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Book
xvi, 171 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Academic exchanges
  • The Toronto-Addis Ababa Academic Collaboration Library Science Program : a case study in global librarianship in Ethiopia / Sandra Kendall
  • Connecting with the University of Hong Kong for program and professional development / Lesley S.J. Farmer
  • The CUNY-Shanghai Library Faculty Exchange Program : participants remember, reflect, and reshape / Sheau-yueh J. Chao, Beth Evans, Ryan Phillips, Mark Aaron Polger, Beth Posner, Ellen Sexton
  • Fulbright experiences
  • Transcending ethnic, racial, and political conflict to achieve understanding between the Greek and Turkish Cypriot library communities / Constantia Constantinou
  • The unfinished work : organizational democracy / John Lubans, Jr.
  • Librarians building digital learning objects supporting cultural understanding : the Fulbright-Hays Seminar Abroad in Morocco and Tunisia / Michael J. Miller
  • Cape crusade : building the Steve Biko Centre's library and archive in South Africa's Eastern Cape / Kenneth Schlesinger
  • Information literacy and access
  • Together we are better : international collaboration supporting information access in the Dominican Republic / Loida García-Febo, Adriana McCleer
  • How do you say "penguin" in K'aqchikel? : promoting literacy in Guatemala / Stephen E. Stratton
  • International partnerships
  • Building capacity for international librarianship through intercultural professional partnerships and civil society outreach in Tanzania / Chantal Phillips
  • Partnering in international library development : Lubuto Library Partners, Zambia Library Service, and Zambia's Ministry of Education / Elizabeth Cramer
  • Training models
  • Peace corps training for sustainable library development projects / Marcy Carrel.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 372 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 22 cm.
  • Machine generated contents note: Contents
  • Preface
  • Acknowledgments
  • 1. One Manifesto Less: Material Text and the Anti-Book
  • 2. Communist Objects and Small Press Pamphlets
  • 3. Root, Fascicle, Rhizome: Forms and Passions of the Political Book
  • 4. What Matter Who's Speaking? The Politics of Anonymous Authorship
  • 5. Proud to be Flesh: Diagrammatic Publishing in Mute Magazine
  • 6. Unidentified Narrative Objects: Wu Ming's Political Mythopoesis
  • Notes
  • Index.
"No, Anti-Book is not a book about books. Not exactly. And yet it is a must for anyone interested in the future of the book. Presenting what he terms "a communism of textual matter, " Nicholas Thoburn explores the encounter between political thought and experimental writing and publishing, shifting the politics of text from an exclusive concern with content and meaning to the media forms and social relations by which text is produced and consumed. Taking a "post-digital" approach in considering a wide array of textual media forms, Thoburn invites us to challenge the commodity form of books--to stop imagining books as transcendent intellectual, moral, and aesthetic goods unsullied by commerce. His critique is, instead, one immersed in the many materialities of text. Anti-Book engages with an array of writing and publishing projects, including Antonin Artaud's paper gris-gris and Valerie Solanas's SCUM Manifesto, Guy Debord's sandpaper-bound Memoires, the collective novelist Wu Ming, and the digital/print hybrid of Mute magazine. Empirically grounded, it is also a major achievement in expressing a political philosophy of writing and publishing, where the materiality of text is interlaced with conceptual production. Each chapter investigates a different form of textual media in concert with a particular concept: the small-press pamphlet as "communist object, " the magazine as "diagrammatic publishing, " political books in the modes of "root" and "rhizome, " the "multiple single" of anonymous authorship, and myth as "unidentified narrative object." An absorbingly written contribution to contemporary media theory in all its manifestations, Anti-Book will enrich current debates about radical publishing, artists' books and other new genre and media forms in alternative media, art publishing, media studies, cultural studies, critical theory, and social and political theory"-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
90 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 23 cm
In 2016 the University of Nebraska Press celebrates its 75th anniversary. Proudly rooted in the Great Plains, the Press has established itself as the largest and most diversified publisher located between Chicago and California. The achievements of a vast network of devoted authors, editors, board members, series editors, and staff, the Press has published more than 4,000 books and more than 30 journals of influential and enduring value.What started as a one-person operation at a land grant institution on the sparsely populated plains of Nebraska has tenaciously grown into a press that has earned an international reputation for publishing notable works in Native studies, history, anthropology, American studies, sports, cultural criticism, fiction, fiction in translation, creative nonfiction, and poetry. Winning numerous awards through the years, most notably several Nobel Prizes, the Press has contributed richly to the state, the region, and far beyond. The Press's partnership with the Jewish Publication Society has placed an emphasis on books in Jewish studies and Bible studies, while the acquisition of Potomac Books has expanded the Press's subject matter to include national and world affairs and more widespread coverage of military history. In honor of its 75th anniversary, the Press has produced the publication Big House on the Prairie, which features a narrative of press highlights, profiles of key historical employees, and lists of its 75 most significant books, 30 journals, and 75 most noteworthy book covers. Please join us in celebrating 75 years of publishing excellence.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780803288126 20160704
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
179 pages : color illustrations ; 30 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
423 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 31 cm
  • Acknowledgments 1. Received, Printed, Impressed: Twenty-Five Years of Flatbed Press (Susan Tallman) 2. Thirty-Six Artists at Flatbed Press 3. Prints from Flatbed Press 4. Flatbed Press Chronology, 1989-2014 Appendix 1. Documentation of the Prints Appendix 2. List of Flatbed Press Artists Appendix 3. List of Flatbed Press Printers Appendix 4. Glossary of Printmaking Terms.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477310083 20170327
Flatbed Press, a collaborative publishing workshop in Austin, Texas, has become one of the premier artists' printshops in America and an epicenter for the art form. Founded in 1989 by Mark Lesly Smith and Katherine Brimberry, Flatbed provides studio spaces for visiting artists to work with the press's master printers to create limited editions of original etchings, lithographs, woodcuts, and monotypes. The roster of artists who have worked at Flatbed includes Robert Rauschenberg, John Alexander, Dan Rizzie, Terry Allen, Michael Ray Charles, Luis Jimenez, Julie Speed, Trenton Doyle Hancock, and James Surls. Prints produced at Flatbed have been collected by major museums-the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Art Museum, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Brooklyn Museum, among others. Lavishly illustrated and printed, Flatbed Press at 25 presents a quarter-century retrospective of the press's productions. The book features the prints of thirty-five prominent artists who have collaborated with the press, each represented by full-color plates and a lively reminiscence by Smith and Brimberry that describes the process of working with the artist. Eighty additional artists are also included with a single print and documentary details. Susan Tallman's introduction places Flatbed in a national context, defines its uniqueness, and discusses many of the outstanding artworks that have been created there. Photographs of the facilities and equipment, technical processes, and artists and printers at work, as well as a chronology and glossary, complete the volume.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477310083 20170327
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
xii, 164 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 22 x 28 cm
Law Library (Crown)
Book
vii, 218 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction: literary production and cultural democracy
  • Chilean literary culture since 1970: a panorama
  • Ergo sum: self-publication and the book-object under dictatorship
  • Cartonera publishers: artisanal and industrial book production in neoliberal Chile
  • Libros de mentira: fake books, digital matter, and cultural democracy 2.0
  • Santiago en 100 palabras: mass literature, cultural sponsorship, and globalization
  • Conclusion: rethinking the field of cultural production: cultural agency, minority literature, and cultural studies scholarship
  • Afterword: feminist research and pedagogy as forms of craft.
By producing literature in nontraditional forms-books made of cardboard trash, posters in subway stations, miniature shopping bags, digital publications, and even children's toys-Chileans have made and circulated literary objects in defiance of state censorship and independent of capitalist definitions of value. In The Labor of Literature Jane D. Griffin studies amateur and noncommercial forms of literary production in Chile that originated in response to authoritarian state politics and have gained momentum throughout the postdictatorship period. She argues that such forms advance a model of cultural democracy that differs from and sometimes contradicts the model endorsed by the state and the market. By examining alternative literary publications, Griffin recasts the seventeen-year Pinochet dictatorship as a time of editorial experimentation despite widespread cultural oppression and shows how grassroots cultural activism has challenged government-approved corporate publishing models throughout the postdictatorship period. Griffin's work also points to the growing importance of autogestion, or do-it-yourself cultural production, where individuals combine artisanal forms with new technologies to make and share creative work on a global scale.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781625342096 20161024
Green Library
Book
vi, 331 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • * List of Figures * List of Tables * Acknowledgments *1. Exploring Theory Development: Learning from Diverse Masters (Diane H. Sonnenwald) * Part 1. Behavior of Individuals and Groups *2. Many Paths to Theory: The Creative Process in the Information Sciences (Marcia J. Bates) *3. Reflections on Theory Construction in Human Information Behavior: A Theory of Browsing (ShanJu Lin Chang) *4. Reflections on the Development of a Theoretical Perspective (Carol Collier Kuhlthau) *5. Converging on Theory from Four Sides (Gary M. Olson and Judith S. Olson) * Part 2. Evaluation *6. Drawing Graphs for Theory Development in Bibliometrics and Retrieval (Michael K. Buckland) *7. Two Views on Theory Development for Interactive Information Retrieval (Kalervo Jarvelin) *8. Relevance: In Search of a Theoretical Foundation (Tefko Saracevic) *9. The Story of a Colony: Theory Development in Webometric Research (Mike Thelwall) * Part 3. Design *10. Theorizing the Unprecedented (John M. Carroll) *11. Appropriating Theory (Bonnie Nardi) *12. Theory for Design: The Case of Reading (Andrew Dillon) * Part 4. Cultural and Scientific Heritage *13. The Poverty of Theory-- or, The Education of Jerome McGann (Jerome McGann) *14. Illuminating Daughter-Mother Narratives in Young Adult Fiction (Hilary S. Crew) *15. The Noblest Pleasure: Theories of Understanding in the Information Sciences (David Bawden) *16. Apologia pro Theoria Sua (Jack Meadows) *17. Supporting Future Theory Development (Diane H. Sonnenwald) * Notes on the Contributors * Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477309063 20160619
Emerging as a discipline in the first half of the twentieth century, the information sciences study how people, groups, organizations, and governments create, share, disseminate, manage, search, access, evaluate, and protect information, as well as how different technologies and policies can facilitate and constrain these activities. Given the broad span of the information sciences, it is perhaps not surprising that there is no consensus regarding its underlying theory-the purposes of it, the types of it, or how one goes about developing new theories to talk about new research questions. Diane H. Sonnenwald and the contributors to this volume seek to shed light on these issues by sharing reflections on the theory-development process. These reflections are not meant to revolve around data collection and analysis; rather, they focus on the struggles, challenges, successes, and excitement of developing theories. The particular theories that the contributors explore in their essays range widely, from theories of literacy and reading to theories of design and digital search. Several chapters engage with theories of the behavior of individuals and groups; some deal with processes of evaluation; others reflect on questions of design; and the rest treat cultural and scientific heritage. The ultimate goal, Sonnenwald writes in her introduction, is to "encourage, inspire, and assist individuals striving to develop and/or teach theory development.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781477309063 20160619
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Journal/Periodical
volumes ; 21 cm
Green Library
Book
207 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 271 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
  • Determining data information literacy needs : a study of students and research faculty / Jake Carlson, Michael Fosmire, C.C. Miller, Megan Sapp Nelson
  • Developing the Data Information Literacy project : approach and methodology / Jake Carlson, Lisa R. Johnston, Brian Westra
  • An exploration of the data information literacy competencies : findings from the project interviews / Jake Carlson, Jon Jeffryes, Lisa R. Johnston, Mason Nichols, Brian Westra, Sarah J. Wright
  • Developing a for-credit course to teach data information literacy skills : a case study in natural resources / Sarah J. Wright, Camille Andrews
  • Addressing software code as data : an embedded librarian approach / Jake Carlson, Megan Sapp Nelson
  • Teaching data information literacy skills in a library workshop setting : a case study in agricultural and biological engineering / Marianne Bracke, Michael Fosmire
  • Teaching civil engineering data information literacy skills : an e-learning approach / Lisa R. Johnston, Jon Jeffryes
  • Teaching ecology data information literacy skills to graduate students : a discussion-based approach / Brian Westra, Dean Walton
  • Developing data information literacy programs : a guide for academic librarians / Sarah J. Wright, Jake Carlson, John Jeffryes, Camille Andrews, Marianne Bracke, Michael Fosmire, Lisa R. Johnston, Megan Sapp Nelson, Dean Walton, Brian Westra
  • Where do we go from here? Further developing the data information literacy competencies / Megan Sapp Nelson
  • Future directions for data information literacy : growing programs and communities of practice / Jake Carlson.
"Given the increasing attention to managing, publishing, and preserving research datasets as scholarly assets, what competencies in working with research data will graduate students in STEM disciplines need to be successful in their fields? And what role can librarians play in helping students attain these competencies? In addressing these questions, this book articulates a new area of opportunity for librarians and other information professionals, developing educational programs that introduce graduate students to the knowledge and skills needed to work with research data. The term "data information literacy" has been adopted with the deliberate intent of tying two emerging roles for librarians together. By viewing information literacy and data services as complementary rather than separate activities, the contributors seek to leverage the progress made and the lessons learned in each service area. The intent of the publication is to help librarians cultivate strategies and approaches for developing data information literacy programs"-- Provided by publisher.
"The intent of the publication is to help librarians cultivate strategies and approaches for developing data information literacy programs of their own using the work done in the multiyear, IMLS-supported Data Information Literacy (DIL) project as real-world case studies. The initial chapters introduce the concepts and ideas behind data information literacy, such as the twelve data competencies. The middle chapters describe five case studies in data information literacy conducted at different institutions (Cornell, Purdue, Minnesota, Oregon), each focused on a different disciplinary area in science and engineering. They detail the approaches taken, how the programs were implemented, and the assessment metrics used to evaluate their impact. The later chapters include the "DIL Toolkit, " a distillation of the lessons learned, which is presented as a handbook for librarians interested in developing their own DIL programs. The book concludes with recommendations for future directions and growth of data information literacy. More information about the DIL project can be found on the project's website: datainfolit.org"-- Provided by publisher.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
x, 415 pages ; 28 cm
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (2 unnumbered pages).
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xiii, 384 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
1 online resource (2 unnumbered pages).
Law Library (Crown)
Book
147 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
541 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm + 1 CD-ROM.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
261 pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm.
East Asia Library
Book
vi, 401 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm.
  • Skills and services: Participatory approaches to building community-centered libraries / Anastasia Diamond-Ortiz (Cleveland Public Library) and Buffy J. Hamilton (Norcross High School Media Center) ; Guiding learners : information literacy / Alesia McManus (Howard Community College, Maryland) ; The reference interview revisited / M. Kathleen Kern (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) ; Reader's advisory services as reference services / Jessica E. Moyer (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee)
  • Content and information sources: Reference publishing in the 21st century : lead, follow, or get out of the way / Rolf Janke (Mission Bell Media) ; Wikipedia, user-generated content, and the future of reference sources / Phoebe Ayers
  • (Wikimedia foundation and University of California, Davis)
  • Tools and technologies: Discovery tools / Michael Courtney (Indiana University) ; Collaborative virtual reference : past, present, and future trends / Kris Johnson (AskColorado/AskAcademic Virtual Reference Cooperative) ; The value of reference services : using assessment to chart the future / Amanda Clay Powers (Mississippi State University)
  • Innovation in action : studies and examples: Alienation, acceptance, or ambiguity? : a qualitative study of librarian and staff perceptions of reference service change / Mara H. Sansolo (Pasco-Hernando State College, Florida) and Kaya Van Beynen (University of South Florida, St. Petersburg) ; Meet your personal librarian / Martha Adkins (University of San Diego) ; Roving reference / Madeline Cohen and Kevin Saw (Lehman College, City University of New York) ; On-call reference / Krista Schmidt (West Carolina University) ; Peer reference tutoring / Michelle Twait (Gustavus Adolphus College, Minnesota) ; A single service point / Diane Hunter and Mary E. Anderson (University of Missouri-Kansas City) ; Community outreach through LibGuides / Mandi Goodsett (Georgia Southwestern State University) and Kirstin Dougan (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) ; 24/7 global virtual reference cooperation : the case of QuestionPoint / Susan McGlamery (OCLC Questionpoint) ; Serving the "somewhere out there" patron : the view from the digital cooperative reference desk / Nicolette Warisse Sosulski (Portage District Library, Michigan) ; Integration of library resources into the course management system / Janet Pinkley (California State University, Channel Islands) and Margaret Driscoll (University of California, Santa Barbara) ; Negotiating space for the library : embedding library resources and services into a university learning management system / Jolanda-Pieta van Arnhem and James Williams (College of Charleston) ; Boosting user engagement with online social tools / Georgina Parsons (Brunel University, London, United Kingdom); - You have a question, so tweet me maybe : a study in using Twitter for reference / Amanda L. Folk (University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg) ; Embedding LibraryThing for Libraries in the online library catalog / Amanda Viana (Norton Public Library, Massachussetts) ; CrowdAsk : crowdsourcing reference and library help / Ilana Stonebraker and Tao Zhang (Purdue University) ; The guide to reference : a solution for teaching reference sources / Denise Beaubien Bennett (University of Florida) ; Reference to patrons with disabilities / Michael Saar (Lamar University, Texas) ; Discovery service : goals, evaluation, and implementation of OhioLINK Academic Consortium / Ron Burns (EBSCO) and Theda Schwing (OhioLINK) ; OCLC and discovery / John McCullough (OCLC) ; Discovery and the digital reference desk / Andrew Nagy (ProQuest) ; Reference : an architect's view / Rayford W. Law (Rayford W. Law Architecture+Planning) ; Addressing user intent : analyzing usage logs to optimize search results / Christine Stohn (Ex Libris) ; Educating reference librarians for first-day success / Elizabeth Mahoney and Christinger Tomer (University of Pittsburgh) ; Where do we go from here? / David A. Tyckoson (California State University, Fresno) and John G. Dove (Former CEO of Credo Reference).
Reference service, the idea that librarians provide direct assistance to users, has been a central function of libraries for over a century. Today's libraries are even more complex and intimidating to new users than libraries of the past, and the technical and social contexts in which users experience their library's resources add to this complexity. The availability of a friendly librarian who helps users find materials, search for information on a topic, interpret citations, identify quality information, and format bibliographies has become a standard component of what libraries do. However, changes in technologies, economics, and user populations are causing many libraries to question the need and function of traditional reference services. This book examines how library services meet user needs in the twenty-first century. Many libraries are asking key questions about reference services, such as: Should librarians be on call waiting for users or out in the community promoting the library? Should we assign staff to help users one-on-one or is it more effective to assign them to build and use tools to teach users how to find and evaluate information? Will we continue to purchase commercial reference sources or just use Wikipedia and other free resources on the web? With the proliferation of information available today, how can we help users evaluate search results and select the best resources that they can find? And how do we evaluate the effectiveness of reference services? Through contributions from the leading scholars and practitioners in the field, this volume addresses such issues and how they affect practises in public and academic libraries. In addition, it presents perspectives from the publishing community and the creators of discovery tools. Each section is enhanced by short case studies that highlight real-world practices and experiences.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781557536983 20160617
Green Library
Book
viii, 46 pages : illustrations ; 29 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)