Database topics
British and Commonwealth History; British and Commonwealth Literary Studies
  • Fast literature
  • Street ephemera : posters, advertising, playbills, ballads and broadsides
  • Penny fiction
  • Cartoons
  • A complete collection of Tallis' Street Views
  • Chapbooks
  • Street Cries
  • Swell's guides to London prostitution, gambling and drinking dens
  • Tourist guides and topography
  • Manuscripts of George Gissing.
Full-text searchable resource, containing colour digital images of rare books, ephemera, maps and other materials relating to 19th and early 20th century London; designed for both teaching and study, from undergraduate to research students and beyond. Will be of interest to students and scholars from a wide range of disciplines, including literature, cultural studies, urban studies, social history and the study of leisure and tourism. There is a strong emphasis on rare or unique material, particularly in the range of ephemera and street literature available.There is also an emphasis on visual material. The documents are drawn from the holdings of the Lilly Library, the rare books, manuscripts, and special collections library of the Indiana University Libraries, Bloomington.
Database topics
British and Commonwealth Literary Studies; British and Commonwealth History
Journal/Periodical
1 online resource
Database topics
British and Commonwealth Literary Studies; News
Book
1 online resource
Launched in 1855, the Telegraph was the first daily morning paper. By 1876, the Telegraph was the largest-selling newspaper in the world, with a circulation of 300,000. Under the editorship of poet and Orientalist Edwin Arnold from 1873 to 1899, the newspaper published widely on foreign affairs and foreign cultures. Its dedication to foreign news coverage was evidenced by its employment of several renowned special correspondents over the years; Winston Churchill, who reported from India in 1897, Rudyard Kipling, who braved the trenches of the First World War, and Clare Hollingworth, who, as the first female war correspondent, relayed the start of the Second World War from Poland. During the twentieth century, the Telegraph cemented its reputation as a pioneering yet reliable source of news reporting. The newspaper's commitment to lively copy was matched by its desire to position itself at the forefront of journalistic innovation; it published the first crossword to appear in a newspaper in 1925, the first television column in 1935, and became the first British newspaper to launch a website in 1994. The publication of the Telegraph is generally seen by press historians as the start of a new era of journalism that emerged following the repeal of the stamp duty, marking the first step towards the mass-market journalism of the Daily Mail. The Telegraph Historical Archive, 1855-2000 has over 1 million pages of content and includes the Sunday edition from its inception in 1961. The archive offers a fundamental insight into domestic and international affairs and culture over a timespan of almost 150 years.