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Book
396 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 31 cm
The Museo del Prado houses the largest known collection of works by Jheronimus Bosch. Among its holdings are The Adoration of the Magi and The Garden of Earthly Delights triptychs, as well as the original of The Haywain, making it the 'home of Bosch' and the perfect institution to hold a major exhibition marking the quincentenary of the artist's death. This magnificent, richly illustrated book reproduces these masterpieces and other recently cleaned and restored paintings, and reveals hitherto unknown facets of Bosch's art. A distinguished team of Bosch scholars contribute to the volume. Pilar Silva Maroto's essay presents an updated biography of Bosch and his family, and includes all the surviving documents dating from his lifetime. It also locates the artist in the context of his home town, 's-Hertogenbosch, and offers an in-depth appreciation of his status as a painter and draughtsman. Eric De Bruyn considers Bosch's sources in texts and images; Paul Vandenbroeck, his values and ideology; and Larry Silver, the sins and their punishment, a fundamental theme in the artist's work. Finally, there is a 'conversation' between Reindert Falkenburg and The Garden of Earthly Delights triptych, and a reflection by Fernando Checa on the reception of Bosch at the Habsburg court in Flanders and in Spain in the 16th century. The catalogue entries for the paintings belonging to the Prado collection discuss the findings of recent technical research carried out specifically for the exhibition, which has shed new light on these works.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780500970799 20171009
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
xi, 339 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 29 cm
  • From the street to the studio
  • Altarpieces, frescoes and the larger workshops, 1580-1620
  • Stanzione, Ribera and the years of consolidation, 1620-1656
  • Aniello Falcone and the rise of Neapolitan cabinet painting
  • Art dealing at the lower reaches of the market
  • Dealing by artists
  • The rise of the art merchants
  • Public commissions
  • Private collections of painting
  • The viceroys
  • Public exhibitions, rivalry and the internalization of Neapolitan Baroque painting.
The second largest city in 17th-century Europe, Naples constituted a vital Mediterranean center in which the Spanish Habsburgs, the clergy, and Neapolitan aristocracy, together with the resident merchants, and other members of the growing professional classes jostled for space and prestige. Their competing programs of building and patronage created a booming art market and spurred painters such as Jusepe de Ribera, Massimo Stanzione, Salvator Rosa, and Luca Giordano as well as foreign artists such as Caravaggio, Domenichino, Artemisia Gentileschi, and Giovanni Lanfranco to extraordinary heights of achievement. This new reading of 17th-century Italian Baroque art explores the social, material, and economic history of painting, revealing how artists, agents, and the owners of artworks interacted to form a complex and mutually sustaining art world. Through such topics as artistic rivalry and anti-foreign labor agitation, art dealing and forgery, cultural diplomacy, and the rise of the independently arranged art exhibition, Christopher R. Marshall illuminates the rich interconnections between artistic practice and patronage, business considerations, and the spirit of entrepreneurialism in Baroque Italy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300174502 20170123
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
xiv, 412 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 29 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
xiii, 200 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm
  • Introduction: Peasants and pagans
  • The archaeological peasant
  • Hybrid histories
  • Bacchic excess
  • Bruegel's art history
  • Conclusion: Bruegel as history.
"Explores the historical imagination of the late sixteenth-century Netherlandish painter Pieter Bruegel, focusing on the complex interplay of classical antiquity, local history, and art history"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
x, 236 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), portraits ; 26 cm
Hailed as one of the most influential and expressive painters of the seventeenth century, Artemisia Gentileschi (1593-ca. 1656) has figured prominently in the art historical discourse of the past two decades. This attention to Artemisia, after many years of scholarly neglect, is partially due to interest in the dramatic details of her early life, including the widely publicized rape trial of her painting tutor, Agostino Tassi, and her admission to Florence's esteemed Accademia del Disegno. While the artist's early paintings have been extensively discussed, her later work has been largely dismissed. This beautifully illustrated and elegantly written book provides a revolutionary look at Artemisia's later career, refuting longstanding assumptions about the artist. The fact that she was semi-illiterate has erroneously led scholars to assume a lack of literary and cultural education on her part. Stressing the importance of orality in Baroque culture and in Artemisia's paintings, Locker argues for her important place in the cultural dialogue of the seventeenth century.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300185119 20160618
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01

6. Sandro Botticelli [2015]

Book
319 pages : color illustrations ; 33 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
xv, 368 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
  • Writing about art
  • Writing about art : the big picture
  • Formal analysis and style
  • Analytic thinking
  • Writing a comparison
  • Writing an entry in an exhibition catalog
  • Writing a review of an exhibition
  • Virtual exhibitions : writing text panels and other materials
  • How to write an effective essay
  • Style in writing
  • Art-historical research
  • Some critical approaches
  • Writing a research paper
  • Manuscript form
  • Writing essay examinations
  • Symbols commonly used in annotating papers
  • Brief guide to instructions in writing
  • Frequently asked questions.
This book is intended for art courses where there is a writing component. This text guides art students through the writing process. Students are shown how to analyze pictures (drawings, paintings, photographs), sculptures and architecture. The text includes: coverage of essential writing assignments including formal analysis, comparison, research paper, review of an exhibition, essay examination; clear step-by-step writing instructions guiding students though the research and writing processes; sample essays, with analytic comments by the author, demonstrating the virtues of effective writing.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01

8. Hans Holbein [2014]

Book
406 pages : ill. (some color) ; 22 cm
Hans Holbein the Younger (1497/8 - 1543), one of the most versatile and admired painters of the Northern Renaissance, trained under his father in Augsburg and then worked for leading patrons in Switzerland before settling in England as Court Painter to Henry viii. Holbein was a hugely ambitious artist, and even during his formative years in Lucerne and Basle designed jewellery, stained glass and woodcuts as well as paint major altarpieces and portraits. He also carried out several monumental decorative schemes for private houses and civic buildings. In all his commissions Holbein sought to rival the greatest masters of Germany and Italy - notably Durer and Mantegna - as well as Antiquity, and by the time of his visit to France in 1524 he was determined to secure a position as court painter. This, and the precarious situation he was finding himself in as a result of the Reformation's increasing hostility to religious works, drove him to England for good in 1532, where in addition to decorative schemes and Triumphs he both drew and painted numerous unrivalled likenesses of leading courtiers, merchants and diplomats, among which is his celebrated double portrait 'The Ambassadors'. This acclaimed, richly illustrated book by Oskar Batschmann and Pascal Griener - now available in a revised and expanded Second Edition - is a major advance in our understanding of Holbein's contribution to European art. The authors re-examine every aspect of a remarkable career, in which they take full account of the artistic and cultural influences that affected the artist and of his friendships with leading humanists such as Erasmus and Sir Thomas More, and cast fresh light on many hitherto vexing questions and misunderstandings.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780231716 20160613
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
xii, 207 pages : color illustrations ; 24 cm + folded reproduction of painting in pocket.
  • How the Discovery Came About, Interpretations, A Very Private Location, The Medici - Violent Politics and Sublime Aspirations, Botticelli - Painter and Mystagogue, Classical Rebirth, First Encounter, A Madonna called Venus, The Esoteric Graces, A Medici as Mercury, Changing Natures, Cupid and the Bride, Flowery Language for a New Alliance, Appendices: Location and Dating, Poetry to Inspire a Painter, An Important Letter.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780856832963 20160613
Rather like the Mona Lisa, there has long been a suspicion that there is something disguised in the Primavera. A chance discovery provided the author with the key to unlocking the secret of the 500 year-old masterpiece, opening a window onto the cryptic world of the Renaissance pagan revival. An elite circle of scholars and artists around the Medici, disillusioned with a worldly and corrupted medieval Church, looked for a purer, unadulterated Christianity in the pagan background to their faith. This was a dangerous occupation, risking the ire of the Church and prosecution as heretics. In 1460 an ancient manuscript, said to be from the time of Moses, was brought to Cosimo de'Medici. Its author had been revered among the early Church Fathers as a gentile prophet of Christianity. Here was the evidence they were seeking - that Judaism, Christianity and Islam had a common source. Convinced, the Medici circle of philosophers and poets strove to merge Judaism, Islam and Christianity into a single religion in harmony with Platonism. This 'new learning' from the pre-Christian past had no place for the medieval concept of man as a sinner seeking redemption, but accepted him instead as a spark of the divine. As Burckhardt noted, 'it became the breath of life for all the most instructed minds of Europe'. Expressing this newly discovered 'God-like' being in art ignited the Renaissance. To find the clue, look at the right side of the painting, at the gesture of Chloris, and focus on the flower pattern she indicates. The same gesture is used in a contemporary painting by Botticelli of the Virgin and Child, where the allusion is more explicit. This beautifully illustrated book explains the allegory Botticelli painted as a reminder for its owner of the Medici circle's vision for Christianity.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780856832963 20160613
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01

10. Bruegel [2012]

Book
351 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 26 cm.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
736 p. : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 30 cm.
  • Preface Chapter 1 PRELUDE: ITALY AND ITALIAN ART 16 Representing This World 17 The Role of Antiquity 18 The Cities 20 The Guilds and the Status of the Artist 24 The Artist at Work 25 The Products of the Painter's Bottega 25 The Practice of Drawing 27 The Practice of Painting 28 The Practice of Sculpture 33 The Practice of Architecture 34 Printmaking in the Renaissance 36 The Practice of History 36 The Practice of Art History: Giorgio Vasari 37 PART ONE: THE LATE MIDDLE AGES Chapter 2 DUECENTO ART IN TUSCANY AND ROME 40 Painting in Pisa 42 Painting in Lucca 44 Painting in Florence 45 Painting in Rome 53 Sculpture 57 Architecture 64 Chapter 3 FLORENTINE ART OF THE EARLY TRECENTO 72 Giotto 73 Florentine Painters after Giotto 95 Sculpture 100 Chapter 4 SIENESE ART OF THE EARLY TRECENTO 102 Duccio 103 Simone Martini 110 Pietro Lorenzetti 119 Ambrogio Lorenzetti 122 Orvieto Cathedral 128 The Master of the Triumph of Death 134 Chapter 5 LATER GOTHIC ART IN TUSCANY AND NORTHERN ITALY 136 Mid-Trecento Art in Florence 138 Late Gothic Painting and the International Style 145 Painting and Sculpture in Northern Italy 149 PART TWO: THE QUATTROCENTO Chapter 6 THE RENAISSANCE BEGINS: ARCHITECTURE 158 The Role of the Medici Family 160 Filippo Brunelleschi and Linear Perspective 161 The Dome of Florence Cathedral 164 The Ospedale degli Innocenti 168 Brunelleschi's Sacristy for San Lorenzo 170 San Lorenzo and Santo Spirito 170 Santa Maria degli Angeli 173 The Pazzi Chapel 174 The Medici Palace and Michelozzi di Bartolommeo 174 Chapter 7 TRANSITIONS IN TUSCAN SCULPTURE 180 The Competition Panels 181 Ghiberti to 1425 183 Donatello to 1420 188 Nanni di Banco 193 Donatello (c. 1420 to c. 1435) 196 Jacopo della Quercia 199 Chapter 8 TRANSITIONS IN FLORENTINE PAINTING 202 Gentile da Fabriano 203 Masolino and Masaccio 206 Popular Devotion and Prints 220 Chapter 9 THE HERITAGE OF MASACCIO: FRA ANGELICO AND FRA FILIPPO LIPPI 222 Fra Angelico 224 Fra Filippo Lippi 232 Chapter 10 FLORENTINE ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE, c. 1430--1455 238 Alberti 239 Ghiberti after 1425 249 Luca della Robbia 251 Donatello (c. 1433 to c. 1455) 254 Florentine Tomb Sculpture 261 The Portrait Bust 261 Chapter 11 FLORENTINE PAINTING AT MID-CENTURY 262 Paolo Uccello 263 Domenico Veneziano 267 Andrea del Castagno 271 Piero della Francesca 278 Chapter 12 ART IN FLORENCE UNDER THE MEDICI I 294 Donatello after 1453 298 Desiderio da Settignano 302 The Chapel of the Cardinal of Portugal 303 Benedetto and Giuliano da Maiano 306 Giuliano da Sangallo 309 Benozzo Gozzoli 312 Baldovinetti and Pesellino 313 Chapter 13 ART IN FLORENCE UNDER THE MEDICI II 318 Antonio del Pollaiuolo 320 Andrea del Verrocchio 327 Renaissance Cassoni 331 Alessandro Botticelli 332 Filippino Lippi 347 Domenico del Ghirlandaio 350 Piero di Cosimo 356 Chapter 14 THE RENAISSANCE IN CENTRAL ITALY 358 Siena 359 Sassetta 361 Domenico di Bartolo 362 Matteo di Giovanni 364 Vecchietta 364 Francesco di Giorgio 365 Neroccio de' Landi 367 Perugia 369 Perugino 369 Pintoricchio 374 Melozzo da ForlA-- 376 The Laurana Brothers and Urbino 378 Naples 384 Luca Signorelli 385 Chapter 15 GOTHIC AND RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND NORTHERN ITALY 388 Pisanello 389 Early Quattrocento Art and Architecture in Venice 393 Jacopo Bellini 395 Andrea Mantegna 397 Mantegna and Isabella d'Este 408 Gentile Bellini 411 Antonello da Messina 412 Giovanni Bellini 415 Vittore Carpaccio 421 Carlo Crivelli 425 Venetian Fabrics 426 Venetian Publishing 426 Late Quattrocento Sculpture and Architecture in Venice 428 Late Quattrocento Art in Milan 433 Vincenzo Foppa 433 Filarete 433 Quattrocento Painting in Ferrara 434 North Italian Terra-Cotta Sculpture 440 PART THREE: THE CINQUECENTO Chapter 16 THE ORIGINS OF THE HIGH RENAISSANCE 442 Leonardo da Vinci 443 Michelangelo to 1505 469 Raphael in Perugia and Florence 480 Fra Bartolommeo 484 Chapter 17 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ROME 486 Donato Bramante 489 Michelangelo 1505 to 1516 496 Raphael in Rome 515 Chapter 18 NEW DEVELOPMENTS c. 1520--50 542 Michelangelo 1516 to 1533 544 Andrea del Sarto 555 Pontormo 558 Rosso Fiorentino 563 Perino del Vaga 565 Domenico Beccafumi 567 Properzia de' Rossi 570 Correggio 572 Parmigianino 577 Pordenone 580 Antonio da Sangallo the Elder and the Younger 581 Baldassare Peruzzi 586 Giulio Romano 586 Chapter 19 HIGH AND LATE RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND ON THE MAINLAND 590 Giorgione 592 Titian 596 Lorenzo Lotto 613 Tullio Lombardo 616 Painting in Northern Italy 617 Tintoretto 624 Paolo Veronese 632 Jacopo Bassano 639 Michele Sanmicheli 639 Jacopo Sansovino 641 Andrea Palladio 643 Alessandro Vittoria 647 Chapter 20 THE LATE SIXTEENTH CENTURY 648 Michelangelo after 1534 649 Art at the Medici Court 660 Benvenuto Cellini 662 Bartolommeo Ammanati 665 Giovanni Bologna 667 Agnolo Bronzino and Francesco Salviati 669 Later Ceramic Production 674 Giorgio Vasari and the Studiolo 676 Developments Elsewhere 681 Giuseppe Arcimboldo 681 Lavinia Fontana 682 Giacomo da Vignola and Giacomo della Porta 683 Federico Barocci 687 Fede Galizia 689 Caravaggio 689 Sixtus V and the Urban Plan of Rome 691 Glossary 692 Bibliography 700 Locating Works of Renaissance Art 715 Index 716 Photo Credits 735 Literary Credits 736.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780205705818 20160528
For survey courses in Italian Renaissance art. A broad survey of art and architecture in Italy between c. 1250 and 1600, this book approaches the works from the point of view of the artist as individual creator and as an expression of the city within which the artist was working. History of Italian Renaissance Art, Seventh Edition, brings you an updated understanding of this pivotal period as it incorporates new research and current art historical thinking, while also maintaining the integrity of the story that Frederick Hartt first told so enthusiastically many years ago. Choosing to retain Frederick Hartt's traditional framework, David Wilkins' incisive revisions keep the book fresh and up-to-date.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780205705818 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
320 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 25 cm.
  • Preface-- Interpretation-- Preamble-- Glosses on the Garden of Earthly Delights Double Images in Bosch's Epigones-- The Mouth of Hell-- Upper and Under-World-- The Creator, Man and Woman-- Visual Typology-- The Fountain of Life-- Mnemonic Imagery-- The Root of Evil-- Wonders of Nature-- The Burgeoning of Evil-- Somnium and Insomnium-- Marching Mountains-- L'Espace de l'Artifice-- Courtly Amusement: Park Hesdin-- Entremets-- Courtly Love-- L'Etat Sauvage-- Ye Shall Know Them by Their Fruits-- Through a Glass, Darkly-- A Glimpse of Hell-- The Tree-Man-- The Region of Dissemblance-- Lucifer's Rule-- The Land of Unlikeness-- Spectators and Speculators-- Princely Mirror-- Notes-- Bibliography-- Credits.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789040077678 20160609
Hieronymus Bosch's 'Garden of Earthly Delights' is one of the most enigmatic paintings in the history of western art. Apart from a brief description by an eyewitness in 1517, there are no contemporary records that tell us anything about the original commission of the painting, its placement, function or audience. Reindert Falkenburg now offers a detailed analysis of Bosch's eye- and mind boggling play with pictorial traditions. He argues that the painting was created towards the end of the fifteenth century as a conversation piece for an audience of Burgundian nobles. He suggests that the Garden of Earthly Delights served as a multifaceted mirror for viewers to reflect on how humanity, while created in the image and likeness of God, in the course of history has lost its original identity and tends towards becoming one with a world that is susceptible to an all-perverting force of evil origin. This debatable nature of Bosch's imagery is central to any engaged viewership, historical or modern.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789040077678 20160609
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
287 p. : ill. ; 27 cm.
This is a fascinating review of the works of Renaissance artists - and what they reveal about the birth of modern banking. Masterpieces by Botticelli, Fra. Angelico, Piero del Pollaiolo, the Della Robbia family, and Lorenzo di Credi - the cream of Renaissance artists - show how the modern banking system developed in parallel alongside the most important artistic flowering in the history of the Western world. "Money and Beauty" recounts the birth of the modern banking system and of the economic boom that it triggered, providing a reconstruction of European life and the continent's economy from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance. It also delves into the daily life of the families that controlled the banking system and the ongoing clash between spiritual and economic values that was such a feature of the period - and how this very convergence provided the ideal crucible for some of the leading artists of all time to flourish.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9788809767645 20160606
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
xiv, 244 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
"Explores how the Renaissance artist Hans Holbein the Younger came to develop his mature artistic styles through the key historical contexts framing his work: the controversies of the Reformation and Renaissance debates about rhetoric"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
xi, 248 p., [4] p. of plates : ill. (some col.), map ; 25 cm.
  • Prologue-- Proverbs and patrons-- Collections for collectors-- Making connections-- Living dangerously-- Turning point-- Epilogue-- Bibliography-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754669791 20160604
The art Bruegel produced between 1559 and 1563 presents a rare opportunity to investigate a concentrated period of productivity by one of the world's greatest artists. In this brief period Bruegel produced some of his most original works - the first pictorial collection of contemporary customs in Carnival and Lent, the first painting with children's activities as its subject in Children's Games, the first large-scale painting of a proverb collection, the unique and enigmatic Dulle Griet (Mad Meg), and the extraordinary Triumph of Death, his disturbing vision of men and women fighting off the onslaught of death. In this comprehensive study, Margaret Sullivan accounts for this burst of creativity, its intensity, innovation and brevity, by taking all aspects of the creative process into consideration - from the technical demands of picture-making to the constraints imposed by the dangerous religious and political situation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780754669791 20160604
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01

16. Writing about art [2009]

Book
xi, 148 p. : ill. ; 23 cm.
  • Preface ix Acknowledgments xi INTRODUCTION: Writing as Critical Thinking 1 1 CHOOSING IMAGES: How to Select the Works of Art You Plan to Write About 9 Visiting Museums and Galleries, 9 Choosing Works of Art to Write About: Some Questions of Taste, 16 Writing Comparative Essays: Some Advantages, 18 Choosing Works from "The Museum without Walls, " 21 The Computer and "The Museum without Walls, " 24 Summary, 27 2 USING VISUAL INFORMATION: What to Look For and How to Describe What You See 29 Considering the Subject Matter of the Work, 31 Describing the Formal Elements You Discover in the Work, 35 Line, 35 Shape and Space, 36 Light and Dark, 40 Color, 43 Other Elements, 47 Recognizing the Principles of Design, 54 Rhythm and Repetition. 54 Balance, 55 Proportion, 56 Scale, 57 Unity and Variety, 58 Considering Questions of Medium, 59 Beginning Your Essay By Describing the Work, 61 Asking Yourself about the Work of Art: A Summary, 64 Questions to Ask Before Writing About a Work of Art, 64 3 RESPONDING TO THE VERBAL FRAME: Where Else to Look for Help in Understanding What You See 66 Taking the Title and Label into Account, 66 Considering Informational Labels Accompanying the Work, 70 Consulting Artists' Statements and Exhibition Catalogues, 72 Discovering Other Helpful Material in the Library and Online, 74 Research Online, 75 Using the Library Catalogue and Databases, 77 Using Art Dictionaries and Other Guides, 81 Considering the Work's Historical and Cultural Context, 82 Quoting and Documenting Your Sources, 89 Learning the Art of Quoting, 89 Acknowledging Your Sources, 90 Choosing Your Footnote Style, 91 Citing Internet Sources, 96 4 WORKING WITH WORDS AND IMAGES: The Process of Writing about What You See 98 Gathering Together What You Know, 98 Taking Notes in a Gallery or Museum, 98 Taking Notes As You Read, 99 Focusing Your Discussion, 101 Brainstorming and Mapping, 103 Using Prewriting as a Way to Begin, 105 Online Writing, 110 Creating a Finished Essay, 112 Organizing Your Essay: From Description to the Verbal Frame, 112 Developing an Argument or Thesis, 116 Revising and Editing, 118 A Revision Checklist, 120 Writing about Art: The Final Product, 121 Appendix A SHORT GUIDE TO USAGE AND STYLE: The Rules and Principles of Good Writing 126 1. Possessive Apostrophes, 127 2. Commas, 127 3. Comma Splices, 128 4. Run-on Sentences, 129 5. That and Which, 129 6. Titles, 129 7. Foreign Phrases, 130 8. Split Infinitives, 130 9. Sentence Fragments, 130 10. Colons, 131 11. Semicolons, 131 12. Dashes, 132 13. Parentheses, 132 14. Quotations, 133 15. Ellipses, 133 16. Dangling Modifiers, 134 17. Subject-Verb Agreement, 134 18. Pronoun Agreement, 135 19. Pronouns and Gender Issues, 135 20. Indefinite Antecedents (it and this), 136 21. Correlative Expressions, 136 22. Verb Tense Consistency, 137 23. Diction Consistency, 137 24. Concrete and Specific Language, 138 25. Frequently Misspelled Words, 138 Notes 140 Index 143.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780205645787 20160528
This straightforward guide prepares students to describe, interpret, and write about works of art in meaningful and lasting terms. Designed as a supplement to Art History survey and period texts, this efficient book features a step-by-step approach to writing--from choosing a work to write about, to essay organization, to research techniques, to footnote form, to preparing the final essay. For beginners as well as more advanced students.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780205645787 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
xvi, 449 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Notes on Contributors.Preface.Introduction.Part I: Making Renaissance Art.Drawing and Workshop Practice.Cennino Cennini on Drawing.Alberti on Drawing Figures.Francesco Squarcione Details the Drawing Regime for his Pupils.Gerard Horenbout takes on two Apprentices.A Master's Duty of Care for his Apprentices.Leonardo da Vinci on Drawing.Durer gives Drawings as Gifts and Uses them to pay day-to-day Expenses.Durer Lists the Qualities Required to be a Painter.Joachim Camerarius Praises Durer's Drawings.Linear Perspective.Cennino Cennini's Method for Depicting Buildings in a Painting.Alberti and the Earliest Written Description of Single-point Perspective.Lorenzo Ghiberti Lists the Sources for Perspective.Filarete's Method for Making Drawings of Buildings.Piero Della Francesca's Perspective for Painters.Manetti's Descriptions of Brunelleschi's Experiments.Leonardo da Vinci on single-point and Aerial Perspective.Sculpture.Posthumous Inventory of Tournai Sculptor Colart le Cat.Michelozzo and Donatello are Contracted to make the Prato Pulpit.Report on Donatello's Progress on the Prato Pulpit.The Brussels Painters' Guild Claims Exclusive Rights to Market Painted Works of Art.Extracts from De Statua by Leon Battista Alberti.1470 regulations of the Antwerp Guild of St Luke.Utrecht Sculptor Adriaen van Wesel makes a Carved Altarpiece for the Confraternity of Our Ladys' Hertogenbosch.Architecture.Filarete's System of Architecture.Brunelleschi's Practice of Architecture.Panel Painting.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Paint Drapery in a Fresco Painting.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Acquire the Skills to Paint on Panel.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Prepare and Size a Panel.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Paint a Panel.Contract for Sassetta's Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.A Fee is fixed for Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.Second Valuation of Sassetta's Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.Final Valuation of Sassetta's Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.Contract for Enguerrand Quarton's Coronation of the Virgin Altarpiece.Prints and Printmaking.An ordinance from the Stadsarchief, Leuven, Concerning Printmaker Jan van den Berghe.The Hard Business of Printing.A Printer tries to Protect his Creative Rights.Durer's Letter to Jakob Heller.A Letter from block-cutter Jost de Negker to Maximilian I.The Purchase of the Contents of an Antwerp Printer's Workshop.Erasmus's Eulogy on Durer.Robert Peril's Agreement Regarding the Manufacture of Printed Playing Cards in Antwerp.Vasari's life of Marcantonio Raimondi.Treatises, Histories, Artists and Education.Lorenzo Ghiberti on the Education Required for Making Sculpture.Two Florentine Views of Art History: (1) Antonio Manetti.Two Florentine Views of Art History: (2) Leonardo da Vinci.Books known or Owned by Leonardo da Vinci.Courtiers Discuss the Merits of Painting and Sculpture.Part II: Locating Renaissance Art.Florence and Rome.Domenico Veneziano looks for Work in Florence.The Contract for Wall Paintings at the Sistine Chapel.The Valuation of the first four Narratives at the Sistine Chapel.Botticelli Pursues Outstanding Payments for his work in the Sistine Chapel.Filippino Lippi works for Cardinal Carafa in Rome at Lorenzo de' Medici's. Suggestion.Filippino Lippi Explains to Filippo Strozzi why he has gone to Rome.A dialogue between Florence and Rome against Savonarola.The Duke of Milan's Agent Reports on Florentine Artists.Michelangelo's Letter to Lorenzo de' Pierfrancesco de' Medici from Rome.A Cultural Tourist Describes Some of the Sites in Rome.Netherlandish Networks.Pedro Tafur's Impressions of the Netherlands in the 1430s.Lluis Dalmau is Contracted to make an Altarpiece for the Councillors' Chapel in Barcelona.Ciriaco d'Ancona's Comments on a Deposition Triptych by Rogier van der Weyden.Bartlommeo Facio's Description of the Work of Jan van Eyck and Rogier van der Weyden.Marcantonio Michiel Records Netherlandish Paintings in the Homes of Collectors in Venice and Padua in the Early Sixteenth Century.Pietro Summonte Describes to Marcantonio Michiel Works by Van Eyck and Rogier van der Weyden in Naples.Tapestries.Statutes of the Tapestry-Makers' Guild in Brussels.The Signoria of Florence Recommends a Weaver from Bruges.A Dispute Between the Painters' Guild and the Tapestry-Makers' Guild.Siena.Ghiberti's Admiration for Early Sienese Art.The Commission for the Reconstructed Altar and Altarpiece for the Cappella dei Signori.Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini and International Politics.Pius II's Canonization of Saint Catherine of Siena.Pius II's Description of his Cathedral in Pienza and its Interior.The Post-Byzantine Renaissance.The Will of the Painter Angelos Akotantos.Ioannes Akotantos Sells the Drawings of his Brother, Angelos Akotantos.Contract to Teach the Art of Painting in the Workshop of Loannes Akotantos.Contract to Teach the Art of Painting in the Workshop of Andreas Pavias.Andreas Pavias Intervenes to Secure the Return of an Icon Painted by Angelos Akotantos.The Commission from the Venetian Ruler of Nauplio, for a Pala A'altare.On the Making of Anthibola (Imprinted Cartoons).How to Plaster a Wall.Venice.Extract From the Mariegola (rule-book) of the Mercers Company in Venice.Gentile Bellini Undertakes the Decoration of the Grand Council Chamber.Gentile Bellini is sent on a Mission to Constantinople.Giovanni Bellini is Contracted to Decorate the Grand Council Chamber.Giovanni Bellini is Exempted from Duties in the Painters' Guild.Alvise Vivarini's Petition to Work on the Decoration of the Grand Council Chamber.Extract from Marin Sanudo's Praise of the City of Venice.Extract from The Memoirs of Philippe de Commynes.Extract from Pietro Casola's Account of a Pilgrimage to Jerusalem.The Bellini Brothers are Contracted to Work at the Scuola Grande di San Marco.Gentile Bellini agrees to Continue Work at the Scuola Grande di San Marco.Giovanni Bellini is Contracted to Complete his Brother's Work.Durer's Correspondence on Venice, and on Venetian Art and Artists.From Francesco Sansovino's Dialogue on All the Notable Things which are in Venice.Architectural Treatises.Vitruvius' Ideas on Architecture.Alberti Improves on Vitruvius.Part III: Viewing Renaissance Art.Art, Class and Wealth.Treasures in the Ducal Chapel of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy.The Camera Grande of Doctor Bartolo di Tura.Luxury goods in the Rooms of Lorenzo the Magnificent.Views on Art in Florence.The Florentine Merchant, Giovanni Rucellai, Discusses his Spending.A Coppersmith Describes the Festivities in Florence for St John the Baptist.Fra Girolamo Savonarola warns Florentines against the Dangers of the New type of Painting.The Cloth Merchants' Guild Commission a New Sculpture for the Florentine Baptistery.A Meeting About Where to Place Michelangelo's David.Illuminated Manuscripts.The Manuscripts in the Library of the Duke of Urbino.The Contract between Attavante and a Florentine Merchant for an Illuminated. Manuscript.The Chequered History of the Sforza Hours.The Preface to Sala's Poetry Book.Art and Monarchy in France.The Tomb of Louis XI.Bourdichon: 'Painter to the King'.Jean Robertet's Poem About the Worst Painter in the World.Henri Baude's 'Moral Sayings for Making Tapestries'.Jean Lemaire de Belges.Jean Perreal de Paris: Painter and Poet.Michel Colombe's Contract for a Tomb Project at Brou.The Travel Journal of Antonio de Beatis.The Market in Icons.John of Damascus on Images.The Will of Andreas Cornaros.Three Cretan Painters are Commissioned to Make 700 Icons of the Virgin.Contract for Employment of a Painter in the Workshop of Another.Contract for Employment of a Painter in the Workshop of Another.Commission for 10 Triptychs.Vasari's Views on the 'Greek' Style.Art and Death.Leonardo Bruni Condemns the Tomb of the Poet Bartolommeo Aragazzi.John Lydgate's Version of 'The Dance of Death' for the Cloister of St Paul's. Cathedral, London.The Foundation Statutes of the Chantry at Ewelme.The Will of John Baret of Bury St Edmunds.The Choice of Artist for the Monument to Cardinal Niccolo Forteguerri in Pistoia.Cardinal Francesco Todeschini Piccolomini Prepares for his Death.The Wills of the 'Catholic Monarchs', Isabella and Ferdinand.The Reform of Images.Andreas Karlstadt, On the Removal of Images.Extract from Hieromymus Emser's response to Karlstadt.Ulrich Zwingli's Criticisms of Religious Images.Zurich Council Orders the Removal of Images from Churches.Luther States his Own Position on Religious Images.Sir Thomas More Defends the Use of Images.William Tyndale Responds to Sir Thomas More.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405146418 20160528
"Renaissance Art Reconsidered" showcases the aesthetic principles and the workaday practices guiding daily life through these years of extraordinary human achievement. A major new anthology, bringing to life the places, works, media, and issues that define Renaissance art, it is ideal for use on Renaissance studies courses and for reference by students of art history. It moves beyond the borders of Italy to consider European, Mediterranean, and post Byzantine art, widening the traditional focus of Renaissance art. It includes letters, treatises, contracts, inventories, and other public documents, many of which are translated into English for the first time in this volume. It showcases the aesthetic principles and the workaday practices guiding daily life through these years of extraordinary human achievement, providing crucial insight into the art and the context in which it was produced.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405146418 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01

18. Hieronymus Bosch [2006]

Book
424 p. : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 34 cm.
  • The garden of earthly delights- and mortal sins
  • Artistic foundations : the spiritual world of fifteenth-century Netherlandish art
  • Documents and early works
  • The infancy and passion of Christ : Gospel triptychs
  • Voices in the wilderness : Bosch's saints
  • Allegories of avarice and lust : morality triptychs
  • Drawings and development
  • Conclusion : late-medieval end-time
  • Bosch's afterlife in sixteenth-century art.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01

19. Holbein and England [2004]

Book
308 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 30 cm.
  • Holbein
  • England
  • Decoration and design
  • Holbein and the English Reformation
  • Holbein the portraitist.
One of the greatest artists of sixteenth-century Europe, Hans Holbein the Younger earned high acclaim for his work both in the city of Basel and in England for Henry VIII and other patrons. This book is the first to explore the full range of the artist's English body of work as well as the relation of this work to the visual and material culture of Tudor England. Providing a detailed account of the paintings, drawings and woodcuts that Holbein produced in England, the book demonstrates convincingly that that country was not as remote from a common European culture as is often assumed: rather, it was an unmistakable part of that culture. Susan Foister discusses not only Holbein's well-known portraits but also his decorative paintings and murals, now lost, his designs for goldsmiths, and the works that can be associated with the English Reformation. In addition, she considers Holbein's religious and secular images, his techniques and practices, his status as an official court painter, and a variety of other intriguing topics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780300102802 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
447 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. Art, Artists and the Marketplace-- 2. Court Art and the Ars Nova-- 3. Art in the Cities-- 4. Early Independent Portraiture and Domestic Art-- 5. Private and Devotional Art-- 6. Faith in Art-- 7. The Art of Dying Well-- 8. Prints-- 9. The Knowledgeable Artist-- 10. The Art of Nature and Human Nature-- 11. Art and the Reformation-- 12. Courts and Cities-- Glossary-- Brief Biographies-- Key Dates-- Map-- Further Reading-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714838670 20160528
An exploration of a highly innovative and exciting period of art following the careers of artists such as Van Eyck, Durer and Holbein. Jeffrey Chipps Smith analyses the context of the time, such as the Protestant Reformation and the discovery of the Americas. He offers the reader an insight into domestic, civic and court life illustrated by some of the most exquisite artworks ever created. In the years from 1380 to 1580 northern Europe witnessed a period of artistic innovation as dynamic as contemporary developments in Italy. Stimulated by the atmosphere of intellectual curiosity about the individual and the natural world, Northern Renaissance artists, such as Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Durer and Hans Holbein, mastered the new techniques of oil painting and printmaking to produce some of the most exquisite art of all time. It was also a period of political, religious and social turmoil, which profoundly changed the patronage, production and subject matter of art. At all levels of society art was a part of everyday life. Jeffrey Chipps Smith writes lucidly about these changes and the objects themselves. The works range from tapestries, altarpieces and illuminated manuscripts to churches, palaces and civic architecture. He discusses the audiences and functions of art from across nothern Europe, including not only Germany, France and the Low Countries, but also Britain and Austria. He explores major cultural and historic events such as the Protestant Reformation and the discovery of the Americas and looks at how they widened intellectual and religious horizons. The result is a book that reveals how the Northern Renaissance masters laid the foundations for the art of succeeding centuries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714838670 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01