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1. Hans Holbein [2014]

Book
406 pages : ill. (some color) ; 22 cm
Hans Holbein the Younger (1497/8 - 1543), one of the most versatile and admired painters of the Northern Renaissance, trained under his father in Augsburg and then worked for leading patrons in Switzerland before settling in England as Court Painter to Henry viii. Holbein was a hugely ambitious artist, and even during his formative years in Lucerne and Basle designed jewellery, stained glass and woodcuts as well as paint major altarpieces and portraits. He also carried out several monumental decorative schemes for private houses and civic buildings. In all his commissions Holbein sought to rival the greatest masters of Germany and Italy - notably Durer and Mantegna - as well as Antiquity, and by the time of his visit to France in 1524 he was determined to secure a position as court painter. This, and the precarious situation he was finding himself in as a result of the Reformation's increasing hostility to religious works, drove him to England for good in 1532, where in addition to decorative schemes and Triumphs he both drew and painted numerous unrivalled likenesses of leading courtiers, merchants and diplomats, among which is his celebrated double portrait 'The Ambassadors'. This acclaimed, richly illustrated book by Oskar Batschmann and Pascal Griener - now available in a revised and expanded Second Edition - is a major advance in our understanding of Holbein's contribution to European art. The authors re-examine every aspect of a remarkable career, in which they take full account of the artistic and cultural influences that affected the artist and of his friendships with leading humanists such as Erasmus and Sir Thomas More, and cast fresh light on many hitherto vexing questions and misunderstandings.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780231716 20160613
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
xvii, 357 p., [40] p. of plates : ill. (some col.) ; 25 x 28 cm.
  • Introduction: The triptych as a "painting with doors"
  • pt. 1. Origins and the first half of the fifteenth century. The emergence of the early Netherlandish triptych I : Robert Campin (and his associates) ; The emergence of the early Netherlandish triptych II : Jan van Eyck
  • pt. 2. The second half of the fifteenth century. The triptych reformulated : Rogier Van der Weyden ; The triptych popularized : painters of the second half of the fifteenth century ; The triptych unified : Memling, David, and later fifteenth-century painters in Bruges
  • pt. 3. The sixteenth century and beyond. The world triptych : Hieronymus Bosch ; The triptych in the age of the Renaissance and the Reformation
  • Coda. The triptych in the age of Rubens.
"A study of Netherlandish triptychs from the early fifteenth century through the early seventeenth century, covering works by Jan van Eyck, Rogier van der Weyden, Hugo van der Goes, Hieronymus Bosch, and Peter Paul Rubens. Explores how the triptych format structures and generates meaning"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
736 p. : ill. (some col.), col. maps ; 30 cm.
  • Preface Chapter 1 PRELUDE: ITALY AND ITALIAN ART 16 Representing This World 17 The Role of Antiquity 18 The Cities 20 The Guilds and the Status of the Artist 24 The Artist at Work 25 The Products of the Painter's Bottega 25 The Practice of Drawing 27 The Practice of Painting 28 The Practice of Sculpture 33 The Practice of Architecture 34 Printmaking in the Renaissance 36 The Practice of History 36 The Practice of Art History: Giorgio Vasari 37 PART ONE: THE LATE MIDDLE AGES Chapter 2 DUECENTO ART IN TUSCANY AND ROME 40 Painting in Pisa 42 Painting in Lucca 44 Painting in Florence 45 Painting in Rome 53 Sculpture 57 Architecture 64 Chapter 3 FLORENTINE ART OF THE EARLY TRECENTO 72 Giotto 73 Florentine Painters after Giotto 95 Sculpture 100 Chapter 4 SIENESE ART OF THE EARLY TRECENTO 102 Duccio 103 Simone Martini 110 Pietro Lorenzetti 119 Ambrogio Lorenzetti 122 Orvieto Cathedral 128 The Master of the Triumph of Death 134 Chapter 5 LATER GOTHIC ART IN TUSCANY AND NORTHERN ITALY 136 Mid-Trecento Art in Florence 138 Late Gothic Painting and the International Style 145 Painting and Sculpture in Northern Italy 149 PART TWO: THE QUATTROCENTO Chapter 6 THE RENAISSANCE BEGINS: ARCHITECTURE 158 The Role of the Medici Family 160 Filippo Brunelleschi and Linear Perspective 161 The Dome of Florence Cathedral 164 The Ospedale degli Innocenti 168 Brunelleschi's Sacristy for San Lorenzo 170 San Lorenzo and Santo Spirito 170 Santa Maria degli Angeli 173 The Pazzi Chapel 174 The Medici Palace and Michelozzi di Bartolommeo 174 Chapter 7 TRANSITIONS IN TUSCAN SCULPTURE 180 The Competition Panels 181 Ghiberti to 1425 183 Donatello to 1420 188 Nanni di Banco 193 Donatello (c. 1420 to c. 1435) 196 Jacopo della Quercia 199 Chapter 8 TRANSITIONS IN FLORENTINE PAINTING 202 Gentile da Fabriano 203 Masolino and Masaccio 206 Popular Devotion and Prints 220 Chapter 9 THE HERITAGE OF MASACCIO: FRA ANGELICO AND FRA FILIPPO LIPPI 222 Fra Angelico 224 Fra Filippo Lippi 232 Chapter 10 FLORENTINE ARCHITECTURE AND SCULPTURE, c. 1430--1455 238 Alberti 239 Ghiberti after 1425 249 Luca della Robbia 251 Donatello (c. 1433 to c. 1455) 254 Florentine Tomb Sculpture 261 The Portrait Bust 261 Chapter 11 FLORENTINE PAINTING AT MID-CENTURY 262 Paolo Uccello 263 Domenico Veneziano 267 Andrea del Castagno 271 Piero della Francesca 278 Chapter 12 ART IN FLORENCE UNDER THE MEDICI I 294 Donatello after 1453 298 Desiderio da Settignano 302 The Chapel of the Cardinal of Portugal 303 Benedetto and Giuliano da Maiano 306 Giuliano da Sangallo 309 Benozzo Gozzoli 312 Baldovinetti and Pesellino 313 Chapter 13 ART IN FLORENCE UNDER THE MEDICI II 318 Antonio del Pollaiuolo 320 Andrea del Verrocchio 327 Renaissance Cassoni 331 Alessandro Botticelli 332 Filippino Lippi 347 Domenico del Ghirlandaio 350 Piero di Cosimo 356 Chapter 14 THE RENAISSANCE IN CENTRAL ITALY 358 Siena 359 Sassetta 361 Domenico di Bartolo 362 Matteo di Giovanni 364 Vecchietta 364 Francesco di Giorgio 365 Neroccio de' Landi 367 Perugia 369 Perugino 369 Pintoricchio 374 Melozzo da ForlA-- 376 The Laurana Brothers and Urbino 378 Naples 384 Luca Signorelli 385 Chapter 15 GOTHIC AND RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND NORTHERN ITALY 388 Pisanello 389 Early Quattrocento Art and Architecture in Venice 393 Jacopo Bellini 395 Andrea Mantegna 397 Mantegna and Isabella d'Este 408 Gentile Bellini 411 Antonello da Messina 412 Giovanni Bellini 415 Vittore Carpaccio 421 Carlo Crivelli 425 Venetian Fabrics 426 Venetian Publishing 426 Late Quattrocento Sculpture and Architecture in Venice 428 Late Quattrocento Art in Milan 433 Vincenzo Foppa 433 Filarete 433 Quattrocento Painting in Ferrara 434 North Italian Terra-Cotta Sculpture 440 PART THREE: THE CINQUECENTO Chapter 16 THE ORIGINS OF THE HIGH RENAISSANCE 442 Leonardo da Vinci 443 Michelangelo to 1505 469 Raphael in Perugia and Florence 480 Fra Bartolommeo 484 Chapter 17 THE HIGH RENAISSANCE IN ROME 486 Donato Bramante 489 Michelangelo 1505 to 1516 496 Raphael in Rome 515 Chapter 18 NEW DEVELOPMENTS c. 1520--50 542 Michelangelo 1516 to 1533 544 Andrea del Sarto 555 Pontormo 558 Rosso Fiorentino 563 Perino del Vaga 565 Domenico Beccafumi 567 Properzia de' Rossi 570 Correggio 572 Parmigianino 577 Pordenone 580 Antonio da Sangallo the Elder and the Younger 581 Baldassare Peruzzi 586 Giulio Romano 586 Chapter 19 HIGH AND LATE RENAISSANCE IN VENICE AND ON THE MAINLAND 590 Giorgione 592 Titian 596 Lorenzo Lotto 613 Tullio Lombardo 616 Painting in Northern Italy 617 Tintoretto 624 Paolo Veronese 632 Jacopo Bassano 639 Michele Sanmicheli 639 Jacopo Sansovino 641 Andrea Palladio 643 Alessandro Vittoria 647 Chapter 20 THE LATE SIXTEENTH CENTURY 648 Michelangelo after 1534 649 Art at the Medici Court 660 Benvenuto Cellini 662 Bartolommeo Ammanati 665 Giovanni Bologna 667 Agnolo Bronzino and Francesco Salviati 669 Later Ceramic Production 674 Giorgio Vasari and the Studiolo 676 Developments Elsewhere 681 Giuseppe Arcimboldo 681 Lavinia Fontana 682 Giacomo da Vignola and Giacomo della Porta 683 Federico Barocci 687 Fede Galizia 689 Caravaggio 689 Sixtus V and the Urban Plan of Rome 691 Glossary 692 Bibliography 700 Locating Works of Renaissance Art 715 Index 716 Photo Credits 735 Literary Credits 736.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780205705818 20160528
For survey courses in Italian Renaissance art. A broad survey of art and architecture in Italy between c. 1250 and 1600, this book approaches the works from the point of view of the artist as individual creator and as an expression of the city within which the artist was working. History of Italian Renaissance Art, Seventh Edition, brings you an updated understanding of this pivotal period as it incorporates new research and current art historical thinking, while also maintaining the integrity of the story that Frederick Hartt first told so enthusiastically many years ago. Choosing to retain Frederick Hartt's traditional framework, David Wilkins' incisive revisions keep the book fresh and up-to-date.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780205705818 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
xiv, 244 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 26 cm.
"Explores how the Renaissance artist Hans Holbein the Younger came to develop his mature artistic styles through the key historical contexts framing his work: the controversies of the Reformation and Renaissance debates about rhetoric"--Provided by publisher.
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
xvi, 449 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Notes on Contributors.Preface.Introduction.Part I: Making Renaissance Art.Drawing and Workshop Practice.Cennino Cennini on Drawing.Alberti on Drawing Figures.Francesco Squarcione Details the Drawing Regime for his Pupils.Gerard Horenbout takes on two Apprentices.A Master's Duty of Care for his Apprentices.Leonardo da Vinci on Drawing.Durer gives Drawings as Gifts and Uses them to pay day-to-day Expenses.Durer Lists the Qualities Required to be a Painter.Joachim Camerarius Praises Durer's Drawings.Linear Perspective.Cennino Cennini's Method for Depicting Buildings in a Painting.Alberti and the Earliest Written Description of Single-point Perspective.Lorenzo Ghiberti Lists the Sources for Perspective.Filarete's Method for Making Drawings of Buildings.Piero Della Francesca's Perspective for Painters.Manetti's Descriptions of Brunelleschi's Experiments.Leonardo da Vinci on single-point and Aerial Perspective.Sculpture.Posthumous Inventory of Tournai Sculptor Colart le Cat.Michelozzo and Donatello are Contracted to make the Prato Pulpit.Report on Donatello's Progress on the Prato Pulpit.The Brussels Painters' Guild Claims Exclusive Rights to Market Painted Works of Art.Extracts from De Statua by Leon Battista Alberti.1470 regulations of the Antwerp Guild of St Luke.Utrecht Sculptor Adriaen van Wesel makes a Carved Altarpiece for the Confraternity of Our Ladys' Hertogenbosch.Architecture.Filarete's System of Architecture.Brunelleschi's Practice of Architecture.Panel Painting.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Paint Drapery in a Fresco Painting.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Acquire the Skills to Paint on Panel.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Prepare and Size a Panel.Cennino Cennini's Instructions on How to Paint a Panel.Contract for Sassetta's Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.A Fee is fixed for Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.Second Valuation of Sassetta's Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.Final Valuation of Sassetta's Madonna della Neve Altarpiece.Contract for Enguerrand Quarton's Coronation of the Virgin Altarpiece.Prints and Printmaking.An ordinance from the Stadsarchief, Leuven, Concerning Printmaker Jan van den Berghe.The Hard Business of Printing.A Printer tries to Protect his Creative Rights.Durer's Letter to Jakob Heller.A Letter from block-cutter Jost de Negker to Maximilian I.The Purchase of the Contents of an Antwerp Printer's Workshop.Erasmus's Eulogy on Durer.Robert Peril's Agreement Regarding the Manufacture of Printed Playing Cards in Antwerp.Vasari's life of Marcantonio Raimondi.Treatises, Histories, Artists and Education.Lorenzo Ghiberti on the Education Required for Making Sculpture.Two Florentine Views of Art History: (1) Antonio Manetti.Two Florentine Views of Art History: (2) Leonardo da Vinci.Books known or Owned by Leonardo da Vinci.Courtiers Discuss the Merits of Painting and Sculpture.Part II: Locating Renaissance Art.Florence and Rome.Domenico Veneziano looks for Work in Florence.The Contract for Wall Paintings at the Sistine Chapel.The Valuation of the first four Narratives at the Sistine Chapel.Botticelli Pursues Outstanding Payments for his work in the Sistine Chapel.Filippino Lippi works for Cardinal Carafa in Rome at Lorenzo de' Medici's. Suggestion.Filippino Lippi Explains to Filippo Strozzi why he has gone to Rome.A dialogue between Florence and Rome against Savonarola.The Duke of Milan's Agent Reports on Florentine Artists.Michelangelo's Letter to Lorenzo de' Pierfrancesco de' Medici from Rome.A Cultural Tourist Describes Some of the Sites in Rome.Netherlandish Networks.Pedro Tafur's Impressions of the Netherlands in the 1430s.Lluis Dalmau is Contracted to make an Altarpiece for the Councillors' Chapel in Barcelona.Ciriaco d'Ancona's Comments on a Deposition Triptych by Rogier van der Weyden.Bartlommeo Facio's Description of the Work of Jan van Eyck and Rogier van der Weyden.Marcantonio Michiel Records Netherlandish Paintings in the Homes of Collectors in Venice and Padua in the Early Sixteenth Century.Pietro Summonte Describes to Marcantonio Michiel Works by Van Eyck and Rogier van der Weyden in Naples.Tapestries.Statutes of the Tapestry-Makers' Guild in Brussels.The Signoria of Florence Recommends a Weaver from Bruges.A Dispute Between the Painters' Guild and the Tapestry-Makers' Guild.Siena.Ghiberti's Admiration for Early Sienese Art.The Commission for the Reconstructed Altar and Altarpiece for the Cappella dei Signori.Aeneas Silvius Piccolomini and International Politics.Pius II's Canonization of Saint Catherine of Siena.Pius II's Description of his Cathedral in Pienza and its Interior.The Post-Byzantine Renaissance.The Will of the Painter Angelos Akotantos.Ioannes Akotantos Sells the Drawings of his Brother, Angelos Akotantos.Contract to Teach the Art of Painting in the Workshop of Loannes Akotantos.Contract to Teach the Art of Painting in the Workshop of Andreas Pavias.Andreas Pavias Intervenes to Secure the Return of an Icon Painted by Angelos Akotantos.The Commission from the Venetian Ruler of Nauplio, for a Pala A'altare.On the Making of Anthibola (Imprinted Cartoons).How to Plaster a Wall.Venice.Extract From the Mariegola (rule-book) of the Mercers Company in Venice.Gentile Bellini Undertakes the Decoration of the Grand Council Chamber.Gentile Bellini is sent on a Mission to Constantinople.Giovanni Bellini is Contracted to Decorate the Grand Council Chamber.Giovanni Bellini is Exempted from Duties in the Painters' Guild.Alvise Vivarini's Petition to Work on the Decoration of the Grand Council Chamber.Extract from Marin Sanudo's Praise of the City of Venice.Extract from The Memoirs of Philippe de Commynes.Extract from Pietro Casola's Account of a Pilgrimage to Jerusalem.The Bellini Brothers are Contracted to Work at the Scuola Grande di San Marco.Gentile Bellini agrees to Continue Work at the Scuola Grande di San Marco.Giovanni Bellini is Contracted to Complete his Brother's Work.Durer's Correspondence on Venice, and on Venetian Art and Artists.From Francesco Sansovino's Dialogue on All the Notable Things which are in Venice.Architectural Treatises.Vitruvius' Ideas on Architecture.Alberti Improves on Vitruvius.Part III: Viewing Renaissance Art.Art, Class and Wealth.Treasures in the Ducal Chapel of Charles the Bold, Duke of Burgundy.The Camera Grande of Doctor Bartolo di Tura.Luxury goods in the Rooms of Lorenzo the Magnificent.Views on Art in Florence.The Florentine Merchant, Giovanni Rucellai, Discusses his Spending.A Coppersmith Describes the Festivities in Florence for St John the Baptist.Fra Girolamo Savonarola warns Florentines against the Dangers of the New type of Painting.The Cloth Merchants' Guild Commission a New Sculpture for the Florentine Baptistery.A Meeting About Where to Place Michelangelo's David.Illuminated Manuscripts.The Manuscripts in the Library of the Duke of Urbino.The Contract between Attavante and a Florentine Merchant for an Illuminated. Manuscript.The Chequered History of the Sforza Hours.The Preface to Sala's Poetry Book.Art and Monarchy in France.The Tomb of Louis XI.Bourdichon: 'Painter to the King'.Jean Robertet's Poem About the Worst Painter in the World.Henri Baude's 'Moral Sayings for Making Tapestries'.Jean Lemaire de Belges.Jean Perreal de Paris: Painter and Poet.Michel Colombe's Contract for a Tomb Project at Brou.The Travel Journal of Antonio de Beatis.The Market in Icons.John of Damascus on Images.The Will of Andreas Cornaros.Three Cretan Painters are Commissioned to Make 700 Icons of the Virgin.Contract for Employment of a Painter in the Workshop of Another.Contract for Employment of a Painter in the Workshop of Another.Commission for 10 Triptychs.Vasari's Views on the 'Greek' Style.Art and Death.Leonardo Bruni Condemns the Tomb of the Poet Bartolommeo Aragazzi.John Lydgate's Version of 'The Dance of Death' for the Cloister of St Paul's. Cathedral, London.The Foundation Statutes of the Chantry at Ewelme.The Will of John Baret of Bury St Edmunds.The Choice of Artist for the Monument to Cardinal Niccolo Forteguerri in Pistoia.Cardinal Francesco Todeschini Piccolomini Prepares for his Death.The Wills of the 'Catholic Monarchs', Isabella and Ferdinand.The Reform of Images.Andreas Karlstadt, On the Removal of Images.Extract from Hieromymus Emser's response to Karlstadt.Ulrich Zwingli's Criticisms of Religious Images.Zurich Council Orders the Removal of Images from Churches.Luther States his Own Position on Religious Images.Sir Thomas More Defends the Use of Images.William Tyndale Responds to Sir Thomas More.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405146418 20160528
"Renaissance Art Reconsidered" showcases the aesthetic principles and the workaday practices guiding daily life through these years of extraordinary human achievement. A major new anthology, bringing to life the places, works, media, and issues that define Renaissance art, it is ideal for use on Renaissance studies courses and for reference by students of art history. It moves beyond the borders of Italy to consider European, Mediterranean, and post Byzantine art, widening the traditional focus of Renaissance art. It includes letters, treatises, contracts, inventories, and other public documents, many of which are translated into English for the first time in this volume. It showcases the aesthetic principles and the workaday practices guiding daily life through these years of extraordinary human achievement, providing crucial insight into the art and the context in which it was produced.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405146418 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
xii, 578 p. : ill. (some col.), maps ; 30 cm.
  • I. INTERNATIONAL CURRENTS IN THE FOURTEENTH CENTURY. 1. Bohemia. 2. The Valois Court and the Low Countries. 3. Germany. II. FIFTEENTH-CENTURY INNOVATIONS. 4. The Rhineland. 5. Jan van Eyck. 6. Robert Campin and Rogier van der Weyden. 7. Flanders at Midcentury. 8. Ghent. 9. The Northern Netherlands. 10. Bruges. 11. French Art. 12. German Art of the Later Fifteenth Century. III. RENAISSANCE AND REFORMATION IN THE SIXTEENTH CENTURY. 13. Albrecht Durer. 14. Responses to Albrecht Durer. 15. Augsburg and Basel. Excursus: Visitors to England. 16. Hieronymus Bosch. 17. The Northern Netherlands. 18. Antwerp. 19. Flemish Renaissance Courts. 20. Later Trends in Antwerp. 21. Netherlandish Renaissance. 22. Pieter Bruegel the Elder.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780131895645 20160528
For courses in Northern Renaissance Art, and Introduction to Dutch/German Art. The only comprehensive survey available for the study of Northern Renaissance Art, this text presents stylistic and iconographical themes, art historical scholarship, and valuable analyses for todays students. The coverage and rich color capture the author's lasting excitement for the period and its artists.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780131895645 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
447 p. ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction-- 1. Art, Artists and the Marketplace-- 2. Court Art and the Ars Nova-- 3. Art in the Cities-- 4. Early Independent Portraiture and Domestic Art-- 5. Private and Devotional Art-- 6. Faith in Art-- 7. The Art of Dying Well-- 8. Prints-- 9. The Knowledgeable Artist-- 10. The Art of Nature and Human Nature-- 11. Art and the Reformation-- 12. Courts and Cities-- Glossary-- Brief Biographies-- Key Dates-- Map-- Further Reading-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714838670 20160528
An exploration of a highly innovative and exciting period of art following the careers of artists such as Van Eyck, Durer and Holbein. Jeffrey Chipps Smith analyses the context of the time, such as the Protestant Reformation and the discovery of the Americas. He offers the reader an insight into domestic, civic and court life illustrated by some of the most exquisite artworks ever created. In the years from 1380 to 1580 northern Europe witnessed a period of artistic innovation as dynamic as contemporary developments in Italy. Stimulated by the atmosphere of intellectual curiosity about the individual and the natural world, Northern Renaissance artists, such as Jan van Eyck, Albrecht Durer and Hans Holbein, mastered the new techniques of oil painting and printmaking to produce some of the most exquisite art of all time. It was also a period of political, religious and social turmoil, which profoundly changed the patronage, production and subject matter of art. At all levels of society art was a part of everyday life. Jeffrey Chipps Smith writes lucidly about these changes and the objects themselves. The works range from tapestries, altarpieces and illuminated manuscripts to churches, palaces and civic architecture. He discusses the audiences and functions of art from across nothern Europe, including not only Germany, France and the Low Countries, but also Britain and Austria. He explores major cultural and historic events such as the Protestant Reformation and the discovery of the Americas and looks at how they widened intellectual and religious horizons. The result is a book that reveals how the Northern Renaissance masters laid the foundations for the art of succeeding centuries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714838670 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01

8. Bosch [2003]

Book
351 p. : ill. (chiefly col.), map ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction - 1 The Enigma of Hieronymus Bosch - 2 The Spectacle of Human Folly: Bosch as Moralist - 3 A Tale of Two Triptychs - 4 Redemption through Emulation: The Imitation of Christ - 5 Martyrdom and Melancholy: The Suffering of the Saints - 6 An Apothecary's Vision? The St Anthony Triptych - 7 The Crucible of God: Bosch and Chemistry - 8 Salvation through Science: The Garden of Earthly Delights - 9 Mirroring the Millennium: Bosch's Apocalyptic Visions - 10 Lost and Found: The Legacy of Hieronymus Bosch.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714839745 20160528
Hieronymus Bosch (1450-1516), one of the major artists of the Northern Renaissance, had a seemingly inexhaustible imagination. Known as the creator of disturbing demons and spectacular hellscapes, he also painted the "Garden of Earthly Delights", where gleeful naked youths feast on giant strawberries. Little is known of Bosch's life and his art has remained enigmatic, variously interpreted as the hallucinations of a madman or the secret language of a heretical sect. The Surrealists claimed Bosch as a predecessor, seeing in his work the imagery of dream, fantasy and the subconscious. Laurinda Dixon argues, however, that to understand and appreciate Bosch's art, we must return to the era in which he lived. Dixon presents Bosch as an artist of his times, knowledgeable about the latest techniques of painting, active in the religious life of his community and conversant with the scientific developments of his day. She draws on popular culture, religious texts and contemporary medicine, astrology, astronomy and chemistry - especially alchemy, now discounted but then of interest to serious thinkers - to investigate the meaning of Bosch's art.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714839745 20160528
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
SLE-92-01
Book
x, 187 p. port. 23 cm.
Green Library, Art & Architecture Library (Bowes), SAL3 (off-campus storage)
SLE-92-01