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1 online resource.
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Book
1 online resource (xi, 260 pages) : illustrations
  • Preface ix 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Life Sciences - A Definition 1 1.1.1 A Short Definition of Life 1 1.1.2 What Is Life Sciences? 2 1.2 Automation - A Definition 4 1.3 History of Automation 5 1.3.1 Automation from the Beginnings to the Nineteenth Century 5 1.3.2 Automation Since the Nineteenth Century 10 1.3.3 History of Laboratory Automation 12 1.4 Impact of Automation 15 1.4.1 Advantages and Disadvantages of Automation 15 1.4.2 Social Impact of Automation 16 1.4.3 Limitation of Automation 17 References 18 2 Automation in Life Sciences - A Critical Review 25 2.1 Overview 25 2.2 Definitions and Basics 26 2.3 Automation in Bioscreening 28 2.3.1 Overview 28 2.3.2 Automation Devices in Biological Screening 31 2.3.3 Application Examples 40 2.4 Automation in Chemical Sciences 43 2.4.1 Overview 43 2.4.2 Automation Devices for Combinatorial Chemistry 45 2.5 Automation in Analytical Measurement Applications 51 2.5.1 Overview 51 2.5.2 Process Analytical Technology 52 2.5.3 Automation Systems for Analytical Measurement Applications 54 2.6 Requirements for Automating Analytical Processes 56 2.6.1 Bioscreening vs. Analytical Measurement 56 2.6.2 Automation Requirements 58 References 61 3 Automation Concepts for Life Sciences 73 3.1 Classification of Automation Systems 73 3.2 Classification Concept for Life Science Processes 75 3.3 Robot Based Automation Systems 78 3.3.1 Robot Based Systems in Industrial Automation 78 3.3.2 Robot-Based Automation Systems in Life Sciences 79 3.3.3 Summary and Application of Concepts 81 3.4 Degree of Automation 83 3.5 Statistical Evaluations 86 References 89 4 Automation Systems with Central System Integrator 93 4.1 Centralized Closed Automation System 93 4.1.1 Background and Applicative Scope 93 4.1.2 Automation Goals 98 4.1.3 System Design 99 4.1.4 Process Description 102 4.1.5 Control of the Automation Process 103 4.1.6 Evaluation of the Automation System 104 4.2 Centralized Open Automation System 109 4.2.1 Background and Applicative Scope 109 4.2.2 Automation Goals 114 4.2.3 System Design 116 4.2.4 Process Description 121 4.2.5 Control of the Automation Process 124 4.2.6 Evaluation of the Automation System 126 4.3 Decentralized Closed Automation System 130 4.3.1 Background and Applicative Scope 131 4.3.2 Automation Goals 132 4.3.3 System Design 134 4.3.4 Process Description 135 4.3.5 Control of the Automation Process 136 4.3.6 Evaluation of the Automation System 136 4.4 Decentralized Open Automation System 143 4.4.1 System Design 144 4.4.2 Process Description 144 4.4.3 Control of the Automation System 145 References 148 5 Automation Systems with Flexible Robots 167 5.1 Centralized Closed Automation System 167 5.1.1 System Design 167 5.1.2 Process Description 174 5.1.3 Control of the Automation System 174 5.1.4 Results 179 5.2 Centralized Open Automation System 180 5.2.1 Background and Applicative Scope 180 5.2.2 Automation Goals 183 5.2.3 System Design 184 5.2.4 Process Description 186 5.2.5 Control of the Automation System 187 5.2.6 Results 189 5.3 Decentralized Automation System 191 5.3.1 System Design 192 5.3.2 Process Description 193 5.3.3 Control of the Automation System 193 5.4 Automation Systems with Integrated Robotics 194 5.4.1 System Design 196 5.4.2 Process Description 198 5.4.3 Process Control 198 References 200 6 Automated Data Evaluation in Life Sciences 205 6.1 Specific Tasks in Data Evaluation in Analytical Measurements 205 6.2 Automation Goals 207 6.3 System Design 208 6.4 System Realization 211 6.4.1 Software Structure 211 6.4.2 Software Operation 214 6.5 Process Description 220 6.6 Application Examples 222 6.6.1 Automated Data Analysis in the Elemental Analysis 222 6.6.2 Automated Data Analysis in the Structural Analysis 224 6.6.3 Automated Data Analysis in Special Applications 225 References 226 7 Management of Automated Processes 231 7.1 Laboratory Information Systems 231 7.2 Laboratory Execution Systems 231 7.3 Process and Workflow Management Systems 232 7.3.1 Overview 232 7.3.2 Intelligent Scheduling 234 7.3.3 Human Machine Interaction 236 7.4 Business Process Management Systems 239 7.4.1 Initial BPM Activities 239 7.4.2 Relationship to Scientific Workflow Management 241 7.4.3 Life Science Automation Industry Application of BPM 241 7.4.4 Status of Life Science Automation 242 7.4.5 Laboratory IT Integration Status 245 7.4.6 Innovation in End-to-End Process Automation 245 7.4.7 Workflow Automation as a New Top-Level Process Automation Approach 246 7.4.8 Outstanding Position of LIMS as an Established Process Documentation System 248 References 249 Index 255.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783527805327 20180828
The first book dedicated specifically to automated sample preparation and analytical measurements, this timely and systematic overview not only covers biological applications, but also environmental measuring technology, drug discovery, and quality assurance. Following a critical review of realized automation solutions in biological sciences, the book goes on to discuss special requirements for comparable systems for analytical applications, taking different concepts into consideration and with examples chosen to illustrate the scope and limitations of each technique.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783527805327 20180828
Book
1 online resource (xi, 260 pages) : illustrations.
  • Preface ix 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Life Sciences - A Definition 1 1.1.1 A Short Definition of Life 1 1.1.2 What Is Life Sciences? 2 1.2 Automation - A Definition 4 1.3 History of Automation 5 1.3.1 Automation from the Beginnings to the Nineteenth Century 5 1.3.2 Automation Since the Nineteenth Century 10 1.3.3 History of Laboratory Automation 12 1.4 Impact of Automation 15 1.4.1 Advantages and Disadvantages of Automation 15 1.4.2 Social Impact of Automation 16 1.4.3 Limitation of Automation 17 References 18 2 Automation in Life Sciences - A Critical Review 25 2.1 Overview 25 2.2 Definitions and Basics 26 2.3 Automation in Bioscreening 28 2.3.1 Overview 28 2.3.2 Automation Devices in Biological Screening 31 2.3.3 Application Examples 40 2.4 Automation in Chemical Sciences 43 2.4.1 Overview 43 2.4.2 Automation Devices for Combinatorial Chemistry 45 2.5 Automation in Analytical Measurement Applications 51 2.5.1 Overview 51 2.5.2 Process Analytical Technology 52 2.5.3 Automation Systems for Analytical Measurement Applications 54 2.6 Requirements for Automating Analytical Processes 56 2.6.1 Bioscreening vs. Analytical Measurement 56 2.6.2 Automation Requirements 58 References 61 3 Automation Concepts for Life Sciences 73 3.1 Classification of Automation Systems 73 3.2 Classification Concept for Life Science Processes 75 3.3 Robot Based Automation Systems 78 3.3.1 Robot Based Systems in Industrial Automation 78 3.3.2 Robot-Based Automation Systems in Life Sciences 79 3.3.3 Summary and Application of Concepts 81 3.4 Degree of Automation 83 3.5 Statistical Evaluations 86 References 89 4 Automation Systems with Central System Integrator 93 4.1 Centralized Closed Automation System 93 4.1.1 Background and Applicative Scope 93 4.1.2 Automation Goals 98 4.1.3 System Design 99 4.1.4 Process Description 102 4.1.5 Control of the Automation Process 103 4.1.6 Evaluation of the Automation System 104 4.2 Centralized Open Automation System 109 4.2.1 Background and Applicative Scope 109 4.2.2 Automation Goals 114 4.2.3 System Design 116 4.2.4 Process Description 121 4.2.5 Control of the Automation Process 124 4.2.6 Evaluation of the Automation System 126 4.3 Decentralized Closed Automation System 130 4.3.1 Background and Applicative Scope 131 4.3.2 Automation Goals 132 4.3.3 System Design 134 4.3.4 Process Description 135 4.3.5 Control of the Automation Process 136 4.3.6 Evaluation of the Automation System 136 4.4 Decentralized Open Automation System 143 4.4.1 System Design 144 4.4.2 Process Description 144 4.4.3 Control of the Automation System 145 References 148 5 Automation Systems with Flexible Robots 167 5.1 Centralized Closed Automation System 167 5.1.1 System Design 167 5.1.2 Process Description 174 5.1.3 Control of the Automation System 174 5.1.4 Results 179 5.2 Centralized Open Automation System 180 5.2.1 Background and Applicative Scope 180 5.2.2 Automation Goals 183 5.2.3 System Design 184 5.2.4 Process Description 186 5.2.5 Control of the Automation System 187 5.2.6 Results 189 5.3 Decentralized Automation System 191 5.3.1 System Design 192 5.3.2 Process Description 193 5.3.3 Control of the Automation System 193 5.4 Automation Systems with Integrated Robotics 194 5.4.1 System Design 196 5.4.2 Process Description 198 5.4.3 Process Control 198 References 200 6 Automated Data Evaluation in Life Sciences 205 6.1 Specific Tasks in Data Evaluation in Analytical Measurements 205 6.2 Automation Goals 207 6.3 System Design 208 6.4 System Realization 211 6.4.1 Software Structure 211 6.4.2 Software Operation 214 6.5 Process Description 220 6.6 Application Examples 222 6.6.1 Automated Data Analysis in the Elemental Analysis 222 6.6.2 Automated Data Analysis in the Structural Analysis 224 6.6.3 Automated Data Analysis in Special Applications 225 References 226 7 Management of Automated Processes 231 7.1 Laboratory Information Systems 231 7.2 Laboratory Execution Systems 231 7.3 Process and Workflow Management Systems 232 7.3.1 Overview 232 7.3.2 Intelligent Scheduling 234 7.3.3 Human Machine Interaction 236 7.4 Business Process Management Systems 239 7.4.1 Initial BPM Activities 239 7.4.2 Relationship to Scientific Workflow Management 241 7.4.3 Life Science Automation Industry Application of BPM 241 7.4.4 Status of Life Science Automation 242 7.4.5 Laboratory IT Integration Status 245 7.4.6 Innovation in End-to-End Process Automation 245 7.4.7 Workflow Automation as a New Top-Level Process Automation Approach 246 7.4.8 Outstanding Position of LIMS as an Established Process Documentation System 248 References 249 Index 255.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783527805327 20180828
The first book dedicated specifically to automated sample preparation and analytical measurements, this timely and systematic overview not only covers biological applications, but also environmental measuring technology, drug discovery, and quality assurance. Following a critical review of realized automation solutions in biological sciences, the book goes on to discuss special requirements for comparable systems for analytical applications, taking different concepts into consideration and with examples chosen to illustrate the scope and limitations of each technique.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783527805327 20180828
Book
638 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), plans, facsimiles ; 29 cm
  • Préface, / Olivier Faron -- Prémices -- Cet étrange objet du désir -- Le monde en réduction -- Theologia naturalis -- L'oeil analytique -- De l'érudition solitaire à l'érudition partagée -- Un marché de la curiosité -- La confusion des genres -- Des "théâtres de machines" aux scientifica -- Heures d'ouverture -- L'art des expériences -- Aux sources de l'émulation technique -- Les "collections" de Vaucanson -- "L'aiguillon de la gloire" et "l'appât du gain" -- Un projet lyonnais -- Le bureau de consultation des arts et métiers -- Le lycée des arts -- Naissance d'une institution -- S'amuser ou s'instruire ? -- L'essai sur la régénération physique, morale et politique des juifs -- Grégoire à la conquête de la capitale -- Le mémoire en faveur des gens de couleur ou sang-mêlés -- Grégoire, prêtre jureur -- Questions d'éducation -- Un conservatoire pour les arts et métiers -- La théorie de l'effet -- Faux amis -- Arts mécaniques, arts libéraux -- La noblesse du fumier -- "Uniformer la technologie" -- Inventaire, sauvegarde et diffusion -- La commission d'agriculture et des arts -- Formation d'une collection publique -- Jean baptiste le Roy -- Alexandre Théophile Vandermonde -- Nicolas jacques conté -- François Beltvelot -- Claude Pierre Molard -- Le docteur Gruvel -- Visées sur le garde-meuble -- Le conservatoire des arts et métiers sous le directoire -- Etat des lieux -- Un bureau de dessinateurs -- Encore un règlement pour l'institution -- L'atelier de perfectionnement -- Les petits malheurs de Molard -- Le rapport d'Alquier -- Solution de continuité -- Grégoire démonstrateur -- Le concours annuel de l'industrie française -- Brevets d'invention -- Une période de transition -- L'installation à Saint-Martin-des-champs -- Le conservatoire des arts et métiers sous le consulat -- Une "école centrale", rue Saint-Martin ? -- Disparition de le Roy -- Delannoy, un architecte difficile -- Essais de distribution des espaces -- Mauvaise réputation -- Les débuts de la petite école -- Droits d'entrée -- Crispations -- Un signe de conté -- Molard, premier administrateur du conservatoire -- Les projets de Jallier -- L'exposition de 1801 -- Au bonheur des rats -- Retour d'Egypte -- L'expérience des tirants de Molard -- Le conservatoire impérial des arts et métiers sous le premier empire -- Expériences aérostatiques -- L'école de filature -- Mort de conté -- Jours d'affluence -- Nouveau départ pour la petite école -- Peyre Neveu, troisième architecte du conservatoire -- Le cabinet de Ferdinand Berthoud -- Le cabinet de physique de Charles -- La petite école au milieu de l'empire -- La tour infernale -- Une visite surprise de napoléon -- "Pour diminuer les dépenses" -- Molard prépare son catalogue -- Des douaniers encombrants -- Pas d'hydrogène pour le roi de Rome -- La mécanique, pas la chimie ! -- Lycée ou pas lycée ? -- L'arche de Molard -- Verdict impérial -- Liqueurs inflammables -- Ce conservatoire royal des arts et métiers sous la première restauration -- Le gotha aux arts et métiers
  • Dépôt des produits industriels -- Un artiste anglais, en 1814 -- Ou l'on reparle du cabinet de Charles -- Un projet de Molard jeune -- L'école et le musée -- Lyonnet relève Gruvel -- Le conservatoire impérial des arts et métiers pendant les cent-jours -- Une vente sans effet -- Constitution, liberté, patrie -- Le conservatoire royal des arts et métiers sous la seconde restauration -- Les trois règnes -- Le blanc, dessinateur du conservatoire -- La plus riche collection d'instruments de physique d'Europe -- Fonctions et salaires -- Chènevotte et bonnets à poils -- Reprise des enseignements graphiques -- Un vilain "rhume catharale" -- La relève fraternelle -- Coup de semonce -- Une maison à vau-l'eau -- L'ordonnance du 16 avril 1817 -- Gérard Joseph Christian -- Le premier conseil de perfectionnement -- Le discours de la méthode -- Le premier catalogue des collections -- Une machine miraculeuse ? -- Une "mission" de Molard jeune en Angleterre -- L'exposition de 1819 -- La technonomie de Christian -- L'ordonnance du 25 novembre 1819 -- Charles Dupin, un légitimiste libéral -- Nicolas Clément-des Ormes -- Un héritier d'Adam Smith : Jean Baptiste Say -- Mauvaise langue -- Premiers cours des trois chaires -- Formalités douanières -- Le premier amphithéâtre -- Eau-de-vie et pomme de terre -- L'incident de la Rochefoucauld -- Cours du soir -- Questions de respectabilité -- "Le sort de la classe ouvrière" -- L'art de se renvoyer la balle -- Le duc de Doudeauville et l'ordonnance du 31 août 1828 -- Claude Pouillet entre en scène -- Hygiène et sécurité -- Un projet de musée industriel -- Les bouderies de Charles Dupin -- Claude Pouillet, professeur et sous-directeur -- Actualisation -- "Les trois glorieuses" aux arts et métiers.
"Au lendemain de la Terreur, dans une France désemparée, l'abbé Grégoire ressuscite l'esprit des Lumières et prône la création d'un Conservatoire des Arts et Métiers dédié à l'inventivité. Relater la destinée de cette institution atypique, des origines à la fin de la Restauration. Tel est l'objet de ce livre. Mais il faut pour ce faire décoder un kaléidoscope aux couleurs aléatoires et aux formes inconstantes. L'histoire capricieuse du "Temple des techniques" livre ici ses secrets..."--Page 4 of cover.
Green Library
Book
xi, 177 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • A New South vision
  • The Negro buildings
  • New women, New South
  • Exhibiting a New South empire
  • Conclusion: the 1907 Jamestown Ter-Centennial: a dream or nightmare of the future?
As an age of empire and industry dawned in the wake of American Civil War, Southerners grappled with what it meant to be modern. The fair expositions popular at this time allowed Southerners to explore this changing world on their own terms. On a local, national, and global stage, African Americans, New South boosters, New Women, and Civil War soldiers presented their dreams of the future to prove to the world how rapidly the South had embraced and, in the words of Henry Grady in 1890, built "from pitiful resources a great and expanding empire." Nowhere was this more apparent than at the Atlanta and Nashville world's fairs held at the close of the nineteenth century. Here, Southerners presented themselves as modern and imperial citizens ready to spread the South's culture and racial politics across the globe. Unlike the World's Columbian Exposition held in Chicago in 1893, the Southern expositions also gave African Americans an opportunity to present their own vision of modernity within the fairs' "Negro Buildings." At the fairs, southern African Americans defined themselves as both a separate race and a modern people, as "New Negroes." In Dream of the Future, Cardon explores these assertions of Southern identity and culture, critically placing them within the wider context of imperialism and industrialization.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780190274726 20180924
Green Library
Book
xxxi, 282 pages ; 25 cm
  • Preface. The seven deadly sins of efficiency : why it is still a work in progress
  • From mill to platform : how the nineteenth century redefined efficiency and the twenty-first has transformed it
  • The failed promise of the information explosion : how the quest to measure elite science empowered populist culture
  • The mirage of the teaching machine : why learning is still a slog after fifty years of Moore's law
  • Moving targets : what geographic information can't do
  • The vanished body : why we are still waiting for robococ
  • Conclusion. Inspired inefficiency : how to balance algorithm and intuition.
"A bold challenge to our obsession with efficiency--and a new understanding of how to benefit from the powerful potential of serendipity. Algorithms, multitasking, the sharing economy, life hacks: our culture can't get enough of efficiency. One of the great promises of the Internet and big data revolutions is the idea that we can improve the processes and routines of our work and personal lives to get more done in less time than ever before. There is no doubt that we're performing at higher levels and moving at unprecedented speed, but what if we're headed in the wrong direction? Melding the long-term history of technology with the latest headlines and findings of computer science and social science, [this book] questions our ingrained assumptions about efficiency, persuasively showing how relying on the algorithms of platforms can in fact lead to wasted efforts, missed opportunities, and above all an inability to break out of established patterns. [The author offers a way] of thinking about efficiency, revealing what we and our institutions, when equipped with an astute combination of artificial intelligence and trained intuition, can learn from the random and unexpected."-- Provided by publisher.
Law Library (Crown)
Book
1 online resource Digital: text file.
"A bold challenge to our obsession with efficiency--and a new understanding of how to benefit from the powerful potential of serendipity Algorithms, multitasking, sharing economy, life hacks: our culture can't get enough of efficiency. One of the great promises of the Internet and big data revolutions is the idea that we can improve the processes and routines of our work and personal lives to get more done in less time than ever before. There is no doubt that we're performing at higher scales and going faster than ever, but what if we're headed in the wrong direction? The Efficiency Paradox questions our ingrained assumptions about efficiency, persuasively showing how relying on the algorithms of platforms can in fact lead to wasted efforts, missed opportunities, and above all an inability to break out of established patterns. Edward Tenner offers a smarter way to think about efficiency, showing how we can combine artificial intelligence and our own intuition, leaving ourselves and our institutions open to learning from the random and unexpected"-- Provided by publisher.
"bold challenge to our obsession with efficiency--and a new understanding of how to benefit from the powerful potential of serendipity"-- Provided by publisher.
Overdrive Access limited to one user.
Business Library
Book
1 PDF (xxi, 223 pages).
  • Foreword Preface and Introduction Acknowledgments Accountable to Whom? Learning from Beginning Schoolteachers 1 ""Oh that we the gift of God to see ourselves as others see us, "" Learning from Beginning Teachers 2 Toward a Scholarship of Teaching. Teaching as Research Objectives and Outcomes Problem Solving, Its Teaching, and the Curriculum Process Critical Thinking, Decision Making, and Problem Solving The Scholar Academic Ideology of the Disciplines Intellectual Development Organization for Learning Concept Learning Complex Concepts The Learning Centered Ideology--How Much Should We Know About Our Students? The Learning Centered Ideology--How Much Should We Know About Our Students? Intelligence Two Views of Competency From IQ to Emotional IQ Social Reconstruction Author's Biography Author Index Subject Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781681732930 20180423
Each one of us has views about education, how discipline should function, how individuals learn, how they should be motivated, what intelligence is, and the structures (content and subjects) of the curriculum. Perhaps the most important beliefs that (beginning) teachers bring with them are their notions about what constitutes ""good teaching"". The scholarship of teaching requires that (beginning) teachers should examine (evaluate) these views in the light of knowledge currently available about the curriculum and instruction, and decide their future actions on the basis of that analysis. Such evaluations are best undertaken when classrooms are treated as laboratories of inquiry (research) where teachers establish what works best for them. Two instructor centred and two learner centred philosophies of knowledge, curriculum and instruction are used to discern the fundamental (basic) questions that engineering educators should answer in respect of their own beliefs and practice. They point to a series of classroom activities that will enable them to challenge their own beliefs, and at the same time affirm, develop, or change their philosophies of knowledge, curriculum and instruction.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781681732930 20180423
Book
xiii, 252 pages : illustrations, map ; 25 cm
  • 1. Introduction: A Kula Ring for the Flying Geese: Japan's Technology Aid and Postwar Asia, Hiromi Mizuno (University of Minnesota, USA) Part 1: Engineering Asia at Home - Japan's Institutional Infrastructure for Asian Development 2. Tokyo's Vision of Southeast Asia: Private Interests and Economic Cooperation in the 1950s, Jin Sato (University of Tokyo, Japan) 3. Itagaki Yoichi and the Formation of the Postwar Knowledge Infrastructure for Japan's Overseas Development Assistance in Asia, Masato Karashima (Kobe University, Japan) Part 2: Engineering Asia on the Ground 4. From 'Constructing' to 'Developing' Asia: Japanese Engineers and the Formation of the Post-Colonial, Cold War Discourse of Development in Asia, Aaron S Moore (Arizona State University, USA) 5. The Hydrocarbon Ring: Indonesian Fossil Fuel, "Japanese Cooperation, " and American Neo-Imperialism, 1941-1975, Eric Dinmore (Hampden-Sydney College, USA) 6. Colonial Seeds and Imperialist Genes: Japanese Colonial Agricultural Development and the Cold-War Green Revolution, Tatsushi Fujihara (Kyoto University, Japan) Part 3: South Korea - Engineering Asia as a Developing Nation 7. Postcolonial Desire and the Tripartite Alliance in East Asia: the Hybrid Origins of a Modern Scientific and Technological System in South Korea, Manyong Moon, (Chonbuk National University, South Korea) 8. Making Miracle Rice: Tongil and Mobilizing a Domestic "Green Revolution" in South Korea, Tae-ho Kim, (Chonbuk National University, South Korea) 9. In Pursuit of "Peace and Construction": Hyundai Construction and Infrastructure in Southeast Asia, 1965-1973, John P DiMoia, (Seoul National University, South Korea).
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781350063921 20180924
Weaving together chapters on imperial Japan's wartime mobilization, Asia's first wave of postwar decolonization, and Cold War geopolitical conflict in the region, Engineering Asia seeks to demonstrate how Asia's present prosperity did not arise from a so-called `economic miracle' but from the violent and dynamic events of the 20th century. The book argues that what continued to operate throughout these tumultuous eras were engineering networks of technology. Constructed at first for colonial development under Japan, these networks transformed into channels of overseas development aid that constituted the Cold War system in Asia. Through highlighting how these networks helped shape Asia's contemporary economic landscape, Engineering Asia challenges dominant narratives in Western scholarship of an `economic miracle' in Japan and South Korea, and the `Asian Tigers' of Southeast Asia. Students and scholars of East Asian studies, development studies, postcolonialism, Cold War studies and the history of technology and science will find this book immensely useful.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781350063921 20180924
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxviii, 274 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • A Note from the Series Editor xiii About the Authors xv Foreword xvii Preface xxiii Acknowledgments xxvii INTRODUCTION 1 1 Pressing Issues for Engineering Education and the Engineering Profession 3 1.1 A Mismatched Curriculum 3 1.2 Responsibility that Emerges from the Transformative Power of Engineering 7 1.3 Inquiring into the Framing of Benefits and Constraints 9 1.4 Transitioning from Weak to Robust Sustainability 9 1.5 Fostering Inclusive Excellence 10 1.6 Engaging Emerging Interest Groups 11 2 Research Methods 12 3 Theoretical Frameworks 13 4 Engineering for Social Justice 14 4.1 Emerging Organizations Provide New Opportunities 15 4.2 Calls from Engineering Education Leaders 16 4.3 Emerging Scholarship on Engineering and Social Justice 18 5 Engineering for Social Justice Criteria 19 5.1 Listening Contextually to Develop Trust and Empathy 21 5.2 Identifying Structural Conditions 23 5.3 Acknowledging Political Agency and Mobilizing Power 24 5.4 Increasing Opportunities and Resources 26 5.5 Reducing Imposed Risks and Harms 27 5.6 Enhancing Human Capabilities 28 5.7 Engineering and Social Justice Criteria Combined 30 6 Guidelines for Engineering for Social Justice Implementation 31 6.1 Cradle-to-Grave Analysis 31 6.2 Transcending Temporal Delimitations 33 6.3 Culling Multiple Perspectives 33 7 Further Chapters 34 7.1 Ideologies and Mindsets that Render Social Justice Invisible or Irrelevant 34 7.2 Engineering Design 35 7.3 Engineering Sciences 36 7.4 Humanities/Social Science Courses for Engineering Students 36 7.5 E4SJ as Catalyst for Inclusive Excellence in Engineering 37 7.6 Conclusion 37 8 Benefits of E4SJ Approach 37 References 38 1 SOCIAL JUSTICE IS OFTEN INVISIBLE IN ENGINEERING EDUCATION AND PRACTICE 45 1.1 Generic Barriers to Rendering Social Justice Visible 46 1.1.1 Normalcy 46 1.1.2 Superiority 47 1.1.3 Unconscious Biases 47 1.1.4 Personal and Broader Societal Framing 48 1.2 Engineering-Specific Barriers to Rendering Social Justice Visible: Ideologies 49 1.2.1 Technical Social Dualism 50 1.2.2 Depoliticization 52 1.2.3 Meritocracy 55 1.3 Engineering-Specific Barriers to Rendering Social Justice Visible: Mindsets 56 1.3.1 Centrality of Military and Corporate Organizations 57 1.3.2 Uncritical Acceptance of Authority 58 1.3.3 Technical Narrowness 59 1.3.4 Positivism and the Myth of Objectivity 59 1.3.5 Willingness to Help and Persistence 60 References 63 2 ENGINEERING DESIGN FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE 67 2.1 Why Engineering Design Matters 69 2.1.1 Why Design Resembles Actual Engineering Practice Yet Has Limitations 70 2.1.2 Why Design is an Important Yet Undervalued Component of Engineering Education 71 2.2 Engineering for Social Justice: Criteria for Engineering Design Initiatives 71 2.2.1 Listening Contextually 74 2.2.2 Identifying Structural Conditions 78 2.2.3 Acknowledging Political Agency and Mobilizing Power 79 2.2.4 Increasing Opportunities and Resources 82 2.2.5 Reducing Imposed Risks and Harms 85 2.2.6 Enhancing Human Capabilities 86 2.3 Social Justice Criteria Combined 88 2.4 Benefits of Integrating SJ in Design 89 2.5 Limitations of Social Justice Criteria 95 Appendix 2.A Engineering for Social Justice Self-Assessment Checklist 98 Appendix 2.B Design for Social Justice Charrette 100 Acknowledgments 102 References 102 3 SOCIAL JUSTICE IN THE ENGINEERING SCIENCES 107 3.1 Why are the Engineering Sciences the Sacred Cow of the Engineering Curriculum? 108 3.1.1 Engineering Sciences as Shapers of Engineering Identity 108 3.1.2 Pedagogical Tradition in the Engineering Sciences 112 3.2 Why Social Justice is Inherent in Engineering Sciences Course Content 114 3.3 Making Social Justice Visible without Compromising Technical Excellence 116 3.3.1 Social Justice Definition 116 3.3.2 E4SJ Criteria 119 3.4 Examples of Making SJ Visible in the Engineering Sciences 120 3.4.1 E4SJ Criteria Engaged in Introduction to Feedback Control Systems 120 3.4.2 E4SJ Criteria Engaged in Continuous-Time Signals and Systems 127 3.4.3 E4SJ Criteria Engaged in Mass and Energy Balances 128 3.5 Challenges of Integrating Social Justice into the Engineering Sciences 132 3.5.1 Accreditation 132 3.5.2 Student Attitude 133 3.5.3 Faculty Attitude 133 3.6 Opportunities Associated with Integrating Social Justice 135 3.6.1 Student Perspectives on Opportunities 136 3.6.2 Teaching and Scholarship Opportunities for Faculty 139 3.7 Author Narratives on Challenges and Opportunities 141 3.7.1 IFCS Reflection by Dr. Johnson 141 3.7.2 CTSS Reflection by Dr. Huff 142 3.7.2.1 CTSS Follow-Up Reflection by Dr. Huff 143 3.7.3 Mass and Energy Balances Reflection by Dr. Riley 144 3.8 Conclusion 145 Appendix 3.A IFCS Case Study Matrix. The Case Study Options are Mapped to Technical and Social Justice Learning Objectives 146 Appendix 3.B SJ Integration Issues. For Future IFCS Course Iterations, the Key SJ Integration Issues and Their Potential Solutions are Explored 147 Acknowledgments 149 References 149 4 HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES IN ENGINEERING EDUCATION: FROM IRRELEVANCE TO SOCIAL JUSTICE 155 4.1 Humanities and Social Sciences, the Engineering Curriculum, and the Distancing of Engineering Education from Pressing Social Problems 157 4.2 The Cold War, the Anti-Technology Movement, and a Marginalized HSS 160 4.2.1 Humanities and Social Sciences in 1960s and 1970s Engineering Education 161 4.2.2 The Emergence and Evolution of STS 162 4.3 It Is Time: Integration of Engineering and Social Justice Through the HSS The Historical Convergence of ABET 2000 and More 163 4.3.1 Changes in the Institutional Landscape 165 4.3.2 Changes in the Scholarly Landscape 166 4.4 Emerging Curricular Innovations 168 4.5 Engineering and Social Justice at Colorado School of Mines 170 4.5.1 Background 170 4.5.2 Description of the Course Engineering and Social Justice 171 4.5.3 Course Learning Outcomes 172 4.6 Intercultural Communication at Colorado School of Mines 173 4.6.1 Course Background 174 4.6.2 Course Description 174 4.6.3 Learning Outcomes 177 4.7 Document Design and Graphics at Utah State 177 4.7.1 Course Background 178 4.7.2 Course Description 178 4.7.3 Learning Outcomes 179 4.8 Benefits and Limitations 182 4.8.1 Benefits 182 4.8.2 Limitations 183 Appendix 4.A Privilege Walk Questions 184 Appendix 4.B Privilege by Numbers Activity 187 Appendix 4.C Intercultural Communication Foundational Questions 188 Acknowledgments 189 References 190 5 TRANSFORMING ENGINEERING EDUCATION AND PRACTICE 197 5.1 Practical Guidelines: From Problem Space to Program Space 199 5.1.1 E4SJ in the Problem Space 199 5.1.2 E4SJ in the Course Space 202 5.1.3 E4SJ in Boundary Spaces 206 5.1.4 E4SJ in the Program Space 207 5.2 Broader Implications of E4SJ-Infused Transformations 208 5.2.1 Changing Who Becomes an Engineer 208 5.2.2 Changing the Culture of Engineering 211 5.2.3 From a Culture of Disengagement to One of Greater Public Engagement 215 5.3 Identity Challenges and Inspirations 217 5.3.1 Engineering Student Identity Issues 217 5.3.2 Engineering Faculty Identity Issues 223 Appendix 5.A Assignment and Examples of Problem Rewrites 228 References 237 6 CONCLUSION: MAKING SOCIAL JUSTICE VISIBLE AND VALUED 243 6.1 Engineering Justice into Your Career 244 6.1.1 Recognizing Barriers and Opportunities to Making E4SJ Visible 245 6.1.2 Developing Creative Framing on the Road to Tenure and Promotion 246 6.1.3 Engaging Other Stakeholders and Building a Community of Practice 250 6.1.4 Supporting Students interested in E4SJ Beyond the Classroom 250 6.1.5 Enacting E4SJ Outside the Home Institution 252 6.2 Future E4SJ Research Directions 253 6.2.1 Longitudinal Studies 253 6.2.2 Vehicles for Giving Voice to Marginalized Groups 255 References 255 Index 259.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118757307 20180226
Shows how the engineering curriculum can be a site for rendering social justice visible in engineering, for exploring complex socio-technical interplays inherent in engineering practice, and for enhancing teaching and learning Using social justice as a catalyst for curricular transformation, Engineering Justice presents an examination of how politics, culture, and other social issues are inherent in the practice of engineering. It aims to align engineering curricula with socially just outcomes, increase enrollment among underrepresented groups, and lessen lingering gender, class, and ethnicity gaps by showing how the power of engineering knowledge can be explicitly harnessed to serve the underserved and address social inequalities. This book is meant to transform the way educators think about engineering curricula through creating or transforming existing courses to attract, retain, and motivate engineering students to become professionals who enact engineering for social justice. Engineering Justice offers thought-provoking chapters on: why social justice is inherent yet often invisible in engineering education and practice; engineering design for social justice; social justice in the engineering sciences; social justice in humanities and social science courses for engineers; and transforming engineering education and practice. In addition, this book: Provides a transformative framework for engineering educators in service learning, professional communication, humanitarian engineering, community service, social entrepreneurship, and social responsibilityIncludes strategies that engineers on the job can use to advocate for social justice issues and explain their importance to employers, clients, and supervisorsDiscusses diversity in engineering educational contexts and how it affects the way students learn and develop Engineering Justice is an important book for today s professors, administrators, and curriculum specialists who seek to produce the best engineers of today and tomorrow.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118757307 20180226
Engineering Library (Terman)
Book
103 pages, 96 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations ; 22 cm.
Green Library
Book
viii, 169 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Green Library
Book
xiv, 246 pages : illustrations ; 26 cm.
  • List of Illustrations List of Contributors Introduction Communities Real and Imagined: World's Fairs and Political MeaningsDavid Raizman and Ethan Robey 1. East Meets West: Re-Presenting the Islamic World at the Nineteenth-Century World's FairsDebra Hanson 2. From London to Paris (via Cairo): The World Expositions and the Making of a Modern Architect, 1862-1867Christian A. Hedrick 3. The Belgian Reception of Italy at the 1885 Antwerp World Exhibition: Converging Artistic, Economic, and Political Strategies on DisplayDaniela N. Prina 4. A Danish Spectacle: Balancing National Interests at the 1888 Nordic Exhibition of Industry, Agriculture and Art in Copenhagen Jorn Guldberg 5. A Neoclassical Translation: The Hooden at the 1893 World's Columbian ExpositionHannah L. Sigur ã 6. Paris, 1900: The Musee Centennal du Mobilier et de la Decoration and the Formulation of a Nineteenth-Century National Design IdentityAnca I. Lasc 7. "Our Country Has Never Been as Popular as It Is Now!": Finland at the 1900 Exposition Universelleã Bart Pushaw 8. "A Revelation of Grace and Pride": Cultural Memory and International Aspiration in Early Twentieth-Century Hungarian DesignRebecca Houze 9. When the Local is the Global: Case Studies in Early Twentieth-Century Chinese Exposition ProjectsSusan R. Fernsebner 10. The 1910 Centenary Exhibition in Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay: Manufacturing Fine Art and Cultural Diplomacy in South AmericaM. Elizabeth Boone Bibliography Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138501751 20180326
Expanding Nationalisms at World's Fairs: Identity, Diversity, and Exchange, 1851-1915 introduces the subject of international exhibitions to art and design historians and a wider audience as a resource for understanding the broad and varied political meanings of design during a period of rapid industrialization, developing nationalism, imperialism, expanding trade and the emergence of a consumer society. Its chapters, written by both established and emerging scholars, are global in scope, and demonstrate specific networks of communication and exchange among designers, manufacturers, markets and nations on the modern world stage from the second half of the nineteenth century into the beginning of the twentieth. Within the overarching theme of nationalism and internationalism as revealed at world's fairs, the book's essays will engage a more complex understanding of ideas of competition and community in an age of emergent industrial capitalism, and will investigate the nuances, contradictions and marginalized voices that lie beneath the surface of unity, progress, and global expansion.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138501751 20180326
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xiii, 548 pages).
  • Acknowledgments xi About the Companion Website xiii 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Measures of System Performance 2 1.2 Characteristics of Queueing Systems 4 1.3 The Experience of Waiting 9 1.4 Little s Law 10 1.5 General Results 19 1.6 Simple Bookkeeping for Queues 22 1.7 Introduction to the Qts Plus Software 26 Problems 27 2 Review of Stochastic Processes 35 2.1 The Exponential Distribution 35 2.2 The Poisson Process 39 2.3 Discrete Time Markov Chains 49 2.4 Continuous Time Markov Chains 62 Problems 69 3 Simple Markovian Queueing Models 73 3.1 Birth Death Processes 73 3.2 Single Server Queues (M=M=1) 77 3.3 Multiserver Queues (M=M=c) 90 3.4 Choosing the Number of Servers 97 3.5 Queues with Truncation (M=M=c=K) 100 3.6 Erlang s Loss Formula (M=M=c=c) 105 3.7 Queues with Unlimited Service (M=M=1) 108 3.8 Finite Source Queues 109 3.9 State Dependent Service 115 3.10 Queues with Impatience 119 3.11 Transient Behavior 121 3.12 Busy Period Analysis 126 Problems 127 4 Advanced Markovian Queueing Models 147 4.1 Bulk Input (M[X]=M=1) 147 4.2 Bulk Service (M=M[Y ]=1) 153 4.3 Erlang Models 158 4.4 Priority Queue Disciplines 172 4.5 Retrial Queues 191 Problems 204 5 Networks, Series, and Cyclic Queues 213 5.1 Series Queues 215 5.2 Open Jackson Networks 221 5.3 Closed Jackson Networks 229 5.4 Cyclic Queues 243 5.5 Extensions of Jackson Networks 244 5.6 NonJackson Networks 246 Problems 248 6 General Arrival or Service Patterns 255 6.1 General Service, Single Server (M=G=1) 255 6.2 General Service, Multiserver (M=G=c=, M=G=1) 290 6.3 General Input (G=M=1, G=M=c) 295 Problems 306 7 General Models and Theoretical Topics 313 7.1 G=Ek=1, G[k]=M=1, and G=PHk=1 313 7.2 General Input, General Service (G=G=1) 320 7.3 Poisson Input, Constant Service, Multiserver (M=D=c) 330 7.4 SemiMarkov and Markov Renewal Processes in Queueing 332 7.5 Other Queue Disciplines 337 7.6 Design and Control of Queues 342 7.7 Statistical Inference in Queueing 353 Problems 361 8 Bounds and Approximations 365 8.1 Bounds 366 8.2 Approximations 378 8.3 Deterministic Fluid Queues 392 8.4 Network Approximations 400 Problems 411 9 Numerical Techniques and Simulation 417 9.1 Numerical Techniques 417 9.2 Numerical Inversion of Transforms 433 9.3 Discrete Event Stochastic Simulation 446 Problems 469 References 475 Appendix A: Symbols and Abbreviations 487 Appendix B: Tables 495 Appendix C: Transforms and Generating Functions 503 C.1 Laplace Transforms 503 C.2 Generating Functions 510 Appendix D: Differential and Difference Equations 515 D.1 Ordinary Differential Equations 515 D.2 Difference Equations 531 Appendix E: QtsPlus Software 537 E.1 Instructions for Downloading 540 Index 541.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118943526 20180618
The definitive guide to queueing theory and its practical applications features numerous real-world examples of scientific, engineering, and business applications Thoroughly updated and expanded to reflect the latest developments in the field, Fundamentals of Queueing Theory, Fifth Edition presents the statistical principles and processes involved in the analysis of the probabilistic nature of queues. Rather than focus narrowly on a particular application area, the authors illustrate the theory in practice across a range of fields, from computer science and various engineering disciplines to business and operations research. Critically, the text also provides a numerical approach to understanding and making estimations with queueing theory and provides comprehensive coverage of both simple and advanced queueing models. As with all preceding editions, this latest update of the classic text features a unique blend of the theoretical and timely real-world applications. The introductory section has been reorganized with expanded coverage of qualitative/non-mathematical approaches to queueing theory, including a high-level description of queues in everyday life. New sections on non-stationary fluid queues, fairness in queueing, and Little s Law have been added, as has expanded coverage of stochastic processes, including the Poisson process and Markov chains. Each chapter provides a self-contained presentation of key concepts and formulas, to allow readers to focus independently on topics relevant to their interests A summary table at the end of the book outlines the queues that have been discussed and the types of results that have been obtained for each queue Examples from a range of disciplines highlight practical issues often encountered when applying the theory to real-world problems A companion website features QtsPlus, an Excel-based software platform that provides computer-based solutions for most queueing models presented in the book. Featuring chapter-end exercises and problems all of which have been classroom-tested and refined by the authors in advanced undergraduate and graduate-level courses Fundamentals of Queueing Theory, Fifth Edition is an ideal textbook for courses in applied mathematics, queueing theory, probability and statistics, and stochastic processes. This book is also a valuable reference for practitioners in applied mathematics, operations research, engineering, and industrial engineering.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118943526 20180618
Book
1 PDF (xvii, 122 pages).
  • Preface Acknowledgments Introduction Programming Model The SIMT Core: Instruction and Register Data Flow Memory System Crosscutting Research on GPU Computing Architectures Bibliography Authors' Biographies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781681733586 20180709
Originally developed to support video games, graphics processor units (GPUs) are now increasingly used for general-purpose (non-graphics) applications ranging from machine learning to mining of cryptographic currencies. GPUs can achieve improved performance and efficiency versus central processing units (CPUs) by dedicating a larger fraction of hardware resources to computation. In addition, their general-purpose programmability makes contemporary GPUs appealing to software developers in comparison to domain-specific accelerators. This book provides an introduction to those interested in studying the architecture of GPUs that support general-purpose computing. It collects together information currently only found among a wide range of disparate sources. The authors led development of the GPGPU-Sim simulator widely used in academic research on GPU architectures. The first chapter of this book describes the basic hardware structure of GPUs and provides a brief overview of their history. Chapter 2 provides a summary of GPU programming models relevant to the rest of the book. Chapter 3 explores the architecture of GPU compute cores. Chapter 4 explores the architecture of the GPU memory system. After describing the architecture of existing systems, Chapters \ref{ch03} and \ref{ch04} provide an overview of related research. Chapter 5 summarizes cross-cutting research impacting both the compute core and memory system. This book should provide a valuable resource for those wishing to understand the architecture of graphics processor units (GPUs) used for acceleration of general-purpose applications and to those who want to obtain an introduction to the rapidly growing body of research exploring how to improve the architecture of these GPUs.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781681733586 20180709
Book
419 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.
  • Grand Challenges meistern : der Beitrag der Technikfolgenabschätzung / Michael Decker, Ralf Lindner, Stephan Lingner, Constanze Scherz, Mahshid Sotoudeh
  • Grand Challenges
  • Theoretische und praktische Probleme transdisziplinärer Forschung angesichts kollektiver Handlungsprobleme von globaler Reichweite / Carl Friedrich Gethmann
  • Think global! reflections on a global technology assessment / Julia Hahn, Miltos Ladikas, Constanze Scherz
  • Grand Challenges : Eröffnung von gesellschaftlichen Lernräumen oder Suche nach diskursiver Kontrolle? / Stefan Böschen
  • Grand Challenges als Spiegelbild des homo fabers : Herausforderungen für die Technikfolgenabschätzung im 21. Jahrhundert / Bettina-Johanna Krings
  • Technikfolgenabschätzung in Wendezeiten : Herausforderungen der Transdisziplinarität und des Nationalen / Elena Seredkina
  • TA-Konzepte
  • Die Forcierung des sozio-technischen Wandels : Neue (alte?) : Herausforderungen für die Technikfolgenabschätzung (TA) / Christian Büscher, Stefan Böschen, Andreas Lösch
  • Navigieren in richtung responsible research and innovation : Governanceprinzipien zur strategischen Reflexion / Ralf Lindner, Stefan Kuhlmann
  • Partizipation als grosse Herausforderung : Neue Formen der Öffentlichkeitsbeteiligung im Kontext von 'Responsible Research and Innovation' / Alexander Bogner, Anja Bauer, Daniela Fuchs
  • Bedürfnisorientierte Forschung, Technologie und Innovation : eine europaweite Multiakteurskonsultation zu Horizon 2020 / Niklas Gudowsky, Walter Peissl, Ulrike Bechtold, Mahshid Sotoudeh
  • (Grand) Challenges in der interdisziplinären technikbezogenen Sicherheitsforschung / Gerhard Banse
  • Lebenswissenschaften, Gesundheit
  • Neue Gentechnologieverfahren : alte Kontroversen? Einsichten und Aussichten aus früheren TA-Projekten / Arnold Sauter
  • Gene Drives : eine neue Qualität bei der Freisetzung gentechnisch veränderter Organismen / Bernd Giese
  • Gene Drive : auf CRISPR, Cas9 basierende mutagene Kettenreaktion als Ultima Ratio zur Bekämpfung von Malaria? / Wolfgang Liehert, Jakob Wölcher
  • In-vitro-Fleisch : die normative Kraft einer Vision im Innovations- und Transformationsprozess / Silvia Woll, Inge Böhm, Arianna Ferrari
  • Neuroenhancement und TA-Verantwortung / Daniela Fuchs, Leo Capari, Helge Torgersen
  • Intelligente Assistenzsysteme und Digitalisierung der Gesellschaft
  • Mit Robotern gegen den Pflegenotstand? Herausforderungen der Pflegerobotik für TA und Gesellschaft / Christoph Kehl
  • Bedarfsorientierte Entwicklung altersgerechter Technik für Menschen mit Demenz am Beispiel des Projektes "QuartrBack" / Claudia Brändle, Nora Weinberger, Johannes Hirsch
  • Der Mensch im Spannungsfeld zwischen digitaler Utopie und digitaler Apokalypse / Martina Kainz
  • Participatory Sensing und Wearable Technologies als partizipative : Formen der Datengenerierung im Internet of things : Potenziale, Herausforderungen und erste Lösungsansätze / Nadine Kleine, Max-R. Ulbricht, Karsten Weber, Frank Pallas
  • Mehr Gesundheit durch Quantified Seif? zu den Folgen der digitalen Selbstvermessung, Szenarien für 2030 und Handlungsoptionen / Nils B. Heyen
  • Immer und überall online? Risiken und Chancen von Hypervernetzung / Sarah Genner
  • Digitalisierung in der chemischen Industrie : Technikreflexionen aus der Forschungswerkstatt / Norbert Malanowski
  • Umwelt, Energie, Mobilität
  • Jugendforum "Umweltbewusster Konsum und Online-Handel" / Mahshid Sotoudeh, Leo Capari
  • Energiesystemwandel und die Folgen von Technik : Neue Ziele und Aufgaben für die TA? / Michael Ornetzeder
  • Instrumente in der Systemanalyse für die Realisierung einer robusten Energieversorgung / Bert Droste-Franke
  • Entschärfung der Atommüllproblematik durch Partitionierung und Transmutation? : Beiträge zur Einschätzung des Potenzials / Friederike Friess, Wolfgang Liebert
  • "Grand Challenges" der Energie- und Rohstoffwende in Deutschland : Optionen, Potenziale und Konfliktfelder am Beispiel von Plattformchemikalien / Lutz Schiffer, Florian Keller, Roh Pin Lee
  • Socio-Economic Impact Assessment bei Zulassungsverfahren unter Reach : Erfahrungen und Erkenntnisse aus einer Neulandbeschreitung / Alexander Gressmann, Iris Dlugi
  • Möglichkeitsbedingungen automatisierten und autonomen Fahrens : Oder : über die kleinen Herausforderungen bei einem Versuch, einen Grand Challenge zu bewältigen / Torsten Fleischer
  • Urbane Seilbahnen : Herausforderungen der Diffusion eines ungewohnten Verkehrsmittels / Max Reichenbach, Maike Puhe
  • Verzeichnis der Autorinnen und Autoren.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xii, 356 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
  • The railroad
  • The dam
  • The plant
  • The test site
  • The strip.
The United States has a long and unfortunate history of exposing employees, the public, and the environment to dangerous work. But in April 2009, the spotlight was on Las Vegas when the Pulitzer committee awarded its public service prize to the Las Vegas Sun for its coverage of the high fatalities on Las Vegas Strip construction sites. The newspaper attributed failures in safety policy to the recent "exponential growth in the Las Vegas market." In fact, since Las Vegas' founding in 1905, rapid development has always strained occupational health and safety standards. A History of Occupational Health and Safety examines the work, hazards, and health and safety programs from the early building of the railroad through the construction of the Hoover Dam, chemical manufacturing during World War II, nuclear testing, and dense megaresort construction on the Las Vegas Strip. In doing so, this comprehensive chronicle reveals the long and unfortunate history of exposing workers, residents, tourists, and the environment to dangerous work-all while exposing the present and future to crises in the region. Complex interactions and beliefs among the actors involved are emphasized, as well as how the medical community interpreted and responded to the risks posed. Few places in the United States contain this mixture of industrial and postindustrial sites, the Las Vegas area offers unique opportunities to evaluate American occupational health during the twentieth century, and reminds us all about the relevancy of protecting our workers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781943859702 20180618
Green Library
Book
vi, 249 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Green Library
Book
vi, 249 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Insights and advice from the field on how to respond to and leverage the radical transformation AI, robotics, and machine learning are having on all kinds of enterprise processes. Articulates the new environment in which AI, machine learning, and bots are increasingly commonplace tools being used across the organization Aids managers trying to understand how to help employees do their best work in a quickly changing tech environment Shows business leaders more concretely than heretofore how processes and definitions of jobs will change and clarifies potential opportunities at their organization or in their industry Provides concrete guidance for the many companies beginning to face the challenges of human-machine collaboration and management Engagingly written and accessible Broad range of stories from across industries (via Accenture's client list) Audience: Broad audience of executives and managers interested in how they can improve processes, profitability, and overall impact via AI, robotics, and machine learning. This interest will range across core operations/manufacturing, back office, R&D, marketing, and HR. Announced first printing: 20,000 Laydown goal: 4,000.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781633693869 20180416
Business Library