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Book
170 pages : 1 illustration ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction - South Africa as a hegemonic power Chapter One - Tentative hegemony from Mandela to Zuma Chapter Two - South Africa's image problem in Africa Chapter Three - The African Renaissance versus the South African Renaissance Chapter Four - The plight of the South African National Defence Force Conclusion - South Africa in Africa: The challenges of the new multipolarity.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138549654 20180306
When Nelson Mandela was sworn in as president on 10 May 1994, South Africa enjoyed an unprecedented global standing. Much of the international community, particularly Western states, saw the new South Africa as well equipped to play a dynamic and dominant role on the continent; promoting conflict resolution, economic development, and acting as a standard-bearer for democracy and human rights. Yet, throughout the presidencies of Nelson Mandela, Thabo Mbeki and Jacob Zuma, South Africa has failed to deliver on this early promise. Its continental primacy has been circumscribed by its own reluctance to lead, combined with widespread African hostility to its economic expansion, antipathy towards its democratic ideals and scepticism about its suitability as Africa's global representative. With an onerous domestic agenda, as it continues to tackle the profound socio-economic legacies of apartheid, and with its military power also on the wane, South Africa must now adapt to an emerging multipolarity on the continent. This transition - which may produce a new concert of African powers working in constructive collaboration or lead to fragmentation, discord and gridlock - is likely to determine Africa's prospects for decades to come. This Adelphi book squarely challenges the received wisdom that South Africa is a dominant power in Africa. It explores the country's complex and difficult relationship with the rest of the continent in the post-apartheid era and examines the ways in which the country has struggled to translate its economic, military and diplomatic weight into tangible foreign policy successes and enduring influence on the ground. The conclusions of this book will be valuable to academics, policymakers, journalists, and business leaders seeking to understand the evolution and trajectory of South African policy in Africa.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138549654 20180306
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

2. Déjà vu [2018]

Book
124 pages ; 19 cm.
Green Library
Book
xvii, 175 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Series Editors' Foreword 1. Introduction 1.1 Elections in authoritarian regimes 1.2 Extending elections to the subnational level 1.3 The argument of the book 1.4 Conceptualisation and methods 1.5 Outline of the book 2. Four Strategies of Manipulation 2.1 Advocating for decentralisation after the Cold War 2.2 How decentralisation failed to deliver 2.3 Why some governments decentralise 2.4 Strategies for Manipulating Political Decentralisation 2.5 Possibilities for contestation and participation 2.6 Conclusions 3. The Requirements of Political Decentralisation 3.1 Unpacking the relationship between regime type and decentralisation 3.2 Elections as hallmarks of political decentralisation 3.3 Requirements for representative subnational governments 3.4 The Four Ways of Manipulating Political Decentralisation 3.5 Case selection 3.6 Conclusions 4. Decentralisation through dominance in Ethiopia 4.1 Ethiopia under EPRDF: Decentralisation and autocratisation side by side 4.2 The requirements of representative subnational governments and their challenges 4.3 Manipulating political decentralisation through dominance 4.4 No contestation but mass-participation 4.5 Conclusions 5. Institutional interruption in Malawi 5.1 Regime and stalled political decentralisation 5.2 The requirements of representative subnational governments 5.3 Identifying Manipulation Strategies 5.4 Opportunities for Contestation and Participation 5.5 Conclusion 6. Overwhelming the opposition in Uganda 6.1 The decentralising autocrat 6.2 The requirements of representative subnational governments 6.3 Identifying Manipulation Strategies 6.4 Opportunities for Contestation and Participation 6.5 Conclusion 7. Regionalised opposition in South Africa 7.1 Democracy and the dominant position of ANC 7.2 The requirements for representative subnational governments 7.3 Manipulating Political Decentralisation 7.4 Consequences for contestation and participation 7.5 Conclusion 8. Conclusions 8.1 The five requirements of representative SNGs 8.2 Manipulation strategies and the space for contestation and participation 8.3 Extension to other cases 8.4 The challenges of measuring and comparing local government 8.5 Inclusive autocrats 8.6 The way forward.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138203037 20171211
Can autocrats establish representative subnational governments? And which strategies of manipulation are available if they would like to reduce the uncertainty caused by introducing political decentralisation? In the wake of local government reforms, several states across the world have introduced legislation that provides for subnational elections. This does not mean that representative subnational governments in these countries are all of a certain standard. Political decentralisation should not be confused with democratisation, as the process is likely to be manipulated in ways that do not produce meaningful avenues for political participation and contestation locally.ã Using examples from Africa, Lovise Aalen and Ragnhild L. Muriaas propose five requirements for representative subnational governments and four strategies that national governments might use to manipulate the outcome of political decentralisation. The case studies of Ethiopia, Malawi, South Africa, and Uganda illustrate why autocrats sometimes are more open to competition at the subnational level than democrats. Manipulating Political Decentralisation provides a new conceptual tool to assess representative subnational governments' quality, aiding us to build theories on the consequences of political decentralisation on democratisation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138203037 20171211
Green Library
Book
xxviii, 266 pages ; 24 cm
  • The return of the "time of demonstrations"
  • "Ordinary people?"
  • "Our rights are for sale!"
  • Specificities of the post-apartheid social protest
  • Social movements against the ANC?
  • An intermediate political space?.
Green Library
Video
1 streaming video file (25 min.) : digital, sound, color.
Lillian Cingo has one great luxury in her life -- a mini whirlpool to soak her sore feet. It's a small self-indulgence for a woman who spends all day on her feet, from dawn to dusk. Lillian's job is, literally, to keep her hospital on track. She's the manager of the Phelophepa health train that spends nine months each year touring the poorest, most remote areas of South Africa. This Life program catches up with the train in the province of KwaZulu Natal, where there's just one doctor for every 4,000 people. With a full contingent of volunteer doctors, dentists, optometrists and health educators on board, the 'Good Clean Health Train' delivers quality health care to deprived rural communities.
Book
xii, 303 pages ; 22 cm.
  • 1. Introduction2. Magolwane kaMkhathini Jiyane and Mshongweni: Izibongo and the construction of King Dingane's archive3. Oral Traditions and the Consolidation of King Dingane's Archive: Mid-nineteenth to the early twentieth century.4. The Image of King Dingane and Zulu Nationalist Politics5. 'Remember Dingaan's Day - the passing of African Independence': Public history and the counter-commemoration of King Dingane, 1920-19306. African Nationalists and Contending Perspectives of King Dingane: 1916-1980s7. African Academics and Poets: The roots of scholarly perspectives on King Dingane, 1930s to 1980s8. The Political Images of King Dingane in the Age of Armed Struggle, 1960-19949. Conclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319567860 20171002
This book examines the active role played by Africans in the pre-colonial production of historical knowledge in South Africa, focusing on perspectives of the second king of amaZulu, King Dingane. It draws upon a wealth of oral traditions, izibongo, and the work of public intellectuals such as Magolwane kaMkhathini Jiyane and Mshongweni to present African perspectives of King Dingane as multifaceted, and in some cases, constructed according to socio-political formations and aimed at particular audiences. By bringing African perspectives to the fore, this innovative historiography centralizes indigenous African languages in the production of historical knowledge.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319567860 20171002
Green Library
Book
xii, 241 pages : illustration ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction1. Contemporary Agricultural Reforms in Sub-Saharan Africa2. Theorizing Governance in Post-Genocide Rwanda3. An Overview of the Political Economy of Agricultural Reform in Rwanda4. Rwanda's Engagement with International Aid and Foreign Direct Investment5. Systems of Governmentality and Discipline in Rwanda6. Agricultural Cooperatives in Musanze District7. Pyrethrum production in Northern Province8. Maize Production and 'Fugitive Farmers' in Kirehe DistrictConclusion.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786990006 20171227
International observers have lauded Rwanda as an example of an African country taking control of its own development trajectory, and as a market-friendly destination for investment. A key component of this has been an ambitious programme of agricultural reform, involving private firms, NGOs, and international charities. The Rwandan government claims these reforms have been a resounding success, tripling crop yields and helping to combat hunger. But, as Chris Huggins argues, Rwanda's liberal, modernising image sits poorly with the regime's continuing authoritarian tendencies. Featuring in-depth case studies of the effects of agricultural reform in three different regions, and drawing on hundreds of interviews, Huggins shows that the much-vaunted 'liberalization' of agriculture has in fact depended on the coercion of Rwandan farmers, and in many cases has had a detrimental impact on their livelihoods. With the Kagame regime now coming under increasing international scrutiny, this work provides a timely look at the impact of 'market friendly authoritarianism' in contemporary Africa, making essential reading for students and scholars of development in the fields of sociology, anthropology, political science, and economics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786990006 20171227
Green Library
Book
235 pages ; 22 cm
Green Library
Book
xiii, 338 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Home, school, army
  • Wits
  • Oxford
  • Truth to power
  • Injustice and absurdity
  • A permit for everything
  • Soweto, apartheid, and business
  • Dreams and nightmares
  • Survival
  • The silent revolution
  • Turmoil in the townships
  • Revolution under the rainbow
  • Race and redress
  • Liberalism for all seasons
  • The way forward.
Looks back over the enormous political and social changes that have taken place in this fractious country. The breadth and depth of ideas and events covered here are striking: the disintegration of apartheid, the chaos of the 'people's war' and its contribution to the broader societal breakdown we see today, the liberal slide-away, the authoritarian ANC with its racial ideology and revolutionary goals, to mention only a few.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 256 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Apartheid victimhood before the courts
  • Reparation, representation, and class actions
  • Embodied memory and the social
  • The formation of the political
  • Emancipation from victimhood
  • Ethnographic experience and anthropological knowledge
  • Conclusion: The embodiment of experiences of violence as seeds of new forms of sociality.
Bodies of Truth offers an intimate account of how apartheid victims deal with the long-term effects of violence, focusing on the intertwined themes of embodiment, injury, victimhood, and memory. In 2002, victims of apartheid-era violence filed suit against multinational corporations, accusing them of aiding and abetting the security forces of the apartheid regime. While the litigation made its way through the U.S. courts, thousands of victims of gross human rights violations have had to cope with painful memories of violence. They have also confronted an official discourse claiming that the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of the 1990s sufficiently addressed past injuries. This book shows victims' attempts to emancipate from their experiences by participating in legal actions, but also by creating new forms of sociality among themselves and in relation to broader South African society.Rita Kesselring's ethnography draws on long-term research with members of the victim support group Khulumani and critical analysis of legal proceedings related to apartheid-era injury. Using juridical intervention as an entry point into the question of subjectivity, Kesselring asks how victimhood is experienced in the everyday for the women and men living on the periphery of Cape Town and in other parts of the country. She argues that the everyday practices of the survivors must be taken up by the state and broader society to allow for inclusive social change in a post-conflict setting.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780804799782 20161024
Law Library (Crown)
Book
358 pages ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
183 pages ; 26 cm
Green Library
Book
xvi, 168 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 221 pages : maps ; 22 cm.
  • 1. Historical Context.- 2. A Rainbow Nation?.- 3. The South African Economy.- 4. Social Structure and Social Policy.- 5. Government.- 6. Political Life.- 7. Culture, Ideas and Issues.- 8. South Africa and the World.- 9. South Africa in the 21st Century.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137373373 20170717
This highly-regarded text provides a wide-ranging introduction to the social, political, cultural and economic life of South Africa. Thoroughly revised and updated, the third edition takes account of recent key developments, including the impact of the economic crisis, the ongoing HIV/AIDS epidemic, and increasing tensions within South Africa's politics and government.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781137373373 20170717
Green Library

15. Dal PCI al PD [2017]

Book
270 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xix, 358 pages, 24 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (chiefly color), map ; 24 cm
  • The challenge of freedom
  • Negotiating democracy
  • A free and fair election
  • Getting into the union buildings
  • National unity
  • The presidency and the Constitution
  • Parliament
  • Traditional leadership and democracy
  • Transformation of the state
  • Reconciliation
  • Social and economic transformation
  • Negotiating the media
  • On the African and world stages.
"'I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can rest only for a moment, for with freedom come responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not yet ended.'--Nelson Mandela, Long Walk to Freedom. In 1994, Nelson Mandela became the first president of a democratic South Africa. From the outset, he was committed to serving only a single five-year term. During his presidency, he and his government ensured that all of South Africa's citizens became equal before the law, and he laid the foundation for turning a country riven by centuries of colonialism and apartheid into a fully functioning democracy. Dare Not Linger is the story of Mandela's presidential years, drawing heavily on the memoir he began to write as he prepared to leave office, but was unable to finish. Now the acclaimed South African writer Mandla Langa has completed the task, using Mandela's unfinished draft, detailed notes that Mandela made as events were unfolding, and a wealth of unseen archival material. With a prologue by Mandela's widow, Graça Machel, the result is a vivid and often inspirational account of Mandela's presidency and the creation of a new democracy. It tells the story of a country in transition and the challenges Mandela faced as he strove to make his vision for a liberated South Africa a reality."--Dust jacket flap.
Green Library
Book
x, 173 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction
  • Intervention, statebuilding and Eurocentrism
  • Strategies for decolonising intervention
  • The state under intervention
  • Intervention and peasantry
  • Anti-corruption and the limits of intervention
  • Conclusions: Decolonising intervention, decolonising international relations.
Building, or re-building, states after war or crisis is a contentious process. But why? Sabaratnam argues that to best answer the question, we need to engage with the people who are supposedly benefiting from international 'expertise'. This book challenges and enhances standard 'critical' narratives of statebuilding by exploring the historical experiences and interpretive frameworks of the people targeted by intervention. Drawing on face-to-face interviews, archival research, policy reviews and in-country participant-observations carried out over several years, the author challenges assumptions underpinning external interventions, such as the incapacity of 'local' agents to govern and the necessity of 'liberal' values in demanding better governance. The analysis focuses on Mozambique, long hailed as one of international donors' great success stories, but whose peaceful, prosperous, democratic future now hangs in the balance. The conclusions underscore the significance of thinking with rather than for the targets of state-building assistance, and appreciating the historical and material conditions which underpin these reform efforts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781783482740 20170731
Law Library (Crown)
Book
x, 173 pages ; 24 cm.
  • 1. Introduction / 2. Intervention, Statebuilding and Eurocentrism / 3. Strategies for Decolonizing Intervention / 4. The State Under Intervention / 5. Intervention and the Peasantry / 6. Anti-corruption Politics and the Limits of Intervention / 7. Conclusion: Decolonizing Intervention, Decolonizing International Relations.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781783482740 20170731
Building, or re-building, states after war or crisis is a contentious process. But why? Sabaratnam argues that to best answer the question, we need to engage with the people who are supposedly benefiting from international 'expertise'. This book challenges and enhances standard 'critical' narratives of statebuilding by exploring the historical experiences and interpretive frameworks of the people targeted by intervention. Drawing on face-to-face interviews, archival research, policy reviews and in-country participant-observations carried out over several years, the author challenges assumptions underpinning external interventions, such as the incapacity of 'local' agents to govern and the necessity of 'liberal' values in demanding better governance. The analysis focuses on Mozambique, long hailed as one of international donors' great success stories, but whose peaceful, prosperous, democratic future now hangs in the balance. The conclusions underscore the significance of thinking with rather than for the targets of state-building assistance, and appreciating the historical and material conditions which underpin these reform efforts.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781783482740 20170731
Green Library
Book
xii, 243 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • * Prologue * Democratic Evaluation and a New Democracy: Acquaintances, Adversaries, or Allies? * A Framework for Identifying Entry Points for International Development Evaluation to Enable Responsive Government Policy * How to Democratize Evaluation Practice: A Challenge for Non-Governmental Organizations and Organizations and Donors* The Role of the Civil Society Organization in Promoting Democracy: The Case of the South African Monitoring and Evaluation Association* Evaluation and Democratic Governance: The Public Management Perspective* How Does Government Evaluation in South Africa Contribute to Democracy? * Strengthening Democratic Governance in the Building of Integrated Human Settlements Through Evaluations * Living the Rainbow: Furthering Education Quality and Democracy Through the Evaluation of Educational Outcomes Using the Annual National Assessment. * Exploring Economic Development Initiatives and the Link to Democratic Outcomes* Strengthening Government Through Evaluation: The Evaluation Journey of a Provincial Agriculture Department * Paying for Troublemaking: Strengthening Democracy by Institutionalizing Multiple Centers of Evaluation * Is Government's Approach to Evaluation Deepening Democracy in South Africa? * How Can Evaluation Strengthen Democracy?* The Teaching Case * About the Authors.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781681237893 20170731
Democratic evaluation brings a way of thinking about evaluation's role in society and in particular, its role in strengthening social justice. Yet the reality of applying it, and what happens when it is applied particularly outside the West, is unclear. Set in South Africa, a newly formed democracy in Southern Africa, the book affords an in-depth journey that immerses a reader into the realities of evaluation and its relation to democracy. The book starts with the broader introductory chapters that set the scene for more detailed ones which bring thorough insights into national government, local government, and civil societies' experience of evaluation, democratic evaluation and their understanding of how it contributes to strengthening democracy (or not). A teaching case, the book concludes by providing guiding questions that encourage reflection, discussion and learning that ultimately aims to inform practice and theory.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781681237893 20170731
Green Library
Book
180 pages ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)