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Book
1 online resource (v, [1], 30, [1] pages) : illustrations (some color).
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
Changes in regulation enacted in 2013 have enabled the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Fishery Monitoring and Analysis Division (FMA) and the Alaska Regional Office's Sustainable Fisheries Division to work collaboratively on an Annual Deployment Plan (ADP). Each ADP documents how the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) plans to deploy observers into fishing activities for the coming year under the limits of available funding. Draft ADPs are presented to the North Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) during September - October and are finalized in December. The sampling design for observer deployment has two elements: how the population is subdivided (i.e., stratification schemes) and how available samples are allocated (i.e., allocation strategies). Here the relative performance of 10 alternative sampling designs (at the primary sampling unit- the trip) are compared in support of the draft 2018 ADP. These alternative sampling designs consisted of the combination of two stratification schemes (gear-type only or gear-type × tendering activity), two metrics upon which to base optimizations [one consisting of discard of groundfish with Prohibited Species Catch (PSC) of Pacific halibut and the other consisting of the prior and PSC of Chinook salmon], and three allocation strategies (no optimization, a "hurdle" approach to optimization, and a optimization only). All optimization allocations incorporate three variables measured over the past 3 years: variance in the metric, the average cost of observing a trip, and the number of trips. Total afforded sample size is determined by the available budget and the average cost of observing each trip. Resulting selection rates derive from sample size, allocation weightings and the anticipated fishing effort which was defined as the most recent complete year of data. The total number of observer days that can be afforded is 4,062 which represents a 33% increase from 2017. Gap analyses that examine the chance of at least one or three observed trips in a NMFS Area × gear type combination (cell) were used as a performance metric. Gap analyses illustrated that stratifications based on gear type (3 strata) were outperformed by stratifications based on gear type × tendering activity (6 strata). Potential gaps in observer coverage appear to be mostly concentrated in areas with low fishing effort with fewer than 12 trips in a cell. Simulations were performed to measure the potential impact of unknown vessel participation in electronic monitoring (EM). The variability in gap analyses from randomized differences in EM participant vessels was relatively minor (less than 10% probability of observation shifts across deployment designs). The NMFS recommended an observer deployment design for the draft 2018 ADP that has gear type × tendering stratification and uses a "hurdle" approach to sample allocation wherein 15% base coverage is obtained first across all strata and the remainder is optimized according to the variance in the metric of discarded groundfish catch combined with PSC Pacific halibut and Chinook salmon. At their October 2017 meeting the Council did not support the NMFS recommendation and instead proposed a five strata design with optimal sample allocations based on discarded groundfish catch and PSC of Pacific halibut only. Comparisons between the NMFS and Council recommended designs were included in the final 2018 ADP. [doi:10.7289/V5/TM-AFSC-364 (https://doi.org/10.7289/V5/TM-AFSC-364)]
Book
1 online resource (xi, [1], 45 pages) : color illustrations, color maps.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
"This NOAA Technical Memorandum represents a 2017 update to the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands as a Fishing Community published by Allen and Amesbury in 2012. This fishing community profile update aspires to provide a comprehensive view of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) as a fishing community. The report begins by presenting recent social, economic, and tourism information gathered by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) and the Marianas Visitors Authority in the CNMI. These data are followed by data on four key topics that emerged from interviews conducted by the author in 2016 with the CNMI fishing community. Next, findings from low income fish consumption in 2015 are presented, aggregated at the island level. These data provide the only current estimates of fish consumption on Tinian and Rota. The report concludes by presenting some additional empirical information that supplements the primary data gathered in the profile"--Executive Summary. [doi:10.7289/V5/TM-PIFSC-66 (https://doi.org/10.7289/V5/TM-PIFSC-66)]
Book
1 online resource (v, [1], 58, [1] pages) : color illustrations, color maps.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
A genetic analysis of the prohibited species catch (PSC) of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) collected during 2016 from the federally managed walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) trawl fishery in the Bering Sea and from the federal groundfish fisheries in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) was undertaken to determine the overall stock composition of the sample sets. Samples were genotyped for 11 microsatellite markers from which stock contributions were estimated using the current chum salmon microsatellite baseline. In 2016, one genetic sample was collected for every 30.6 chum salmon caught in the Bering Sea midwater trawl fishery. The evaluation of sampling in the Bering Sea based on time, location, and vessel indicated that the genetic samples were representative of the total chum salmon PSC in the Bering Sea. The majority of the 114 chum salmon samples from the A-season were from Northeast Asia (37%) and Eastern GOA/Pacific Northwest (PNW) (37%) stocks. Based on the analysis of 2,701 chum salmon collected throughout the B-season, the largest stock groups in the catch were Eastern GOA/PNW (35%) and Northeast Asia (31%), followed by Western Alaska (19%), Southeast Asia (9%), Upper/Middle Yukon (5%), and Southwest Alaska (< 2%) stocks. The chum salmon caught in the Bering Sea in 2016 shared general patterns of stock distribution with those from past years, but differed by some finer-scale spatiotemporal strata. Of the 473 chum salmon samples from the GOA groundfish fisheries, the highest proportion was from Eastern GOA/PNW (93%) stocks, similar to previous years. [doi:10.7289/V5/TM-AFSC-366 (https://doi.org/10.7289/V5/TM-AFSC-366)]
Book
1 online resource (v, 32, [2] pages) : color illustrations, color maps.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
"A genetic analysis of samples from the Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) bycatch of the 2016 Bering Sea-Aleutian Island (BSAI) trawl fishery for walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) was undertaken to determine the overall stock composition of the bycatch. Samples were genotyped for 43 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) DNA markers and results were estimated using the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) SNP baseline. In 2016, genetic samples from the Bering Sea were collected using a systematic random sampling protocol where one out of every 10 Chinook salmon encountered was sampled. Based on the analysis of 1,910 Chinook salmon bycatch samples collected throughout the 2016 BSAI walleye pollock trawl fishery, Coastal Western Alaska and British Columbia regions (34% and 29% respectively) dominated the sample set with smaller contributions from West Coast US (14%), and North Alaska Peninsula (13%) regions. Analysis of temporal groupings within the pollock "A" and "B" seasons revealed changes in stock composition during the course of the year with lower contributions of Coastal Western Alaska and North Alaska Peninsula regions and higher contributions of West Coast US, British Columbia, and NW Gulf of Alaska, regions during the "B" season when compared to the "A" season"--PDF Abstract.
Book
xvii, 329 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Acknowledgments Preface List of contributors Introduction: Societal and governing responses to global change in marine systems Appendix Part1_Oyster farming systems under stress Chapter 1_Oyster farming in Matsushima Bay, Japan Chapter 2_Ocean acidification and Pacific oyster larval failures in the Pacific Northwest United States Chapter 3_ Mass mortality of farmed oysters in France: bad responses and good results Part 2_Vulnerable mixed fisheries Chapter 4_ Fisheries in Indonesia between livelihoods and environmental degradation: Coping strategies in the Spermonde Archipelago, Sulawesi Chapter 5_The Baltic Sea, the Baltic Sea Action Plan and the challenge of adaptiveness Part 3_Coastal water quality issues Chapter 6_The crisis management of Amvrakikos Gulf (W. Greece) massive fish mortality: Lessons learned from the handling of a 950 tons dead farmed fish biomass Chapter 7_ The crisis management of a Chatonella fish kill within the semi-enclosed embayment of Maliakos Gulf (CE Aegean Sea), Greece Chapter 8_Clam harvesting in the Venice Lagoon, Italy Chapter 9_ The case study of the regional ICM system introduced voluntarily by the prefectural government in Omura Bay, Japan Chapter 10_Conservation of the short-necked clam in Yokohama, Japan Part 4_Overexploited and weakly governable fisheries Chapter11_A Balancing Act: Managing Multiple Pressures to Fisheries and Fish Farming in Marilao-Meycauayan-Obando River System, Philippines Chapter 12_Threats of extreme events to the Bangladesh Sundarbans: Vulnerabilities, responses and appraisal Chapter 13_Transition and Development in the Jin-shanzui Fishing Village near Shanghai, China Chapter 14_Climate variability, overfishing and transformation in the small pelagics sector in South Africa Chapter 15_Oyster Fishery in Rappahannock River, Chesapeake Bay, USA, East coast Chapter 16_ Local fisheries and land reclamation, The case of the Tokyo Bay Mantis Shrimp Fishery Chapter 17_ Natural, social and governance responses of a small-scale fishery to mass mortalities: the yellow clam Mesodesma mactroides in Uruguay Chapter 18_The Degradation of Cameroon's Mangroves: An Ignorance and/or Absence of a Legal and Regulatory Framework Issue Part 5_Habitat restoration programs Chapter 19_Social Responses to a Fishery-tourism Conflict in Onna Village, Okinawa, Japan Chapter 20_Coral reef restoration in Sekisei Lagoon, Okinawa, Japan Conclusion: Taking lessons from global change responses to advance governance and sustainable use of marine systems List of Tables and Figures Index List of abstracts.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138059221 20180213
Marine social and ecological systems around the world face multiple natural and anthropogenic stressors associated with global change. The resulting changes can create hardship for local societies that depend on them for food, livelihoods and wellbeing. Knowing how to respond to global change in a timely and appropriate manner is increasingly occupying the attention of researchers, policy makers, decision makers and practitioners around the world. ã Written by an international group of researchers from the natural and social sciences, Societal and governing responses to Global Change in Marine Systems analyses and appraises societal and governing responses to change, highlighting and explaining similarities and distinctions between successful, and less successful, responses. The authors present "I-ADApT", an analytical framework that enables decision makers to consider possible responses to global change, based on experiences elsewhere. Within this volume, I-ADApT is applied to 20 enlightening case studies covering a wide range of marine systems that have been challenged by critical global change issues around the world. ã Introducing innovative research to work towards a range of possible responses to global change, Societal and governing responses to Global Change in Marine Systems will appeal to undergraduate and postgraduate students, as well as postdoctoral researchers and practitioners interested in fields such as: Environment & Natural Resources, Marine Resources and social sciences.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138059221 20180213
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
xxi, 267 pages : illustrations, map ; 22 cm
This book provides an in-depth study of Japanese whaling culture, emphasizing how the Japanese have considered whales and whaling in relation to their understanding of nature and religion. It examines why and how the Japanese have mourned the deaths of whales, treating them as if they were human beings, and assesses the relevance of this culture to nature conservation and management of sustainable use of natural resources. It also sheds new light on Japanese whaling, one of the most controversial issues in the contemporary world, by highlighting the hitherto unknown aspects of Japanese beliefs about whales and whaling, which constitute an integral part of their core concept of how they should coexist with nature. Through cross-examining previous studies of Japanese whaling, as well as analyzing new documents and conducting field research on location, this book presents a comprehensive survey of Japanese whaling culture and memorial rites for whales and offers viable insights on how the Japanese whaling culture can be applied to solving current global issues, including nature conservation, management of sustainable use of natural resources, and protection of wildlife and its habitats.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811066702 20180403
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (iii, 13 pages) : color illustrations, color maps.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
"Aerial surveys are flown December 01 through March 31 each year in the Southeast United States to detect North Atlantic right whales in their primary calving area. The purpose of the aerial surveys is to contribute to (in prioritized order): • Population monitoring via detection and identification of individual right whales including cow/calf pairs occurring in the Southeast United States. • Monitoring trends in human-related serious injuries and mortality. • Vessel-strike reduction. Given these objectives, we focused aerial surveys in areas where we expected the highest number of right whale detections. Additionally, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric and Administration's National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have agreed to implement the "Early Warning System" (EWS) -a system of aerial surveys and communications designed to provide mariners with information on whale locations. The goal of the EWS is vessel-whale collision mitigation. This report briefly summarizes results from the NOAA Fisheries-administered aerial surveys and the EWS during the 2015/2016 North Atlantic right whale calving season"--PDF Introduction.
Book
1 online resource (v, 25 pages) : color illustrations.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
"The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has enacted a climate science strategy as part of its proactive approach to better track, forecast, and incorporate information on changing climate conditions into living marine resource management. This strategy is being implemented through customized 5-year Regional Action Plans for climate science (RAPs). These RAPs detail regional climate science needs and specific action items to address them. The drivers and impacts of climate change vary greatly by geographic location. By creating action plans at the regional level, NMFS can tailor its response to meet specific challenges and forge critical partnerships at the local level. A first step in implementing that Pacific Islands Regional Action Plan for climate science (PIRAP) is to identify what information is needed by resource managers and what scientific research and data are available or being developed. Furthermore, regional staff will need to keep abreast of changes on these fronts. To this end, PIRAP authors decided to convene an internal Annual Collaborative Climate Science Workshop. The first workshop, detailed here, was held in September 2017. It was attended by scientists and advisors from NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Regional Office (PIRO) and Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC), as well as the Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council (WPRFMC). The specific goal of this workshop was to identify climate-related information needs, the science products available or in development that can address these needs, and also the potential existing gaps. The workshop spanned three afternoons, with each afternoon focusing on a specific topic: protected species, coral reefs and insular/bottomfish, and pelagic/highly migratory fish. Each afternoon, participants met in small groups for facilitated discussions to identify climate-related information needs, with each group choosing three "top priority" needs. Participants then reconvened for a plenary exercise to aggregate these "top priority" needs and look for commonalities. Once an aggregated list was generated, participants identified science products that could potentially address individual information needs. Current scientific and/or management limitations were also identified. This report synthesizes and summarizes the information gathered from this workshop"--Background. [doi:10.7289/V5/AR-PIFSC-H-18-01 (https://doi.org/10.7289/V5/AR-PIFSC-H-18-01)].
Book
viii, 211 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: political roles for fish populations
  • The fishing empires of the Pacific: the Americans, the Japanese, and the Soviets
  • Islands and war
  • Manifest destiny and fishing
  • Tariffs
  • Industrialization
  • Treaties
  • Imperialism
  • Enclosure
  • Conclusions: updating the best available science.
Most current fishing practices are neither economically nor biologically sustainable. Every year, the world spends $80 billion buying fish that cost $105 billion to catch, even as heavy fishing places growing pressure on stocks that are already struggling with warmer, more acidic oceans. How have we developed an industry that is so wasteful, and why has it been so difficult to alter the trajectory toward species extinction? In this transnational, interdisciplinary history, Carmel Finley answers these questions and more as she explores how government subsidies propelled the expansion of fishing from a coastal, in-shore activity into a global industry. While nation states struggling for ocean supremacy have long used fishing as an imperial strategy, the Cold War brought a new emphasis: fishing became a means for nations to make distinct territorial claims. A network of trade policies and tariffs allowed cod from Iceland and tuna canned in Japan into the American market, destabilizing fisheries in New England and Southern California. With the subsequent establishment of tuna canneries in American Samoa and Puerto Rico, Japanese and American tuna boats moved from the Pacific into the Atlantic and Indian Oceans after bluefin. At the same time, government subsidies in nations such as Spain and the Soviet Union fueled fishery expansion on an industrial scale, with the Soviet fleet utterly depleting the stock of rosefish (or Pacific ocean perch) and other groundfish from British Columbia to California. This massive global explosion in fishing power led nations to expand their territorial limits in the 1970s, forever changing the seas. Looking across politics, economics, and biology, All the Boats on the Sea casts a wide net to reveal how the subsidy-driven expansion of fisheries in the Pacific during the Cold War led to the growth of fisheries science and the creation of international fisheries management. Nevertheless, the seas are far from calm: in a world where this technologically advanced industry has enabled nations to colonize the oceans, fish literally have no place left to hide, and the future of the seas and their fish stocks is uncertain.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226443379 20170410
Green Library
Book
520 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
  • Introduction: Salt in our veins
  • A life's work: the character of fishermen
  • Tribute to the lost: honoring those who slipped beneath the sea
  • Our changing oceans: the hand of man in a dynamic environment
  • Catch of the day: consumer demand and our evolving tastes
  • Hook, line, and sinker: fishing methods through the centuries
  • Heading in: exploring our inland fisheries
  • Aquaculture: farming our seas
  • Merroir: taste of the sea and all things in it
  • All that's old is new again: artisan preservation methods and early cuisine
  • A fish by any other name: seafood nomenclature
  • A short list of fellow sigh lovers
  • Fish species: a complete catalog of American seafood.
A must-have reference on every aspect of American seafood from writer, chef and sustainability advocate, Barton Seaver. This book looks at maritime history, including Native American fisheries, fishing technology (including aquaculture), the effect of imports on our diet, economy and the health of our seas, the biology of taste and the evolution of seafood cuisine. Although not a cookbook, it presents invaluable information on traditional culinary arts and ideas for taste pairings and preferred methods for cooking seafood.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781454919407 20180129
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
xiii, 337 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • -: Foreword 1: General Overview of Aquaculture 2: Getting Started 3: Culture Systems 4: Understanding and Maintaining Water Quality 5: Diseases and Parasites of Aquaculture Species 6: Reproduction and Early Rearing 7: Prepared Feeds 8: Aquatic Animal Nutrition 9: A Pot-pourri of Additional Topics.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786390103 20170612
Providing a broad and readable overview of the subject, this updated third edition of Aquaculture: An Introductory Text covers issues associated with sustainable aquaculture development, culture systems, hatchery methods, nutrition and feeding of aquaculture species, reproductive strategies, harvesting and many other topics. While its main focus is on the culture of fish, molluscs and crustaceans for food, the book also covers other forms of aquaculture, such as the production of seaweeds, recreational fish and ornamental species, and live foods such as algae and rotifers that are used to feed larval shrimp and marine fish. Thoroughly updated and revised, the third edition of this essential textbook now includes: - Increased coverage of species under culture - Increased scope to cover species for enhancement, recreational fishing, commercial fishing and aquaria - Newly developed culture systems - Information on predictive impacts of climate change - Updated aquaculture production statistics Aquaculture remains one of the most rapidly growing agricultural disciplines and this book remains an essential resource for all students of aquaculture and related disciplines.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786390103 20170612
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
x, 227 pages : illustrations, map ; 25 cm.
  • Introduction Part I: A metabolism of labour and environment 1 'Working the ground' 2 From Wullie's Peak to the Burma: naming places at sea Part II: Techniques and technologies 3 Techniques to extend the body and its senses 4 From 'where am I?' to 'where is that?' Rethinking navigation Part III: Capitalism and class 5 'You just can't get a price': the difference political economy makes 6 Structural violence in ecological systems Conclusion: labour, class, environments and anthropology Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781784994143 20170515
This book explores how fishers make the sea productive through their labour, using technologies ranging from wooden boats to digital GPS plotters to create familiar places in a seemingly hostile environment. It shows how their lives are affected by capitalist forces in the markets they sell to, forces that shape even the relations between fishers on the same boat. Fishers frequently have to make impossible choices between safe seamanship and staying afloat economically, and the book describes the human impact of the high rate of deaths in the fishing industry. The book makes a unique contribution to understanding human-environment relations, examining the places fishers create and name at sea, as well as technologies and navigation practices. It combines phenomenology and political economy to offer new approaches for analyses of human-environment relations and technologies.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781784994143 20170515
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (ii, 21 pages) : color maps. Digital: text file.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
This report provides estimated bycatch of 5 species of small cetaceans and pinnipeds bycaught in the New England sink (NESG) and Mid-Atlantic (MAG) gillnet fisheries. The 2015 total serious injuries and mortalities in the NESG fishery were 177 (coefficient of variation [CV] =0.28) harbor porpoises (Phocoena phocoena phocoena), 55 (CV= 0.54) short-beaked common dolphins (Delphinusdelphis delphis), 1021 (CV = 0.25) gray seals (Halichoerus grypus grypus), 474 (CV = 0.17) harbor seals (Phocavitulina concolor), and 119 (CV = 0.34) harp seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus). The NESG estimates are based on observed bycatch consisting of 23 harbor porpoises, 3 short-beaked common dolphins, 131 gray seals, 87 harbor seals, and 12 harp seals. The 2015 total serious injuries and mortalities in the MAG fishery were 33 (CV = 1.16) harbor porpoises, 30 (CV= 0.55) short-beaked common dolphins, 15 (CV = 1.04) gray seals, and 48 (CV = 0.52) harbor seals. The MAG estimates are based on observed bycatch consisting of 2 harbor porpoises, 3 short-beaked common dolphins, 1 gray seal, and 5 harbor seals. Compliance with the 2010 Harbor Porpoise Take Reduction Plan pinger regulations was 86% in 2015, where compliance refers to the correct number of pingers used, not the pingers' functionalit y. Compliance rates in the 2015 MAG fishery were low for large mesh gillnets (55%) and relatively high for small mesh gillnets (87%).
Book
1 online resource ( xi, 364 pages) :
  • 1: Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus, Arun K. Dhar, Scott LaPatra, Andrew Orry and F.C. Thomas Allnutt2: Infectious Haematopoietic Necrosis Virus, Jo-Ann C. Leong and Gael Kurath3: Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus, John S. Lumsden4: Epizootic Haematopoietic Necrosis and European Catfish Virus, Paul Hick, Ellen Ariel and Richard Whittington5: Oncogenic Viruses: Oncorhynchus masou Virus and Cyprinid Herpesvirus, Mamoru Yoshimizu, Hisae Kasai, Yoshihiro Sakoda, Nanako Sano and Motohiko Sano6: Infectious Salmon Anaemia, Knut Falk and Maria Aamelfot7: Spring Viraemia of Carp, Peter Dixon and David Stone8: Channel Catfish Viral Disease, Larry A. Hanson and Lester H. Khoo9: Largemouth Bass Viral Disease, Rodman G. Getchell and Geoffrey H. Groocock10: Koi Herpesvirus Disease, Keith Way and Peter Dixon11: Viral Encephalopathy and Retinopathy, Anna Toffan12: Iridoviral Diseases: Red Sea Bream Iridovirus and White Sturgeon Iridovirus, Yasuhiko Kawato, Kuttichantran Subramaniam, Kazuhiro Nakajima, Thomas Waltzek and Richard Whittington13: Alphaviruses in Salmonids, Marius Karlsen and Renate Johansen14: Aeromonas salmonicida and A. hydrophila, Bjarnheidur K. Gudmundsdottir and Bryndis Bjornsdottir15: Edwardsiella spp., Matt J. Griffin, Terrence E. Greenway and David J. Wise16: Flavobacterium spp.: F. psychrophilum, F. columnare and F. branchiophilum, Thomas P. Loch and Mohamed Faisal17: Francisella noatunensis, Esteban M. Soto and John P. Hawke18: Mycobacterium spp., David T. Gauthier and Martha W. Rhodes19: Photobacterium damselae, John P. Hawke20: Piscirickettsia salmonis, Jerri Bartholomew, Kristen D. Arkush and Esteban M. Soto21: Renibacterium salmoninarum, Diane G. Elliott22: Streptococcus iniae and S. agalactiae, Craig A. Shoemaker, De-Hai Xu and Esteban M. Soto23: Vibriosis: Vibrio anguillarum, V. ordalii and Aliivibrio salmonicida, Alicia E. Toranzo, Beatriz Magarinos and Ruben Avendano-Herrera24: Weissella ceti, Timothy J. Welch, David P. Marancik and Christopher M. Good25: Yersinia ruckeri, Michael Ormsby and Robert Davies.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780647784 20170710
Taking a disease-based approach, Fish Viruses and Bacteria: Pathobiology and Protection focuses on the pathobiology of and protective strategies against the most common, major microbial pathogens of economically important marine and freshwater fish. The book covers well-studied, notifiable piscine viruses and bacteria, including new and emerging diseases which can become huge threats to local fish populations in new geographical regions if transported there via infected fish or eggs. A concise but thorough reference work, this book: - Covers key viral and bacterial diseases of notable fish species; - Reviews major well-established piscine pathogens as well as new, emerging and notifiable diseases; and - Contains the most up-to-date research contributed by a team of over fifty world experts. An invaluable bench book for fish health consultants, veterinarians and all those wanting instant access to information, this book is also a useful textbook for students specializing in fish health and research scientists initiating fish disease research programmes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780647784 20170710
Book
vii, 68 pages ; 21 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xvi, 346 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
Green Library
Book
23 pages ; 29 cm
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxii, 234 pages ; 24 cm
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
1 online resource (328 pages)
Induced Fish Breeding: A Practical Guide for Hatcheries takes a successive approach to explaining the use of breeding technology with proven scientific methods. It provides real-life examples for the purpose of maximizing fish and seed production to support overall sustainability in aquaculture. It is a concise reference to understanding the latest developments in the field, useful for anyone who is involved in fisheries or hatchery management as well as researchers and students who need to understand the technology. A practice originally developed to produce quality seed in captivity, induced breeding has made great strides in fish populations for India. The book offers a practical and succinct overview-from existing methods and operations to recent trends and their impacts on aquaculture for the future. * Provides detailed information about empirical breeding practices like mixed spawning and indiscriminate hybridization* Presents the environmental and hormonal influence on maturation and spawning of fish with real-life fish breeding examples from around the world* Includes step-by-step scientific measures to help solve problems arising from common fish-farming mistakes* Provides real-life examples for the purpose of maximizing fish and seed production to support overall sustainability in aquaculture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780128017746 20161213
Book
xvii, 264, viii pages : illustrations, maps ; 20 cm
East Asia Library