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Book
viii, 329 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Copyright assignment, transfer, and licensing : what is best for scholarly journal authors? / Anne T. Gilliland
  • "Protecting" our works : from what? / Nancy Sims
  • Faculty require online distribution of student work : enter the librarian / Micah Ziller and Emily Symonds Stenberg
  • Paying to publish : open access author fees and libraries' initiative to fund publishing costs / Stephen M. Arougheti
  • Library expertise driving pedagogical innovation : the role of libraries in bringing "open" to the classroom and to the world / William M. Cross
  • A measured approach : evaluating almetrics as a library service / Hui Zhang and Korey Jackson
  • Engaging undergraduates in scholarly communication : a case study in intellectual entrepreneurship at Illinois Wesleyan University / Stephanie Davis-Kahl
  • Sharing the spotlight : open access publishing and undergraduate research / Genya O'Gara and Laura Drake Davis
  • Open access implications for information literacy / Rachel Elizabeth Scott
  • Out of the archives and into the world : ETDs and the consequences of openess / Hillary Corbett
  • Open access and the graduate author : a dissertation anxiety manual / Jill Cirasella and Polly Thistlethwaite
  • From apprehension to comprehension : addressing anxieties about open access to ETDs / Kyle K. Courtney and Emily Kilcer
  • Library services in critical thinking, use, and evaluation of open data / Tara Das
  • Your metadata's showing : open access and the future of bibliographic control / Laura Krier and Kathryn Stine
  • DocSouth data : open access data for digital humanities / Stewart Varner.
This volume, the second of two in the series Creating the 21st-Century Academic Library that deals with the topic of open access in academic libraries, focuses on the implementation of open access in academic libraries. Chapters on the legalities and practicalities of open access in academic libraries address the issues associated with copyright, licensing, and intellectual property and include support for courses that require open access distribution of student work. The topic of library services in support of open access is explored, including the library's role in providing open educational resources, and as an ally and driver of their adoption, for example, by helping defray author fees that are required for open access articles. A detailed look at open access in the context of undergraduate research is provided and considers how librarians can engage undergraduates in conversations about open access. Chapters consider ways to engage undergraduate students in the use, understanding, evaluation, and creation of open access resources. Issues that are of concern to graduate students are also given some attention and central to these are the development of Electronic Thesis and Dissertation (ETD) programs. A chapter examines the library's role in balancing greater access to graduate student work with the consequences of openness, such as concerns about book contracts and sales, plagiarism, and changes in scholarly research and production. The book concludes with issues surrounding open data and library services in critical data librarianship, including advocacy, preservation, and instruction. It is hoped that this volume, and the series in general, will be a valuable and exciting addition to the discussions and planning surrounding the future directions, services, and careers in the 21st-century academic library.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442275034 20170403
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xii, 120 pages ; 23 cm.
  • Acknowledgements List of contributors Introduction: The Academic Book of the Future-- Rebecca E. Lyons and Samantha J. Rayner PART I: ACADEMICS 1. The academic book as a socially-embedded media artefact-- Tom Mole 2. Wearable books-- Michael Pidd 3. The impossible constellation: Practice-as-Research as a viable alternative-- Sarah Barrow PART II: PUBLISHERS 4. The academic book of the future and the need to break boundaries-- Jenny McCall and Amy Bourke-Waite 5. The academic 'book' of the future and its function-- Frances Pinter 6. The university press and the academic book of the future-- Anthony Cond PART III: LIBRARIANS 7. National libraries and academic books of the future-- Maja Maricevic 8. Strategic engagement and librarians-- Neil Smyth 9. Academic libraries and academic books: vessels of cultural continuity, agents of cultural change-- Kate Price PART IV: BOOKSELLERS 10. Selling words: an economic history of bookselling-- Jaki Hawker 11. The future of the academic book: the role of booksellers-- Peter Lake 12. Back to the future: the role of the campus bookshop-- Craig Dadds Bibliography Further Reading Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137595768 20160619
This book is open access under a CC-BY licence. Part of the AHRC/British Library Academic Book of the Future Project, this book interrogates current and emerging contexts of academic books from the perspectives of thirteen expert voices from the connected communities of publishing, academia, libraries, and bookselling.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137595768 20160619
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (vi, 36 pages) : illustrations (some color).
Book
xii, 221 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
xvi, 436 pages ; 23 cm
  • Knowledge as a public good (2009)
  • Open access, markets, and missions (2010)
  • Open access overview (2004)
  • Removing the barriers to research : an introduction to open access for librarians (2003)
  • The taxpayer argument for open access (2003)
  • "It's the authors, stupid!" (2004)
  • Six things that researchers need to know about open access (2006)
  • Trends favoring open access (2007)
  • Gratis and libre open access (2008)
  • The scaling argument (2004)
  • Problems and opportunities (blizzards and beauty) (2007)
  • Open access and the self-correction of knowledge (2008)
  • Open access and the last-mile problem for knowledge (2008)
  • The case for OAI in the age of Google (2004)
  • Good facts, bad predictions (2006)
  • No-fee open-access journals (2006)
  • Balancing author and publisher rights (2007)
  • Flipping a journal to open access (2007)
  • Society publishers with open access journals (2007)
  • Ten challenges for open-access journals (2009)
  • The final version of the NIH public-access policy (2005)
  • Another OA mandate : the Federal Research Public Access Act of 2006 (2006)
  • Twelve reminders about FRPAA (2007)
  • An open access mandate for the NIH (2008)
  • The open access mandate at Harvard (2008)
  • A bill to overturn the NIH policy (2008)
  • Open access policy options for funding agencies and universities (2009)
  • Open access and quality (2006)
  • Thinking about prestige, quality, and open access (2008)
  • Not Napster for science (2003)
  • Two distractions (2004)
  • Praising progress, preserving precision (2004)
  • Who should control access to research literature? (2004)
  • Four analogies to clean energy (2010)
  • Promoting open access in the humanities (2005)
  • Helping scholars and helping libraries (2005)
  • Unbinding knowledge : a proposal for providing open access to past research articles, staring with the most important (2006)
  • Open access to electronic theses and dissertations (2006)
  • Open access for digitization projects (2011)
  • Analogies and precedents for the FOS revolution (2002)
  • Thoughts on the first and second-order scholarly judgments (2002)
  • Saving the oodlehood and shebangity of the Internet (2003)
  • What's the ullage of your library? (2004)
  • Can search tame the wild Web? : can open access help? (2005)
  • Glossary.
Peter Suber has been a leading advocate for open access since 2001 and has worked full time on issues of open access since 2003. As a professor of philosophy during the early days of the internet, he realized its power and potential as a medium for scholarship. As he writes now, "it was like an asteroid crash, fundamentally changing the environment, challenging dinosaurs to adapt, and challenging all of us to figure out whether we were dinosaurs." When Suber began putting his writings and course materials online for anyone to use for any purpose, he soon experienced the benefits of that wider exposure. In 2001, he started a newsletter -- the Free Online Scholarship Newsletter, which later became the SPARC Open Access Newsletter -- in which he explored the implications of open access for research and scholarship. This book offers a selection of some of Suber's most significant and influential writings on open access from 2002 to 2010. In these texts, Suber makes the case for open access to research; answers common questions, objections, and misunderstandings; analyzes policy issues; and documents the growth and evolution of open access during its most critical early decade.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262528498 20160704
Green Library
Book
xvi, 436 pages ; 24 cm
  • Knowledge as a public good (2009)
  • Open access, markets, and missions (2010)
  • Open access overview (2004)
  • Removing the barriers to research : an introduction to open access for librarians (2003)
  • The taxpayer argument for open access (2003)
  • "It's the authors, stupid!" (2004)
  • Six things that researchers need to know about open access (2006)
  • Trends favoring open access (2007)
  • Gratis and libre open access (2008)
  • The scaling argument (2004)
  • Problems and opportunities (blizzards and beauty) (2007)
  • Open access and the self-correction of knowledge (2008)
  • Open access and the last-mile problem for knowledge (2008)
  • The case for OAI in the age of Google (2004)
  • Good facts, bad predictions (2006)
  • No-fee open-access journals (2006)
  • Balancing author and publisher rights (2007)
  • Flipping a journal to open access (2007)
  • Society publishers with open access journals (2007)
  • Ten challenges for open-access journals (2009)
  • The final version of the NIH public-access policy (2005)
  • Another OA mandate : the Federal Research Public Access Act of 2006 (2006)
  • Twelve reminders about FRPAA (2007)
  • An open access mandate for the NIH (2008)
  • The open access mandate at Harvard (2008)
  • A bill to overturn the NIH policy (2008)
  • Open access policy options for funding agencies and universities (2009)
  • Open access and quality (2006)
  • Thinking about prestige, quality, and open access (2008)
  • Not Napster for science (2003)
  • Two distractions (2004)
  • Praising progress, preserving precision (2004)
  • Who should control access to research literature? (2004)
  • Four analogies to clean energy (2010)
  • Promoting open access in the humanities (2005)
  • Helping scholars and helping libraries (2005)
  • Unbinding knowledge : a proposal for providing open access to past research articles, staring with the most important (2006)
  • Open access to electronic theses and dissertations (2006)
  • Open access for digitization projects (2011)
  • Analogies and precedents for the FOS revolution (2002)
  • Thoughts on the first and second-order scholarly judgments (2002)
  • Saving the oodlehood and shebangity of the Internet (2003)
  • What's the ullage of your library? (2004)
  • Can search tame the wild Web? : can open access help? (2005)
  • Glossary.
Peter Suber has been a leading advocate for open access since 2001 and has worked full time on issues of open access since 2003. As a professor of philosophy during the early days of the internet, he realized its power and potential as a medium for scholarship. As he writes now, "it was like an asteroid crash, fundamentally changing the environment, challenging dinosaurs to adapt, and challenging all of us to figure out whether we were dinosaurs." When Suber began putting his writings and course materials online for anyone to use for any purpose, he soon experienced the benefits of that wider exposure. In 2001, he started a newsletter -- the Free Online Scholarship Newsletter, which later became the SPARC Open Access Newsletter -- in which he explored the implications of open access for research and scholarship. This book offers a selection of some of Suber's most significant and influential writings on open access from 2002 to 2010. In these texts, Suber makes the case for open access to research; answers common questions, objections, and misunderstandings; analyzes policy issues; and documents the growth and evolution of open access during its most critical early decade.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262528498 20160704
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 307 pages : charts ; 23 cm.
  • Extending the principles and promise of scholarly communication reform : a chronicle and future glimpse / Joyce L. Ogburn
  • "Free" to all : the role of the academic librarian in institutional open access initiatives / Dusty Folds
  • Making a virtue out of necessity : using budget-cut discussions to promote scholarly communication reform / Jeanne Pavy
  • Open access and closed minds? : collaborating across campus to help faculty understand changing scholarly communication models / Elizabeth Price, Leslie Engelson, Candace Vance, Rebecca Richardson, and Jeffrey Henry
  • "When we're done with it, we don't care what happens to it" : what open access practitioners can learn from deadheads / Shannon Kipphut-Smith and Scott Carlson
  • Agents of diversity and social justice : librarians and scholarly communication / Harrison W. Inefuku and Charlotte Roh
  • Opportunities through open access : a small liberal arts college perspective / Annie Erdmann and Jeremy Shaw-Munderback
  • Navigating the political waters of open access publishing in libraries / Carol Ann Borchert, Charlene N. Simser, and Wendy C. Robertson
  • Infrastructure for open access : mechanics, economics, politics / Mark Mattson, Sarah Pickle, Andrew Gearhart, and James O'Sullivan
  • The ethics and evolution of library information sharing : lessons from interlibrary loan services for library open access publishing / Beth Posner
  • Open access, digital preservation, and the changing scholarly record / Heidi Downing
  • Developing new publishing service models at an undergraduate college : library as open access textbook publisher / Kate Pitcher
  • Metadata standards for open access repositories / Thomas Adamich
  • Research management : the next step for open access / Shawn Martin.
This volume of Creating the 21st-Century Academic Library looks closely at issues of policy and infrastructure for libraries that wish to provide leadership on their campus in the transition to more open forms of scholarship. The authors discuss how to make the case for open access on campus, as well as the political and policy implications of libraries that themselves want to become publishing entities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442273023 20170206
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (319 pages).
This volume of Creating the 21st-Century Academic Library looks closely at issues of policy and infrastructure for libraries that wish to provide leadership on their campus in the transition to more open forms of scholarship. The authors discuss how to make the case for open access on campus, as well as the political and policy implications of libraries that themselves want to become publishing entities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442273023 20170206
EBC Access limited to one user.
Book
xiv, 248 pages ; 24 cm.
In Pirate Philosophy, Gary Hall considers whether the fight against the neoliberal corporatization of higher education in fact requires scholars to transform their own lives and labor. Is there a way for philosophers and theorists to act not just for or with the antiausterity and student protestors -- "graduates without a future" -- but in terms of their political struggles? Drawing on such phenomena as peer-to-peer file sharing and anticopyright/pro-piracy movements, Hall explores how those in academia can move beyond finding new ways of thinking about the world to find instead new ways of being theorists and philosophers in the world. Hall describes the politics of online sharing, the battles against the current intellectual property regime, and the actions of Anonymous, LulzSec, Aaron Swartz, and others, and he explains Creative Commons and the open access, open source, and free software movements. But in the heart of the book he considers how, when it comes to scholarly ways of creating, performing, and sharing knowledge, philosophers and theorists can challenge not just the neoliberal model of the entrepreneurial academic but also the traditional humanist model with its received ideas of proprietorial authorship, the book, originality, fixity, and the finished object. In other words, can scholars and students today become something like pirate philosophers?
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262034401 20160704
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xii, 295 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Einleitung
  • Wandel des wissenschaftlichen Publizierens : eine Heuristik zur Analyse rezenter Wandlungsprozesse / Niels Taubert, Peter Weingart
  • Das wissenschaftliche Kommunikationssystem im Wandel
  • Von Fach zu Fach verschieden : Diversität im wissenschaftlichen Publikationssystem / Konstanze Rosenbaum
  • Open Access und digitale Publikation aus der Perspektive von Wissenschaftsverlagen / Niels Taubert
  • Zur Situation und Entwicklung wissenschaftlicher Bibliotheken / Peter Weingart
  • Ein wissenschaftspolitisches Beteiligungsexperiment : Ergebnisse und Bewertung der Online-Konsultation "Publikationssystem" / Niels Taubert, Kevin Schön
  • Rahmenbedingungen
  • Empfehlungen, Stellungnahmen, Deklarationen und Aktivitäten wissenschaftspolitischer Akteure zur Gestaltung des wissenschaftlichen Kommunikationssystems / Ulrich Herb
  • Open access : effects on publishing behaviour of scientists, peer review and interrelations with performance measures / David Ball
  • Das Urheberrecht und der Wandel des wissenschaftlichen Kommunikationssystems / Alexander Peukert, Marcus Sonnenberg
  • Visionen
  • Einleitung : Visionen zur Zukunft des Publizierens in der Wissenschaft
  • Elektronisches Publizieren, Open Access, Open Science und ähnliche Träume / Martin Grötschel
  • A vision of scientific communication / Reinhold Kliegl
  • Methodischer Optimismus vor digitaler Zukunft / Volker Gerhardt
  • Vertrauen, Qualitätssicherung und Open Access : Predatory Journals und die Zukunft des wissenschaftlichen Publikationssystems / Peter Weingart
  • Publizieren in der Soziologie im Jahr 2030-291 / Niels Taubert.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 191 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Some fundamental economics
  • Academic journal publishing and the open access movement
  • On the access principle in science : a law and economics analysis
  • The future of academic publishing
  • Conclusions and further research
  • Appendix.
This book addresses the recent debate about copyright law and its impact on the distribution of scientific knowledge from an economic perspective. The focus is on the question whether a copyright regime or an open access regime is better suited to the norms and organizational structure in a purely global science community. The book undertakes a thorough economic analysis of the academic journal market and showcases consequences of a regime change. It also takes account of the Digital Divide debate, reflecting issues in developing countries. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of legal action in the light of international Intellectual Property (IP) agreements offers prospects on the future of academic publishing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319127385 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource (xvi, 191 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • Introduction.- Some Fundamental Economics.- Academic Journal Publishing and the Open Access Movement.- On the Access Principle in Science: A Law & Economics Analysis.- The Future of Academic Publishing.- Conclusions and Further Research.- Appendix.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319127385 20160618
This book addresses the recent debate about copyright law and its impact on the distribution of scientific knowledge from an economic perspective. The focus is on the question whether a copyright regime or an open access regime is better suited to the norms and organizational structure in a purely global science community. The book undertakes a thorough economic analysis of the academic journal market and showcases consequences of a regime change. It also takes account of the Digital Divide debate, reflecting issues in developing countries. Finally, a comprehensive analysis of legal action in the light of international Intellectual Property (IP) agreements offers prospects on the future of academic publishing.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319127385 20160618
Book
122 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Agradecimientos
  • Prólogo
  • Sobre luces y sombras : las revistas científicas hechas en Latinoamérica / Gustavo E. Fischman y Juan Pablo Alperin
  • Enfoque regional a la comunicación científica : sistemas de revistas en acceso abierto / Ana María Cetto, José Octavio Alonso-Gamboa, Abel L. Packer y Eduardo Aguado-López
  • Conocimientos y opiniones sobre acceso abierto en Argentina, México y Brasil / Paola C. Bongiovani y Nancy D. Gómez
  • Sistemas de evaluación de las revistas científicas en Latinoamérica / Keyla Mafalda de Oliveira Amorim, Filipe Degani-Carneiro, Nathalia da Silva Ávila y Glaucio José Marafon
  • Evaluación del impacto de las iniciativas de acceso abierto en el ámbito académico y otros / Anabel Marin, Sergio Petralia, y Lila Stubrin
  • Revistas científicas hechas en Latinoamérica / Juan Pablo Alperin y Gustavo E. Fischman
  • Los authores.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (x, 271 pages) : illustrations.
  • A digital research revolution?
  • Conceptualizing e-research
  • The rise of digital research
  • Aggregating people and machines : collaborative computation
  • Distributed data
  • Digital research across the disciplines : the sciences and social sciences
  • Digital research across the disciplines : humanities and access to knowledge
  • Open science
  • Limits of e-research
  • Knowledge machines.
In Knowledge Machines, Eric Meyer and Ralph Schroeder argue that digital technologies have fundamentally changed research practices in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Meyer and Schroeder show that digital tools and data, used collectively and in distributed mode -- which they term e-research -- have transformed not just the consumption of knowledge but also the production of knowledge. Digital technologies for research are reshaping how knowledge advances in disciplines that range from physics to literary analysis. Meyer and Schroeder map the rise of digital research and offer case studies from many fields, including biomedicine, social science uses of the Web, astronomy, and large-scale textual analysis in the humanities. They consider such topics as the challenges of sharing research data and of big data approaches, disciplinary differences and new forms of interdisciplinary collaboration, the shifting boundaries between researchers and their publics, and the ways that digital tools promote openness in science. This book considers the transformations of research from a number of perspectives, drawing especially on the sociology of science and technology and social informatics. It shows that the use of digital tools and data is not just a technical issue; it affects research practices, collaboration models, publishing choices, and even the kinds of research and research questions scholars choose to pursue. Knowledge Machines examines the nature and implications of these transformations for scholarly research.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780262028745 20160618
Book
xvi, 278 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Preface Acknowledgments Chapter 1. Scholarly Communications - The Intersection of Research and Commerce Chapter 2. The Scientific Journal - An Historical Perspective to Modern Times Chapter 3. The Scholarly Book - Its Hard Times and Rise Again Chapter 4. Secondary Publishing From Abstracting and Indexing to Access and Information Chapter 5. The Rise and Fall of the CD-ROM Technology Chapter 6. The Birth of Online - the Internet and the Web Change Scholarly Communication Chapter 7. Traditional Economics of Academic Publishing Chapter 8. Institutional Buyers, Scholars, and Open Access: A Continuing Story Chapter 9. Big Data, Big Science, and Social Academic Networks Chapter 10. The Rise of Workflow Systems Index About the Author.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810890879 20160618
Scholarly Communications: A History from Content as King to Content as Kingmaker traces the development of scholarly communications from the creation of the first scientific journal through the wide diversity of professional information services today. Unlike any other book, this work is an authoritative history by the past President of Elsevier and current Professor at Long Island University, which examines the changing nature of scholarly communication throughout its history, including its research importance as well as its business value. It specifically covers four key themes: 1.the value of scholarly content and information at various stages of it development and use; 2.the role that technology has played on the use, importance, and value of scholarly information and research communications; 3.the changing business models affecting the system of scholarly communication from the way it is produced to how it is distributed and consumed; and 4.some of the implications of mobile, cloud, and social computing technologies on the future of scholarly communications. Attention is paid to analyzing the structural changes that the professional publishing community now faces. Regazzi examines research content as an economic good; how technology and business models have greatly affected the value of scholarly publishing; and the drivers of the future sustainability of our system of scholarly communication.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780810890879 20160618
Green Library
Book
279 pages, 1 unnumbered page ; 22 cm
  • Einleitung
  • Kulturkritik und mediale Heilserwartung
  • Der Untergang des Buches nach dem Ersten Weltkrieg
  • Das Buch am Ende der Gutenberg-Galaxis
  • Buchkritik digital
  • Bibliophobie in den Geisteswissenschaften
  • Alles umsonst? Open Access
  • Aufklärung, Utopie und Technologie : der Budapester Appell
  • Science Sells oder : die Geschichte der Wissenschaftsverlage
  • Der Gewinn an Bequemlichkeit ist ein Verlust an Freiheit
  • Open Access als Geschäftsmodell
  • Lost between common and commodity
  • Vom Buch zum Buch
  • Das Goldene Zeitalter des geisteswissenschaftlichen Buches
  • Überforschung
  • Das offene Buch
  • Lesen ist eine Kulturtechnik
  • Epilog : Warum Bücher?
  • Nachbemerkung
  • Anmerkungen.
Green Library
Book
165 pages : illustrations ; 28 cm.
By actively participating in the research and writing process, librarians can use their subject expertise to develop new roles for themselves and devise new modes of contributing to the scholarly communication cycle. This SPEC Kit explores ARL member libraries' activities related to support of faculty and researcher publishing of scholarly works. It investigates the level and variety of services ARL libraries are providing to support, facilitate, and participate in the publishing activities of the faculty and researchers they serve, whether through the re-framing of existing traditional library services or the development of new services. This SPEC Kit includes examples of publishing services offered by libraries, events that showcase faculty research and promote authors, author's rights information, library support for repository deposits and public access policy compliance, author addenda, open access policies, and job descriptions--Publisher's website description.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
211 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • The digital enterprise: views philosophical, historical and personal[-]Jacques Dubucs, Digital Humanities: Foundations[-]Gudrun Gersmann, Looking forward, not back: Some ideas on the future of electronic publications[-]Claudine Moulin and Julianne Nyhan, The dynamics of digital publications: An Exploration of Digital Lexicography[-]Luca Codignola, Too Much of a Good Thing? Or, A Historian Swamped by the Web[-][-]The changing rationale of editing in electronic publication [-]G bor Kecskem ti, Electronic textual criticism: A challenge to the editor and to the publisher [-]Andrea Bozzi, Computer-assisted Scholarly Editing of Manuscript Sources [-]Bernhard Palme, Electronic Media and Changing Methods in Classics[-][-]Cutting edge: new means of access, evaluation and funding [-]Janneke Adema and Eelco Ferwerda, Publication Practices in Motion: The Benefits of Open Access Publishing for the Humanities[-]Milena Zic-Fuchs, The Future of Publications in the Humanities: Possible Impacts of Research Assessment [-]Ferenc Kiefer, ERIH's role in the evaluation of research achievements in the Humanities[-]Vera Sz ll si-Brenig, Performing Excellence in the Humanities - the Funding Initiative 'opus magnum' of the VolkswagenStiftung[-].
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789089645647 20160619
Digital turn, publication cultures, paradigm shift, electronic editing, humanities.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789089645647 20160619
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xv, 209 pages ; 22 cm
  • Preface-- 1. Introduction, or why open access?-- 2. Digital economics-- 3. Open licensing-- 4. Monographs-- 5. Innovations-- Glossary of open access terms-- Bibliography.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107484016 20160617
If you work in a university, you are almost certain to have heard the term 'open access' in the past couple of years. You may also have heard either that it is the utopian answer to all the problems of research dissemination or perhaps that it marks the beginning of an apocalyptic new era of 'pay-to-say' publishing. In this book, Martin Paul Eve sets out the histories, contexts and controversies for open access, specifically in the humanities. Broaching practical elements alongside economic histories, open licensing, monographs and funder policies, this book is a must-read for both those new to ideas about open-access scholarly communications and those with an already keen interest in the latest developments for the humanities. This title is also available as open access via Cambridge Books Online.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781107484016 20160617
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (ix, 339 pages . : illustrations)
  • Towards another scientific revolution / Sönke Bartling and Sascha Friesike.--Open science : one term, five schools of thought / Benedikt Fecher and Sascha Friesike.--Excellence by nonsense : the competition for publication in modern science / Mathias Binswanger.--Science caught flat-footed : how academia struggles with open science communication / Alexander Gerber.--Open science and the three cultures : expanding open science to all domains of knowledge creation / Michelle Sidler.--(Micro)blogging science? : notes on potentials and constraints of new forms of scholarly communication / Cornelius Puschmann.--Academia goes Facebook? : the potential of social network sites in the scholarly realm / Michael Nentwich and René König.--Reference management / Martin Fenner, Kaja Scheliga and Sönke Bartling.--Open access : a state of the art / Dagmar Sitek and Roland Bertelmann.--Novel scholarly journal concepts / Peter Binfield.--The Public Knowledge Project : open source tools for open access to scholarly communication / James MacGregor, Kevin Stranack and John Willinsky.--Altmetrics and other novel measures for scientific impact / Martin Fenner.--Dynamic publication formats and collaborative authoring / Lambert Heller, Ronald The and Sönke Bartling.--Open research data : from vision to practice / Heinz Pampel and Sünje Dallmeier-Tiessen.--Intellectual property and computational science / Victoria Stodden.--Research funding in open science / Jörg Eisfeld-Reschke, Ulrich Herb and Karsten Wenzlaff.--Open innovation and crowdsourcing in the sciences / Thomas Schildhauer and Hilger Voss.--The social factor of open science / Tobias Fries.--Creative commons licenses / Sascha Friesike.--Organizing collaboration on scientific publications : from email lists to cloud services / Sönke Bartling.--Unique identifiers for researchers / Martin Fenner and Laure Haak.--Challenges of open data in medical research / Ralf Floca.--On the sociology of Science 2.0 / Vladimir B. Teif.--How this book was created using collaborative authoring and cloud tools / Sönke Bartling.--History II.0 / Luka Orešković.--Making data citeable : DataCite / Jan Brase.
Modern information and communication technologies, together with a cultural upheaval within the research community, have profoundly changed research in nearly every aspect. Ranging from sharing and discussing ideas in social networks for scientists to new collaborative environments and novel publication formats, knowledge creation and dissemination as we know it is experiencing a vigorous shift towards increased transparency, collaboration and accessibility. Many assume that research workflows will change more in the next 20 years than they have in the last 200. This book provides researchers, decision makers, and other scientific stakeholders with a snapshot of the basics, the tools, and the underlying visions that drive the current scientific (r)evolution, often called Open Science.

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