Book
xxi, 582 p. : ill., maps ; 27 cm.
  • 1. Hunting for the Snark, by Elizabeth L. Bennett and John G. Robinson I: Biological Limits to Sustainability 2. Carrying Capacity Limits to Sustainable Hunting in Tropical Forests, by John G. Robinson and Elizabeth L. Bennett 3. Evaluating the Impact and Sustainability of Subsistence Hunting at Multiple Amazonian Forest Sites, by Carlos A. Peres 4. The Sustainability of Current Hunting Practices by the Huaorani, by Patricio Mena V., Jody R. Stallings, Jhanira Regalado B. and Ruben Cueva L. 5. Sustainability of Ach Hunting in the Mbaracayu Reserve, Paraguay, by Kim Hill and Jonathan Pad 6. Impact of Sustainability of Indigenous Hunting in the Ituri Forest, Congo-Zaire: A Comparison of Unhunted and Hunted Duiker Populations, by John A. Har 7. Threatened Mammals, Subsistence Harvesting, and High Human Population Densities: A Recipe for Disaster?, by Clare D. FitzGibbon, Hezron Mogaka, and John H. Fanshawe 8. Hunted Animals in Bioko Island, West Africa: Sustainability and Future, by John E. Fa 9. Differential Vulnerability of Large Birds and Mammals to Hunting in North Sulawesi, by Timothy G. O'Brien and Margaret F. Ki 10. The Impact of Traditional Subsistence Hunting and Trapping on Prey Populations: Data from Wana Horticulturalists of Upland Central Sulawesi, Indonesia, by Michael Alvard II: Sociocultural Context Influencing Sustainability 11. A Pound of Flesh: Social Change and Modernization as Factors in Hunting Sustainability Among Neootropical Indigenous Societie, by Allyn MacLean Stearman 12. Wildlife Conservation and Game Harvest by Maya Hunters in Quintana Roo, Mexico, by Jeffrey P. Jorgenson 13. The Sustainability of Subsistence Hunting by the Sirion Indians of Bolivia, by Wendy R. Townsend 14. Cable Snares and Nets in the Central African Republic, by Andrew Noss 15. Saving Borneo's Bacon: The Sustainability of Hunting in Sarawak and Sabah, by Elizabeth L. Bennett, Adrian J. Nyaoi, and Jephte Sompud 16. Agta Hunting and Sustainability of Resource Use in Northeastern Luzon, Philippines, by P. Bion Griffin and Marcus B. Griffin III: Institutional Capacity for Management 17. Hunting for an Answer: Is Local Hunting Compatible with Large Mammal Conservation in India?, by M. D. Madhusudan and K. Ullas Karanth 18. Enhancing the Sustainability of Duiker Hunting Through Community Participation and Controlled Access in the LobCkC Region of Southeastern Cameroon, by Cheryl Fimbel, Bryan Curran, and Leonard Usongo 19. Traditional Management of Hunting in a Xavante Community in Central Brazil: The Search for Sustainability, by Frans J. Leeuwenberg and John G. Robinson 20. Community-Based Comanagement of Wildlife in the Peruvian Amazon, by Richard Bodmer and Pablo E. Puertas IV: Economic Influences on Sustainability 21. Wildlife Use in Northern Congo: Hunting in a Commercial Logging Concession, by Philippe, Auzel and David S. Wilkie 22. Socioeconomics and the Sustainability of Hunting in the Forests of Northern Congo (Brazzaville), by Heather E. Eves and Richard G. Ruggiero 23. Impact of Subsistence Hunting in North Sulawesi Indonesia, and Conservation Options, , by Rob J. Lee 24. The Trade in Wildlife in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, by Lynn Clayton and E. J. Milner-Gulland V: Synthesis 25. Hunting for Sustainability: The Start of a Synthesis, by Elizabeth L. Bennett and John G. Robinson.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231109772 20160528
-- Ecological Economics.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231109772 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
viii, 126 p. : maps ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 87 p. : ill., maps ; 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
171 p. ; 25 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
221 p. : ill. (many col.), map ; 22 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xiv, 182 pages : illustrations (chiefly color), map, charts, tables ; 24 cm
  • Summary
  • Zusammenfassung [Summary]
  • RESEARCH OUTLINE
  • GENERAL INTRODUCTION AND RESEARCH OBJECTIVES
  • ANCIENT HISTORY OF ASIAN FALCONRY
  • Earliest representation of human and raptor interaction: North and Central Asia
  • Falconer Figures in Ancient East Asia: China and Japan
  • ETHNOGRAPHIC NARRATIVE OF ALTAIC KAZAKH FALCONRY
  • Traditional art and knowledge of eagle-taming process
  • Eagle falconers in hunting operation: Contemporary operations of horse riding falconry and its decline
  • CULTURAL SUSTAINABILITY OF EAGLE FALCONRY
  • Socio-cultural actions geared towards sustainability: Heritage tourism & cultural alterations in Altaic Kazakh falconry
  • Social-ecological basis for sustainability: Transhumant animal herding livelihood for eagle-ownership facilitation
  • Conclusions on the future sustainability of Altaic Kazakh falconry: falconry as a gift of human-raptor harmony
  • List of tables and figures.
"This research project focuses on current eagle-taming falconry practice of the Altaic Kazakhs animal herding society in Bayan Ulgii Province in Western Mongolia...It aims to contributing both theoretical and empirical criteria for cultural preservation of Asian falconry...Falconry culture used to hold a significant status in human history, not only as avocational hunting, royal sport and panache of higher strata, but also even as a source of literal imaginary. However, falconry cultures, especially across Asian territories, have been undergoing a decline through the process of modernization during the last century. This threatens with disappearance from human history those cultural resources and the century-lasting legacy of 'art and humanity sense'. Hence, an initial purpose of this thesis is to seek both theoretical and empirical criteria for cultural preservation of Asian falconry. This cultural and even enironmental discourse is illustrated with concentrated field research designed by ecological anthropology and ethno-ornithology from the viewpoint of 'Human-Animal Interaction (HAI)' and 'Human-Animal Behavior (HAB)'. The theoretical framework of this project also includes a protection of 'Traditional Art and Knowledge (TAK)' developed by Kazakh eagle masters. The current situation is characterised by the absence of basic socio-cultural information, precursory research and a theoretical framework surrounding Altaic Kazakh falconry. This research therefore departs from three initial questions: (1) When and where did raptor taming custom start? (2) How and why can Altaic Kazakhs tame Golden Eagle? (3) How can we conserve indigenous eagle falconry for the future?" --Excerpted from Summary, page iv, by Takuya Soma.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
iii, 30 leaves : ill., maps ; 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
38 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xii, 84 p. : ill. ; 30 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 282 : ill., maps ; 22 cm.
The purpose of this book is to assess the extent to which displaced and marginalized people in Zimbabwe's Zambezi Valley are participating in the implementation of Campfire and how far they are benefiting from wildlife as a result of Campfire.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
vi, 282 p. : ill., maps ; 21 cm.
The purpose of this book is to assess the extent to which displaced and marginalized people in Zimbabwe's Zambezi Valley are participating in the implementation of Campfire and how far they are benefiting from wildlife as a result of Campfire.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
7 v. : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • List of Tables-- List of Embedded Figures-- List of Color Photo Figures-- List of Black & White Photo Figures-- Foreword by R.J. Gutierrez-- Preface-- Acknowledgement-- Introduction-- Book VII (Chapters 14)-- Chapter 14-- Suggested Road Map for the Way Forward-- Introduction-- The Way Forward - A Roadmap for the Future-- Role of Watchdog NGOs-- Concluding Remarks-- Acronyms-- Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773450707 20160527
Looks at the big picture, on the African sub-continent as it applies to conservation, development, human rights and foreign policy. This book is suitable as a historical reference, a technical document and as a basis for policy formulation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780773450707 20160527
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xiii, 463 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Introduction Chapter 1. Wildlife Conservation and Management in South and Central America: Multiple Pressures and Innovative solutions, by Jose M. V. Fragoso, Richard E. Bodmer and Kirsten M. Silvius Part I. Local peoples and Community Management Chapter 2. Wildlife management strategies with the Embera people in the Utria National Park, by Choco, Colombia, Astrid Ulloa, Claudia Campos, and Heidi Rubio-Torgler Chapter 3. Bridging the gap between western scientific and traditional indigenous wildlife management, by Kirsten M. Silvius Chapter 4. Techniques to increase community participation in wildlife management programs: general approaches, by Wendy R. Townsend Chapter 5. Community-based wildlife management in the Gran Chaco, by Bolivia, Andrew J. Noss and Michael Painter Chapter 6. Fisheries Management and Conservation in the Amazon Varzea Floodplain, by William G. R. Crampton, Leandro Castello and Joao Paulo Viana Chapter 7. Fisheries Management in the Mamiraua Sustainable Development Reserve, by William G. R. Crampton, Joao Paulo Viana, Leandro Castello and Jose Maria B. Dam Chapter 8. Hunting effort analysis by rural communities in Northeastern Peru, by Pablo E. Puertas and Richard E. Bodmer Part II. Economic Considerations Chapter 9. Community management of fishery resources in the Mamiraua Sustainable Development Reserve, by Amazonas, BrazilJoao Paulo Viana, Jose Maria B. Damasceno, Leandro Castello, Wi Chapter 10. Community ownership and live Shearing of vicunas in Peru, by Catherine T. Sahley, Jorge Torres Vargas and Jesus Sanchez Valdivia Chapter 11. Captive breeding programs as an alternative for wildlife conservation in Brazil, by Sergio Nogueira-Filho and Selene Siqueira da Cunha Nogueira Chapter 12. Economic Analysis of Wildlife Use in the Peruvian Amazon, by Richard Bodmer, and Eterzit Pezo Lozano and Tula G. Fang Part III. Fragmentation and other non-harvest human impacts Chapter 13. Population management of mammals in Atlantic Forest fragments of Brazil, by Laury Cullen Jr., Richard E. Bodmer, Claudio Valladares-Padua, and Jonathan D. B Chapter 14. Human pressure, by abundance and spatial distribution of Orinoco Crocodiles in the Cojedes River sy Chapter 15. Impacts of Damming on Primate Community Sructure in the Amazon -- A Case Study of the Samuel Dam, by Rondonia, Brazil, Rosa M. Lemos de Sa Chapter 16. Resource partitioning of pampas deer, by brocket deer and cattle in the Pantanal, Brazil, Laurenz Pinder Chapter 17. Ecology and conservation of the Jaguar in Iguacu National Park, by Peter G. Crawshaw Jr., Jan K. Mahler, Cibele Indrusiak, Sandra M.C. Cavalcanti, Chapter 18. Local white-lipped peccary (Tayassu pecari) population declines in Amazonia: Migration, by overhunting or epidemic?, Jose M. V. Fragoso Part IV. Hunting Impacts--biological basis and rationale for sustainability Chapter 19. Evaluating the sustainability of hunting in the Neotropics, by Richard E. Bodmer and John G. Robinson Chapter 20. Hunting sustainability of ungulate populations in the Lacandon forest, by Mexico, Eduardo J. Naranjo, Jorge E. Bolanos, Michelle M. Guerra, and Richard E. Chapter 21. Title: Conservation of economically important birds in seasonally-flooded forests of the northeastern Peruvian Amazon, by Jose A. Gonzalez Chapter 22. Patterns of use and hunting of turtles in the Mamiraua Sustainable Development Reserve, by Amazonas, Brazil, Augusto Fachin Teran, Richard C. Vogt, and John B. Thorbjarnar Chapter 23. Fisheries, by Fishing Effort and Fish Consumption in the Pacaya-Samiria National Reserve and i Chapter 24. Title: Implications of the spatial structure of game populations for the sustainability of hunting in the Neotropics, by Andres J. Novaro Chapter 25. Hunting and wildlife management in French Guiana: Current aspects and future prospects, by Cecile Richard-Hansen and Eric Hansen.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231127837 20160528
The most extensive, undisturbed tropical forests and wetlands on our planet are located in South and Central America. The persistence of intact eco-systems in South America, and to a lesser degree in Central America, is the result of the region's unique mixture of human cultures and of its inhabitants' continued reliance on wild plants and animals for subsistence and economic use. The world-view of the region's indigenous peoples, which does not separate humans and nature, has fused with the worldviews of African, European, and East Indian immigrants to produce a new conservation 'philosophy'. Biologists and resource managers in the region have developed research and conservation tools that are both scientifically rigorous and uniquely adapted to make use of the biological, economic, and spiritual links between humans and non-human nature."People in Nature" highlights South and Central American approaches to wildlife conservation and documents both the current state and the historical development of a Latin American conservation and management strategy. This book addresses the threats to bio-diversity caused by ranching, habitat fragmentation, fishing, and hunting and critically assesses the potential benefits and risks of continued human use of wildlife. By making available in English research results originally presented in Spanish or Portuguese at the first five International Conferences on Wildlife Management and Conservation in Latin America and the Amazon, this book also reverses the traditional flow of information and innovation in conservation practices from North to South and Central America, providing North American and European researchers and conservationists with management solutions that are potentially applicable in their own regions.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780231127837 20160528
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xx, 415 p., [4] p. of plates : ill. ; 24 cm.
  • Exploitation of mammal populations: past, present and future. The exploitation, sustainable use and welfare of mammals. Historical dichotomies in the exploitation of mammals. Exploitation of wild fur-bearer populations. Assessing the impact of mammal uses: the good, the bad and the neutral. Harvesting wild mammal populations: Game ranching. Status and exploitation of the saiga antelope in Kalmykia. Capybara use and conservation in South America. Sustainable use of whales: whaling or whale watching? Hunting and its impact on wildlife: The impact of game meat hunting on target and non-target species in the Serengeti. Resolving a conflict: subsistence hunting and mammal conservation in a Kenyan coastal forest. The impact of sport hunting: a case study. Deer populations subject to hunting-to-hounds. Wildlife trade and conservation: Zimbabwe: a model for the sustainable use of wildlife and the development of innovative wildlife management practices. Sustainable utilization: the lessons of history. Wildlife trade - a conserver or exploiter? Tiger poaching - the road to extinction. The exploitation of Asian elephants. Ecotourism: making mammal populations pay. The impact of ecotourism development on distribution, status and activity of rainforest mammals in Manu, Peru. Mountain gorillas in the Virunga volcanoes and the effects of human disturbance. Use, misuse, and abuse of the orang utan - exploitation as a threat or the only real salvation? Elephant family values. Human disturbance of cetaceans.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)
Mankind has historically exploited mammalian populations in their wild and domesticated forms. Today, as steadily increasing human populations demand more space and resources, the exploitation of mammals for commercial gain, subsistence, conservation and control is stimulating lively debate on the morality, sustainability and welfare implications of a continuing exploitative relationship. This volume presents a selection of edited papers from a conference jointly organized by the Universities' Federation for Animal Welfare (UFAW) and the Mammal Society, in November 1994, with contributions from an international team of wildlife biologists, ecologists and conservationists. The issues involved in harvesting, hunting, sustainable trade and ecotourism are explored and set in the context of past and present mammal exploitation. It provides a wide-ranging review of current attitudes to mammal exploitation, and should be of interest and use to zoologists, ecologists, animal behaviourists, wildlife managers, conservation biologists and campaigners.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xix, 290 p. : ill., maps ; 25 cm.
  • PART I Introduction and Conceptual Issues 1 An introduction to consumptive wildlife tourism BRENT LOVELOCK 2 The 'Animal Question' and the 'consumption' of wildlife ADRIAN FRANKLIN 3 The lure of fly-fishing ROBERT PRESTON-WHYTE PART II Historic Precedents 4 The Scandinavian Sporting Tour 1830-1914 PIA SILLANPAA 5 Controversies surrounding the ban of wildlife hunting in Kenya: A historical perspective JOHN S. AKAMA 6 Game estates and guided hunts: two perspectives on the hunting of red deer GUIL FIGGINS 7 Shooting tigers as leisure in colonial India KEVIN HANNAM PART III Impacts of Consumptive Wildlife Tourism 8 Conservation Hunting Concepts, Canada's Inuit, and Polar Bear Hunting LEE FOOTE & GEORGE WENZEL 9 Environmental values of consumptive and non-consumptive marine tourists JACKIE DAWSON & BRENT LOVELOCK 10 The Success and Sustainability of Consumptive Wildlife Tourism in Africa JOSEPH E. MBAIWA 11 Trophy hunting and recreational angling in Namibia: an economic, social and environmental comparison JOHNATHAN I. BARNES & MARINA NOVELLI 12 Welfare foundations for efficient management of wildlife and fish resources for recreational use in Sweden LEIF MATTSSON, MATTIAS BOMAN, GORAN ERICSSON, ANTON PAULRUD, THOMAS LAITILA, BENGT KRISTROM & RUNAR BRAMLUND 13 What happens in a Swedish Rural Community when the Local Moose Hunt meets Hunting Tourism? YVONNE GUNNARSDOTTER 14 Arab Falconry: Changes, challenges and conservation opportunities of an ancient art PHILIP J. SEDDON & FREDERIC SAUNAY PART IV Current Issues and Destination Development 15 Communicating for Wildlife Management or Hunting Tourism: the Case of the Manitoba Spring Bear Hunt MICHAEL CAMPBELL 16 Catch and Release Tourism: Community, culture and consumptive wildlife tourism strategies in rural Idaho KENNETH COHEN 17 Marine Fishing Tourism in Lofoten, Northern Norway: The Management of the Fish Resources OYSTEIN NORMANN 18 Footprints in the sand: Encounter norms for backcountry river trout anglers in New Zealand CARL WALROND 19 Australia as a Safari Hunting Destination for Exotic Animals STEVEN CRAIG-SMITH & GORDON MCL DRYDEN 20 Conclusion: consumptive wildlife tourism - sustainable niche or endangered species? BRENT LOVELOCK.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415403818 20160527
Consumptive forms of wildlife tourism (hunting, shooting and fishing) have become a topic of interest - both to the tourism industry, in terms of destinations seeking to establish or grow this sector, and to other stakeholders such as environmental organisations, animal-rights groups, and the general public. Hunting tourism, in particular, has come under fire with accusations that it is contributing to the demise of some species. Practices such as "canned hunting" (within fenced safari parks) or the use of hounds are described as unethical, and fishing tourism too has attracted recent negative publicity as it is said to be cruel. At the same time, however, many peripheral and indigenous communities around the world are strategising how to capitalise on consumptive forms of wildlife tourism. This book addresses a range of contentious issues facing the consumptive wildlife tourism sector across a number of destinations in Europe, North America, Africa, India, Arabia and Oceania. Practices such as baited bear hunting, trophy hunting of threatened species, and hunting for conservation are debated, along with the impact of this type of tourism on indigenous communities and on wider societies. Research on all aspects of "consumptive wildlife tourism" is included, which for the purposes of the book is defined to include all tourism that involves the intended killing of wildlife for sport purposes, and may include the harvest of wildlife products. This includes, among others, recreational hunting, big-game hunting and safari operations, traditional/indigenous hunting, game-bird shooting, hunting with hounds, freshwater angling and saltwater game fishing etc. This is the first book to specifically address tourist aspects of consumption of wildlife. It will appeal to tourism and recreation academics and students, tourism industry operators, community tourism planners and wildlife managers.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780415403818 20160527
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
ix, 274 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Contributors.Preface.Introduction. David Brown and Glyn Davies.Part 1. Bushmeat: Markets and Households. Glyn Davies and John G. Robinson.1. Hunting and trapping in Gola forests, south-eastern Sierra Leone: Bushmeat from farm, fallow and forest. Glyn Davies, Bjorn Schulte-Herbruggen, Noelle F. Kumpel, and Samantha Mendelson.2. Livelihoods and sustainability in a bushmeat commodity chain in Ghana. Guy Cowlishaw, Samantha Mendelson, and J. Marcus Rowcliffe.3. Bushmeat markets - white elephants or red herrings? John E. Fa.4. Cameroon: from free gift to valued commodity. The bushmeat commodity chain around the Dja Reserve. Hilary Solly.5. Determinants of bushmeat consumption and trade in continental Equatorial Guinea: an urban-rural comparison. Noelle F. Kumpel, Tamsyn East, Nick Keylock, J. Marcus Rowcliffe, Guy Cowlinshaw, and E.J. Milner-Gulland.6. Livelihoods, hunting and the game meat trade in northern Zambia. Taylor Brown and Stuart A. Marks.Part 2: Institutional contexts. E.J. Milner-Gulland.7. Is the best the enemy of the good? Institutional and livelihoods perspectives on bushmeat harvesting and trade - some issues and challenges. David Brown.8. Bushmeat, wildlife management, and good governance: rights and institutional arrangements in Namibia's community based natural resources management programme. Christopher Vaughan and Andrew Long.9. Wildlife management in a logging concession in Northern Congo: can livelihoods be maintained through sustainable hunting? John R. Poulsen, Connie J. Clark, and Germain A. Mavah.10. Institutional challenges to sustainable bushmeat management in Central Africa. Andrew Hurst.Part 3. Extra-Sectoral Influences and Models. Jo Elliott.11. Can wildlife and agriculture coexist outside protected areas in Africa? A hopeful model and a case study in Zambia. Dale M. Lewis.12. Food for thought for the bushmeat trade: lessons from the commercialisation of plant NTFPs. Elaine Marshall, Kathrin Schreckenberg, Adrian Newton, Dirk Willem te Velde, Jonathan Rushton, Fabrice Edouard, Catarina Illsley, and Eric Arancibia.13. Bushmeat, forestry and livelihoods: exploring the coverage in PRSPs. Neil M. Bird and Chris S. Dickson.14. The Beverly and Qamanirjuaq Caribou Management Board (BQCMB): blending knowledge, people and practice for barren-ground caribou conservation in Northern Canada. Ross C. Thompson.Part 4: Regional perspectives. Glyn Davies and Ruth Whitten.15. Hunting, wildlife trade and wildlife consumption patterns in Asia. Elizabeth L. Bennett.References.Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405167796 20160528
This book explores the links between bushmeat and livelihoods in Africa, with a focus on the human dimension of the debate. It assembles biological, social and economic perspectives that illuminate the bushmeat debate. It features a series of case studies that explore what species survive different intensities of bushmeat hunting and trapping. It examines the shape and size of household bushmeat consumption and market trading. It reviews governance and institutional impacts on wildlife management; lessons learned from agriculture, forest plant product, and development sectors; and perspectives from Asia and Latin America. It provides an excellent resource for students and policy makers in wildlife management, conservation, and development.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405167796 20160528
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
x, 196 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • Part 1 Wildlife Policy Issues: Intergovernmental Dilemma in Policy Implementation, William R. Mangun and Jean C. Mangun-- The Theory and Application of a Wildlife Policy Framework, Stephen R. Kellert and Tim W. Clark. Part 2 Planning Issues in Wildlife Policy: Operating at the "Wildlife-Human Interface" - A Marketing Approach to Wildlife Planning, Brett A. Wright et al-- Public Involvement in Natural Resource Allocation, William Earle Klay and James D. McElveen. Part 3 Intergovernmental Policy Strategies: The Exxon Valdez Oil Spill - Policy Strategies for Protecting Wildlife Resources, James N. Gladden. Part 4 Resource Allocation Policy Issues: Public Involvement in Natural Resource Management, Steve L. McMullin and Larry A. Nielsen-- Subsistence Use of Wildlife Resources in Alaska - Policy Implications for Wildlife Management in Modernizing Economies, Robert M. Muth et al. Part 5 Organizational Issues in Wildlife Policy: Professional Subcultural Value Conflicts and Policy Interpretation - The Case of Wildlife and Fisheries Managers in the US Forest Service, Connie A. Bullis and James J. Kennedy. Part 6 Sustainable Development Issues in Wildlife Policy: International, National, and Local Management for Sustainable Development - Sea Turtles as Common Property Resources, Debra A. Rose-- Wildlife Management and Sustainable Development - A Critique of Canada's "Endangered Spaces" Plan, Gregory A. Daneke. Part 7 Wildlife Policy Issues Across National Boundaries: Industrialized Fishery Policy Implications for Developing Countries' Structural Adjustment Programmes, Bruce T. Wilkins and Herbert Acquay.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780313280108 20160528
At a time when wildlife policy management becomes increasingly complex and when effective administration is of paramount importance, William R. Mangun has designed a study analyzing the public policy-making process and wildlife conservation issues today. As editor, he has brought together an interdisciplinary group of scholars and practitioners to give a conceptual framework and in-depth evaluation of practical issues in wildlife management. The book stresses the importance of the human dimension and calls for knowledgeable public involvement. Charting new ground, the text should help resource managers and behavioural scientists, students, and professionals in public administration, political science, and wildlife protection find new ways to overcome current problems. The book begins with an overview of the enormous changes in wildlife management over the past 50 years, and then provides a theoretical framework for understanding wildlife policy. Strategies and operations, intergovernmental policies and programmes, issues in resource allocation and sustainable development, and organizational problems describe contemporary political, economic, social, and ethical conflicts and administrative pitfalls. Case studies range from problems like the Exxon Valdez oil spill, the plight of sea turtles, and endangered species plans to matters demonstrating local, state, national, and transnational priorities. The book demonstrates that a lack of understanding of the policy process will lead to compromised effectiveness, diminished professional pride, and relative powerlessness in overcoming the growing problems confronting those concerned with wildlife protection and conservation today.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780313280108 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xvii, 520 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
This book brings together for the first time biological and social scientists with the expertise necessary to document the ways in which the economic value of neotropical wildlife can affect conservation. The contributors, who have done extensive research in Latin America, explore the importance of wildlife to people, the impact of the use of wildlife on animal populations, and whether the present pattern of human use is--or could be made--sustainable. "John Robinson and Kent Redford provide an invaluable overview of the status of wildlife use, from a conservation perspective, in Latin America. "This book is required reading for everyone in conservation, from professionals, students and the general reader, and particularly those who are concerned about the impact of human populations on wild species in developing countries, irrespective of their geographic focus...We know very little about the requirements for sustainable use. This book is an important step toward remedying that."--Stephen Edwards, New Scientist.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226722580 20160528
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xvi, 382 p. : ill., maps ; 24 cm.
  • Notes on contributors. Acknowledgements. Preface. Part 1 Conservation and Hunting . 1. Conservation and hunting: friends or foes? N. Leader-Williams. 2. An overview of recreational hunting in North America, Europe and Australia Robin Sharp and Kai Wollscheid. 3. Recreational fisheries: socio-economic importance, conservation issues and management challenges Robert Arlinghaus and Steven J. Cooke. 4. The ethics of recreational hunting Barney Dickson. Part 2 Science . 5. The science of sustainable hunting E.J.Milner-Gulland, Nils Bunnefeld and Gil Proaktor. 6. Guns, sheep and genes: when and why trophy hunting may be a selective pressure Marco Festa-Bianchet and Ray Lee. 7. Science and the recreational hunting of lions Andrew Loveridge, Craig Packer and Adam Dutton. Part 3 Livelihoods . 8. Sportsman's shot, poacher's pot: hunting, local people and the history of conservation William M. Adams. 9. Exploitation prevents extinction: Case study of endangered Himalayan sheep and goats Michael R. Frisina & Sardar Naseer A. Tareen. 10. Community benefits from safari hunting and related activities in southern Africa Brian T.B. Jones. Part 4 Policy and Practice . 11. Conservation values from falconry Robert E. Kenward. 12. Gamebird science, agricultural policy and biodiversity conservation in lowland UK Nicholas J. Aebischer. 13. The re-introduction of recreational hunting in Uganda Richard H. Lamprey and Arthur Mugisha. 14. Does recreational hunting conflict with photo-tourism? Richard Davies, Kas Hamman and Hector Magome. Part 5 Governance . 15. When does hunting contribute to conservation & rural development? Bill Wall and Brian Child. 16. Recreational hunting and sustainable wildlife use in North America Shane Patrick Mahoney. 17. The development of a recreational hunting industry and its relationship with conservation in southern Africa Vernon R. Booth and David H.M. Cumming. 18. The influence of corruption on the conduct of recreational hunting N. Leader-Williams, R.D. Baldus and R.J. Smith. Part 6 Regulation and Certification. 19. Regulation and recreational hunting Alison M. Rosser. 20. The application of certification to hunting: a case for simplicity Brian Child and Bill Wall. Conclusion. 21. Conservation, Livelihoods and Recreational Hunting: Issues and Strategies William M Adams, Barney Dickson, Holly Dublin and Jon Hutton. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405191425 20160608
For the first time, this book addresses many of the issues that are fundamental to an understanding of the real role of recreational hunting in conservation and rural development. It examines the key issues, asks the difficult questions, and seeks to present the answers to guide policy. Where the answers are not available, it highlights gaps in our knowledge and lays out the research agenda for the next decade.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405191425 20160608
Recreational hunting has long been a controversial issue. Is it a threat to biodiversity or can it be a tool for conservation, giving value to species and habitats that might otherwise be lost? Are the moral objections to hunting for pleasure well founded? Does recreational hunting support rural livelihoods in developing countries, or are these benefits exaggerated by proponents? For the first time, this book addresses many of the issues that are fundamental to an understanding of the real role of recreational hunting in conservation and rural development. It examines the key issues, asks the difficult questions, and seeks to present the answers to guide policy. Where the answers are not available, it highlights gaps in our knowledge and lays out the research agenda for the next decade.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781444303179 20160614
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Book
xiv, 407 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
  • List of boxes.List of symbols.Preface.Acknowledgments.PART I: Background to applied population biology.1. The Big Picture: Human population dynamics meets applied population biology.Introduction.Population ecology of humans.Extinction rates of other species.Humans and sustainable harvest.The big picture.Further reading.2. Designing studies and interpreting population biology data: how do we know what we know?.Introduction.Obtaining reliable facts through sampling.Linking observed facts to ideasmind leads to understanding.Ethics and the wildlife population biologist.Summary.Further reading.3. Genetic concepts and tools to support wildlife population biology.Introduction.What is genetic variation?.Genetic markers used in wildlife population biology.Insights into wildlife population biology using genetic tools.Summary.Further reading.4. Estimating population vital rates.Estimating abundance and density.Survival estimation.Estimation of reproduction.Sex ratio.Summary.Further reading.PART II: POPULATION PROCESSES: THE BASIS FOR MANAGEMENT.5. The simplest way to describe and project population growth: exponential and geometric change.Introduction.Fundamentals of geometric or exponential growth.Causes and consequences of variation in population growth.Quantifying population growth in a stochastic environment.Summary.Further reading.6. Density dependent population change.Introduction.Negative density dependence.Positive density dependence.The logistic: one simple model of negative density-dependent population growth.Some counterintuitive dynamics: limit cycles and chaos.Summary.Further reading.7. Accounting for age and sex-specific differences: population projection models.Introduction.Anatomy of a population-projection matrix.How timing of sampling affects the matrix.Projecting a matrix through time.Adding stochasticity to a matrix model.Sensitivity analysis.Case studies.Summary.Further reading.8. Predation and wildlife populations.Does predation affect prey numbers?.Factors affecting how predation impacts prey numbers.Summary.Further reading.9. Genetic Variation and Fitness of Wildlife Populations.Introduction.Long-term benefits of genetic variation.What determines levels of genetic variation in populations?.Quantifying the loss of heterozygosity: the inbreeding coefficient.When does inbreeding lead to inbreeding depression?.What to do when faced with inbreeding depression?.General Rules.Summary.Further reading.10. Dynamics of Multiple Populations.Introduction.Connectivity among populations.Measuring connectivity among wildlife populations.Multiple populations are not all equal.Options for restoring connectivity.Summary.Further reading.PART III: APPLYING KNOWLEDGE OF POPULATION PROCESSES TO PROBLEMS OF DECLINING, SMALL, OR HARVESTABLE POPULATIONS.11. Human Perturbations: Deterministic Factors Leading to Population Decline.Introduction.General effects of deterministic stressors on populations.Habitat loss and fragmentation.Introduced and invasive species.Pollution.Overharvest.Global climate change.Synergistic effects among deterministic stressors.Summary.Further reading.12. Predicting the dynamics of small and declining populations.Introduction.Ecological characteristics predicting risk.The extinction vortex.Predicting risks in small populations.Population viability analysis: quantitative methods of assessing viability.Other approaches to assessing viability.Some closing thoughts about assessing viability.Summary.Further reading.13. Bridging applied population and ecosystem ecology with focal species concepts.Introduction.Flagship species.Umbrella species.Indicator species.Keystone species and strong interactors.Summary.Further reading.14. Population biology of harvested populations.Introduction.Effects of hunting on population dynamics.Long term effects: hunting as a selective force.Models to guide sustainable harvests.Waterfowl harvest and adaptive harvest management.Management of overabundant and pest populations.Summary.Further reading.Epilogue.References.Species lists.Subject index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405121460 20160528
Professor L. Scott Mills has been named a 2009 Guggenheim Fellow by the board of trustees of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. "Conservation of Wildlife Populations" provides an accessible introduction to the most relevant concepts and principles for solving real-world management problems in wildlife and conservation biology. Bringing together insights from traditionally disparate disciplines, the book shows how population biology addresses important questions involving the harvest, monitoring, and conservation of wildlife populations. This book covers the most up-to-date approaches for assessing factors that affect both population growth and interactions with other species, including predation, genetic changes, harvest, introduced species, viability analysis and habitat loss and fragmentation. It is an essential guide for undergraduates and postgraduate students of wildlife biology, conservation biology, ecology, and environmental studies and an invaluable resource for practicing managers on how population biology can be applied to wildlife conservation and management.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781405121460 20160528
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