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Book
xvi, 274 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction : the hummus wars
  • Size matters
  • Roasting meat
  • Why we like Italian food
  • The McDonaldization of the Kibbutz dining room
  • Meat and masculinity in a military prison
  • Thai migrant workers and the dog-eating myth
  • Conclusion : food and power, orientalization and ambivalence.
"Drawing on ethnography conducted in Israel since the late 1990s, Food and Power considers how power is produced, reproduced, negotiated, and subverted in the contemporary Israeli culinary sphere. Nir Avieli explores issues such as the definition of Israeli cuisine, the ownership of hummus, the privatization of communal Kibbutz dining rooms, and food at a military prison for Palestinian detainees to show how cooking and eating create ambivalence concerning questions of strength and weakness and how power and victimization are mixed into a sense of self-justification that maintains internal cohesion among Israeli Jews."--Provided by publisher.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • About the Author ix Acknowledgments xi Outline xiii 1 Adhesion: Definition and Nomenclature 1 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Adhesives a Brief Historical Viewpoint 1 1.3 Nomenclature and Definitions of Adhesion Terms 6 1.4 Concluding Remarks 11 References 12 2 Adhesion Mechanisms and Measurements 17 2.1 Introduction 17 2.2 The Phenomenon of Adhesion 17 2.3 Methods of Determining Adhesion of Food Materials 27 2.4 Adhesion Strength Measurements 29 2.5 Wettability 30 References 39 3 Stickiness of Foods and Its Relation to Technological Processes 47 3.1 Introduction 47 3.2 Dough Properties and Stickiness 47 3.3 Cookies, Breads, Cakes, and Pasta 49 3.4 Stickiness of Rice 54 3.5 Fruit Powders 57 3.6 Stickiness of Milk Powders 59 3.7 Cereal Products 60 3.8 Relations Between Technological Processes and Stickiness 61 References 65 4 Perception of Stickiness 75 4.1 Introduction 75 4.2 Collection and Classification of Words for Descriptions of Food Texture 75 4.3 Principles of Objective Measurements of Stickiness 77 4.4 The Problematic Nature of Instrumental Determinations 78 4.5 Perception of Stickiness in Oil -in -Water Dairy Emulsions 79 4.6 Stickiness of Dispersions, Semi -solids, and Sugar -rich Foods 80 4.7 Changes in Sensory Stickiness Perception with Age 84 References 88 5 Hydrocolloids as Adhesive Agents in Foods 93 5.1 Introduction 93 5.2 Food Uses and Applications of Adhesives 93 5.3 Hydrogel Adherend Relationships and Structure Function Issues 94 5.4 Hydrocolloid Adhesion Tests 96 5.5 Hydrocolloids as Wet Glues 98 5.6 Hydrocolloids as Adhesives in Foods 100 5.7 Hydrocolloid Adhesion: Future Prospects and Possible Developments 109 References 110 6 Adhesion Phenomena in Coated, Battered, Breaded, and Fried Foods 115 6.1 Introduction 115 6.2 A Few Definitions 115 6.3 Enrobing Processes 118 6.4 Types of Batter and Their Use in Different Products 119 6.5 Breaded Products 128 6.6 New Batters and Breadings 131 References 132 7 Electrostatic Adhesion in Foods 137 7.1 Introduction 137 7.2 Technology of Electrostatic Powder Spraying 137 7.3 Adhesion of Food Powders onto Food Products 140 7.4 Adhesion of Sodium Chloride and Its Effect on Coating 143 7.5 Other Food -Related Uses of Electrostatic Adhesion 147 References 152 8 Multilayered Adhered Food Products 159 8.1 Introduction 159 8.2 Multilayered Hydrocolloid -Based Foodstuffs 159 8.3 Stiffness and Compressive Deformabilities of Multilayered Texturized Fruits and Gels 160 8.4 Other Edible Multilayered Hydrocolloid Products 161 8.5 Layered Cellular Solids 164 8.6 Future Biotechnological Potential Uses of Multilayered Gels 165 8.7 Methods to Estimate Properties of Multilayered Products 167 8.8 Current Systems and Methods to Prepare Multilayered Products 168 8.9 Problems Related to Multilayered and Colored Products 169 References 174 9 Adhesion of Substances to Food Packages and Cookware 179 9.1 Wetting Properties of Food Packaging 179 9.2 Adhesion of Fermented Dairy Products to Packaging Materials 182 9.3 Active Food Packaging and Bacterial Adhesion 184 9.4 Antimicrobial Food Packaging 185 9.5 Protein Adsorption to Processing Surfaces 187 9.6 Adhesion of Edible Oils to Food -Contact Surfaces 188 9.7 Microorganism Adhesion to and Oil Removal from Modified Surfaces 188 9.8 Aspects of Non -stick Coatings for Cookware 190 References 192 Index 199.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118851616 20170522
To the layman, adhesion is a simple matter of how well two different materials stick together, and adhesion measurements provide some indication of the force required to separate them. However, a more detailed look at adhesion shows that it is a very important feature of food throughout its manufacturing, packaging and storage. Chapters are fully devoted to the fascinating topic of adhesion in foods. Key features of the book include, but are not limited to: definition and nomenclature of adhesion; adhesion mechanisms and measurements; stickiness in various foods and its relation to technological processes; perception of stickiness; hydrocolloids as adhesive agents for foods; adhesion phenomena in coated, battered, breaded and fried foods; electrostatic adhesion in foods; multilayered adhered food products, and adhesion of substances to packaging and cookware. Adhesion in Foods: Fundamental Principles and Applications is dedicated not only to the academic community but also to the broader population of industrialists and experimentalists who will find it to be not only a source of knowledge, but also a launching pad for novel ideas and inventions. In particular, this book is expected to be of interest to personnel involved in food formulation, food scientists, food technologists, industrial chemists and engineers, and those working in product development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118851616 20170522
Book
1 online resource.
  • About the Author ix Acknowledgments xi Outline xiii 1 Adhesion: Definition and Nomenclature 1 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Adhesives a Brief Historical Viewpoint 1 1.3 Nomenclature and Definitions of Adhesion Terms 6 1.4 Concluding Remarks 11 References 12 2 Adhesion Mechanisms and Measurements 17 2.1 Introduction 17 2.2 The Phenomenon of Adhesion 17 2.3 Methods of Determining Adhesion of Food Materials 27 2.4 Adhesion Strength Measurements 29 2.5 Wettability 30 References 39 3 Stickiness of Foods and Its Relation to Technological Processes 47 3.1 Introduction 47 3.2 Dough Properties and Stickiness 47 3.3 Cookies, Breads, Cakes, and Pasta 49 3.4 Stickiness of Rice 54 3.5 Fruit Powders 57 3.6 Stickiness of Milk Powders 59 3.7 Cereal Products 60 3.8 Relations Between Technological Processes and Stickiness 61 References 65 4 Perception of Stickiness 75 4.1 Introduction 75 4.2 Collection and Classification of Words for Descriptions of Food Texture 75 4.3 Principles of Objective Measurements of Stickiness 77 4.4 The Problematic Nature of Instrumental Determinations 78 4.5 Perception of Stickiness in Oil -in -Water Dairy Emulsions 79 4.6 Stickiness of Dispersions, Semi -solids, and Sugar -rich Foods 80 4.7 Changes in Sensory Stickiness Perception with Age 84 References 88 5 Hydrocolloids as Adhesive Agents in Foods 93 5.1 Introduction 93 5.2 Food Uses and Applications of Adhesives 93 5.3 Hydrogel Adherend Relationships and Structure Function Issues 94 5.4 Hydrocolloid Adhesion Tests 96 5.5 Hydrocolloids as Wet Glues 98 5.6 Hydrocolloids as Adhesives in Foods 100 5.7 Hydrocolloid Adhesion: Future Prospects and Possible Developments 109 References 110 6 Adhesion Phenomena in Coated, Battered, Breaded, and Fried Foods 115 6.1 Introduction 115 6.2 A Few Definitions 115 6.3 Enrobing Processes 118 6.4 Types of Batter and Their Use in Different Products 119 6.5 Breaded Products 128 6.6 New Batters and Breadings 131 References 132 7 Electrostatic Adhesion in Foods 137 7.1 Introduction 137 7.2 Technology of Electrostatic Powder Spraying 137 7.3 Adhesion of Food Powders onto Food Products 140 7.4 Adhesion of Sodium Chloride and Its Effect on Coating 143 7.5 Other Food -Related Uses of Electrostatic Adhesion 147 References 152 8 Multilayered Adhered Food Products 159 8.1 Introduction 159 8.2 Multilayered Hydrocolloid -Based Foodstuffs 159 8.3 Stiffness and Compressive Deformabilities of Multilayered Texturized Fruits and Gels 160 8.4 Other Edible Multilayered Hydrocolloid Products 161 8.5 Layered Cellular Solids 164 8.6 Future Biotechnological Potential Uses of Multilayered Gels 165 8.7 Methods to Estimate Properties of Multilayered Products 167 8.8 Current Systems and Methods to Prepare Multilayered Products 168 8.9 Problems Related to Multilayered and Colored Products 169 References 174 9 Adhesion of Substances to Food Packages and Cookware 179 9.1 Wetting Properties of Food Packaging 179 9.2 Adhesion of Fermented Dairy Products to Packaging Materials 182 9.3 Active Food Packaging and Bacterial Adhesion 184 9.4 Antimicrobial Food Packaging 185 9.5 Protein Adsorption to Processing Surfaces 187 9.6 Adhesion of Edible Oils to Food -Contact Surfaces 188 9.7 Microorganism Adhesion to and Oil Removal from Modified Surfaces 188 9.8 Aspects of Non -stick Coatings for Cookware 190 References 192 Index 199.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118851616 20170522
To the layman, adhesion is a simple matter of how well two different materials stick together, and adhesion measurements provide some indication of the force required to separate them. However, a more detailed look at adhesion shows that it is a very important feature of food throughout its manufacturing, packaging and storage. Chapters are fully devoted to the fascinating topic of adhesion in foods. Key features of the book include, but are not limited to: definition and nomenclature of adhesion; adhesion mechanisms and measurements; stickiness in various foods and its relation to technological processes; perception of stickiness; hydrocolloids as adhesive agents for foods; adhesion phenomena in coated, battered, breaded and fried foods; electrostatic adhesion in foods; multilayered adhered food products, and adhesion of substances to packaging and cookware. Adhesion in Foods: Fundamental Principles and Applications is dedicated not only to the academic community but also to the broader population of industrialists and experimentalists who will find it to be not only a source of knowledge, but also a launching pad for novel ideas and inventions. In particular, this book is expected to be of interest to personnel involved in food formulation, food scientists, food technologists, industrial chemists and engineers, and those working in product development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118851616 20170522
Book
xxiv, 413 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 24 cm.
  • Heat Transfer Operations in Bread Making: Introduction Ma. De la Paz Salgado-Cruz and Georgina Calderon-Dominguez Steady-State Heat Transfer Julio C. Fuentes-Gutierrez, Hugo E. Romero-Campos, Melissa E. Morales-Tovar, Georgina Calderon-Dominguez, Gustavo F. Gutierrez-Lopez, and Keshavan Niranjan Nonsteady-State Heat Transfer Jose Caro-Corrales and Kevin Cronin Principles of Mass Transfer by Molecular Diffusion Stefany Cardenas-Perez, Elier Ekberg Neri-Torres, Jorge Chanona-Perez, Georgina Calderon-Dominguez, and Juan Vicente Mendez-Mendez Thermophysical and Transport Properties of Bread Products during Baking and Freezing Maria Elena Vargas-Ugalde, Evangelina Garcia-Armenta, Liliana Alamilla-Beltran, Gustavo F. Gutierrez-Lopez, and Maribel Cornejo-Mazon Heat and Mass Transfer during Baking Emmanuel Purlis Effect of Baking in Product Quality and Baking Ovens Josue Penaloza-Espinosa, Georgina Calderon-Dominguez, Jorge Chanona-Perez, and Reynold R. Farrera-Rebollo Baking Oven Design Josue Penaloza-Espinosa, Minerva Fonseca-Ayala. Georgina Calderon-Dominguez, Jorge Chanona-Perez, and Reynold R. Farrera-Rebollo Heat and Mass Transfer during Bread Freezing Nasser Hamdami, Jean-Yves Monteau, Alain Le Bail, and Vanessa Jury Freezing Time Calculations Evangelina Garcia-Armenta, Maria Ximena Quintanilla Carvajal, and Liliana Alamilla-Beltran Effect of Freezing Conditions on Bread Quality Carmen C. Tadini, Pedro de Alcantara Pessoa Filho, Smail Meziani, Messaouda Kaci, Alberto Edel Leon, and Pablo Daniel Ribotta Cryoprotective Effect of Ingredients on Bread Quality Cristina M. Rosell and Rossana Altamirano-Fortoul Changes in Dough and Bread Structure as a Result of the Freezing Process Mayra Diaz-Ramirez, Georgina Calderon-Dominguez, Alan J. Hernandez-Alvarez, Jorge Chanona-Perez, Reynold R. Farrera-Rebollo, and Ma. De la Paz Salgado-Cruz Modeling and Simulation of the Freezing Process Liana Drummond and Da-Wen Sun.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781466504677 20171218
Advances in Heat Transfer Unit Operations: Baking and Freezing in Bread Making explains the latest understanding of heat transfer phenomena involved in the baking and freezing of bread and describes the most recent advanced techniques used to produce higher quality bread with a longer shelf life. Heat transfer phenomena occur during key bread-making stages (cold storage, resting, and fermentation) in which temperature and amount of heat transfer must be carefully controlled. This book combines the engineering and technological aspects of heat transfer operations and discusses how these operations interact with the bread making process; the book also discusses how baking and freezing influence the product quality. Divided into fourteen chapters, the book covers the basics of heat and mass transfer, fluid dynamics, and surface phenomena in bread-making industrial operations, mathematical modelling in porous systems, the estimation of thermo-physical properties related to bread making, design of equipment, and industrial applications.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781466504677 20171218
Book
pages ; cm
  • Current Human Research Questions being addressed through Laboratory and Free-Living Dietary Methods. Advantages and Limitations of Laboratory Methods. Advantages and Limitations of Traditional Free-Living Methods. Statistical Approaches to Adjust for Bias of Traditional Recall and Diary Methods. Computer Assisted Dietary Recall Methods. Dietary Energy Intake Models to Assess Energy Intake. Dietary Biomarkers. Isotopic Biomarkers. Photographic Diet Diaries. Chewing and Swallowing Sensors to Detect Eating Events. Compendium of Novel Electronic Monitoring Devices being Investigated to Assess Dietary Intake.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498749343 20171218
  • Contents Editors ................................................................ ................................................................ ...............ix Contributors ................................................................ ................................................................ ......xi Prologue ................................................................ ................................................................ ...........xv Chapter 1 Benefits and Limitations of Traditional Self-Report Instruments ................................1 Hamid R. Farshchi, Ian Macdonald, Ameneh Madjd, and Moira A. Taylor Chapter 2 Statistical Approaches to Mitigate Measurement Error in Dietary Intake Data Collected Using 24-hour Recalls and Food Records/Diaries .................................... 19 Sharon I. Kirkpatrick, Amy F. Subar, and Janet A. Tooze Chapter 3 Computer-Assisted Dietary Assessment Methods ..................................................... 45 Suzanne McNutt, Thea Palmer Zimmerman, and Brooke Colaiezzi Chapter 4 Strategies for Improving the Validity of the 24-hour Dietary Recall and Food Record Methods ................................................................ ......................................... 67 Lisa J. Harnack and Mark A. Pereira Chapter 5 The Assessment of Food Intake with Digital Photography .......................................85 Keely R. Hawkins, John W. Apolzan, Candice A. Myers, and Corby K. Martin Chapter 6 Meal Patterns, Physical Activity, Sleep, and Circadian Rhythm ............................. 113 Margriet S. Westerterp-Plantenga and Marta Garaulet Chapter 7 Assessment of Ingestion by Chewing and Swallowing Sensors .............................. 129 Edward Sazonov, Muhammad Farooq, and Edward Melanson Chapter 8 Bites as a Unit of Measurement ................................................................ ................ 149 Adam Hoover, Ryan Mattfeld, and Eric Muth Chapter 9 Direct and Indirect Measures of Dietary Intake: Use of Sensors and Modern Technologies ................................................................ ............................................. 163 Holly L. McClung, Joseph J. Kehayias, Gary P. Zientara, and Reed W. Hoyt Chapter 10 Use of Doubly-Labeled Water Measured Energy Expenditure as a Biomarker of Self-Reported Energy Intake ................................................................ ............... 185 Dale A. Schoeller and David B. Allison Chapter 11 Biomarker for Energy Intake: Resting Energy Expenditure and Physical Activity ................................................................ ................................................ 199 Klaas R. Westerterp Chapter 12 Dynamic Modeling of Energy Expenditure to Estimate Dietary Energy Intake..... 211 Diana Thomas and Vincent W. Antonetti Chapter 13 Use of Intake Biomarkers in Nutritional Epidemiology .......................................... 221 Ross L. Prentice Chapter 14 Stable Isotopic Biomarkers of Diet ................................................................ .......... 235 Sarah H. Nash and Diane M. O'Brien Chapter 15 The Food Metabolome and Dietary Biomarkers ...................................................... 259 Augustin Scalbert, Joseph A. Rothwell, Pekka Keski-Rahkonen, and Vanessa Neveu Chapter 16 Metabolomic Techniques to Discover Food Biomarkers .........................................283 Pekka Keski-Rahkonen, Joseph A. Rothwell, and Augustin Scalbert Chapter 17 The Validation of Dietary Biomarkers ................................................................ ..... 301 Pietro Ferrari Chapter 18 Targeted and Untargeted Metabolomics for Specific Food Intake Assessment: Whole Grains as an Example ................................................................ ................... 315 Carl Brunius, Huaxing Wu, and Rikard Landberg Chapter 19 Strengths and Limitations of Food Composition Databases .................................... 337 Phyllis Stumbo and Gary Beecher Index ................................................................ ................................................................ .............. 353.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498749329 20171218
Considerable evidence proves that self-reported dietary intake using written diaries or recalls are subject to bias resulting in poor accuracy. While dietary intake data are needed to drive many nutritional policies, the obesity epidemic has increased the need to assess diet with absolute accuracy.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498749343 20171218
Book
xx 236 pages ; 24 cm
  • Introduction
  • The hustle
  • Building a company
  • Airbnb nation
  • The bad and the ugly
  • Air rage
  • Hospitality, disrupted
  • Learning to lead
  • What's next?
A thorough and objective profile of this groundbreaking and unusual company covers its founders, meteoric rise, nagging troubles, and global popularity.
Business Library
Book
767 pages : color illustrations, color maps ; 28 cm
With 800 home-cooking recipes, America: The Cookbook is a celebration of the remarkable diversity of American food and food culture state by state. Features 50 essays and menus from a 'who's who' of 100 foremost food experts and chefs.America: The Cookbook is the first book to document comprehensively - and celebrate - the remarkable diversity of American cuisine and food culture. A thoroughly researched compendium of 800 home-cooking recipes for delicious and authentic American dishes, America: The Cookbook explores the country's myriad traditions and influences, regional favorites and melting-pot fusion - the culinary heritage of a nation, from appetizers to desserts and beyond. A unique state-by-state section features essays and menus from a 'who's who' of 100 foremost food experts and chefs.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714873961 20171227
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vii, 201 pages ; 24 cm.
  • Cooking in 1800
  • The early to late 1800s
  • The late 1800s through 1945
  • 1945 to the early 1970s
  • The early 1970s through today
  • The future of home cooking.
American Home Cooking provides an answer to the question of why, in the face of all the modern technology we have for saving time, Americans still spend time in their kitchens cooking. Americans eat four to five meals per week in a restaurant and buy millions of dollars' worth of convenience foods. Cooking, especially from scratch, is clearly on its way out. However, if this is true, why do we spend so much money on kitchen appliances both large and small? Why are so many cooking shows and cookbooks published each year if so few people actually cook? In American Home Cooking, Timothy Miller argues that there are historical reasons behind the reality of American cooking. There are some factors that, over the past two hundred years, have kept us close to our kitchens, while there are other factors that have worked to push us away from our kitchens. At one end of the cooking and eating continuum is preparing meals from scratch: all ingredients are raw and unprocessed and, in extreme cases, grown at the home. On the other end of the spectrum is dining out at a restaurant, where no cooking is done but the family is still fed. All dining experiences exist along this continuum, and Miller considers how American dining has moved along the continuum. He looks at a number of different groups and trends that have affected the state of the American kitchen, stretching back to the early 1800s. These include food and appliance companies, the restaurant industry, the home economics movement of the early 20th century, and reform movements such as the counterculture of the 1960s and the religious reform movements of the 1800s. And yet the kitchen is still, most often, the center of the home and the place where most people expect to cook and eat - even if they don't.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781442253452 20170814
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • Foreword xiii Acknowledgments xvii About the Author xxi Chapter 1 Building a Strategic Analytic Culture in Hospitality and Gaming 1 Strategic Analytic Culture 3 Moving Ahead and Staying Ahead with Prescriptive Decision Making 5 Making It Happen 9 Getting Started 13 How This Book Can Help 15 Notes 17 Chapter 2 Data Management for Hospitality and Gaming 19 Data Management Challenge and Opportunity 21 Data Storage 29 Data Integration 34 Data Quality 40 Measuring the Benefits of Data Management 42 Responsible Use of Data 43 Conclusion 51 Additional Resources 52 Notes 52 Chapter 3 Data Visualization 53 Why Are Visualizations So Important? 55 Visualization Technology 56 Data Handling 58 Visualization Types 62 Creating Powerful Visualizations 67 Conclusion 79 Additional Resources 80 Notes 80 Chapter 4 From Reactive to Proactive Decision Making: Advanced Analytics in Action 81 Reactive to Proactive Decision Making 83 Statistical Analysis 84 Forecasting 91 Predictive Analytics 96 Optimization 100 Machine Learning 103 Text Analytics 104 Making It Work Analytics and Technology 111 Innovations in Solution Delivery 113 Real Time and Streaming 118 Conclusion 119 Additional Resources 119 Notes 120 Chapter 5 Analytics for Operations 123 Operations 125 Operations Data 128 Advanced Analytics for Operations 134 Workforce Planning and Optimization 140 Queues 146 The Impact of Queue Configuration 148 Managing Consumer Perceptions of the Wait 152 Benchmarking Operations Analytics Capabilities 156 Technology and People Investments 158 Conclusion 163 Additional Resources 166 Notes 166 Chapter 6 Analytics for Marketing 167 Marketing Data 169 Advanced Analytics for Marketing 177 Digital Intelligence 183 Benchmarking Marketing Analytics Capabilities 191 Technology and People Investments 196 Conclusion 199 Additional Resources 201 Notes 201 Chapter 7 Analytics for Sales 203 Sales Data 205 Advanced Analytics for Sales 210 Statistical Analysis 210 The Changing Landscape of Sales 212 Benchmarking Sales Analytics 214 Conclusion 218 Note 219 Chapter 8 Analytics for Revenue Management 221 Revenue Management: A History Lesson 223 Then Things Changed ... 227 Revenue Management Data 229 Revenue Management Analytics 231 Benchmarking Revenue Management Analytics Capabilities 247 Technology and People Investments 249 Conclusion 252 Additional Resources 255 Notes 255 Chapter 9 Analytics for Performance Analysis 257 Data for Performance Analysis 259 Advanced Analytics for Performance Analysis 263 Benchmarking Performance Analytics Capabilities 267 Technology and People Investments 269 Conclusion 273 Additional Resources 273 Notes 274 Chapter 10 Analytics for Gaming 275 Gaming Data 278 Advanced Analytics for Gaming 281 Casino Floor Revenue Optimization 285 Fraud and Anti Money Laundering 294 Benchmarking Gaming Analytics Capabilities 299 Technology and People Investments 300 Conclusion 303 Additional Resources 304 Notes 304 Chapter 11 Pulling It All Together: Building an Analytical Organization 307 Getting Started: Well-Defined, Small Projects for Maximum Impact 309 Organizing Your Analytics Department 316 The Build versus Buy Decision 324 Integrated Decision Making 327 Conclusion 337 Additional Resources 340 Notes 341 Appendix 1 Case Study from Infor: Analytics Opportunities in Operations 343 Appendix 2 Case Study from IDeaS: Meetings and Events Revenue Management 349 Appendix 3 Why Dynamic? 367 Appendix 4 Chapter Questions 377 References 385 Index 389.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119129981 20170313
Targeted analytics to address the unique opportunities in hospitality and gaming The Analytic Hospitality Executive helps decision makers understand big data and how it can drive value in the industry. Written by a leading business analytics expert who specializes in hospitality and travel, this book draws a direct link between big data and hospitality, and shows you how to incorporate analytics into your strategic management initiative. You'll learn which data types are critical, how to identify productive data sources, and how to integrate analytics into multiple business processes to create an overall analytic culture that turns information into insight. The discussion includes the tools and tips that help make it happen, and points you toward the specific places in your business that could benefit from advanced analytics. The hospitality and gaming industry has unique needs and opportunities, and this book's targeted guidance provides a roadmap to big data benefits. Like most industries, the hospitality and gaming industry is experiencing a rapid increase in data volume, variety, and velocity. This book shows you how to corral this growing current, and channel it into productive avenues that drive better business. * Understand big data and analytics * Incorporate analytics into existing business processes * Identify the most valuable data sources * Create a strategic analytic culture that drives value Although the industry is just beginning to recognize the value of big data, it's important to get up to speed quickly or risk losing out on benefits that could drive business to greater heights. The Analytic Hospitality Executive provides a targeted game plan from an expert on the inside, so you can start making your data work for you.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119129981 20170313
Book
175 pages : color illustrations ; 22 x 31 cm
Green Library
Book
466 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 256 pages : color illustrations ; 27 cm
Known for its bustling tables, the sizzle of onions and garlic in the wok, and a wait time so legendary that customers start to line up before the doors even open--Burma Superstar is a Bay Area institution, offering diners a taste of the addictively savory and spiced food of Myanmar. With influences from neighboring India and China, as well as Thailand and Laos, Burmese food is a unique blend of flavors, and Burma Superstar includes such stand-out dishes as the iconic Tea Leaf Salad, Chili Lamb, Pork and Pumpkin Stew, Platha (a buttery layered flatbread), Spicy Eggplant, and Mohinga, a fish noodle soup that is arguably Myanmar's national dish. Each of these nearly 90 recipes has been streamlined for home cooks of all experience levels, and without the need for special equipment or long lists of hard-to-find ingredients. Stunningly photographed, and peppered with essays about the country and its food, this inside look at the world of Burma Superstar presents a seductive glimpse of this jewel of Southeast Asia.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxii, 640 pages : illustrations ; [ca. 23-29] cm
  • Chromatographic Techniques of Mono- and Disaccharides AnalysisNoureddine Benkeblia Mono- and Disaccharides: Selected Physicochemical and Functional AspectsKirsi Jouppila Health Aspects of Mono- and DisaccharidesAnne Raben, Ian A. Macdonald, and Mikael Fogelholm Cell-Wall Polysaccharides: Structural, Chemical, and Analytical AspectsRoger Andersson, Eric Westerlund, and Per Aman Functional Properties of Cereal Cell-Wall PolysaccharidesMarta S. Izydorczyk Hydrocolloids/Food Gums: Analytical AspectsJames N. BeMiller Gums and hydrocolloids: Functional AspectsJean-Louis Doublier, Catherine Garnier, and Gerard Cuvelier Nondigestible Carbohydrates Nutritional AspectsAlison Parrett, Hannah Harris, and Christine A. Edwards Starch: Analytical and Structural AspectsEric Bertoft and Lars Nilsson Starch: Physicochemical and Functional AspectsAnn-Charlotte Eliasson Starch: Nutritional and Health AspectsM. Naushad Emmambux and John R.N. Taylor.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781482245516 20171218
Carbohydrates in Food, Third Edition provides thorough and authoritative coverage of the chemical analysis, structure, functional properties, analytical methods, and nutritional relevance of monosaccharides, disaccharides, and polysaccharides used in food. Carbohydrates have become a hot topic in the debate about what to eat. This new edition includes increased treatment of resistant starch, dietary fiber, and starch digestion, especially in relation to different diets, suggesting that carbohydrate consumption should be reduced. New to the Third Edition: Explains how models for starch molecules have been improved recently leading to clearer understandingDiscusses the growing interest in new sources of carbohydrates, such as chitosan and fructans, because of their function as prebioticsFeatures the latest developments on research into dietary fiber and starch digestion Carbohydrates in Food, Third Edition combines the latest data on the analytical, physicochemical, and nutritional properties of carbohydrates, offering a comprehensive and accessible single source of information. It evaluates the advantages and disadvantages of using various analytical methods, presents discussion of relevant physicochemical topics that relate to the use of carbohydrates in food that allow familiarity with important functional aspects of carbohydrates; and includes information on relevant nutritional topics in relation to the use of carbohydrates in food.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781482245516 20171218

14. Çerez kitabı [2017]

Book
302 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
Green Library
Book
ix, 320 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Part I. Breakfast: Coffee-- Bacon-- Eggs-- Pancakes-- Part II. Lunch: Jelly-- Macaroni and Cheese-- Bread-- Vinaigrette-- Part III. Dinner: Pizza-- Meat Time-- More Meat Time-- Color-- Part IV: Drinks and Dessert: Beer-- Cocktails-- Ice Cream-- Pie-- Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782623137 20170522
Whether you know it or not, you become a chemist any time you step into a kitchen. As you cook, you oversee intricate chemical transformations that would test even the most hardened of professional chemists. Focussing on how and why we cook different dishes the way we do, this book introduces basic chemistry through everyday foods and meal preparations. Through its unique meal-by-meal organisation, the book playfully explores the chemistry that turns our food into meals. Topics covered range from roasting coffee beans to scrambling eggs and gluten development in breads. The book features many experiments that you can try in your own kitchen, such as exploring the melting properties of cheese, retaining flavour when cooking and pairing wines with foods. Through molecular chemistry, biology, neuroscience, physics and agriculture, the author discusses various aspects of cooking and food preparation. This is a fascinating read for anyone interested in the science behind cooking.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781782623137 20170522
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
xi, 307 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 26 cm.
The Chicago Food Encyclopedia is a far-ranging portrait of an American culinary paradise. Hundreds of entries deliver all of the visionary restauranteurs, Michelin superstars, beloved haunts, and food companies of today and yesterday. More than 100 sumptuous images include thirty full-color photographs that transport readers to dining rooms and food stands across the city. Throughout, a roster of writers, scholars, and industry experts pays tribute to an expansive--and still expanding--food history that not only helped build Chicago but fed a growing nation. Pizza. Alinea. Wrigley Spearmint. Soul food. Rick Bayless. Hot Dogs. Koreatown. Everest. All served up A-Z, and all part of the ultimate reference on Chicago and its food.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252087240 20171009
Green Library
Book
vi, 254 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Comfort Food explores this concept with examples taken from Atlantic Canadians, Indonesians, the English in Britain, and various ethnic, regional, and religious populations as well as rural and urban residents in the United States. This volume includes studies of particular edibles and the ways in which they comfort or in someinstances cause discomfort. The contributors focus on items ranging from bologna to chocolate, including sweet and savory puddings, fried bread with an egg in the center, dairy products, fried rice, cafeteria fare, sugary fried dough, soul food, and others.Several essays consider comfort food in the context of cookbooks, films, blogs, literature, marketing, and tourism. Of course what heartens one person might put off another, so the collection also includes takes on victuals that prove problematic. All this fare is then related to identity, family, community, nationality, ethnicity, class, sense of place, tradition, stress, health, discomfort, guilt, betrayal, and loss, contributing to and deepening our understanding of comfort food.This book offers a foundation for further appreciation of comfort food. As a subject of study, the comfort food is relevant to a number of disciplines, most obviously food studies, folkloristics, and anthropology, but also American studies, cultural studies, global and international studies, tourism, marketing, and public health.With contributions by: Barbara Banks, Sheila Bock, Susan Eleuterio, Jillian Gould, Phillis Humphries, Michael Owen Jones, Alicia Kristen, William G. Lockwood, Yvonne R. Lockwood, Lucy M. Long, LuAnne Roth, Rachelle H. Saltzman, Charlene Smith, Annie Tucker, and Diane Tye.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781496810854 20171017
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 306 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • Preface, xxiii Preface to the second edition, xxvii Acknowledgements, xxix Part I: Theoretical introduction 1 Principles of food engineering, 3 1.1 Introduction, 3 1.2 The Damkohler equations, 6 1.2.1 The application of the Damkohler equations in food engineering: conservative substantial fragments, 6 1.3 Investigation of the Damkohler equations by means of similarity theory, 8 1.4 Analogies, 14 1.5 Dimensional analysis, 16 1.6 System theoretical approaches to food engineering, 19 1.7 Food safety and quality assurance, 21 Further reading, 22 2 Characterization of substances used in the confectionery industry, 23 2.1 Qualitative characterization of substances, 23 2.2 Quantitative characterization of confectionery products, 33 2.3 Preparation of recipes, 49 2.4 Composition of chocolate, confectioneries, biscuits and wafers made for special nutritional purposes, 56 Further reading, 60 3 Engineering properties of foods, 61 3.1 Introduction, 61 3.2 Density, 61 3.3 Fundamental functions of thermodynamics, 65 3.4 Latent heat and heat of reaction, 71 3.5 Thermal conductivity, 76 3.6 Thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number, 78 3.7 Mass diffusivity and Schmidt number, 81 3.8 Dielectric properties, 85 3.9 Electrical conductivity, 91 3.10 Infrared absorption properties, 95 3.11 Physical characteristics of food powders, 96 Further reading, 107 4 The rheology of foods and sweets, 109 4.1 Rheology: its importance in the confectionery industry, 109 4.2 Stress and strain, 109 4.3 Solid behaviour, 115 4.5 Viscosity of solutions, 159 4.6 Viscosity of emulsions, 161 4.7 Viscosity of suspensions, 164 4.8 Rheological properties of gels, 166 4.9 Rheological properties of sweets, 171 4.10 Rheological properties of wheat flour doughs, 183 4.11 Relationship between food oral processing and rheology, 193 Further reading, 194 5 Introduction to food colloids, 197 5.1 The colloidal state, 197 5.2 Formation of colloids, 199 5.3 Properties of macromolecular colloids, 202 5.4 Properties of colloids of association, 208 5.5 Properties of interfaces, 210 5.6 Electrical properties of interfaces, 219 5.7 Theory of colloidal stability: the DLVO theory, 221 5.8 Stability and changes of colloids and coarse dispersions, 224 5.9 Emulsion instability, 233 5.10 Phase inversion, 243 5.11 Foams, 245 5.12 Gelation as a second-order phase transition, 256 Further reading, 261 Part II: Physical operations 6 Comminution, 265 6.1 Changes during size reduction, 265 6.2 Rittinger s surface theory, 266 6.3 Kick s volume theory, 267 6.4 The third or Bond theory, 268 6.5 Energy requirement for comminution, 268 6.6 Particle size distribution of ground products, 269 6.7 Particle size distributions, 273 6.8 Kinetics of grinding, 275 6.9 Comminution by five-roll refiners, 276 6.10 Grinding by a melangeur, 280 6.11 Comminution by a stirred ball mill, 284 Further reading, 289 7 Mixing/kneading, 290 7.1 Technical solutions to the problem of mixing, 290 7.2 Power characteristics of a stirrer, 290 7.3 Mixing time characteristics of a stirrer, 292 7.4 Representative shear rate and viscosity for mixing, 292 7.5 Calculation of the Reynolds number for mixing, 292 7.6 Mixing of powders, 294 7.7 Mixing of fluids of high viscosity, 300 7.8 Effect of impeller speed on heat and mass transfer, 301 7.9 Mixing by blade mixers, 302 7.10 Mixing rolls, 303 7.11 Mixing of two liquids, 304 Further reading, 304 8 Solutions, 306 8.1 Preparation of aqueous solutions of carbohydrates, 306 8.2 Solubility of sucrose in water, 308 8.3 Aqueous solutions of sucrose and glucose syrup, 309 8.4 Aqueous sucrose solutions containing invert sugar, 311 8.5 Solubility of sucrose in the presence of starch syrup and invert sugar, 312 8.6 Rate of dissolution, 312 8.7 Solubility of bulk sweeteners, 315 Further reading, 316 9 Evaporation, 317 9.1 Theoretical background: Raoult s law, 317 9.2 Boiling point of sucrose/water solutions at atmospheric pressure, 318 9.3 Application of a modification of Raoult s law to calculate the boiling point of carbohydrate/water solutions at decreased pressure, 319 9.4 Vapour pressure formulae for carbohydrate/water solutions, 323 9.5 Practical tests for controlling the boiling points of sucrose solutions, 330 9.6 Modelling of an industrial working process for hard boiled sweets, 331 9.7 Boiling points of bulk sweeteners, 335 Further reading, 335 10 Crystallization, 337 10.1 Introduction, 337 10.2 Crystallization from solution, 337 10.3 Crystallization from melts, 355 10.4 Crystal size distributions, 371 10.5 Batch crystallization, 374 10.6 Isothermal and non-isothermal recrystallization, 375 10.7 Methods for studying the supermolecular structure of fat melts, 376 10.8 Crystallization of glycerol esters: Polymorphism, 381 10.9 Crystallization of cocoa butter, 385 10.10 Crystallization of fat masses, 398 10.11 Crystallization of confectionery fats with a high trans-fat portion, 411 10.12 Modelling of chocolate cooling processes and tempering, 414 10.13 EU programme ProPraline, 421 Further reading, 422 11 Gelling, emulsifying, stabilizing and foam formation, 424 11.1 Hydrocolloids used in confectionery, 424 11.2 Agar, 424 11.3 Alginates, 429 11.4 Carrageenans, 432 11.5 Furcellaran, 437 11.6 Gum arabic, 437 11.7 Gum tragacanth, 438 11.8 Guaran gum, 439 11.9 Locust bean gum, 439 11.10 Pectin, 440 11.11 Starch, 444 11.12 Xanthan gum, 447 11.13 Gelatin, 448 11.14 Egg proteins, 453 11.15 Foam formation, 458 Further reading, 466 12 Transport, 468 12.1 Types of transport, 468 12.2 Calculation of flow rate of non-newtonian fluids, 468 12.3 Transporting dessert masses in long pipes, 470 12.4 Changes in pipe direction, 471 12.5 Laminar unsteady flow, 472 12.6 Transport of flour and sugar by airflow, 472 Further reading, 477 13 Pressing, 478 13.1 Applications of pressing in the confectionery industry, 478 13.2 Theory of pressing, 478 13.3 Cocoa liquor pressing, 480 Further reading, 482 14 Extrusion, 483 14.1 Flow through a converging die, 483 14.2 Feeders used for shaping confectionery pastes, 491 14.3 Extrusion cooking, 495 14.4 Roller extrusion, 497 Further reading, 500 15 Particle agglomeration: instantization and tabletting, 501 15.1 Theoretical background, 501 15.2 Processes of agglomeration, 512 15.3 Granulation by fluidization, 514 15.4 Tabletting, 516 Further reading, 524 Part III: Chemical and complex operations: stability of sweets: artisan chocolate and confectioneries 16 Chemical operations (inversion and caramelization), ripening and complex operations, 527 16.1 Inversion and caramelization, 527 16.2 Acrylamide formation, 538 16.3 Alkalization of cocoa material, 540 16.4 Ripening, 542 16.5 Complex operations, 545 16.6 Drying/frying, baking and roasting, 562 Further reading, 577 17 Water activity, shelf life and storage, 579 17.1 Water activity, 579 17.2 Shelf life and storage, 594 17.3 Storage scheduling, 601 Further reading, 602 18 Stability of food systems, 604 18.1 Common use of the concept of food stability, 604 18.2 Stability theories: types of stability, 604 18.3 Shelf life as a case of marginal stability, 606 18.4 Stability matrix of a food system, 607 Further reading, 608 19 Artisan chocolate and confectioneries, 609 19.1 Actuality of artisanship in the confectionery practice, 609 19.2 The characteristics of the artisan products, 609 19.3 Raw materials and machinery, 610 19.4 The characteristics of the artisan confectionery technologies, 611 19.5 Managing an artisan workshop, 611 19.6 An easy and effective shaping technology for producing praline bars, 612 Further reading, 614 Part IV: Appendices 1 Data on engineering properties of materials used and made by the confectionery industry, 617 A1.1 Carbohydrates, 617 A1.2 Oils and fats, 626 A1.3 Raw materials, semi-finished products and finished products, 626 2 Comparison of Brix and Baume concentrations of aqueous sucrose solutions at 20 C (68 F), 643 3 Survey of fluid models: some trends in rheology, 645 A3.1 Decomposition method for calculation of flow rate of rheological models, 645 A3.2 Calculation of the friction coefficient ( ) of non-newtonian fluids in the laminar region, 653 A3.3 Tensorial representation of constitutive equations: The fading memory of viscoelastic fluids, 654 A3.4 Computer simulations in food rheology and science, 660 A3.5 Ultrasonic and photoacoustic testing, 660 Further reading, 661 4 Fractals, 663 A4.1 Irregular forms: fractal geometry, 663 A4.2 Box-counting dimension, 664 A4.3 Particle-counting method, 665 A4.4 Fractal backbone dimension, 666 Further reading, 666 5 Introduction to structure theory, 668 A5.1 The principles of the structure theory of blickle and seitz, 668 A5.2 Modelling a part of fudge processing plant by structure theory, 673 Further reading, 674 6 Technological layouts, 675 Further reading, 686 References, 687 Index, 737.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118939772 20170403
Confectionery and chocolate manufacture has been dominated by large-scale industrial processing for several decades. It is often the case though, that a trial and error approach is applied to the development of new products and processes, rather than verified scientific principles. Confectionery and Chocolate Engineering: Principles and Applications, Second edition, adds to information presented in the first edition on essential topics such as food safety, quality assurance, sweets for special nutritional purposes, artizan chocolate, and confectioneries. In addition, information is provided on the fading memory of viscoelastic fluids, which are briefly discussed in terms of fractional calculus, and gelation as a second order phase transition. Chemical operations such as inversion, caramelization, and the Maillard reaction, as well as the complex operations including conching, drying, frying, baking, and roasting used in confectionery manufacture are also described. This book provides food engineers, scientists, technologists and students in research, industry, and food and chemical engineering-related courses with a scientific, theoretical description and analysis of confectionery manufacturing, opening up new possibilities for process and product improvement, relating to increased efficiency of operations, the use of new materials, and new applications for traditional raw materials.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118939772 20170403
Book
1 online resource.
  • Preface, xxiii Preface to the second edition, xxvii Acknowledgements, xxix Part I: Theoretical introduction 1 Principles of food engineering, 3 1.1 Introduction, 3 1.2 The Damkohler equations, 6 1.2.1 The application of the Damkohler equations in food engineering: conservative substantial fragments, 6 1.3 Investigation of the Damkohler equations by means of similarity theory, 8 1.4 Analogies, 14 1.5 Dimensional analysis, 16 1.6 System theoretical approaches to food engineering, 19 1.7 Food safety and quality assurance, 21 Further reading, 22 2 Characterization of substances used in the confectionery industry, 23 2.1 Qualitative characterization of substances, 23 2.2 Quantitative characterization of confectionery products, 33 2.3 Preparation of recipes, 49 2.4 Composition of chocolate, confectioneries, biscuits and wafers made for special nutritional purposes, 56 Further reading, 60 3 Engineering properties of foods, 61 3.1 Introduction, 61 3.2 Density, 61 3.3 Fundamental functions of thermodynamics, 65 3.4 Latent heat and heat of reaction, 71 3.5 Thermal conductivity, 76 3.6 Thermal diffusivity and Prandtl number, 78 3.7 Mass diffusivity and Schmidt number, 81 3.8 Dielectric properties, 85 3.9 Electrical conductivity, 91 3.10 Infrared absorption properties, 95 3.11 Physical characteristics of food powders, 96 Further reading, 107 4 The rheology of foods and sweets, 109 4.1 Rheology: its importance in the confectionery industry, 109 4.2 Stress and strain, 109 4.3 Solid behaviour, 115 4.5 Viscosity of solutions, 159 4.6 Viscosity of emulsions, 161 4.7 Viscosity of suspensions, 164 4.8 Rheological properties of gels, 166 4.9 Rheological properties of sweets, 171 4.10 Rheological properties of wheat flour doughs, 183 4.11 Relationship between food oral processing and rheology, 193 Further reading, 194 5 Introduction to food colloids, 197 5.1 The colloidal state, 197 5.2 Formation of colloids, 199 5.3 Properties of macromolecular colloids, 202 5.4 Properties of colloids of association, 208 5.5 Properties of interfaces, 210 5.6 Electrical properties of interfaces, 219 5.7 Theory of colloidal stability: the DLVO theory, 221 5.8 Stability and changes of colloids and coarse dispersions, 224 5.9 Emulsion instability, 233 5.10 Phase inversion, 243 5.11 Foams, 245 5.12 Gelation as a second-order phase transition, 256 Further reading, 261 Part II: Physical operations 6 Comminution, 265 6.1 Changes during size reduction, 265 6.2 Rittinger s surface theory, 266 6.3 Kick s volume theory, 267 6.4 The third or Bond theory, 268 6.5 Energy requirement for comminution, 268 6.6 Particle size distribution of ground products, 269 6.7 Particle size distributions, 273 6.8 Kinetics of grinding, 275 6.9 Comminution by five-roll refiners, 276 6.10 Grinding by a melangeur, 280 6.11 Comminution by a stirred ball mill, 284 Further reading, 289 7 Mixing/kneading, 290 7.1 Technical solutions to the problem of mixing, 290 7.2 Power characteristics of a stirrer, 290 7.3 Mixing time characteristics of a stirrer, 292 7.4 Representative shear rate and viscosity for mixing, 292 7.5 Calculation of the Reynolds number for mixing, 292 7.6 Mixing of powders, 294 7.7 Mixing of fluids of high viscosity, 300 7.8 Effect of impeller speed on heat and mass transfer, 301 7.9 Mixing by blade mixers, 302 7.10 Mixing rolls, 303 7.11 Mixing of two liquids, 304 Further reading, 304 8 Solutions, 306 8.1 Preparation of aqueous solutions of carbohydrates, 306 8.2 Solubility of sucrose in water, 308 8.3 Aqueous solutions of sucrose and glucose syrup, 309 8.4 Aqueous sucrose solutions containing invert sugar, 311 8.5 Solubility of sucrose in the presence of starch syrup and invert sugar, 312 8.6 Rate of dissolution, 312 8.7 Solubility of bulk sweeteners, 315 Further reading, 316 9 Evaporation, 317 9.1 Theoretical background: Raoult s law, 317 9.2 Boiling point of sucrose/water solutions at atmospheric pressure, 318 9.3 Application of a modification of Raoult s law to calculate the boiling point of carbohydrate/water solutions at decreased pressure, 319 9.4 Vapour pressure formulae for carbohydrate/water solutions, 323 9.5 Practical tests for controlling the boiling points of sucrose solutions, 330 9.6 Modelling of an industrial working process for hard boiled sweets, 331 9.7 Boiling points of bulk sweeteners, 335 Further reading, 335 10 Crystallization, 337 10.1 Introduction, 337 10.2 Crystallization from solution, 337 10.3 Crystallization from melts, 355 10.4 Crystal size distributions, 371 10.5 Batch crystallization, 374 10.6 Isothermal and non-isothermal recrystallization, 375 10.7 Methods for studying the supermolecular structure of fat melts, 376 10.8 Crystallization of glycerol esters: Polymorphism, 381 10.9 Crystallization of cocoa butter, 385 10.10 Crystallization of fat masses, 398 10.11 Crystallization of confectionery fats with a high trans-fat portion, 411 10.12 Modelling of chocolate cooling processes and tempering, 414 10.13 EU programme ProPraline, 421 Further reading, 422 11 Gelling, emulsifying, stabilizing and foam formation, 424 11.1 Hydrocolloids used in confectionery, 424 11.2 Agar, 424 11.3 Alginates, 429 11.4 Carrageenans, 432 11.5 Furcellaran, 437 11.6 Gum arabic, 437 11.7 Gum tragacanth, 438 11.8 Guaran gum, 439 11.9 Locust bean gum, 439 11.10 Pectin, 440 11.11 Starch, 444 11.12 Xanthan gum, 447 11.13 Gelatin, 448 11.14 Egg proteins, 453 11.15 Foam formation, 458 Further reading, 466 12 Transport, 468 12.1 Types of transport, 468 12.2 Calculation of flow rate of non-newtonian fluids, 468 12.3 Transporting dessert masses in long pipes, 470 12.4 Changes in pipe direction, 471 12.5 Laminar unsteady flow, 472 12.6 Transport of flour and sugar by airflow, 472 Further reading, 477 13 Pressing, 478 13.1 Applications of pressing in the confectionery industry, 478 13.2 Theory of pressing, 478 13.3 Cocoa liquor pressing, 480 Further reading, 482 14 Extrusion, 483 14.1 Flow through a converging die, 483 14.2 Feeders used for shaping confectionery pastes, 491 14.3 Extrusion cooking, 495 14.4 Roller extrusion, 497 Further reading, 500 15 Particle agglomeration: instantization and tabletting, 501 15.1 Theoretical background, 501 15.2 Processes of agglomeration, 512 15.3 Granulation by fluidization, 514 15.4 Tabletting, 516 Further reading, 524 Part III: Chemical and complex operations: stability of sweets: artisan chocolate and confectioneries 16 Chemical operations (inversion and caramelization), ripening and complex operations, 527 16.1 Inversion and caramelization, 527 16.2 Acrylamide formation, 538 16.3 Alkalization of cocoa material, 540 16.4 Ripening, 542 16.5 Complex operations, 545 16.6 Drying/frying, baking and roasting, 562 Further reading, 577 17 Water activity, shelf life and storage, 579 17.1 Water activity, 579 17.2 Shelf life and storage, 594 17.3 Storage scheduling, 601 Further reading, 602 18 Stability of food systems, 604 18.1 Common use of the concept of food stability, 604 18.2 Stability theories: types of stability, 604 18.3 Shelf life as a case of marginal stability, 606 18.4 Stability matrix of a food system, 607 Further reading, 608 19 Artisan chocolate and confectioneries, 609 19.1 Actuality of artisanship in the confectionery practice, 609 19.2 The characteristics of the artisan products, 609 19.3 Raw materials and machinery, 610 19.4 The characteristics of the artisan confectionery technologies, 611 19.5 Managing an artisan workshop, 611 19.6 An easy and effective shaping technology for producing praline bars, 612 Further reading, 614 Part IV: Appendices 1 Data on engineering properties of materials used and made by the confectionery industry, 617 A1.1 Carbohydrates, 617 A1.2 Oils and fats, 626 A1.3 Raw materials, semi-finished products and finished products, 626 2 Comparison of Brix and Baume concentrations of aqueous sucrose solutions at 20 C (68 F), 643 3 Survey of fluid models: some trends in rheology, 645 A3.1 Decomposition method for calculation of flow rate of rheological models, 645 A3.2 Calculation of the friction coefficient ( ) of non-newtonian fluids in the laminar region, 653 A3.3 Tensorial representation of constitutive equations: The fading memory of viscoelastic fluids, 654 A3.4 Computer simulations in food rheology and science, 660 A3.5 Ultrasonic and photoacoustic testing, 660 Further reading, 661 4 Fractals, 663 A4.1 Irregular forms: fractal geometry, 663 A4.2 Box-counting dimension, 664 A4.3 Particle-counting method, 665 A4.4 Fractal backbone dimension, 666 Further reading, 666 5 Introduction to structure theory, 668 A5.1 The principles of the structure theory of blickle and seitz, 668 A5.2 Modelling a part of fudge processing plant by structure theory, 673 Further reading, 674 6 Technological layouts, 675 Further reading, 686 References, 687 Index, 737.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118939772 20170403
Confectionery and chocolate manufacture has been dominated by large-scale industrial processing for several decades. It is often the case though, that a trial and error approach is applied to the development of new products and processes, rather than verified scientific principles. Confectionery and Chocolate Engineering: Principles and Applications, Second edition, adds to information presented in the first edition on essential topics such as food safety, quality assurance, sweets for special nutritional purposes, artizan chocolate, and confectioneries. In addition, information is provided on the fading memory of viscoelastic fluids, which are briefly discussed in terms of fractional calculus, and gelation as a second order phase transition. Chemical operations such as inversion, caramelization, and the Maillard reaction, as well as the complex operations including conching, drying, frying, baking, and roasting used in confectionery manufacture are also described. This book provides food engineers, scientists, technologists and students in research, industry, and food and chemical engineering-related courses with a scientific, theoretical description and analysis of confectionery manufacturing, opening up new possibilities for process and product improvement, relating to increased efficiency of operations, the use of new materials, and new applications for traditional raw materials.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118939772 20170403