Book
volumes : illustrations ; 31 cm.
  • V.I.I. Introducción ; II. "Para que la historia no cayera en el tragadero del olvido" ; III. El rey ; IV. El cronista ; V. La obra de Antonio de Herrera ; VI. Historia general del mundo ; VII. Bibliografía
  • v. II. Primera parte de la Historia general del Mundo, de XVI. años del tiempo del señor Rey don Felipe II. el Prudente, desde el año de M.D. LIX. hasta el de M.D. LXXIIII
  • v. III. Segunda parte de la Historia general del Mundo, de XI. años del tiempo del señor Rey don Felipe II. el Prudente, desde el año de M.D. LXXV. hasta el de M.D. LXXXV
  • v. IV. Tercera parte de la Historia general del Mundo, de XIIII. años del tiempo del señor Rey don Felipe II. el Prudente, desde el año de 1585. hasta el de 1598. que passò a mejor vida.
Green Library, SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xix, 332 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
This work resituates the Spanish Caribbean as an extension of the Luso-African Atlantic world from the late sixteenth to the mid-seventeenth century, when the union of the Spanish and Portuguese crowns facilitated a surge in the transatlantic slave trade. After the catastrophic decline of Amerindian populations on the islands, two major African provenance zones, first Upper Guinea and then Angola, contributed forced migrant populations with distinct experiences to the Caribbean. They played a dynamic role in the social formation of early Spanish colonial society in the fortified port cities of Cartagena de Indias, Havana, Santo Domingo, and Panama City and their semirural hinterlands. David Wheat is the first scholar to establish this early phase of the "Africanization" of the Spanish Caribbean two centuries before the rise of large-scale sugar plantations. With African migrants and their descendants comprising demographic majorities in core areas of Spanish settlement, Luso-Africans, Afro-Iberians, Latinized Africans, and free people of color acted more as colonists or settlers than as plantation slaves. These ethnically mixed and economically diversified societies constituted a region of overlapping Iberian and African worlds, while they made possible Spain's colonization of the Caribbean. Published for the Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Virginia.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469623412 20160802
Green Library
Book
ix, 223 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: Black Africans, a Black legend, and challenges of representation
  • Points of origin: English voyages to Guinea
  • Reconstructing the Ethiop: Sir Francis Drake and the simarrones of Panama
  • Alliances real and imagined: Thomas Gage and Black African collaboration in New Spain
  • Consuming beauty: Richard Ligon, Black African women, and a reciprocity of power
  • Locating Africa in the Americas: George Best, Sir Walter Ralegh, and the quandaries of racial representation
  • Afterword: beyond the mediation.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 200 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm
  • Introduction: Peasants and pagans
  • The archaeological peasant
  • Hybrid histories
  • Bacchic excess
  • Bruegel's art history
  • Conclusion: Bruegel as history.
"Explores the historical imagination of the late sixteenth-century Netherlandish painter Pieter Bruegel, focusing on the complex interplay of classical antiquity, local history, and art history"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
536 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), color map ; 30 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xvii, 242, 16 pages of plates : illustrations (some color), maps ; 27 cm.
  • List of Illustrations Technical Notes Introduction 1. Nako's Socio-Political History and Artistic Heritage 2. Forgetting to Remember: Gyapagpa Temple's Shifting Identity 3. Mapping Drigung Activity in Nako and the Western Himalaya 4. Gyapagpa's Painting Style and its Antecendents 5. Origin and Meaning of a Renascent Painting Tradition Conclusion Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253013064 20160619
Sixteenth-century wall paintings in a Buddhist temple in the Tibetan cultural zone of northwest India are the focus of this innovative and richly illustrated study. Initially shaped by one set of religious beliefs, the paintings have since been reinterpreted and retraced by a later Buddhist community, subsumed within its religious framework and communal memory. Melissa Kerin traces the devotional, political, and artistic histories that have influenced the paintings' production and reception over the centuries of their use. Her interdisciplinary approach combines art historical methods with inscriptional translation, ethnographic documentation, and theoretical inquiry to understand religious images in context.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780253013064 20160619
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
349 pages ; 19 cm.
Green Library
Book
405 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 196 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction by Darlene Farabee, Mark Netzloff, and Bradley D. Ryner Chapter 1: Dramatic Verse and Early Modern Playgoers in Marlowe's Time by Roslyn L. Knutson Chapter 2: The Usurer's Theatrical Body: Refiguring Profit in The Jew of Malta and The Blind Beggar of Alexandria by Bradley D. Ryner Chapter 3: Theater of Anatomy: The Tragedy of Hoffman by Peter Hyland Chapter 4: 'Know you this ring?': Metonymic Functions of a Prop by Ann Thompson and John O. Thompson Chapter 5: Editing and Staging The Revenger's Tragedy: Three Problems by Alan C. Dessen Chapter 6: The 'most unsavoury similes' and Henry IV, Part One by Darlene Farabee Chapter 7: Shakespeare's Cognitive Vision by Arthur Kinney Chapter 8: Shakespeare's Conception of Tragedy: The Middle Tragedies by Jay L. Halio Chapter 9: Shakespeare or not Shakespeare?: The propogation of the text in Europe through J. F. Ducis's 'Imitations' by Michele Willems Chapter 10:Un/natural Perspective: Viola on the late nineteenth-century stage by Virginia Mason Vaughan Chapter 11: Reading, Recitation, and Entertainments: The Dunedin Shakespeare Club, 1877-1956 by Evelyn Tribble Chapter 12: The power of Shakespeare's word in twentieth-century Prague by Zdenek Stribrny Chapter 13: Showtime: Temporality and the Video Archive of Julius Caesar at the RSC by Andrew Hartley.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611495126 20160618
Early Modern Drama in Performance is a collection of essays in honor of Lois Potter, the distinguished author of five monographs, including most recently The Life of William Shakespeare (2012), and numerous articles, edited collections, and editions. This collection's emphasis on Shakespearean and early modern drama reflects the area for which Potter is most widely known, as a performance critic, editor, and literary scholar. The essays by a diverse group of scholars who have been influenced by Potter address recurring themes in her work: Shakespeare and non-Shakespearean early modern drama, performance history and theatre practice, theatrical performance across cultures, play reviewing, and playreading. What unifies them most, though, is that they carry on the spirit of Potter's work: her ability to meet a text, a performance, or a historical period on its own terms, to give scrupulous attention to specific details and elegantly show how these details generate larger meaning, and to recover and preserve the fleeting and the ephemeral.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611495126 20160618
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
205 pages : 2 illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
258 pages ; 24 cm.
Green Library
Book
xix, 121 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
  • Selected letters from the Río de la Plata
  • Pedro de Mendoza to Juan de Ayolas (April 21, 1537)
  • Isabel Guevara to Princess Juana (July 2, 1556)
  • Domingo de Irala to Emperor Charles V (March 1, 1545)
  • Francisco Galán to Rodrigo de Vera (March 1, 1545)
  • Juan Pavyenn to Martín de Agreda (June 15, 1556)
  • Francisco de Andrada to the Council of the Indies (March 1, 1545)
  • Martín González to Emperor Charles V (June 25, 1556)
  • Domingo Martínez to Emperor Charles V (July 2, 1556).
"A translation of letters written by settlers in the Río de la Plata region of South America during the Spanish conquest in the sixteenth century"--Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
211 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
391 pages ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 247 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm
  • Constructing status : family narratives, family myths
  • Constructing identity : Henri de Rohan, 1579-1638
  • Women, gender, and the management of dynastic capital
  • Material contexts : wealth, income, strategies
  • Followers and servants : aristocracy as collective practice.
"Examines the aristocratic experience in early modern France through a close examination of the history of the Rohan, a noble family in the Parisian court who were involved in notable political and religious events from the sixteenth through the eighteenth centuries"--Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
352 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), maps (some color) ; 27 cm.
  • Hernán Cortes, heroico y piadoso / Solange Alberro
  • Veracruz en la conquista de México / Rodrigo Martínez Baracs
  • Siguiendo la ruta de Cortés, escalas de una historia / Rosío Córdova Plaza, Hipólito Rodríguez Herrero.
Green Library
Book
xiii, 221 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm
  • The divinity of painting
  • The devotional image
  • Synthesis as artistic ideal
  • The theatrics of the counter-reformation narrative
  • The artist as antiquarian in Christian Rome
  • From icon to altarpiece.
"Explores the early career of Domenikos Theotokopoulos, 'El Greco, ' in particular his engagement with Italian art around the time of his sojourn in Venice and Rome (1567-76). Examines the form, function, and conception of religious images in the second half of the sixteenth century"-- Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xiii, 297 pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm.
  • Illustrations Acknowledgments Introduction Chapter 1. Don Tomas de la Plaza Introduction Parish Priest Cathedral Dean Don Tomas and His Family Don Tomas's Library and His Collections Conclusion Chapter 2. An Urban Palace Introduction Purism and the Casa del Dean The Facade The Residence's Plan The Designer and Builder of the Casa del Dean Conclusion Chapter 3. The Artist as Tlapalli: Art as Rhetoric Introduction Tlapalli: The Deified Heart Form as Metaphor in Early Colonial Painting Rhetoric and Image Education of the Amerindian Artists A Franciscan School in the Tlaxcala-Puebla Region Master of the Sibyls Conclusion Chapter 4. Dic Tu Sibila: The Salon of the Sibyls Introduction The Sibyls Tracing the Sibylline Oracles The Sibyls in Procession: Liturgical Drama The Sibyls in the Casa del Dean Murals Visual Sources for the Sibyls Conclusion Chapter 5. The Salon of the Triumphs Introduction Petrarch's Triumphs and Spectacle Literacy The Impact on the Arts The Triumphal Scenes Conclusion Chapter 6. The Wild Man in the Salon of the Triumphs Introduction Antecedents of the Satyr and Wild Man The Wild Man in New Spain Conclusion Chapter 7. Amerindian Iconography: The Dream of a Word Introduction The Artist's Antecedents The Animals in the Salon of the Triumphs Conclusion Conclusion Appendix I. Don Tomas de la Plaza's Last Will and Testament: El Testamento de Don Tomas de la Plaza Appendix II. Sibylline Oracles and Attributes Appendix III. Documenting Don Tomas de la Plaza's Capellania Notes Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292759305 20160618
The Casa del Dean in Puebla, Mexico, is one of few surviving sixteenth-century residences in the Americas. Built in 1580 by Tomas de la Plaza, the Dean of the Cathedral, the house was decorated with at least three magnificent murals, two of which survive. Their rediscovery in the 1950s and restoration in 2010 revealed works of art that rival European masterpieces of the early Renaissance, while incorporating indigenous elements that identify them with Amerindian visual traditions. Extensively illustrated with new color photographs of the murals, The Casa del Dean presents a thorough iconographic analysis of the paintings and an enlightening discussion of the relationship between Tomas de la Plaza and the indigenous artists whom he commissioned. Penny Morrill skillfully traces how native painters, trained by the Franciscans, used images from Classical mythology found in Flemish and Italian prints and illustrated books from France - as well as animal images and glyphic traditions with pre-Columbian origins - to create murals that are reflective of Don Tomas's erudition and his role in evangelizing among the Amerindians. She demonstrates how the importance given to rhetoric by both the Spaniards and the Nahuas became a bridge of communication between these two distinct and highly evolved cultures. This pioneering study of the Casa del Dean mural cycle adds an important new chapter to the study of colonial Latin American art, as it increases our understanding of the process by which imagery in the New World took on Christian meaning. The Casa del Dean in Puebla, Mexico, is one of few surviving sixteenth-century residences in the Americas. Built in 1580 by Tomas de la Plaza, the Dean of the Cathedral, the house was decorated with at least three magnificent murals, two of which survive. Their rediscovery in the 1950s and restoration in 2010 revealed works of art that rival European masterpieces of the early Renaissance, while incorporating indigenous elements that identify them with Amerindian visual traditions.Extensively illustrated with new color photographs of the murals, The Casa del Dean presents a thorough iconographic analysis of the paintings and an enlightening discussion of the relationship between Tomas de la Plaza and the indigenous artists whom he commissioned. Penny Morrill skillfully traces how native painters, trained by the Franciscans, used images from Classical mythology found in Flemish and Italian prints and illustrated books from France - as well as animal images and glyphic traditions with pre-Columbian origins - to create murals that are reflective of Don Tomas's erudition and his role in evangelizing among the Amerindians. She demonstrates how the importance given to rhetoric by both the Spaniards and the Nahuas became a bridge of communication between these two distinct and highly evolved cultures. This pioneering study of the Casa del Dean mural cycle adds an important new chapter to the study of colonial Latin American art, as it increases our understanding of the process by which imagery in the New World took on Christian meaning.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292759305 20160618
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
265 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm
Green Library
Book
x, 240 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • The constitution of privilege : royal granting, revoking, and recognizing of hidalguía
  • The economic and political value of status
  • Migration, resettlement, and status
  • Anatomy of a lawsuit of hidalguía
  • Social networks and privilege
  • Justice and malfeasance at the tribunal of the hidalgos.
"In the context of legal privileges based on status and class in premodern Spain and Europe in general, investigates conflicts over and resistance to the status of hidalgo in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Castile"--Provided by publisher.
Green Library