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Book
xxviii, 148 pages : map ; 20 cm.
Part of a new series Legends from the Ancient North, The Wanderer tells the classic tales that influenced JRR Tolkien's The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings. "Therefore I may not think, throughout this world, why cloud cometh not on my mind when I think over all the life of earls, how at a stroke they have given up hall, mood-proud thanes. So this middle earth each of all days ageth and falleth". (J.R.R). Tolkien spent much of his life studying, translating and teaching the great epic stories of northern Europe, filled with heroes, dragons, trolls, dwarves and magic. He was hugely influential for his advocacy of Beowulf as a great work of literature and, even if he had never written The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, would be recognised today as a significant figure in the rediscovery of these extraordinary tales. Legends from the Ancient North brings together from Penguin Classics five of the key works behind Tolkien's fiction. They are startling, brutal, strange pieces of writing, with an elemental power brilliantly preserved in these translations. They plunge the reader into a world of treachery, quests, chivalry, trials of strength. They are the most ancient narratives that exist from northern Europe and bring us as near as we will ever get to the origins of the magical landscape of Middle-earth (Midgard) which Tolkien remade in the 20th century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780141393742 20160612
Green Library
Book
xiv, 556 p., [20] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm.
  • List of plates and maps. Preface to the second edition. Acknowledgements. Publisher's Acknowledgements. 1. Why read Old English Literature? An introduction to this book. Richard North, David Crystal and Joe Allard. Names to Look Out For. Joe Allard and Richard North. 2. Is it relevant? Old English influence on The Lord of the Rings. Clive Tolley. 3. Is violence what Old English literature is about? Beowulf and other battlers: an introduction to Beowulf. Andy Orchard. 4. Is there more like Beowulf? Old English minor heroic poems. Richard North. 5. What else is there?. Joyous Play and Bitter Tears: the Riddles and the Elegies. Jennifer Neville. 6. How Christian is OE literature? The Dream of the Rood and Anglo-Saxon Northumbria. Eamonn O Carragain and Richard North. 7. How did OE literature start? Cadmon the cowherd and Old English biblical verse. Bryan Weston Wyly. 8. Were all the poets monks? Monasteries and courts: Alcuin and Offa. Andy Orchard. 9. What was it like to be in the Anglo-Saxon or Viking World? Material culture: archaeology and text. Michael Bintley. 10. Did the Anglo-Saxons write fiction? Old English prose: King Alfred and his books. Susan Irvine. 11. How difficult is the Old English language? The Old English language. Peter S. Baker. 12. When were the Vikings in England? Viking wars and The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Jayne Carroll. Notes on the Old Norse language. Richard North. 13. What gods did the Vikings worship? Viking religion: Old Norse mythology. Terry Gunnell. 14. Just who were the Vikings anyway? Sagas of Icelanders. Joe Allard. 15. Were there stories in late OE literature? Prose writers of the English Benedictine Reform. Stewart Brookes. 16. What happened when the Normans arrived?. Anglo-Norman literature: the road to Middle English. Patricia Gillies. Epilogue. The end of Old English? David Crystal. The editors and the contributors. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781408286036 20160606
Beowulf & Other Stories was first conceived in the belief that the study of Old English - and its close cousins, Old Icelandic and Anglo-Norman - can be a genuine delight, covering a period as replete with wonder, creativity and magic as any other in literature. Now in a fully revised second edition, the collection of essays written by leading academics in the field is set to build upon its established reputation as the standard introduction to the literatures of the time. Beowulf & Other Stories captures the fire and bloodlust of the great epic, Beowulf, and the sophistication and eroticism of the Exeter Riddles. Fresh interpretations give new life to the spiritual ecstasy of The Seafarer and to the imaginative dexterity of The Dream of the Rood, andprovide the student and general reader with all they might need to explore and enjoy this complex but rewarding field. The book sheds light, too, on the shadowy contexts of the period, with suggestive and highly readable essays on matters ranging from the dynamism of the Viking Age to Anglo-Saxon input into The Lord of the Rings, from the great religious prose works to the transition from Old to Middle English. It also branches out into related traditions, with expert introductions to the Icelandic Sagas, Viking Religion and Norse Mythology. Peter S. Baker provides an outstanding guide to taking your first steps in the Old English language, while David Crystal provides a crisp linguistic overview of the entire period. With a new chapter by Mike Bintley on Anglo-Saxon archaeology and a revised chapter by Stewart Brookes on the prose writers of the English Benedictine Reform, this updated second edition will be essential reading for students of the period.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781408286036 20160606
Green Library
Book
xi, 525, [8] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), maps ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Why read Old English Literature? An Introduction to this Book Richard North, David Crystal and Joe Allard Names to Look Out For Joe Allard and Richard North 2. Is it relevant? Old English Influence on The Lord of the Rings Clive Tolley 3. Is violence what OE poetry is about? Beowulf and Other Battlers: an introduction to Beowulf Andy Orchard 4. Is there more like Beowulf? Old English Minor Heroic Poems Richard North 5. What else is there? Joyous Play and Bitter Tears: the Riddles and the Elegies Jennifer Neville 6. How Christian is OE literature? The Dream of the Roodand Anglo-Saxon Northumbria Eamonn (c) Carragain and Richard North 7. How did OE literature start? Cadmon the Cowherd and Old English Biblical Verse Bryan W. Wyly 8. Were all the poets monks? Monasteries and Courts: Alcuin and Offa Andy Orchard 9. Did the Anglo-Saxons write fiction? Old English prose: King Alfred and his books Susan Irvine 10. How difficult is the OE language? The Old English language Peter S. Baker 11. When were the Vikings in England? Viking Wars and The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle Jayne Carroll Noteson the Old Norse Language Richard North 12. What gods did the Vikings worship? Viking religion: Old Norse mythology Terry Gunnell 13. Just who were the Vikings anyway? Sagas of Icelanders Joe Allard 14. Were there sagas in OE literature? Prose Writers of the English Benedictine Reform Stewart Brookes 15. What happened when the Normans arrived? Anglo-Norman literature: the road to Middle English Patricia Gillies Epilogue The end of Old English? David Crystal.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405835725 20160528
'Beowulf' & Other Stories is a new introduction to the study of Old English consisting of fifteen essays, each written by an expert in the field, that cover the many diverse facets of Old English. 'Beowulf' & Other Stories has been conceived in the firm belief that Old English - and its close cousins, Old Icelandic and Anglo-Norman - should be seen as a genuine delight, a period as replete with wonder, creativity and magic as any other in literature. The book discusses a vast range of subjects, from the fire and bloodlust of the great epic, Beowulf, and the sophistication and eroticism of the Exeter Riddles, to fresh interpretations of the spiritual ecstasy of The Seafarer and the imaginative dexterity of The Dream of the Rood. 'Beowulf' & Other Stories provides students and the general reader with all they might need to explore and enjoy this complex but rewarding field. Written throughout with verve, panache and a deep understanding of its subject, 'Beowulf' & Other Stories is set to be the standard introduction to the field for many years to come.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405835725 20160528
Green Library
Book
lv, 1188 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction, by Tom Shippey Note on the Texts, Titles, and Organization of the Poems List of Abbreviations On Translating Old English Poetry The Junius Manuscript -Introduction -Genesis (A and B) -Exodus -Daniel -Christ and Satan The Vercelli Book -Introduction -Andreas: Andrew in the Country of the Cannibals -The Fates of the Apostles -Soul and Body I -Homiletic Fragment I: On Human Deceit -The Dream of the Rood -Elene: Helena's Discovery of the True Cross The Exeter Book -Introduction -Christ I: Advent Lyrics -Christ II: The Ascension -Christ III: Judgment -Guthlac A -Guthlac B -Azarias: The Suffering and Songs of the Three Youths -The Phoenix -Juliana -The Wanderer -The Gifts of Men -Precepts: A Father's Instruction -The Seafarer -Vainglory -Widsith -The Fortunes of Men -Maxims I: Exeter Maxims (A, B, and C) -The Order of the World -The Rhyming Poem -Physiologus I: The Panther -Physiologus II: The Whale -Physiologus III: Partridge or Phoenix -Homiletic Fragment III: God's Bright Welcome -Soul and Body II -Deor -Wulf and Eadwacer -Riddles 1-57 -The Wife's Lament -Judgment Day I -Resignation A: The Penitent's Prayer -Resignation B: The Exile's Lament -The Descent into Hell -Almsgiving -Pharaoh -The Lord's Prayer I -Homiletic Fragment II: Turn Toward the Light -Riddles 28b and 58 -The Husband's Message -The Ruin -Riddles 59-91 Beowulf and Judith -Introduction -Beowulf -Judith The Metrical Psalms of the Paris Psalter and the Meters of Boethius -Introduction -The Metrical Psalms of the Paris Psalter -The Meters of Boethius The Minor Poems -Introduction -The Fight at Finnsburg -Waldere -The Battle of Maldon -The Poems of The Anglo-Saxon ChronicleThe Battle of Brunanburg (937)The Capture of the Five Boroughs (942)The Coronation of Edgar (973)The Death of Edgar (975)The Death of Alfred (1036)The Death of Edward (1065) -Durham -The Rune Poem -Solomon and Saturn I -Solomon and Saturn II -The Menologium: A Calendar Poem -Maxims II: Cotton Maxims -A Proverb from Winfrid's Time -Judgment Day II -The Rewards of Piety -The Lord's Prayer II -The Gloria I -The Lord's Prayer III -The Creed -Fragments of Psalms -The Kentish Hymn -Psalm 50 -The Gloria II -A Prayer -Thureth -The Book's Prologue to Aldhelm's De virginitate -The Seasons for Fasting -Caedmon's Hymn -Bede's Death Song -The Leiden Riddle -Latin-English Proverbs -The Metrical Preface to The Pastoral Care -The Metrical Epilogue to The Pastoral Care -The Metrical Preface to Gregory's Dialogues -Colophon to Bede's Ecclesiastical History -The Ruthwell Cross -The Brussels Cross -The Franks Casket -The Metrical CharmsCharm for Unfruitful LandNine Herbs CharmCharm Against a DwarfCharm for a Sudden StitchCharm for Loss of Property or CattleCharm for a Difficult or Delayed BirthCharm for the Water-Elf-DiseaseCharm for a Swarm of BeesCharm for a Theft of CattleCharm for Loss of Property or CattleJourney CharmCharm Against Wens (or Tumors) Additional Poems -Introduction -Additional Poems of The Anglo-Saxon ChronicleThe Accession of Edgar (959)Prince Edward's Return (1057)Malcolm and Margaret (1067)The Wedding Conspiracy Against King William (1075)The Rhyme of King William (1086)The Suffering Under King Henry (1104) -Captions for Drawings -Cnut's Song -Distich: Psalm 17:51 -Distich on Kenelm -Distich on the Sons of Lothebrok-Five Memorial Stone InscriptionsDewsbury Memorial (or Stone Cross)Falstone Hogback MemorialGreat Urswick MemorialOverchurch MemorialThornhill III Memorial -Genealogical Verse -Godric's Hymns -The Grave -Honington Clip -Instructions for Christians -Lament for the English Church (From the Worcester Fragments) -Lancashire Gold Ring -Metrical Psalms 90:15-95:2 -The Soul's Address to the Body (From the Worcester Fragments) -Sutton Disc Brooch -Two Marginalic Lines -Verse in a Charter -Verse in a Homily: The Judgment of the Damned -Verse Paraphrase of Matthew 25:41 -Verse Proverb in a Junius Homily -Verses in Vercelli Homily XXI Appendix of Possible Riddle Solutions Bibliography Index of Poem Titles Acknowledgments.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812248470 20180213
From the riddling song of a bawdy onion that moves between kitchen and bedroom to the thrilling account of Beowulf's battle with a treasure-hoarding dragon, from the heart-rending lament of a lone castaway to the embodied speech of the cross upon which Christ was crucified, from the anxiety of Eve, who carries "a sumptuous secret in her hands / And a tempting truth hidden in her heart, " to the trust of Noah who builds "a sea-floater, a wave-walking / Ocean-home with rooms for all creatures, " the world of the Anglo-Saxon poets is a place of harshness, beauty, and wonder. Now for the first time, the entire Old English poetic corpus-including poems and fragments discovered only within the past fifty years-is rendered into modern strong-stress, alliterative verse in a masterful translation by Craig Williamson. Accompanied by an introduction by noted medievalist Tom Shippey on the literary scope and vision of these timeless poems and Williamson's own introductions to the individual works and his essay on translating Old English poetry, the texts transport us back to the medieval scriptorium or ancient mead-hall, to share a herdsman's recounting of the story of the world's creation or a people's sorrow at the death of a beloved king, to be present at the clash of battle or to puzzle over the sacred and profane answers to riddles posed over a thousand years ago. This is poetry as stunning in its vitality as it is true to its sources. Were Williamson's idiom not so modern, we might think that the Anglo-Saxon poets had taken up the lyre again and begun to sing once more.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780812248470 20180213
Green Library
Book
x, 343 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Construction and Constriction: Introducing Human Experience in Old English Poetry Part I - Webs and Rings: Experiencing Objects Chapter 1: The Material Context of Weaving Chapter 2: The Woven Mail-Coat Chapter 3: The Material Context of Structural Binding Part II - Ties and Chains: Experiencing Bondage Chapter 4: Binding in Nature Chapter 5: Imprisonment and Hell Chapter 6: Slavery and Servitude Part III - Patterns and Nets: Experiencing the Internal and the Abstract Chapter 7: The Body and Mind Chapter 8: Language and Knowledge Chapter 9: Creation, Magic and Fate Chapter 10: Peace Weaving and Binding: Conclusions on Human Experience and World View.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442637221 20170327
References to weaving and binding are ubiquitous in Anglo-Saxon literature. Several hundred instances of such imagery occur in the poetic corpus, invoked in connection with objects, people, elemental forces, and complex abstract concepts. Weaving Words and Binding Bodies presents the first comprehensive study of weaving and binding imagery through intertextual analysis and close readings of Beowulf, riddles, the poetry of Cynewulf, and other key texts. Megan Cavell highlights the prominent use of weaving and binding in previously unrecognized formulas, collocations, and type-scenes, shedding light on important tropes such as the lord-retainer "bond" and the gendered role of "peace-weaving" in Anglo-Saxon society. Through the analysis of metrical, rhetorical, and linguistic features and canonical and neglected texts in a wide range of genres, Weaving Words and Binding Bodies makes an important contribution to the ongoing study of Anglo-Saxon poetics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442637221 20170327
Green Library

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