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Book
xxviii, 148 pages : map ; 20 cm.
Part of a new series Legends from the Ancient North, The Wanderer tells the classic tales that influenced JRR Tolkien's The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. "Therefore I may not think, throughout this world, why cloud cometh not on my mind when I think over all the life of earls, how at a stroke they have given up hall, mood-proud thanes. So this middle earth each of all days ageth and falleth". (J.R.R). Tolkien spent much of his life studying, translating and teaching the great epic stories of northern Europe, filled with heroes, dragons, trolls, dwarves and magic. He was hugely influential for his advocacy of Beowulf as a great work of literature and, even if he had never written The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, would be recognised today as a significant figure in the rediscovery of these extraordinary tales. Legends from the Ancient North brings together from Penguin Classics five of the key works behind Tolkien's fiction. They are startling, brutal, strange pieces of writing, with an elemental power brilliantly preserved in these translations. They plunge the reader into a world of treachery, quests, chivalry, trials of strength. They are the most ancient narratives that exist from northern Europe and bring us as near as we will ever get to the origins of the magical landscape of Middle-earth (Midgard) which Tolkien remade in the 20th century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780141393742 20160612
Green Library
Book
xiv, 556 p., [20] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of plates and maps. Preface to the second edition. Acknowledgements. Publisher's Acknowledgements. 1. Why read Old English Literature? An introduction to this book. Richard North, David Crystal and Joe Allard. Names to Look Out For. Joe Allard and Richard North. 2. Is it relevant? Old English influence on The Lord of the Rings. Clive Tolley. 3. Is violence what Old English literature is about? Beowulf and other battlers: an introduction to Beowulf. Andy Orchard. 4. Is there more like Beowulf? Old English minor heroic poems. Richard North. 5. What else is there?. Joyous Play and Bitter Tears: the Riddles and the Elegies. Jennifer Neville. 6. How Christian is OE literature? The Dream of the Rood and Anglo-Saxon Northumbria. Eamonn O Carragain and Richard North. 7. How did OE literature start? Cadmon the cowherd and Old English biblical verse. Bryan Weston Wyly. 8. Were all the poets monks? Monasteries and courts: Alcuin and Offa. Andy Orchard. 9. What was it like to be in the Anglo-Saxon or Viking World? Material culture: archaeology and text. Michael Bintley. 10. Did the Anglo-Saxons write fiction? Old English prose: King Alfred and his books. Susan Irvine. 11. How difficult is the Old English language? The Old English language. Peter S. Baker. 12. When were the Vikings in England? Viking wars and The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Jayne Carroll. Notes on the Old Norse language. Richard North. 13. What gods did the Vikings worship? Viking religion: Old Norse mythology. Terry Gunnell. 14. Just who were the Vikings anyway? Sagas of Icelanders. Joe Allard. 15. Were there stories in late OE literature? Prose writers of the English Benedictine Reform. Stewart Brookes. 16. What happened when the Normans arrived?. Anglo-Norman literature: the road to Middle English. Patricia Gillies. Epilogue. The end of Old English? David Crystal. The editors and the contributors. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781408286036 20160606
Beowulf & Other Stories was first conceived in the belief that the study of Old English - and its close cousins, Old Icelandic and Anglo-Norman - can be a genuine delight, covering a period as replete with wonder, creativity and magic as any other in literature. Now in a fully revised second edition, the collection of essays written by leading academics in the field is set to build upon its established reputation as the standard introduction to the literatures of the time. Beowulf & Other Stories captures the fire and bloodlust of the great epic, Beowulf, and the sophistication and eroticism of the Exeter Riddles. Fresh interpretations give new life to the spiritual ecstasy of The Seafarer and to the imaginative dexterity of The Dream of the Rood, andprovide the student and general reader with all they might need to explore and enjoy this complex but rewarding field. The book sheds light, too, on the shadowy contexts of the period, with suggestive and highly readable essays on matters ranging from the dynamism of the Viking Age to Anglo-Saxon input into The Lord of the Rings, from the great religious prose works to the transition from Old to Middle English. It also branches out into related traditions, with expert introductions to the Icelandic Sagas, Viking Religion and Norse Mythology. Peter S. Baker provides an outstanding guide to taking your first steps in the Old English language, while David Crystal provides a crisp linguistic overview of the entire period. With a new chapter by Mike Bintley on Anglo-Saxon archaeology and a revised chapter by Stewart Brookes on the prose writers of the English Benedictine Reform, this updated second edition will be essential reading for students of the period.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781408286036 20160606
Green Library
Book
xi, 525, [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Why read Old English Literature? An Introduction to this Book Richard North, David Crystal and Joe Allard Names to Look Out For Joe Allard and Richard North 2. Is it relevant? Old English Influence on The Lord of the Rings Clive Tolley 3. Is violence what OE poetry is about? Beowulf and Other Battlers: an introduction to Beowulf Andy Orchard 4. Is there more like Beowulf? Old English Minor Heroic Poems Richard North 5. What else is there? Joyous Play and Bitter Tears: the Riddles and the Elegies Jennifer Neville 6. How Christian is OE literature? The Dream of the Roodand Anglo-Saxon Northumbria Eamonn (c) Carragain and Richard North 7. How did OE literature start? Cadmon the Cowherd and Old English Biblical Verse Bryan W. Wyly 8. Were all the poets monks? Monasteries and Courts: Alcuin and Offa Andy Orchard 9. Did the Anglo-Saxons write fiction? Old English prose: King Alfred and his books Susan Irvine 10. How difficult is the OE language? The Old English language Peter S. Baker 11. When were the Vikings in England? Viking Wars and The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle Jayne Carroll Noteson the Old Norse Language Richard North 12. What gods did the Vikings worship? Viking religion: Old Norse mythology Terry Gunnell 13. Just who were the Vikings anyway? Sagas of Icelanders Joe Allard 14. Were there sagas in OE literature? Prose Writers of the English Benedictine Reform Stewart Brookes 15. What happened when the Normans arrived? Anglo-Norman literature: the road to Middle English Patricia Gillies Epilogue The end of Old English? David Crystal.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405835725 20160528
'Beowulf' & Other Stories is a new introduction to the study of Old English consisting of fifteen essays, each written by an expert in the field, that cover the many diverse facets of Old English. 'Beowulf' & Other Stories has been conceived in the firm belief that Old English - and its close cousins, Old Icelandic and Anglo-Norman - should be seen as a genuine delight, a period as replete with wonder, creativity and magic as any other in literature. The book discusses a vast range of subjects, from the fire and bloodlust of the great epic, Beowulf, and the sophistication and eroticism of the Exeter Riddles, to fresh interpretations of the spiritual ecstasy of The Seafarer and the imaginative dexterity of The Dream of the Rood. 'Beowulf' & Other Stories provides students and the general reader with all they might need to explore and enjoy this complex but rewarding field. Written throughout with verve, panache and a deep understanding of its subject, 'Beowulf' & Other Stories is set to be the standard introduction to the field for many years to come.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405835725 20160528
Green Library

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