Paris blues.
At the close of the Second World War, waves of African American musicians migrated to Paris, eager to thrive in its reinvigorated jazz scene. Jazz Diasporas challenges the notion that Paris was a color-blind paradise for African Americans. On the contrary, musicians adopted a variety of strategies to cope with the cultural and social assumptions that confronted them throughout their careers in Paris, particularly as France became embroiled in struggles over race and identity when colonial conflicts like the Algerian War escalated. Using case studies of prominent musicians and thoughtful analysis of interviews, music, film, and literature, Rashida K. Braggs investigates the impact of this postwar musical migration. She examines key figures including musicians Sidney Bechet, Inez Cavanaugh, and Kenny Clarke and writer and social critic James Baldwin to show how they performed both as artists and as African Americans. Their collaborations with French musicians and critics complicated racial and cultural understandings of who could represent "authentic" jazz and created spaces for shifting racial and national identities-what Braggs terms "jazz diasporas.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library

4. Listening to jazz [2016]

Book
xxiv, 374 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 28 cm
Music Library
Book
xii, 264 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Miles goes electric
  • "Bitches brew, " in the studio and on the road
  • Anthony Braxton: Leroy Jenkins, Musica Elettronica Viva, and the "Peace Church" concert
  • Interlude: musical rumblings in Chelsea
  • Miles Davis's increasingly electric 1970, and a reflection on his 1971-75 bands
  • Circle
  • The Revolutionary Ensemble
  • Ornette Coleman's children: comparisons and contrasts inside and outside the jazz economy.
Miles Davis's Bitches Brew is one of the most iconic albums in American music, the preeminent landmark and fertile seedbed of jazz-fusion. Fans have been fortunate in the past few years to gain access to Davis's live recordings from this time, when he was working with an ensemble that has come to be known as the Lost Quintet. In this book, jazz historian and musician Bob Gluck explores the performances of this revolutionary group-Davis's first electric band-to illuminate the thinking of one of our rarest geniuses and, by extension, the extraordinary transition in American music that he and his fellow players ushered in. Gluck listens deeply to the uneasy tension between this group's driving rhythmic groove and the sonic and structural openness, surprise, and experimentation they were always pushing toward. There he hears-and outlines-a fascinating web of musical interconnection that brings Davis's funk-inflected sensibilities into conversation with the avant-garde worlds that players like Ornette Coleman and John Coltrane were developing. Going on to analyze the little-known experimental groups Circle and the Revolutionary Ensemble, Gluck traces deep resonances across a commercial gap between the celebrity Miles Davis and his less famous but profoundly innovative peers. The result is a deeply attuned look at a pivotal moment when once-disparate worlds of American music came together in explosively creative combinations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Book
xiii, 235 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
  • We live here
  • From frontier to jazz mecca
  • Jackson Street and Williams Avenue: 1940-1959
  • The dark ages: 1960-1972
  • The renaissance: 1973-1982
  • Coming of age: 1983-1993
  • A rising tide: 1994-1999
  • Riding the wave: 1999-2007
  • Freedom on the margins: 2008-2015
  • An uncertain future.
Music Library
Book
224 pages, xxxii pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm
Music Library
Book
64 pages : illustrations ; 38 cm
  • The faces of jazz / Ted Gioia
  • Meet me at the lighthouse / Dana Gioia
  • The faces of jazz / James G. Todd, Jr.
Paying homage to a quintessential American style of music, known for its spontaneity and improvisation, this edition blends evocative jazzmen portraiture with new and highly personal characterizations of the music. Jazz is embodied music. Here you will find portraits of eight iconic jazz figures, engraved by James G. Todd Jr., an innovator in the field of wood engraving. Accompanying these penetrating engravings are words from jazz pianist and writer Ted Gioia, author of The History of Jazz, and poetry from his brother Dana Gioia, poet and former Chairman for the National Endowment for the Arts.
Special Collections
Book
viii, 297 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Histories of jazz in France
  • Hugues Panassié's supernatural swing : criticism, politics and the iconic jazz recording
  • Jazz between art and entertainment : André Hodeir and Thelonious Monk
  • Cool going cold : Miles Davis and Ascenseur pour l'échafaud
  • Barney Wilen : phantoms and freedom
  • Looking for something we don't yet know : towards a French jazz
  • A good jazzman is a dead jazzman.
Music Library
Book
103 pages : many photographs ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
72 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 x 30 cm
Music Library
Book
52 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Book
ix, 229 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Prelude
  • Memphis soil
  • Out West, and then East
  • Marquee trajectory
  • The wilderness years
  • The Munich connection
  • Dialoguing with master Higgins
  • New millennial dance steps
  • Postlude : horizons on the run.
Music Library
Book
32 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Book
xvi, 194 pages ; 23 cm
  • Setting up
  • A rhetorical aesthetic of jazz
  • What jazz is
  • Where jazz comes from
  • What jazz does
  • How jazz works
  • So what?
Jazz is born of collaboration, improvisation, and listening. In much the same way, the American democratic experience is rooted in the interaction of individuals. It is these two seemingly disparate, but ultimately thoroughly American, conceits that Gregory Clark examines in Civic Jazz. Melding Kenneth Burke's concept of rhetorical communication and jazz music's aesthetic encounters with a rigorous sort of democracy, this book weaves an innovative argument about how individuals can preserve and improve civic life in a democratic culture. Jazz music, Clark argues, demonstrates how this aesthetic rhetoric of identification can bind people together through their shared experience in a common project. While such shared experience does not demand agreement-indeed, it often has an air of competition-it does align people in practical effort and purpose. Similarly, Clark shows, Burke considered Americans inhabitants of a persistently rhetorical situation, in which each must choose constantly to identify with some and separate from others. Thought-provoking and path-breaking, Clark's harmonic mashup of music and rhetoric will appeal to scholars across disciplines as diverse as political science, performance studies, musicology, and literary criticism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Book
ix, 265 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Apostles of sound
  • The self-representation and spiritual teachings of John Coltrane the Saint
  • Jimbo's Bop City
  • The Yardbird Club and the history of African American jazz entrepreneurship in San Francisco
  • The Dr. Huey P. Newton experience
  • The Yardbird and One Mind Temple and new church movements in the 1960s and '70s
  • The Alice Coltrane experience
  • The African Orthodox Church
  • Anatomy of a miracle
  • The Oscar Grant movement
  • The John Coltrane University of Arts and Social Justice
  • The battle against environmental racism
  • The ordination of Pastor Wanika Kristi King-Stephens
  • The apostles of sound Occupy SF
  • Answering the prophetic call.
The John Coltrane Church began in 1965, when Franzo and Marina King attended a performance of the John Coltrane Quartet at San Francisco's Jazz Workshop and saw a vision of the Holy Ghost as Coltrane took the bandstand. Celebrating the spirituality of the late jazz innovator and his music, the storefront church emerged during the demise of black-owned jazz clubs in San Francisco, and at a time of growing disillusionment with counter-culture spirituality following the 1978 Jonestown tragedy. The ideology of the church was refined through alliances with the Black Panther Party, Alice Coltrane, the African Orthodox Church and the Nation of Islam. For 50 years, the church has - in the name of its patron saint, John Coltrane - effectively fought redevelopment, environmental racism, police brutality, mortgage foreclosures, religious intolerance, gender disparity and the corporatization of jazz. This critical history is the first book-length treatment of the evolution, beliefs and practices of an extraordinary African-American church and community institution.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Book
xii, 250 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction: Jazz as a Collective Problem Nicholas Gebhardt 2. Complaining Time is Over:" Network and Collective Strategies of The New York Musicians Organization Michael C. Heller 3. Playing politics: Dutch improvising musicians facing the authorities Loes Rusch 4. Sound Visions and Free Initiatives: The Cultural Politics of Creative Improvised Music Collectives A. Scott Currie 5. Musical Hybridity in the New European City: The Jazz Hip Hop Collectives of C-Mon & Kypski and Kytopia Kristin McGee 6. Collective Cultures and Live Jazz in Birmingham Tim Wall and Simon Barber 7. San Francisco State University's Music Federation: The Political Machine behind a Jazz Cooperative for Teachers Meredith Eliassen 8. MINNET: Transcending Genre Boundaries, Organizing Diversity Alf Arvidsson and Jorgen Adolfsson 9. 'Wonderbrass' as a South Wales Community Jazz Collective Rob Smith 10. Jazz networks in Austria - the young initiative JazzWerkstatt Christa Bruckner-Haring and Michael Kahr 11. Improvisational conduct and case studies from the margins - an insider's view on negotiating the collective Petter Frost Fadnes 12. Collective practice and digital mediation Andrew Dubber 13. Conclusion: Towards a Collective Jazz Studies Tony Whyton.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
The Cultural Politics of Jazz Collectives: This Is Our Music documents the emergence of collective movements in jazz and improvised music. Jazz history is most often portrayed as a site for individual expression and revolves around the celebration of iconic figures, while the networks and collaborations that enable the music to maintain and sustain its cultural status are surprisingly under-investigated. This collection explores the history of musician-led collectives and the ways in which they offer a powerful counter-model for rethinking jazz practices in the post-war period. It includes studies of groups including the New York Musicians Organization, Sweden's Ett minne for livet, Wonderbrass from South Wales, the contemporary Dutch jazz-hip hop scene, and Austria's JazzWerkstatt. With an international list of contributors and examples from Europe and the United States, these twelve essays and case studies examine issues of shared aesthetic vision, socioeconomic and political factors, local education, and cultural values among improvising musicians.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
Music Library
Book
24 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Book
44 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
  • Discography of Finney's Jazzmen
  • Discography of Kurt Jensen
  • Discography of Arosia / compiler: Erwin Elvers
  • Discography of Finn Burich.
Archive of Recorded Sound
Book
32 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
  • Discography of Dr. Jazz Companie Lübeck / compiled by Gerard Bielderman, Günter Gehrmann, Günter Berndt
  • Red Hot Hottentots Discography / compiled by Erwin Elvers
  • Jazz O'Maniacs Discography / compiled by Aart van de Munt
  • Discography of the White Eag[le] New Orleans Band / compiled by Gerard Bielderman &, Erwin Elvers.
Archive of Recorded Sound

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