Book
xiv, 278 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 23 cm.
  • Recipe contributors
  • Ancestor cooks
  • Stirring up memories
  • Recipes
  • Breads
  • Main dishes
  • Vegetables and sides
  • Desserts
  • Cakes
  • Cookies
  • Pies and cobblers
  • Puddings
  • Other desserts
  • Extras
  • Preserving heirloom recipes
  • Resources
  • Map of Texas counties
  • Collecting heirloom recipes: questions for the cook
  • Deciphering obscure terms in older recipes
  • Additional information
  • Sites and events
  • Books
  • Other media
  • Organizations
  • Recipe index.
Join Nola McKey, former editor at Texas Highways, on a journey through Texas history-through food! In this collection of morethan one hundred recipes, Texans share the dishes they inheritedfrom their ancestors and the family stories and traditionsthat accompany them. With a strong focus on Texas' culturaldiversity-featuring Polish cheese pie, Czech sauerkraut, Chinesefried rice, Mexican caldo, Italian pizzelle, African American purple hull peas, and German egg noodles-McKey documents theculinary impact of immigrants from around the globe. But thisbook is not for foodies alone; history enthusiasts will appreciatethe snapshots of daily Texan life, captured in the narrativesaccompanying the recipes and spanning more than a century. Toldprimarily in the words of today's cooks, these multigenerationalfamily memories can take anyone on a trip down memory lane, back to a beloved grandmother's kitchen or great-aunt's holidaytable. Included are recommendations for Texas museums andfestivals where interested readers can learn more about many ofthe foods and cultures featured in this book. Additionally, McKeyprovides tips for preserving your own family recipes and forrecording the heritage surrounding a special dish. Illustrated withfamily photos and original watercolors by Cora McKown, FromTea Cakes to Tamales will quickly itself become a Texan familyheirloom.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781623494094 20161010
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 184 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Today we care about the source of our food as much as the preparation, so it is no surprise that foodies have discovered wild edibles. From the most upscale restaurants in New York to humble farm stays in Europe, chefs and restaurant-goers alike are seeking pleasure in food found in the wild. In Pursuit of Wild Edibles: A Forager's Tour tells the story of one man passionate about finding wild edibles and creating recipes to highlight their unique flavors. An American expatriate, poet, and gourmet living in France, Jeffrey Greene has scoured the fields, rivers, and beaches of Europe and his native New England in search of foods ranging from puffballs and periwinkles to stone pine nuts and gooseneck barnacles. For many, foraging is the latest trend in foodie culture, but for Greene this journey stretches back to his childhood, when his parents fled New York City to a shack-like house in rural Connecticut. Convinced they could live off the land, the family raised goats, planted gardens, gathered seafood at the nearby coast, and foraged for food from the woods. Inspired by these childhood experiences, Greene and his wife, Mary, bought and restored an old priory in rural Burgundy. Surrounded by forests, they learned to identify mushrooms and greens, and devoted themselves to inventing recipes for them. Thus began a pursuit that took Greene to the Polish Carpathians, the Appennines overlooking the Ligurian coast, the shores of Normandy and Brittany, and to Plymouth, Massachusetts, where the Pilgrims eked out their first winter in near starvation. Greene's captivating book offers experienced foragers and novices alike an extensive sampling of his own recipes and a chance to come along with him on his international adventures. From razor clams and wild sea urchins, to young nettles and dandelion greens, to wild strawberries and cherries, Greene showcases the beauty of what one can cook up in a truly wild recipe.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780813938578 20160619
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
458 pages ; 27 cm
  • Appetizers, spreads, and salads
  • Savory pastries
  • Eggs and fritters
  • Soups
  • Rice, pasta, and grains
  • Vegetables
  • Fish
  • Poultry
  • Meat
  • Preserves and condiments
  • Desserts
  • Pantry ingredients.
For thousands of years, the people of the Jewish Diaspora have carried their culinary traditions and kosher laws throughout the world. In the United States, this has resulted primarily in an Ashkenazi table of matzo ball soup and knishes, brisket and gefilte fish. But Joyce Goldstein is now expanding that menu with this comprehensive collection of over four hundred recipes from the kitchens of three Mediterranean Jewish cultures: the Sephardic, the Maghrebi, and the Mizrahi. The New Mediterranean Jewish Table is an authoritative guide to Jewish home cooking from North Africa, Italy, Greece, Turkey, Spain, Portugal, and the Middle East. It is a treasury filled with vibrant, seasonal recipes-both classic and updated-that embrace fresh fruits and vegetables; grains and legumes; small portions of meat, poultry, and fish; and a healthy mix of herbs and spices. It is also the story of how Jewish cooks successfully brought the local ingredients, techniques, and traditions of their new homelands into their kitchens. With this varied and appealing selection of Mediterranean Jewish recipes, Joyce Goldstein promises to inspire new generations of Jewish and non-Jewish home cooks alike with dishes for everyday meals and holiday celebrations.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520284999 20160619
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
189 pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxiii, 151 pages : illustrations, maps ; 22 cm.
  • Introduction : Dining Out in Boston
  • Filet de Boeuf at the Tremont House : Luxury Hotel Dining Rooms
  • Bolted Beef and Bolted Pudding : Eating Houses
  • Charlotte Russe in the Afternoon : Elite Ladies' Eateries
  • Roast, Chop Suey, and Beer : Cafes
  • Epilogue : Ice Cream at Howard Johnson's
  • Acknowledgments
  • Notes
  • Index.
"Before the 1820s, the vast majority of Americans ate only at home. As the nation began to urbanize and industrialize, home and work became increasingly divided, resulting in new forms of commercial dining. In this fascinating book, Kelly Erby explores the evolution of such eating alternatives in Boston over the nineteenth century. Why Boston? Its more modest assortment of restaurants, its less impressive--but still significant--expansion in commerce and population, and its growing diversity made it more typical of the nation's other urban centers than New York. Restaurants, clearly segmented along class, gender, race, ethnic, and other lines, helped Bostonians become more comfortable with deepening social stratification in their city and young republic even as the experience of eating out contributed to an emerging public consumer culture. Restaurant Republic sheds light on how commercial dining both reflected and helped shape growing fragmentation along lines of race, class, and gender--from the elite Tremont House, which served fashionable French cuisine, to such plebian and ethnic venues as oyster saloons and Chinese chop suey houses. The epilogue takes us to the opening, in 1929, near Boston, of the nation's first Howard Johnson's, and that restaurant's establishment as a franchise in the next decade. The result is a compelling story that continues to shape America"-- Provided by publisher.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xiii, 234 pages ; 23 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xi, 223 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm.
  • Introduction : sensing food in the New Deal era
  • America eats : the making of a sensory archive
  • Romance of the homemade
  • Tasting place, sensing race
  • An American culinary heritage? Mexican food in the Southwest
  • A "well-filled melting pot"
  • Conclusion : how taste is made.
During the Depression, the Federal Writers' Project (FWP) dispatched scribes to sample the fare at group eating events like church dinners, political barbecues, and clambakes. Its America Eats project sought nothing less than to sample, and report upon, the tremendous range of foods eaten across the United States. Camille Begin shapes a cultural and sensory history of New Deal-era eating from the FWP archives. From "ravioli, the diminutive derbies of pastries, the crowns stuffed with a well-seasoned paste" to barbeque seasoning that integrated "salt, black pepper, dried red chili powder, garlic, oregano, cumin seed, and cayenne pepper" while "tomatoes, green chili peppers, onions, and olive oil made up the sauce", Begin describes in mouth-watering detail how Americans tasted their food. They did so in ways that varied, and varied widely, depending on race, ethnicity, class, and region. Begin explores how likes and dislikes, cravings and disgust operated within local sensory economies that she culls from the FWP's vivid descriptions, visual cues, culinary expectations, recipes and accounts of restaurant meals. She illustrates how nostalgia, prescriptive gender ideals, and racial stereotypes shaped how the FWP was able to frame regional food cultures as "American.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780252081705 20160704
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xi, 138 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : color illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • A global slurp: naengmyeon noodles
  • Food for the ancestors: jeon pancakes
  • Two colonizations and three migrations: grilling galbi
  • A taste of diversity: the bibimbap rice bowl.
Can food be both national and global at the same time? What happens when a food with a national identity travels beyond the boundaries of a nation? What makes a food authentically national and yet American or broader global? With these questions in mind, Sonia Ryang explores the world of Korean food in four American locations, Iowa City, Baltimore, Los Angeles, and Hawaii (Kona and Honolulu). Ryang visits restaurants and grocery stores in each location and observes Korean food as it is prepared and served to customers. She analyzes the history and evolution of each dish, how it arrived and what it became, but above all, she tastes and experiences her food - four items to be specific - naengmyeon cold noodle soup; jeon pancakes; galbi barbecued beef; and bibimbap, rice with mixed vegetable. In her ethnographic journey, Ryang discovers how the chewy noodles from Pyongyang continue to retain their texture and yet are served differently in different locales. Jeon pancakes become completely decontextualized in the United States and metamorphosed into a portable and packable carry-out food. American consumers are unaware of the pancakeAEs sacred origin.In Hawaii, Ryang fi nds that it is the Vietnamese restaurant that serves unexpectedly delicious galbi barbecued meat. Intertwined in the complex colonial and postcolonial contexts, Korean galbi and Japanese yakiniku can be found side by side on the streets of Honolulu frequented by both the locals and tourists. In writing Eating Korean in America: Gastronomic Ethnography of Authenticity , Sonia Ryang is as much an eater as a researcher. Her accounts of the cities and their distinctive take on Korean food are at once entertaining and insightful, yet deeply moving. Ryang challenges the reader to stop and think about the food we eat every day in close connection to colonial histories, ethnic displacements, and global capitalism.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780824839352 20160619
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xiv, 208 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Introduction
  • Public
  • Private
  • Beginnings
  • Endings
  • Rich
  • Poor
  • Fortune
  • Failure
  • Coda.
What is a hotel? As Caroline Field Levander and Matthew Pratt Guterl show us in this thought-provoking book, even though hotels are everywhere around us, we rarely consider their essential role in our modern existence and how they help frame our sense of who and what we are. They are, in fact, as centrally important as other powerful places like prisons, hospitals, or universities. More than simply structures made of steel, concrete, and glass, hotels are social and political institutions that we invest with overlapping and contradictory meaning. These alluring places uniquely capture the realities of our world, where the lines between public and private, labor and leisure, fortune and failure, desire and despair are regularly blurred. Guiding readers through the story of hotels as places of troublesome possibility, as mazelike physical buildings, as inspirational touchstones for art and literature, and as unsettling, even disturbing, backdrops for the drama of everyday life, Levander and Guterl ensure that we will never think about this seemingly ordinary place in the same way again.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781469621128 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
xv, 246 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 29 cm
  • The collection : African American cookbooks, 1827-2011
  • 19th century cookbooks : cookbooks break a stereotype
  • 1900-1925, surviving mammyism
  • 1926-1950, the servant problem : dual messages
  • 1951-1960, lifting as we climb : tea cakes, finger sandwiches, community service, and civil rights
  • 1961-1970, soul food : mama's cooking leaves home for the city
  • 1971-1980, simple pleasures and the soul food revival
  • 1981-1990, mammy's makeover : the ever useful life
  • 1991-2011, the hope of Jemima.
Women of African descent have contributed to America s food culture for centuries, but their rich and varied involvement is still overshadowed by the demeaning stereotype of an illiterate Aunt Jemima who cooked mostly by natural instinct. To discover the true role of black women in the creation of American, and especially southern, cuisine, Toni Tipton-Martin has spent years amassing one of the world s largest private collections of cookbooks published by African American authors, looking for evidence of their impact on American food, families, and communities and for ways we might use that knowledge to inspire community wellness of every kind."The Jemima Code" presents more than 150 black cookbooks that range from a rare 1827 house servant s manual, the first book published by an African American in the trade, to modern classics by authors such as Edna Lewis and Vertamae Grosvenor. The books are arranged chronologically and illustrated with photos of their covers; many also display selected interior pages, including recipes. Tipton-Martin provides notes on the authors and their contributions and the significance of each book, while her chapter introductions summarize the cultural history reflected in the books that follow. These cookbooks offer firsthand evidence that African Americans cooked creative masterpieces from meager provisions, educated young chefs, operated food businesses, and nourished the African American community through the long struggle for human rights. "The Jemima Code" transforms America s most maligned kitchen servant into an inspirational and powerful model of culinary wisdom and cultural authority.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292745483 20160618
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xv, 246 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
  • Nineteenth-century cookbooks : breaking a stereotype
  • 1900-1925, surviving mammyism : cooking lessons for work and home
  • 1926-1950, the servant problem : dual messages
  • 1951-1960, lifting as we climb : tea cakes, finger sandwiches, community service, and civil rights
  • 1961-1970, soul food : mama's cooking leaves home for the city
  • 1971-1980, simple pleasures : a soul food revival
  • 1981-1990, mammy's makeover : the ever useful life
  • 1991-2011, the hope of Jemima.
Women of African descent have contributed to America s food culture for centuries, but their rich and varied involvement is still overshadowed by the demeaning stereotype of an illiterate Aunt Jemima who cooked mostly by natural instinct. To discover the true role of black women in the creation of American, and especially southern, cuisine, Toni Tipton-Martin has spent years amassing one of the world s largest private collections of cookbooks published by African American authors, looking for evidence of their impact on American food, families, and communities and for ways we might use that knowledge to inspire community wellness of every kind."The Jemima Code" presents more than 150 black cookbooks that range from a rare 1827 house servant s manual, the first book published by an African American in the trade, to modern classics by authors such as Edna Lewis and Vertamae Grosvenor. The books are arranged chronologically and illustrated with photos of their covers; many also display selected interior pages, including recipes. Tipton-Martin provides notes on the authors and their contributions and the significance of each book, while her chapter introductions summarize the cultural history reflected in the books that follow. These cookbooks offer firsthand evidence that African Americans cooked creative masterpieces from meager provisions, educated young chefs, operated food businesses, and nourished the African American community through the long struggle for human rights. "The Jemima Code" transforms America s most maligned kitchen servant into an inspirational and powerful model of culinary wisdom and cultural authority.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780292745483 20160618
Law Library (Crown)
Book
292 pages : illustrations ; 23 cm
  • Setting a course
  • Organizing and protecting your materials
  • Adjusting recipes
  • Working with regional or world recipes
  • Interviews and cooking visits
  • Orphaned recipes and conducting research
  • Sharing family recipes and foodways.
Heirloom dishes and family food traditions are rich sources of nostalgia and provide vivid ways to learn about our families' past, yet they can be problematic. Many family recipes and food traditions are never documented in written or photographic form, existing only as unwritten know-how and lore that vanishes when a cook dies. Even when recipes are written down, they often fail to give the tricks and tips that would allow another cook to accurately replicate the dish. Unfortunately, recipes are also often damaged as we plunk Grandma's handwritten cards on the countertop next to a steaming pot or a spattering mixer, shortening their lives. This book is a guide for gathering, adjusting, supplementing, and safely preservingfamily recipes and for interviewing relatives, collecting oral histories, and conducting kitchen visits to document family food traditions from the everyday to special occasions. It blends commonsense tips with sound archival principles, helping you achieve effective results while avoiding unnecessary pitfalls. Chaptersare also dedicated to unfamiliar regional or ethnic cooking challenges, as well as to working with recipes that are "orphans, " surrogates, or terribly outdated. Whether you simply want to save a few accurate recipes, help yesterday's foodways evolve so they are relevant for today's table, or create an extensive family cookbook, this guidebook will help you to savor your memories.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780820330631 20160619
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
167 pages : 1 map ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvii, 326 pages : illustrations, maps, portraits ; 23 cm
  • Hell on earth, 1897-1898
  • Saloon reform, 1899-1901
  • A restricted district, 1901
  • Behind red curtains, 1901-1906
  • Nurturing vice, 1902-1905
  • Saloons and the working class, 1902-1908
  • The closing of the Seventh Avenue District, 1909-1910
  • The Alaska Street District, 1910-1914
  • Women's suffrage and the end of vice, 1910-1917
  • Retrospect, 1918.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xxiii, 61 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 225 pages : illustrations, map ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction: The richness of eating
  • Disease and modernities
  • Nutritional black-boxing
  • Care of the social
  • Contemporary body counts
  • Bodies in balance
  • Many values of health
  • Conclusion: The opposite of obesity.
A woman with hypertension refuses vegetables. A man with diabetes adds iron-fortified sugar to his coffee. As death rates from heart attacks, strokes, and diabetes in Latin America escalate, global health interventions increasingly emphasize nutrition, exercise, and weight loss - but much goes awry as ideas move from policy boardrooms and clinics into everyday life. Based on years of intensive fieldwork, The Weight of Obesity offers poignant stories of how obesity is lived and experienced by Guatemalans who have recently found their diets - and their bodies - radically transformed. Anthropologist Emily Yates-Doerr challenges the widespread view that health can be measured in calories and pounds, offering an innovative understanding of what it means to be healthy in post-colonial Latin America. Through vivid descriptions of how people reject global standards and embrace fatness as desirable, this book interferes with contemporary biomedicine, adding depth to how we theorize structural violence. It is essential reading for anyone who cares about the politics of healthy eating.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780520286818 20160619
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
31 pages : colour illustrations ; 30 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
205 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.
  • Feeding the North / by Kelly J. Sisson Lessens and Adam Arenson
  • Seeing the Civil War era through its cookbooks: Mary Hooker Cornelius, The young housekeeper's friend (Boston : Taggard & Thompson, 1863); Mrs. S.G. Knight, Tit-bits, or, How to prepare a nice dish at a moderate expense (Boston : Crosby and Nichols, 1864); P.K.S., What to do with the cold mutton : a book of réchauffés, together with many other approved receipts for the kitchen of a gentleman of moderate income (New York : Bunce and Huntington, Publishers, 1865); Ann Howe, The American kitchen directory and housewife (Cincinnati : howe's Subscription Book Concern, 1868); What shall we eat? A manual for housekeepers, comprising a bill of fare for breakfast, dinner, and tea, for every day in the year (New York : G.P. Putnam & Son, 1868)
  • Glossary of nineteenth-century cooking terms.
Cookbooks offer a unique and valuable way to examine American life. Their lessons, however, are not always obvious. Direct references to the American Civil War were rare in cookbooks, even in those published right in the middle of it. In part, this is a reminder that lives went on and that dinner still appeared on most tables most nights, no matter how much the world was changing outside. But people accustomed to thinking of cookbooks as a source for recipes, and not much else, can be surprised by how much information they can reveal about the daily lives and ways of thinking of the people who wrote and used them. In this fascinating historical compilation, excerpts from five Civil War-era cookbooks present a compelling portrait of cooking and eating in the urban north of the 1860s United States.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611861228 20160617
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
vi, 275 pages : illustrations, maps ; 23 cm
  • Maygrass (Phalaris caroliniana Walt.) : its role and significance in native eastern North American agriculture / Gayle J. Fritz
  • Goosefoot (Chenopodium) / Kristen J. Gremillion
  • Sumpweed or marshelder (Iva annua) / Gail E. Wagner and Peter H. Carrington
  • Agave (Agave spp.): a crop lost and found in the US-Mexico borderlands / Suzanne K. Fish and Paul R. Fish
  • Little barley grass (Hordeum pusillum Nutt.) : a prehispanic new world domesticate lost to history / Karen R. Adams
  • Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) / Emily McClung de Tapia, Diana Martínez-Yrizar, and Carmen Cristina Adriano-Morán
  • Arrowroot (Maranta arundinacea) and leren (Calathea latifolia), marantaceae / Deborah M. Pearsall
  • Panicum sumatrense : the forgotten millet / Steven A. Weber and Arunima Kashyap
  • Bitter vetch (Vicia ervilia) : ancient medicinal crop and farmers' favorite for feeding livestock / Naomi F. MIller and Dirk Enneking.
Over many millennia, farmers across the world have domesticated literally thousands of species and developed tens of thousands of varieties of these plants. Despite the astonishing agricultural diversity that existed long ago, the world s current food base has narrowed to a dangerous level. By studying the long and dynamic history of farming in the ancient past, archaeology can play a part in helping ensure the stability of the human food supply by identifying once-important crops and showing where and how such crops were grown in the past. Thanks to this work, extinct crops might even be redomesticated from their wild progenitors. New Lives for Ancient and Extinct Crops profiles nine plant species that were important contributors to human diets and had medicinal uses in antiquity: maygrass, chenopod, marshelder, agave, little barley, chia, arrowroot, little millet, and bitter vetch. Each chapter is written by a well-known scholar, who illustrates the global value of the ancient crop record to inform the present. From eastern and western North America, Mesoamerica, South America, western Asia, and south-central Asia, the contributors provide examples of the unexpected wealth of information available in the archaeological record about ancient and extinct crops.".
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780816530625 20161003
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
51 pages : color illustrations ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)