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Book
1 online resource (218 pages) : illustrations (some color), color map
Book
xi, 264 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Preface * Part I: Methodology of Studies and External Conditions of Energy Development in the 21st Century. 1. World Energy: State of the Art and Trends in Development. 2. Methodology of Studies * 3. Energy Demand. 4. Energy Resources. 5. Technologies of Energy Conversion and Final Consumption * Part II: Study on Problems and Tendencies of Energy Development in the 21st Century. 6. Global Scenarios of External Conditions for Energy Development. 7. Changes in the World Energy Structure. 8. Tendencies in Energy Development of World Regions and in Interregional Ties. 9. Analysis of Conditions and Requirements of Sustainable Development. 10. Directions and Priorities of Technological Progress in Energy * Conclusion * References * Acronyms * Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781402009150 20160528
This book presents the results of a study of long-term perspectives for energy development of the world and its main regions, performed at the Siberian Energy Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Energy Systems Institute since 1998). The methodological approach, the 10-regional Global Energy Model (GEM-10R) of the world energy system, energy demand forecasts, data on energy resources and energy technologies, and results of calculations based on mathematical models are described. Particular attention is given to determination of energy requirements and peculiarities of its technological structure that are caused by mankind's necessary transition to sustainable development. Economic and ecological consequences of constraints on greenhouse gas emissions and scales of nuclear energy production, as well as assistance of developed countries to developing ones are investigated. Problems of cheap oil, gas and uranium resources depletion, fuel price growth, synthetic fuel production and new energy technology implementation are analysed. The book is intended for specialists in energy and economics, as well as students and postgraduate students of technical high schools and universities. ac.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781402009150 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
iv, 46 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

4. Green energy [2012]

Book
1 online resource (169 pages) : illustrations.
  • Preface-- 1. Carbon Capture and Storage Need and Prospects-- 2. The Economics of Sustainability: The Business Case that Makes Itself-- 3. Bioenergy in Developing Countries: Lessons Learned in Brazil and Perspec-tives in Other Countries-- 4. Technical Feasibility of Renewable-- Electricity Generation in Nunavut-- 5. The Role of Renewable Energy Technology in Holistic-- Community Develop-ment-- 6. Europe's Sunny Future.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9788792329417 20180604
Green Energy is increasingly becoming an important component for all individuals and governments of the world. According to Brundtland Commission Report (Our Common Future, 1987) of United Nations states: sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Green Energy is widely considered as Sustainable Energy/ Re-newable Energy which meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generation to meet their own needs. In the global movement of Green Energy Sustainable Renewable Energy, most of the countries decided to be a part of this movement of saving our planet and our future generation. This effort is supported by eleven international authors who are experts in their respective fields. The output is this book Green Energy. This book is comprises of six chapters. The first chapter discusses how global temperature can be controlled with the help of technology. Second chapter explains about green buildings. It explains about costs and benefits of green houses. Third chapter discusses about biofuels. Fourth chapter discusses about technical feasibility of Renewable Electricity Generation in Nunavut. Fifth chapter presents a summary of 15 years of grass root project experience in Partnership with impoverished, remote high altitude communities in the Nepal Himalayas. Sixth chapter argues that, contrary to popular belief, sustainable sources, in particular solar power, are capable of providing allthe energy the Europe needs at reasonable cost.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9788792329417 20180604
Book
xxxiv, 504 p.
  • Acknowledgements xiii Preface xv Introduction xvii 1 A True Sustainability Criterion and Its Implications 1 1.1 Introduction 1 1.2 Importance of a Sustainability Criterion 3 1.3 Criterion: The Switch that Determines Direction at a Bifurcation Point 8 1.3.1 Some Applications of the Criterion 11 1.4 Current Practices in Petroleum Engineering 16 1.5 Development of a Sustainable Model 24 1.6 Violation of Characteristic Time 26 1.7 Analogies with Physical Phenomena 31 1.8 Intangible Cause to Tangible Consequence 32 1.9 Removable Discontinuities: Phases and Renewability of Materials 34 1.10 Rebalancing Mass and Energy 35 1.11 Holes in the Current Energy Model 37 1.12 Tools Needed for Sustainable Petroleum Operations 40 1.13 Conditions of Sustainability 43 1.14 Sustainability Indicators 44 1.15 Assessing the Overall Performance of a Process 46 2 "Alternative" and Conventional Energy Sources: Trail-Mix, Tom Mix or Global Mixup? 59 2.1 Introduction 63 2.2 Global 68 2.3 Solar Energy 74 2.4 Hydroelectric Power 78 2.5 Ocean Thermal, Wave and Tidal Energy 79 2.6 Windi Energy 80 2.7 Bioenergy 82 2.8 Fuelwood 82 2.9 Bioethanol 83 2.10 Biodiesel 86 2.11 Nuclear Power 88 2.12 Geothermal Energy 91 2.13 Hydrogen Energy 92 2.14 Global [ Efficiency 94 2.15 Solar Energy 95 2.16 "Global Warming" 113 2.17 Impact of Energy Technology and Policy 117 2.18 Energy Demand in Emerging Economies 119 2.19 Conventional Global Energy Model 120 2.20 Renewable vs Non-renewable: Is There a Boundary? 121 2.21 Knowledge-Enriched Global Energy Model 126 2.22 Conclusions 128 3 Electricity and Sustainability 131 3.1 Electrical Power as the World's Premier Non-Primary Energy Source 131 3.2 Consequences of the Ubiquity of Electric Power Services 143 3.3 The Last Twenty Years of "Electrical Services Reform" in the United States 150 4 The Zero-Waste Concept and Its Applications 169 Part A. Petroleum Engineering Applications 169 4.1 Introduction 170 4.2 Petroleum Refining 172 4.3 Zero-Waste Impacts on Product Life Cycle (Transportation, Use, and End-of-Life) 193 4.4 No-Flaring Technique 194 Part B. Other Applications of the 'Zero-Waste' Principle 205 4.5 Zero-Waste Living and the Anaerobic Biodigester 205 4.6 Solar Aquatic Process Purifies Waste (including Desal-inated) Water 209 4.7 Last Word 212 5 Natural Gas 293 5.1 Introduction 293 5.2 Divergence of Energy Commodity Pricing From Laws of Supply and Demand 303 5.3 Sustainability and the Increasing Fascination with Natural Gas 307 5.4 Natural Gas Pricing, Markets, Risk Management, and Supply 311 5.5 Natural Gas in Eurasia 328 5.6 Nature As The New Model 333 6 OPEC -- The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries 359 6.1 Birthmarks -- The First Twenty Years 359 6.2 OPEC's Hard Choices in the Era of the Bush Doctrine 367 6.3 Monopoly, Cartel, Rentier -- or Instrumentality for Economic Independence? 380 6.4 Postscript (Friday 21 October 2011) 400 7 Concluding Remarks 405 Appendix 409 Al Taking Economics Backward As Science 416 A2 Developing a Theory of Marginal Information Utility Based on "The Alternative Approach of Beginning with Highly Simplified, Quite Concrete Models" 418 A3 Imperfections of Information, or Oligopoly and Monopoly? 426 A4 Afterword 435 Bibliography 443 Introductory Note 443 I. Bibliography 445 II. Websites 494 Index 497.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118568859 20160610
"True sustainability" is the line of engineering research and practice that is giving rise to a series of Scrivener textbooks, such as Khan & Islam's best-selling The Greening of Petroleum Operations . Making explicit reference to his own recently-published book in this series, Sustainable Energy Pricing, as the companion volume of this book, the author applies the principles of true economic sustainability developed there to re-examine actual engineering practices in fossil fuel and as well as alternative-energy (such as wind and tidal power) exploration and development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118568859 20160610
Book
xxxiv, 504 p.
Book
xxx, 354 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.
  • Contributors.Foreword.Series Preface.Preface.List of Abbreviations.Part I: Renewables as a Resource and Sustainability Performance Indicators.1 The Contribution of Renewables to Society (Goran Berndes).2 The Potential of Renewables as a Feedstock for Chemistry and Energy (Wilfried G. J. H. M. van Sark, Martin K. Patel, Andre P. C. Faaij and Monique M. Hoogwijk).3 Sustainability Performance Indicators (Alexei Lapkin).Part II: Relevant Assessment Tools.4 Life Cycle Inventory Analysis Applied to Renewable Resources (Niels Jungbluth and Rolf Frischknecht).5 Net Energy Balancing and Fuel-Cycle Analysis (Hosein Shapouri, Michael Wang and James A. Duffield).6 Life Cycle Assessment as an Environmental Sustainability Tool (Adisa Azapagic).7 Exergy (Jo Dewulf and Herman Van Langenhove).8 Material Flow Analysis and the Use of Renewables from a Systems Perspective (Stefan Bringezu).9 Ecological Footprints and Biocapacity: Essential Elements in Sustainability Assessment (William E. Rees).10 The Sustainable Process Index (SPI) (Michael Narodoslawsky and Anneliese Niederl).Part III:Case Studies.11 Assessment of Sustainable Land Use in Producing Biomass (Helmut Haberl and Karl-Heinz Erb).12 Assessment of the Forest Products Industries (Klaus Richter, Frank Werner and Hans-Jorg Althaus).13 Assessment of the Energy Production Industry: Modern Options for Producing Secondary Energy Carriers from Biomass (Andre Faaij).14 Assessment of Biofuels (James A. Duffield, Hosein Shapouri and Michael Wang).15 Assessment of Organic Waste Treatment (Jan-Olov Sundqvist).16 Oleochemical and Petrochemical Surfactants: An Overall Assessment (Erwan Saouter, Gert Van Hoof, Mark Stalmans and Alan Brunskill).17 Assessment of Bio-Based Packaging Materials (Andreas Detzel, Martina Kruger and Axel Ostermayer).18 Assessment of Biotechnology-Based Chemicals (Peter Saling and Andreas Kicherer).19 Assessment of Bio-Based Pharmaceuticals: The Cephalexin Case (Alle Bruggink and Peter Nossin).Part IV:Conclusions.20 Conclusions (Jo Dewulf and Herman Van Langenhove).Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470022412 20160528
Sustainability is a key driving force for industries in the chemical, food, packaging, agricultural and pharmaceutical sectors, and quantitative sustainability indicators are being incorporated into company reports. This is driving the uptake of renewable resources and the adoption of renewables. Renewables' can either be the substituted raw materials that are used in a given industry, (e.g. the use of biomass for fuel); the use and/or modification of a crop for use in a new industry (e.g. plant cellulose), or the reuse of a waste product (e.g. organic waste for energy production). This is the first book in the "Wiley Renewable Resources" series that brings together the range of sustainability assessment methods and their uses. Ensuing books in the series will look at individual renewable materials and applications.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470022412 20160528
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Engineering Library (Terman)
Book
31 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.
Green Library
Book
1 online resource : illustrations (some color). Digital: text file; PDF.
Book
1 online resource (99 pages) : illustrations (some color)
Book
1 online resource (99 pages) : illustrations (some color)
Book
ii, 86 p. : ill.
Book
ii, 86 p. : ill.
Book
vii, 197 p.
  • The Context.- Wind Energy.- Solar Thermal Electricity.-Photovoltaic Solar Electricity.- Liquid and Gaseous Fuels Derived from Biomass.- The "Hydrogen Economy".- Storing Electricity.- Conclusions on the Potential and the Limits.- Why Nuclear Energy is Not the Answer.- The Wider Context: Our Sustainability and Justice Predicament.- The Simpler Way.- References.- Terms and Units.- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781402055485 20160528
It is widely assumed that our consumer society can move from using fossil fuels to using renewable energy sources while maintaining the high levels of energy use to which we have become accustomed. This book details the reasons why this almost unquestioned assumption is seriously mistaken. Chapters on wind, photovoltaic and solar thermal sources argue that these are not able to meet present electricity demands, let alone future demands. Even more impossible will be meeting the demand for liquid fuel. The planet's capacity to produce biomass is far below what would be required. Chapter 6 explains why it is not likely that there will ever be a hydrogen economy, in view of the difficulties in generating sufficient hydrogen and especially considering the losses and inefficiencies in distributing it. Chapter 9 explains why nuclear energy is not the answer. The discussion is then extended beyond energy to deal with the ways in which our consumer society is grossly unsustainable and unjust. Its fundamental twin commitments to affluent living standards and economic growth have inevitably generated a range of alarming and accelerating global problems. These can only be solved by a transition to the simpler way, a society based more on simpler, self-sufficient and cooperative ways, within a zero-growth economy. The role renewable energy might play in enabling such a society is outlined.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781402055485 20160528
Book
85 p. : col. ill. ; 28 cm.
The World Energy Assessment report released in 2000 (ISBN 9211261260) considered energy policy options and challenges in the context of sustainable development objectives, and analysed trends based on data analysis available in 1998. This publication updates this analysis, taking into account developments and information available through to early 2003. Topics covered include: the discussions at the World Summit for Sustainable Development, held in Johannesburg in 2002; energy linkages to major global issues such as access to affordable energy services, poverty alleviation, economic development, greenhouse gas emissions, fuel supply and security; energy resources and technological options; using energy scenarios to gauge whether sustainable futures are possible; and identification of key energy policies and strategies to achieve sustainable economic growth.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789211261677 20160527
Green Library
Book
237 pages : illustrations, maps ; 39 cm + 1 computer disc (color ; 4 3/4 in.) + 1 map
SAL3 (off-campus storage)

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