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Book
166 pages : color illustrations ; 25 cm
  • Preface Introduction 1. The History of 3D Printing in Relation to the Visual Arts 2. An Overview of Current 3D Printing Technologies: What Each Offers and How They Might Develop in the Future 3. Crafts and Craftspeople Case Study: Jack Row Case Study: Marianne Forrest Case Study: Michael Eden 4. The Fine Arts Case Study: Sophie Kahn Case Study: Jonathan Monaghan Case Study: Mat Collishaw Case Study: Sebastian Burdon 5. Design and Designers: Case Studies from Contemporary Designers Case Study: Assa Ashuach Case Study: Laura Alvarado and Vivian Meller Case Study: Lionel Dean Case Study: Dr Peter Walters 6. Hackspaces, Fablabs and Makerspaces, Art Research: The COllaborative and More Public Face of 3D Printing and its Future in the Arts Case Study: Don Undeen 7. Fashion and Animation Case Study: Michael Schmidt 8. Conclusion Glossary Further Reading List Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474248723 20180306
Fully revised and with a new chapter and international case studies, this second edition of the best-selling book traces how artists and designers continue to adapt and incorporate 3D printing technology into their work and explains how the creative industries are directly interfacing with this new technology. Covering a broad range of applied art practice - from fine art and furniture-design to film-making - Stephen Hoskins introduces some of his groundbreaking research from the Centre for Fine Print Research along with an updated history of 3D print technology, a new chapter on fashion and animation, and new case studies featuring artists working with metal, plastic, ceramic and other materials. A fascinating investigation into how the applied arts continue to adapt to new technologies and a forecast of what developments we might expect in the future, this book is essential reading for students, researchers studying contemporary art and design and professionals involved in the creative industries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781474248723 20180306
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
ix, 324 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm.
The engineers who built the first generations of modern textile machines, between 1770 and 1850, pushed at the boundaries of possibility. This book investigates these pioneering machine-makers, almost all working within textile communities in northern England, and the industry they created. It probes their origins and skills, the sources of their inspiration and impetus, and how it was possible to develop a high-tech, factory-centred, world-leading market in textile machinery virtually from scratch. The story of textile engineering defies classical assumptions about the driving forces behind the Industrial Revolution. The circumstances of its birth, and the personal affiliations at work during periods of exceptional creativity, suggest that the potential to accelerate economic growth could be found within social assets and craft skills. Appreciating textile engineering within its own time and context challenges views inherited from Victorian thinkers, who tended to ascribe to it features of the fully fledged industry they saw before them. The Age of Machinery is an engagingly written account of the trade in its key northern centres, devoid of jargon and yet tightly argued, equally rich with historical narrative and analysis. It will be invaluable not only to students and scholars of British economic history and the Industrial Revolution but also to social scientists looking at human agency and its contribution to economic growth and innovation. GILLIAN COOKSON holds a DPhil in economic history and has been employed since 1995 in academic research and consultancy, including as county editor, Victoria County History of Durham.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781783272761 20180312
Green Library
Book
xv, 263 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • List of figures Acknowledgements List of abbreviations Introduction Part 1 - The fundamentals of GDR design 1 - Aims and priorities 2 - Institutional support Part 2 - Exemplary ideas and practices 3 - Designing for complex functionality 4 - Designing for appropriate product lifespans 5 - Designing systems Part 3 - Resistance encountered by GDR designers 6 - Cultural-political resistance 7 - Obstacles in the spheres of production and distribution Conclusion Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138187917 20180306
How does industrial design operate outside of capitalist consumer culture? Designing for Socialist Need assembles a detailed picture of industrial design practice in the socialist German Democratic Republic (GDR). Drawing on much previously unexplored material from a wide variety of sources, it not only maps out some of the ideological, institutional and economic contexts within which GDR design functioned, it also critically reconstructs the designers' aims and perspectives in order to argue that they shared a profoundly socially responsible approach to design. By focusing on their ideas and approaches, this volume attends to the previously unacknowledged intellectual and practical richness of GDR design culture and demonstrates that it can provide pertinent insights not only for scholars of GDR history or German design, but also for contemporary design practitioners, theorists and educators with an interest in sustainability in design.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138187917 20180306
Green Library
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Introduction PART I: FIBRE AND YARN SELECTION 2. Fibre selection 3. Specialty/functional/high-performance fibres 4. High performance blends 5. Fabric structure and properties 6. Fibre-to-yarn predictions PART II: ENGINEERING OF HIGH PERFORMANCE FABRICS 7. Fabric types: woven, knitted or nonwoven? 8. Colour fastness 9. Warmth without the weight 10. Moisture absorption and transport 11. Easy-care fabrics 12. Stretch fit and compression 13. Pilling resistant knitwear 14. Fire retardant fabrics 15. Impact resistant fabrics 16. Camouflage fabrics 17. Insect repellent fabrics 18. Conductive textiles 19. Filtration fabrics 20. Fabrics for reinforcement of engineering composites.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780081012734 20180306
Engineering of High-Performance Textiles discusses the fiber-to-fabric engineering of various textile products. Each chapter focuses on practical guidelines and approaches for common issues in textile research and development. The book discusses high-performance fibers and yarns before presenting the engineering fabrics and architectures needed for particular properties required of high-performance textiles. Properties covered include moisture absorption, pilling resistant knitwear, fire retardant fabrics, camouflage fabrics, insect repellent fabrics, filtration, and many more. Coordinated by two highly distinguished editors, this book is a practical resource for all those engaged in textile research, development and production, for both traditional and new-generation textile products, and for academics involved in research into textile science and technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780081012734 20180306
Book
1 online resource.
  • 1. Introduction PART I: FIBRE AND YARN SELECTION 2. Fibre selection 3. Specialty/functional/high-performance fibres 4. High performance blends 5. Fabric structure and properties 6. Fibre-to-yarn predictions PART II: ENGINEERING OF HIGH PERFORMANCE FABRICS 7. Fabric types: woven, knitted or nonwoven? 8. Colour fastness 9. Warmth without the weight 10. Moisture absorption and transport 11. Easy-care fabrics 12. Stretch fit and compression 13. Pilling resistant knitwear 14. Fire retardant fabrics 15. Impact resistant fabrics 16. Camouflage fabrics 17. Insect repellent fabrics 18. Conductive textiles 19. Filtration fabrics 20. Fabrics for reinforcement of engineering composites.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780081012734 20180306
Engineering of High-Performance Textiles discusses the fiber-to-fabric engineering of various textile products. Each chapter focuses on practical guidelines and approaches for common issues in textile research and development. The book discusses high-performance fibers and yarns before presenting the engineering fabrics and architectures needed for particular properties required of high-performance textiles. Properties covered include moisture absorption, pilling resistant knitwear, fire retardant fabrics, camouflage fabrics, insect repellent fabrics, filtration, and many more. Coordinated by two highly distinguished editors, this book is a practical resource for all those engaged in textile research, development and production, for both traditional and new-generation textile products, and for academics involved in research into textile science and technology.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780081012734 20180306
Book
1 online resource.
Handbook of Properties of Textile and Technical Fibres, Second Edition introduces tensile properties and failure and testing of fibers, also examining tensile properties and the failure of natural fibers, such as cotton, hemp, flax, agave, wool and silk. Next, the book discusses the tensile properties and failure of synthetic fibers, ranging from polyamide, polyester, polyethylene and carbon fibers. Chapters provide a general background of the fiber, including its manufacture, microstructure, factors that affect tensile properties and methods to improve tensile failure. With its distinguished editor and international contributors, this book is an important reference for fiber scientists, textile technologists, engineers and academics.
Book
1 online resource.
  • About the Author Preface to the Second Edition Preface to the First Edition Chapter 1. Introduction 1.1 High Temperature Environment References Chapter 2. Fundamental Concepts 2.1 Thermodynamic Concepts 2.2 Concept of Kinetics 2.3 Crystal Structure 2.4 Equilibrium Phases 2.5 Mechanical Behavior References Chapter 3. Substrate Materials 3.1 Temperature Capability of metal, alloys, intermetallics, ceramics, and composites 3.2 Strengthening Mechanisms 3.3 Titanium Alloys 3.4 Steels 3.5 Nickel-Iron Alloys 3.6 Nickel and Cobalt base Superalloys 3.7 Ceramics, Refractory Intermetallics & Composites 3.8 Need for Coatings References Chapter 4. Oxidation 4.1 Oxidation Process 4.2 Oxidation Testing and Evaluation 4.3 Oxidation of Alloys 4.4 Role of Specific Alloying Constituents 4.5 Oxidation in the Presence of Water vapor 4.6 Oxidation of Polycrystalline Alloys versus Single Crystals 4.7 Oxidation of Intermetallic ï §TiAl References Chapter 5. High temperature corrosion 5.1 Hot Corrosion Process 5.2 Hot Corrosion of Metals and Alloys 5.3 Role of Specific Alloying Elements in Hot Corrosion of Ni and Co Based Alloys and 5.4 Influence of Other Contaminants 5.5 Hot Corrosion of TBC 5.6 Hot Corrosion - like Degradation References Chapter 6. Oxidation & corrosion resistant coatings 6.1 Requirements for Metallic Coatings 6.2 Coatings Processes 6.3 Diffusion Coatings 6.4 Overlay Coatings 6.5 Overlay Coatings by Spray and Arc Processes 6.6 Overlay Coatings by Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) 6.7 Relative Oxidation and Corrosion Resistance of Coatings 6.8 Modeling of Oxidation and Corrosion Life 6.9 Interaction of Erosion - Oxidation and Erosion - Corrosion References Chapter 7. Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) 7.1 Temperature Reduction by TBC 7.2 Materials Requirements for TBC 7.3 Partially Stabilized Zirconia 7.4 Plasma Sprayed TBC 7.5 Electron Beam Physical Vapor deposited (EB-PVD) TBC 7.6 Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBC) References Chapter 8 . Nondestructive Inspection of Coatings 8.1 NDI Techniques References Chapter 9. Coatings repair 9.1 Limits to Coatings Repair 9.2 The Repair Process 9.3 Recoating and Material Restoration References Chapter 10. Field And Simulated Field Experience 10.1 Gas Turbine Engine Application 10.2 Other Applications 10.3 New Field Observation on Gas Turbine Engine Hot section Parts References APPENDIX A1 Abradable Blade Outer Air Seal (BOAS) A2 Metal and Ceramic Coating Surface Temperature as Functions of Coating Thickness and Ceramic Coating Thermal Conductivity A3 A Simple Microstructure based Model to explain the difference in Thermal Conductivity between APS and EB-PVD TBC A4 Sol Gel Process for deposition of Zirconia based topcoat of TBC Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128046227 20180213
High Temperature Coatings, Second Edition, demonstrates how to counteract the thermal effects of rapid corrosion and degradation of exposed materials and equipment that can occur under high operating temperatures. This is the first true practical guide on the use of thermally protective coatings for high-temperature applications, including the latest developments in materials used for protective coatings. It covers the make-up and behavior of such materials under thermal stress and the methods used for applying them to specific types of substrates, as well as invaluable advice on inspection and repair of existing thermal coatings. With his long experience in the aerospace gas turbine industry, the author has compiled the very latest in coating materials and coating technologies, as well as hard-to-find guidance on maintaining and repairing thermal coatings, including appropriate inspection protocols. The book is supplemented with the latest reference information and additional support to help readers find more application- and industry-type coatings specifications and uses.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128046227 20180213
Book
1 online resource (xiv, 488 pages) : illustrations.
  • Front Cover; High-Performance Apparel: Materials, Development, and Applications; Copyright; Contents; List of contributors; Foreword; Preface; Chapter 1: Introduction; Part One: High-Performance Fabric, Materials, and Manufacture; Chapter 2: Fibers used for high-performance apparel; 2.1. Introduction; 2.2. Consideration of high-performance apparel; 2.3. Fiber: complex structure; 2.3.1. Natural fibers; 2.3.2. Animal fibers; 2.3.3. Manufactured fibers; 2.4. Characteristics of textile fibers; 2.4.1. Gross morphology; 2.4.2. Chemical structure of fibers; 2.5. Key properties of textile fibers
  • 2.5.1. Physical properties2.5.1.1. Length and fineness; 2.5.1.2. Moisture absorption; 2.5.1.3. Texture; 2.5.1.4. Static electricity; 2.5.1.5. Crimp; 2.5.2. Mechanical properties; 2.5.2.1. Abrasion; 2.5.2.2. Dimensional stability; 2.5.2.3. Elastic recovery; 2.5.2.4. Resiliency; 2.5.2.5. Tenacity; 2.5.3. Chemical properties; 2.5.3.1. Absorbency and wicking; 2.6. Cellulose fibers; 2.6.1. Applications of cotton for high-performance apparel: ventile fabrics; 2.6.2. Moleskin fabrics: manufacture and properties; 2.6.3. Flax; 2.7. Protein fibers; 2.7.1. Silk fibers; 2.8. Synthetic fibers
  • 2.8.1. Viscose Fiber2.8.2. Polyester fiber; 2.8.3. Nylon fiber; 2.9. High-performance fibers; 2.9.1. Meta-aramid: nomex (dupont); 2.9.1.1. Nomex; 2.9.2. Para-aramid: kevlar (dupont); 2.9.2.1. Kevlar; 2.9.3. High density polyethylene-HDPE: dyneema; 2.9.4. High-performance inorganic fibers; 2.9.4.1. Glass fibers; 2.9.4.2. Carbon fiber: PAN (polyacylonitrile); 2.10. Future trends; References; Chapter 3: Yarn and thread manufacturing methods for high-performance apparel; 3.1. Introduction; 3.1.1. Yarns for high-performance apparel applications; 3.2. Staple yarns
  • 3.2.1. Short-staple (cotton) spinning3.2.2. Long-staple (worsted) spinning; 3.2.3. Variable staple (woollen) spinning; 3.2.4. Prespinning operations; 3.2.4.1. Blow room; 3.2.4.2. Carding; 3.2.4.3. Drawing; 3.2.4.4. Combing; 3.2.4.5. Roving; 3.2.4.6. Tow-to-top; 3.2.5. Spinning methods; 3.2.5.1. Ring spinning; 3.2.5.2. Rotor spinning; 3.2.5.3. Friction spinning; 3.2.5.4. Air-jet/vortex spinning; 3.2.6. Postspinning operations; 3.2.6.1. Winding; 3.2.6.2. Plied and cabled yarns; 3.3. Filament yarns; 3.3.1. Monofilament yarn; 3.3.2. Multifilament yarn; 3.4. Composite yarns; 3.4.1. Core spinning
  • 3.4.2. Wrap spinning3.5. Key yarn properties; 3.5.1. Linear density (count); 3.5.2. Twist; 3.5.3. Tensile strength; 3.5.4. Evenness; 3.6. Sewing threads; 3.6.1. Twist content; 3.6.2. Twist direction; 3.6.3. Plied and corded threads; 3.6.4. Staple-spun threads; 3.6.5. Core-spun threads; 3.6.6. Continuous filament threads; 3.6.7. Thread counts; 3.6.8. Lubrication; 3.6.9. Mercerized cotton thread; 3.6.10. Glace cotton thread; 3.6.11. Thread extensibility; 3.6.12. Thread packages; 3.6.13. Thread quality; 3.6.13.1. Evenness; 3.6.13.2. Tensile properties; Loop strength; Loop strength ratio
Book
xiv, 328 pages : illustrations ; [ca. 23-29] cm
  • Introduction and Background. Introduction to Laser-Based Additive Manufacturing Technologies. Recent Advances in laser-Based Additive Manufacturing. Process Fundamentals and the Mechanical Properties of Manufactured Parts. Microstructural and Mechanical Properties. Fatigue Behavior. Post Manufacturing Treatments. Laser Power Transfer and Thermal Monitoring. Summary of Process and Part Characterization. Design, Optimization, and Control. Part CAD. Process Optimization. Process Control. Uncertainty Qualification. Summary of Design Optimization and Control. Advanced Topics. Functionally Graded Materials. Applications of Additive Manufacturing.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498739993 20171218
Laser-Based Additive Manufacturing (LBAM) technologies, hailed by some as the "third industrial revolution, " can increase product performance, while reducing time-to-market and manufacturing costs. This book is a comprehensive look at new technologies in LBAM of metal parts, covering topics such as mechanical properties, microstructural features, thermal behavior and solidification, process parameters, optimization and control, uncertainty quantification, and more. The book is aimed at addressing the needs of a diverse cross-section of engineers and professionals.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498739993 20171218
Book
1 online resource (xxiii, 638 pages) : illustrations
  • PrefaceAcknowledgementsPART 1: FUNDAMENTALSChapter 1: Chemistry of Process SafetyChapter 2: Thermodynamics and Thermochemistry of Process SafetyChapter 3: Reaction Engineering for Process SafetyChapter 4: Fluid-Dynamics for Process SafetyChapter 5: Loads and Stress Analysis for Process SafetyChapter 6: Statistics and Reliability for Process SafetyPART 2: CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENTChapter 7: Source ModelsChapter 8: Dispersion ModelsChapter 9: FireChapter 10: ExplosionsChapter 11: Dust ExplosionsPART 3: QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENTChapter 12: Quantitative Risk AssessmentIndex.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780081012284 20171211
Process Safety Calculations is an essential guide for process safety engineers involved in calculating and predicting risks and consequences. The book focuses on calculation procedures based on basic chemistry, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, conservation equations, kinetics and practical models. This book provides helpful calculations to demonstrate compliance with regulations and standards. Standards such as Seveso directive(s)/COMAH, CLP regulation, ATEX directives, PED directives, REACH regulation, OSHA/NIOSH and UK ALARP are covered, along with risk and consequence assessment, stoichiometry, thermodynamics, stress analysis and fluid-dynamics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780081012284 20171211
Book
256 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 27 cm
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
1 online resource#x1E.
With a particular focus on both commercial and premarket tools, this comprehensive and authoritative book examines the emerging market of 3D-printed biomaterials and its clinical applications. -- Edited summary from book.
Book
pages ; cm
  • Introduction. How do 3D Printing Work? Design of a 3D Printer. Calibrating the Printer. Materials for 3D Printers. Classifications of RP & 3DP Systems. Scanning and Reverse Engineering. Common Applications of 3D Printers. 3D Printing in Medicine. How to Select RP and 3DP.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498783750 20171218
3D Printing is a faster, more cost-effective method for building prototypes from three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) drawings. 3D Printing provides a fundamental overview of the general product design and manufacturing process and presents the technology and application for designing and fabricating parts in a format that makes learning easy. This user-friendly book clearly covers the 3D printing process for designers, teachers, students, and hobbyists and can also be used as a reference book in a product design and process development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498783750 20171218
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF.
  • 1 INTRODUCTION Acceptance Quality Control Acceptance Control and Process Control Process Quality Control Background of Acceptance Quality Control Top Ten Reasons for Acceptance Sampling References Problems 2â PROBABILITY AND THE OPERATING CHARACTERISTIC CURVE Probability Classical Definition Empirical Definition Subjective Definition Random Samples and Random Numbers Counting Possibilities Probability Calculus The Operating Characteristic Curve Software Applications Excel Minitab References Problems 3â PROBABILITY FUNCTIONS Probability Distributions Measures of Distribution Functions Hypergeometric Distribution Binomial Distribution Poisson Distribution f-Binomial Distribution Negative Binomial Distribution Exponential and Continuous Distributions Weibull Distribution Normal Distribution Summary of Distributions Tables of Distributions Hypergeometric Tables Binomial Tables Poisson Tables Negative Binomial Tables Normal Distribution Tables Summary Useful Approximations Tests of Fit Software Applications Excel Minitab References Problems 4â CONCEPTS AND TERMINOLOGY Average Run Length of Type B Plans Samples Size and Lot Size Effect of Inspection Error Rectification Curtailment Tolerance and Confidence Intervals Levels and Risks Choosing Quality Levels Classification of Defects Measures of Sampling Plans: Terminology Graphs of Measures Specifying a Plan Software Applications Minitab References Problems 5â SINGLE SAMPLING BY ATTRIBUTES Operation Selection Table of Poisson Unity Values Binomial Nomograph f- Binomial Nomograph Thorndyke Chart Hypergeometric Tables Measures Software Applications Excel Minitab Statgraphics References Problems 6â DOUBLE AND MULTIPLE SAMPLING BY ATTRIBUTES Operation Double Sampling Multiple Sampling Selection Measures Double Sampling Multiple Sampling Further Considerations Software Applications Excel Minitab Statgraphics References Problems 7â SEQUENTIAL SAMPLING BY ATTRIBUTES Operation Selection Measures Sequential Sampling for Defects per Unit Software Applications Excel References Problems 8â VARIABLES SAMPLING FOR PROCESS PARAMETER Single Sampling for Process Parameter Acceptance Control Charts Sequential Plans for Process Parameter (ï ³ Known) Sequential Plans for Process Parameter (ï ³ Unknown) Cumulative Sum Charts References Problems 9â BULK SAMPLING Construction of the Sample Estimation Sampling Plans Simple Random Sampling of Unique Lot (Components of Variance Unknown) Sampling from Stream of Lots Estimation of Testing and Reduction Variances Estimation of Segment and Increment Variances Application of Plan to Stream of Lots References Problems 10â SAMPLING BY VARIABLES FOR PROPORTION NONCONFORMING Specification Limits Assumptions and Theory Operation Method k Method Double Specification Limits Selection Tables Formulas Jacobson Nomograph for Plan Selection Measures Jacobson Nomograph for Operating Characteristics Calculation: ï ³ Known Calculation: ï ³ Unknown Double Specification Limits Measures of Performance M Method Plans Based on Sample Range Double Sampling by Variables Tolerance Intervals and Variables Plans for Percent Nonconforming Sequential Plans for Proportion Nonconforming Further Considerations Derivation of n, k Formulas Need for Normality Software Applications Minitab Statgraphics References Problems 11â ATTRIBUTES SAMPLING SCHEMES Sampling Schemes Quick Switching Systems TNT Plans Mil-Std-105E and Derivative Standards Operation Selection Measures Scheme Properties Implementation of MIL-STD-105E Matching Individual Sampling Plans to MIL-STD-105E System Performance MIL-STD-105 Derivatives Further Considerations Software Applications Minitab Snap Sampling Plans! Statgraphics References Problems 12â VARIABLES SAMPLING SCHEMES Mil-Std-414 Operation Selection Measures Implementation of Form 2 Implementation of Form 1 Implementation of Plans for Range and Variability Known Match Between MIL-STD-414 and MIL-STD-105E Conversion of MIL-STD-414 to ANSI/ASQ Z1.9 MIL-STD-414 Derivatives Further Considerations Software Applications Excel Minitab Statgraphics References Problems 13â SPECIAL PLANS AND PROCEDURES No-Calc Plans Lot Plot Plans Narrow Limit Gauging Mixed Variables - Attributes Plan Advantages and Disadvantages of Mixed Plans Generalized Mixed Dependent Procedure Measures: Independent Mixed Plan Measures: Dependent Mixed Plan Mil-Std-414 Dependent Mixed Plans Comparison of Independent and Dependent Mixed Plans Comparison of Mixed and Other Type Plans References Problems 14â SERIES OF LOTS: RECTIFICATION SCHEMES Single-Sampling AOQL Plan Dodge-Romig Sampling Scheme Operation Selection Measures Further Considerations Constructing LTPD Plan With Minimum ATI Constructing AOQL Plan With Minimum ATI Anscombe Rectifying Inspection Procedure Operation Selection Measures Credit-Based Schemes Dodge-Romig Plan Derivatives Software Applications Excel Snap Sampling Plans! References Problems 15â CONTINUOUS SAMPLING PLANS Dodge Continuous Plans Dodge CSP-1 Dodge-Torrey CSP-2 and CSP-3 Measures of CSP-1, 2, 3 Stopping Rules and Selection of CSP-1 Plans Multi-Level Plans Tightened Multi-Level Plans Block Continuous Plans Wald-Wolfowitz Plan Girshick Plan MIL-STD-1235B MIL-STD-1235B Derivatives Software Applications Excel Snap Sampling Plans! References Problems 16â CUMULATIVE RESULTS PLANS Skip-Lot Sampling Plans SkSP-1 SkSP-2 Chain Sampling Plans ChSP-1 Two-Stage Plans Deferred Sentencing Schemes Demerit Rating Plan Cumulative Results Criterion Plan (CRC) Software Applications Excel References Problems 17â COMPLIANCE SAMPLING Lot Sensitive Sampling Plan (LSP) Procedure Protection Producer's Risk Examples of LSP Applications Further Considerations Tightened-Normal-Tightened (TNT) Scheme Procedure Protection Selection Quick Switching System (QSS) Mil-Std-1916 Structure Operation Implementation Measures Further Considerations Simplified Grand Lot Procedure Simon's Approach Simplified Procedure: Attributes Simplified Procedure: Variables Continuing Series of Lots Further Considerations Accept on Zero (AoZ) Plans U. S. Department of Defense Approach Squeglia Plans AOZ and AQL Plans Chain Sampling Alternative The Zero Acceptance Number Chained Quick Switching System Summary Software Applications Excel LSP Plans TNT Plans QSS Plans MIL-STD-1916 Plans Chain Sampling Alternative Plans Zero Acceptance Number Chained Quick Switching System Plans Minitab Snap Sampling Plans! LSP Plans Squeglia Plans Statgraphics MIL-STD-1916 Plans References Problems 18â RELIABILITY SAMPLING Censored Sampling Variables Plans for Life Testing and Reliability Handbook H-108 Operation Failure Terminated Time Terminated Sequential Proportion Failing by Specified Time Selection Example of H-108 Application Failure Terminated Time Terminated Sequential Proportion of Lot Failing by Specified Time Measures Further Considerations Technical Report TR 7 Mean Life Criterion Hazard Rate Criterion Reliable Life Criterion TR 7 Tables Operation TR 7 with the Mil-Std-105E System Further Considerations References Problems 19â ADMINISTRATION OF ACCEPTANCE SAMPLING Selection and Implementation of a Sampling Procedure Determining Quality Levels Setting AQL Setting AOQL Setting IQ Setting LTPD (or LQ) Relation of Levels Setting PQL and CQL Economic Considerations Mandatory Standards Basic Principle of Administration References Problems APPENDIX TABLES ANSWERS TO PROBLEMS AUTHOR INDEX SUBJECT INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498733588 20171218
Acceptance Sampling in Quality Control, Third Edition presents the state of the art in the methodology of sampling while integrating both theory and best practices. It discusses various standards, including those from the ISO, MIL-STD and ASTM and explores how to set quality levels. The book also includes problems at the end of each chapter with solutions. This edition improves upon the previous editions especially in the areas of software applications and compliance sampling plans. New to the Third Edition: Numerous Microsoft Excel templates to address sampling plans are used. Commercial software applications are discussed at the end of many chapters. Discussion of quick switching systems has been expanded to account for the considerable recent activity in this area. Added discussion of zero acceptance number chained quick switching systems. ã ã .
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498733588 20171218
Book
xiv, 240 pages : illustrations (some color) ; [ca. 23-29] cm
  • Scope of the book Technology and 3D printing AICE, an approach to designing for Additive Manufacturing Impact of 3D printing Visual three-dimensional form Potential of Additive-Manufactured Products in Building Brands The future of Additive Manufacturing.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351767491 20171218
Additive manufacturing has matured from rapid prototyping through the now popular and "maker"-oriented 3D printing, recently commercialized and marketed. The terms describing this technology have changed over time, from "rapid prototyping" to "rapid manufacturing" to "additive manufacturing, " which reflects largely a focus on technology. This book discusses the uptake, use, and impact of the additive manufacturing and digital fabrication technology. It augments technical and business-oriented trends with those in product design and design studies. It includes a mix of disciplinary and transdisciplinary trends and is rich in case and design material. The chapters cover a range of design-centered views on additive manufacturing that are rarely addressed in the main conferences and publications, which are still mostly, and importantly, concerned with tools, technologies, and technical development. The chapters also reflect dialogues about transdisciplinarity and the inclusion of domains such as business and aesthetics, narrative, and technology critique. This is a great textbook for graduate students of design, engineering, computer science, marketing, and technology and also for those who are not students but are curious about and interested in what 3D printing really can be used for in the near future.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351767491 20171218
Book
1 online resource : text file, PDF.
  • Table of Contents Acknowledgments Dedication Preface SECTION I: INTRODUCTORY SECTION Chapter 1: From Traditional Manufacturing to Additive Manufacturing Adedeji B. Badiru Chapter 2: A Novice's Guide to 3D Printing Making the Process Less Magical and More Understandable Kim Brand Chapter 3: Comprehensive Project Management of High End Additive Manufacturing Equipment Adedeji B. Badiru Chapter 4: 3D-Printing Impacts on Systems Engineering In Defense Industry Jason Deters Chapter 5: 3D Printing Design Using Systems Engineering Bradford Shields and Vhance Valencia Chapter 6: Evaluation of Existing Modeling Software Shesh Srivatsa Chapter 7: Additive Manufacturing Research and Development Needs Shesh Srivatsa Chapter 8: Operational Aspects and Regulatory Gaps in Additive Manufacturing Adeola Adediran and Akinola Oyedele Chapter 9: Additive Manufacturing and Its Implications for Military Ethics John Mark Mattox Chapter 10: Additive manufacturing technologies: state of the art and trends Julien Gardan Chapter 11: A new global approach to design for additive manufacturing R. Ponche, J. Y. Hascoet, O. Kerbrat, P. Mognol Chapter 12: A new methodological framework for design for additive manufacturing Martin Kumke, Hagen Watschke and Thomas Vietor SECTION II: TECHNICAL SECTION Chapter 13: Development and Implementation of Metals Additive Manufacturing Ian D. Harris Chapter 14: Selective Laser Melting (SLM) of Ni-based Superalloys - A Mechanics of Materials Review Sanna F. Siddiqui, Abiodun A. Fasoro, and Ali P. Gordon Chapter 15: A Review on Powder Bed Fusion Technology of Metal Additive Manufacturing Valmik Bhavar, Prakash Kattire, Vinaykumar Patil, Shreyans Khot, Kiran Gujar, Rajkumar Singh Chapter 16: Additive Manufacturing of Titanium Alloys B. Dutta and Francis H. Froes Chapter 17: Ultrasonic Additive Manufacturing Paul J. Wolcott and Marcelo J. Dapino Chapter 18: Printing Components for Reciprocating Engine Applications Michael D. Kass and Mark W. Noakes Chapter 19: Developing Practical Additive Manufacturing Design Methods David Liu, Alan Jennings, K. Rekedal, David Walker, and H. Richards Chapter 20: Optical Diagnostics for Real-Time Monitoring and Feedback Control of Metal Additive Manufacturing Processes Glen P. Perram and Grady T. Phillips Chapter 21: 3D Printed Structures for Nano-Scale Research Tod V. Laurvick Chapter 22: Additive Manufacturing at the Micron Scale Ronald A. Coutu, Jr. Chapter 23: Computer Modeling of Sol-Gel Thin Film Deposition Using Finite Element Analysis Alex Li Chapter 24: Additive Manufacturing Technology Review: From Prototyping To Production Larry Dosser, Kevin Hartke, Ron Jacobson, and Sarah Payne Chapter 25: Mechanical Property Optimization of Fused Deposition Modeled Polylactic Acid Components via Design of Experiments Jonathan Torres and Ali P. Gordon Chapter 26: Laser powder bed fusion additive manufacturing of metals-- physics, computational, and materials challenges W. E. King, A. T. Anderson, R. M. Ferencz, N. E. Hodge, C. Kamath, S. A. Khairallah, and A. M. Rubenchik Chapter 27: Calculation of laser absorption by metal powders in additive manufacturing C. D. Boley, S. A. Khairallah, A. M. Rubenchik Chapter 28: The Accuracy and Surface Roughness of Spur Gears Processed by FDM Additive Manufacturing Junghsen Lieh, Bin Wang and Omotunji Badiru Chapter 29: Surface Roughness of Electron Beam Melting Ti-6Al-4v Effect on Ultrasonic Testing Evan Hanks, David Liu, and Anthony Palazotto Chapter 30: Dynamic Failure Properties of Additively Manufactured Stainless Steel Allison Dempsey, David Liu, Anthony Palazotto, and Rachel Abrahams Chapter 31: Fatigue Life of Selective Laser Melted and Hot Isostatically Pressed Ti-6Al-4v Absent of Surface Machining Kevin D. Rekedal and David Liu Chapter 32: Development and Implementation of Metals Additive Manufacturing Ian D. Harris Chapter 33: Laser powder-bed fusion additive manufacturing: physics of complex melt flow and formation mechanisms of pores, spatter, and denudation zones Saad A. Khairallah, Andrew T. Anderson, Alexander Rubenchik, and Wayne E. King Chapter 34: Measurement Science Needs for Real-time Control of Additive Manufacturing Powder Bed Fusion Processes Mahesh Mani, Shaw Feng, Brandon Lane, Alkan Donmez, Shawn Moylan, and Ronnie Fesperman Chapter 35: Denudation of metal powder layers in laser powder bed fusion processes Manyalibo J. Matthews, Gabe Guss, Saad Khairallah, Alexander M. Rubenchik, Philip J. Depond, and Wayne E. King Chapter 36: Tension-compression fatigue of an oxide/oxide ceramic composite at elevated temperature Marina B. Ruggles-Wrenn and R. L. Lanser Chapter 37: Effects of steam environment on fatigue behavior of two SiC/[SiC+Si3N4] ceramic composites at 1300 DegreesC Marina B. Ruggles-Wrenn and Vipul Sharma SECTION III: APPLICATION SECTION Chapter 38: 3D Product Design, Evaluation, Justification, and Integration Adedeji B. Badiru Chapter 39: 3D Printing Rises to the Occasion: ORNL group shows how it's done, one layer at a time Leo Williams Chapter 40: 3D Printing Implications for STEM education John L. Irwin Chapter 41: Additive Manufacturing Applicability for United States Air Force Civil Engineer Contingency Operations Seth N. Poulsen and Vhance V. Valencia Chapter 42: Additive Manufacturing Applications for Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) Using the Systems Engineering Spiral Process Model Tracy Meeks, Bradford Shields, Eric Holm, and Vhance Valencia Chapter 43: Proof-of-Concept Applications of Additive Manufacturing in Air Force Explosive Ordnance Disposal Training and Operations Abdulrahman Suliman Alwabel, Nathan Greiner, Sean Murphy, William Page, Shane Veitenheimer, and Vhance Valencia Chapter 44: Wing Design Utilizing Topology Optimization and Additive Manufacturing David Walker, David Liu, and Alan Jennings Chapter 45: Topology Optimization of a Penetrating Warhead William T. Graves, Jr., David Liu, and Anthony N. Palazotto Chapter 46: Iteration Revolution: DMLS Production Applications Erin Stone and Chad Cooper Chapter 47: Information Storage on Additive Manufactured Parts Larry Dosser, Kevin Hartke, Ron Jacobson, and Sarah Payne INDEX.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781482264098 20171218
Theoretical and practical interests in additive manufacturing (3D printing) are growing rapidly. Engineers and engineering companies now use 3D printing to make prototypes of products before going for full production. In an educational setting faculty, researchers, and students leverage 3D printing to enhance project-related products. Additive Manufacturing Handbook focuses on product design for the defense industry, which affects virtually every other industry. Thus, the handbook provides a wide range of benefits to all segments of business, industry, and government. Manufacturing has undergone a major advancement and technology shift in recent years.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781482264098 20171218
Book
1 online resource : illustrations.
  • 1. Carpet types and requirements [REPRINT] D. Whitefoot 2. Structure and properties of carpet fibres and yarns Sailen Kumar Chaudhuri 3. Advances in carpet weaving Kristof De Ruyck 4. Tufting techniques and yarn manufacture Kristof De Ruyck 5. Recycling carpet materials Mohsen Miraftab 6. Developments in wool carpet manufacture [REPRINT] E.J. Wood 7. Developments in textile sports surfaces [REPRINT] Gustaaf Schoukens 8. Reducing static electricity in carpets Jeremy Smallwood 9. Carpets for improved acoustics and sound absorption Paul Bakker 10. Functional finish for value added carpets Mangesh Teli 11. Developments in handmade carpets: introduction K. K. Goswami 12. Developments in handmade carpets: design and manufacture K. K. Goswami 13. Developments in the thermal processing of carpets [REPRINT] Wallace Carr, Hongming Ding, Fred L. Cook 14. Carpets from the buyer's viewpoint Dietrich Kebschull 15. Processing and finishing in carpet R. K. Malik 16. Carpet cleaning and maintenance Agnes Zsednai 17. Carpet quality and durability S. K. Gupta 18. Emerging technologies in a carpet and textiles context R. Chattopadhyay 19. Classification of carpets Bholanath Baranwal 20. Performance measurement and management of carpet Propa Goswami.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780081011317 20171017
Advances in Carpet Manufacture, Second Edition, discusses the manufacture of carpets, an industry that has evolved over hundreds of years, also exploring the new changes and developments in textile science and manufacturing technology that occur every day. This updated edition provides revised, expanded and updated coverage of carpet manufacturing processes and applications. The book begins by reviewing the different types of carpets and their applications, also exploring the structure and properties of carpet materials. Carpet manufacturing techniques are then reviewed, including a new chapter on tufting and yarn manufacturing techniques, and design and manufacture for handmade carpets. Subsequent chapters review the development of carpets with important properties, including new chapters on carpets for acoustics and sound absorption, carpets with increased fire retardancy and those with antimicrobial and soil-resist finishes. With the variety of topics covered and its international team of contributors, the book offers a valuable and informative reference for technologists in the carpet and associated industries. However, it is also a great resource for researchers and students working in applied textile sciences.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780081011317 20171017
Book
pages ; cm
  • Introduction1. Designing across Cultures2. The Role of Tension and Conflict in Design Thinking3. The Cognitive Aspects of Design Thinking4. Aspects, Iterations and Co-Evolution in Design Thinking5. Designing with Users and Co-Creation6. Bridging Disciplines in Design Thinking ResearchConcluding Remarks.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351802833 20171218
The scientific analysis of design thinking is of considerable interest to academic scholars and design practitioners across many disciplines. This research tradition has generated a growing corpus of studies examining how designers think when creating innovative products, although there has been limited analysis of how designers think when creating less tangible deliverables (e.g., concepts and user-insights). This book brings together 28 contributions from internationally-leading academics with an interest in design thinking who examine professional designers working on a project that not only involved soft deliverables, but where a central role was played by co-creation across multiple, culturally-diverse stakeholders. This collection of detailed, multi-method analyses gives a unique insight into how a Scandinavian design team tackled a four-month long design task within the automotive industry. All papers draw upon a common, video-based dataset and report analyses that link diverse academic disciplines including psychology, anthropology, linguistics, philosophy, architecture, management, engineering and design studies. The dataset affords multiple entry points into the analysis of design thinking, with the papers demonstrating the application of a wide range of techniques that generate distinct yet complementary insights. Collectively these papers provide a coherent framework for analysing and interpreting design thinking `in vivo' through video-based field studies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351802833 20171218
Book
297 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 33 cm
The definitive monograph of internationally acclaimed designers - creators of the Tip Ton and the 2012 Olympic Torch. Collaborators for over 20 years, Edward Barber and Jay Osgerby have applied their talents to everything from industrial design and furniture to lighting and installations. The most comprehensive survey of their work to date, this book offers a unique, 360-degree view of their approach and working methods. Stunning images explore their work thematically, while six essays provide an exclusive look into career-defining projects.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780714874838 20171023
Art & Architecture Library (Bowes)
Book
viii, 279 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm
A year after seceding from the Union, South Carolina and the Confederate States government faced the daunting challenge of equipping soldiers with weapons, ammunition, and other military implements during the American Civil War. In The Best Gun in the World, Robert S. Seigler explains how South Carolina created its own armory and then enlisted the help of a weapons technology inventor to meet the demand. Seigler mined state and federal factory records, national and state archives, and U.S. patents for detailed information on weapons production, the salaries and status of free and enslaved employees, and other financial records to reveal an interesting, distinctive story of technological innovation and industrialization in South Carolina. George Woodward Morse, originally from New Hampshire, was a machinist and firearms innovator, who settled in Louisiana in the 1840s. He invented a reliable breechloading firearm in the mid-1850s to replace muzzleloaders that were ubiquitous throughout the world. Essential to the successful operation of any breechloader was its ammunition, and Morse perfected the first metallic, center-fire, pre-primed cartridge, his most notable contribution to the development of modern firearms. The U.S. War Department tested Morse rifles and cartridges prior to the beginning of the Civil War and contracted with the inventor to produce the weapons at Harpers Ferry Armory. However, when the war began, Morse, a slave-holding plantation owner, determined that he could sell more of his guns in the South. The South Carolina State Military Works originally designed to cast cannon, produced Morse's carbine and modified muskets, brass cartridges, cartridge boxes, and other military accoutrements. The armory ultimately produced only about 1,350 Morse firearms. For the next twenty years, Morse sought to regain his legacy as the inventor of the center-fire brass cartridges that are today standard ammunition for military and sporting firearms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781611177923 20171211
Green Library