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Book
1 online resource.
  • List of contributors, List of figures, List of tables, Preface and acknowledgements. Chapter 1 - Introduction, Juan Carlos Seijo and Jon G. Sutinen. Chapter 2. The Number of Players in a Fisheries Game: Curse or Blessing?, Rognvaldur Hannesson. Chapter 3. Consequences of Recovering Enforcement Costs in Fisheries, Jon G. Sutinen and Peder Andersen. Chapter 4. Conserving Spawners and Harvesting Juveniles: Is this a Better Alternative to Postponing Capture Until Sexual Maturity?, John F. Caddy. Chapter 5. Bioeconomics of Ocean Acidification, Juan Carlos Seijo and Raul Villanueva. Chapter 6. The Economics of Unwanted By-Catch and a Landing Obligation, Peder Andersen and Lisa Stahl. Chapter 7. A Simple Application of Bioeconomics to Fisheries Subsidies, Rashid Sumaila and Anna Schuhbauer. Chapter 8. Eco-labelling and Eco-certification of Fisheries: Benefits, Challenges and the Future, Kevern Cochrane. Chapter 9. The Implementation of Ecosystem Based Fisheries Management: A Precautionary Pathway with Needed Bioeconomic Analysis, Lee G. Anderson. Chapter 10. Fishery Bio-Socio-Economics, Anthony Charles. Chapter 11. Synthesis: Theory, Policy and Contemporary Challenges for Bioeconomics, Jon G. Sutinen and Juan Carlos Seijo. Index.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351341202 20180530
Efforts to effectively conserve and manage marine resources are facing increasing complexity of environmental and governance challenges. To address some of these challenges, this book presents advancements in fisheries bioeconomics research that provides significant ideas for addressing emerging environmental and fisheries management issues. Advances in Fisheries Bioeconomics gives insights into innovative approaches dealing with these issues, as well as novel ideas on changes in fisheries management paradigms. With contributions from leading experts in the field, this book offers an examination of a number of topics including: ecosystem based fisheries management; by-catch management and discard bans; the number of players in the fisheries game; the effects of ocean acidification; and the trends and impacts of eco-labeling and eco-certification of fisheries. Through integrating resource biology and ecology with the economics of fishers' behaviour, the authors provide valuable analysis of the current issues in fisheries management. This book will be of interest to those on advanced courses in fisheries science, natural resource biology and ecology, and environmental and natural resource economics. It will also appeal to researchers, policy makers, and advocacy groups around the world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781351341202 20180530
Book
328 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (v, [1], 30, [1] pages) : illustrations (some color).
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
Changes in regulation enacted in 2013 have enabled the Alaska Fisheries Science Center's Fishery Monitoring and Analysis Division (FMA) and the Alaska Regional Office's Sustainable Fisheries Division to work collaboratively on an Annual Deployment Plan (ADP). Each ADP documents how the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) plans to deploy observers into fishing activities for the coming year under the limits of available funding. Draft ADPs are presented to the North Pacific Fishery Management Council (Council) during September - October and are finalized in December. The sampling design for observer deployment has two elements: how the population is subdivided (i.e., stratification schemes) and how available samples are allocated (i.e., allocation strategies). Here the relative performance of 10 alternative sampling designs (at the primary sampling unit- the trip) are compared in support of the draft 2018 ADP. These alternative sampling designs consisted of the combination of two stratification schemes (gear-type only or gear-type × tendering activity), two metrics upon which to base optimizations [one consisting of discard of groundfish with Prohibited Species Catch (PSC) of Pacific halibut and the other consisting of the prior and PSC of Chinook salmon], and three allocation strategies (no optimization, a "hurdle" approach to optimization, and a optimization only). All optimization allocations incorporate three variables measured over the past 3 years: variance in the metric, the average cost of observing a trip, and the number of trips. Total afforded sample size is determined by the available budget and the average cost of observing each trip. Resulting selection rates derive from sample size, allocation weightings and the anticipated fishing effort which was defined as the most recent complete year of data. The total number of observer days that can be afforded is 4,062 which represents a 33% increase from 2017. Gap analyses that examine the chance of at least one or three observed trips in a NMFS Area × gear type combination (cell) were used as a performance metric. Gap analyses illustrated that stratifications based on gear type (3 strata) were outperformed by stratifications based on gear type × tendering activity (6 strata). Potential gaps in observer coverage appear to be mostly concentrated in areas with low fishing effort with fewer than 12 trips in a cell. Simulations were performed to measure the potential impact of unknown vessel participation in electronic monitoring (EM). The variability in gap analyses from randomized differences in EM participant vessels was relatively minor (less than 10% probability of observation shifts across deployment designs). The NMFS recommended an observer deployment design for the draft 2018 ADP that has gear type × tendering stratification and uses a "hurdle" approach to sample allocation wherein 15% base coverage is obtained first across all strata and the remainder is optimized according to the variance in the metric of discarded groundfish catch combined with PSC Pacific halibut and Chinook salmon. At their October 2017 meeting the Council did not support the NMFS recommendation and instead proposed a five strata design with optimal sample allocations based on discarded groundfish catch and PSC of Pacific halibut only. Comparisons between the NMFS and Council recommended designs were included in the final 2018 ADP. [doi:10.7289/V5/TM-AFSC-364 (https://doi.org/10.7289/V5/TM-AFSC-364)]
Book
1 online resource (xi, [1], 45 pages) : color illustrations, color maps.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
"This NOAA Technical Memorandum represents a 2017 update to the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands as a Fishing Community published by Allen and Amesbury in 2012. This fishing community profile update aspires to provide a comprehensive view of the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) as a fishing community. The report begins by presenting recent social, economic, and tourism information gathered by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) and the Marianas Visitors Authority in the CNMI. These data are followed by data on four key topics that emerged from interviews conducted by the author in 2016 with the CNMI fishing community. Next, findings from low income fish consumption in 2015 are presented, aggregated at the island level. These data provide the only current estimates of fish consumption on Tinian and Rota. The report concludes by presenting some additional empirical information that supplements the primary data gathered in the profile"--Executive Summary. [doi:10.7289/V5/TM-PIFSC-66 (https://doi.org/10.7289/V5/TM-PIFSC-66)]
Book
1 online resource (viii, 260 pages) : illustrations, maps (some color). Digital: text file.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
This report presents data from the 2017 Gulf of Alaska groundfish survey conducted by the Alaska Fisheries Science Center of the National Marine Fisheries Service. It contains detailed descriptions of the survey planning and operations, species distribution and abundance charts, length frequency plots, tables of estimated biomass, catch per unit effort, average weight and length estimates, length-weight regression parameters, lists of identified species, survey strata specifications and charts, and trawl descriptions and diagrams.
Book
246 pages ; 24 cm
  • Fouled fish. The Giovanni Padre: the sun sets on small-scale fisheries in the Gulf of Naples
  • The king is dead: the collapse and resurrection of Vosso salmon
  • Ode to the sea: Chile's troubled fisheries
  • Loss and recovery of indigenous fisheries. The first fish: the Coast Salish salmon fishery
  • Northern lights: the Sea Sámi fishery in Norway
  • Return to artisanal. A clean and green fishery: Legoe Bay reefnets
  • Crimson tide: the Bay of Fundy weir fishery and a conflict with green power
  • A dying fishery? Puget Sound keta salmon
  • Striking a balance in aqua farming . Mother of pearl: ocean farming red abalone in Monterey Bay
  • King of the Amazon: culture and harvest of Arapaima
  • Evolving solutions.
Fish bones in the caves of East Timor reveal that humans have systematically fished the seas for at least 42,000 years. But in recent centuries, our ancient, vital relationship with the oceans has changed faster than the tides. As boats and fishing technology have evolved, traditional fishermen have been challenged both at sea and in the marketplace by large-scale fishing companies whose lower overhead and greater efficiency guarantee lower prices. In Fishing Lessons, Kevin M. Bailey captains a voyage through the deep history and present course of this sea-change--a change that has seen species depleted, ecosystems devastated, and artisanal fisheries transformed into a global industry afloat with hundreds of billions of dollars per year. Bailey knows these waters, the artisanal fisheries, and their relationship with larger ocean ecology intimately. In a series of place-based portraits, he shares stories of decline and success as told by those at the ends of the long lines and hand lines, channeling us through the changing dynamics of small-scale fisheries and the sustainability issues they face--both fiscal and ecological. We encounter Paolo Vespoli and his tiny boat, the Giovanni Padre, in the Gulf of Naples; Wenche, a sea Sami, one of the indigenous fisherwomen of Norway; and many more. From salmon to abalone, the Bay of Fundy to Monterey and the Amazon, Bailey's catch is no fish tale. It is a global story, casting a net across waters as vast and distinct as Puget Sound and the Chilean coast. Sailing across the world, Bailey explores the fast-shifting current of how we gather food from the sea, what we gain and what we lose with these shifts, and potential solutions for the murky passage ahead.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226307459 20180521
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
1 online resource (v, [1], 58, [1] pages) : color illustrations, color maps.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
A genetic analysis of the prohibited species catch (PSC) of chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) collected during 2016 from the federally managed walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) trawl fishery in the Bering Sea and from the federal groundfish fisheries in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA) was undertaken to determine the overall stock composition of the sample sets. Samples were genotyped for 11 microsatellite markers from which stock contributions were estimated using the current chum salmon microsatellite baseline. In 2016, one genetic sample was collected for every 30.6 chum salmon caught in the Bering Sea midwater trawl fishery. The evaluation of sampling in the Bering Sea based on time, location, and vessel indicated that the genetic samples were representative of the total chum salmon PSC in the Bering Sea. The majority of the 114 chum salmon samples from the A-season were from Northeast Asia (37%) and Eastern GOA/Pacific Northwest (PNW) (37%) stocks. Based on the analysis of 2,701 chum salmon collected throughout the B-season, the largest stock groups in the catch were Eastern GOA/PNW (35%) and Northeast Asia (31%), followed by Western Alaska (19%), Southeast Asia (9%), Upper/Middle Yukon (5%), and Southwest Alaska (< 2%) stocks. The chum salmon caught in the Bering Sea in 2016 shared general patterns of stock distribution with those from past years, but differed by some finer-scale spatiotemporal strata. Of the 473 chum salmon samples from the GOA groundfish fisheries, the highest proportion was from Eastern GOA/PNW (93%) stocks, similar to previous years. [doi:10.7289/V5/TM-AFSC-366 (https://doi.org/10.7289/V5/TM-AFSC-366)]
Book
1 online resource (v, 32, [2] pages) : color illustrations, color maps.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
"A genetic analysis of samples from the Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) bycatch of the 2016 Bering Sea-Aleutian Island (BSAI) trawl fishery for walleye pollock (Gadus chalcogrammus) was undertaken to determine the overall stock composition of the bycatch. Samples were genotyped for 43 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) DNA markers and results were estimated using the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) SNP baseline. In 2016, genetic samples from the Bering Sea were collected using a systematic random sampling protocol where one out of every 10 Chinook salmon encountered was sampled. Based on the analysis of 1,910 Chinook salmon bycatch samples collected throughout the 2016 BSAI walleye pollock trawl fishery, Coastal Western Alaska and British Columbia regions (34% and 29% respectively) dominated the sample set with smaller contributions from West Coast US (14%), and North Alaska Peninsula (13%) regions. Analysis of temporal groupings within the pollock "A" and "B" seasons revealed changes in stock composition during the course of the year with lower contributions of Coastal Western Alaska and North Alaska Peninsula regions and higher contributions of West Coast US, British Columbia, and NW Gulf of Alaska, regions during the "B" season when compared to the "A" season"--PDF Abstract.
Book
xvii, 329 pages ; 25 cm.
  • Acknowledgments Preface List of contributors Introduction: Societal and governing responses to global change in marine systems Appendix Part1_Oyster farming systems under stress Chapter 1_Oyster farming in Matsushima Bay, Japan Chapter 2_Ocean acidification and Pacific oyster larval failures in the Pacific Northwest United States Chapter 3_ Mass mortality of farmed oysters in France: bad responses and good results Part 2_Vulnerable mixed fisheries Chapter 4_ Fisheries in Indonesia between livelihoods and environmental degradation: Coping strategies in the Spermonde Archipelago, Sulawesi Chapter 5_The Baltic Sea, the Baltic Sea Action Plan and the challenge of adaptiveness Part 3_Coastal water quality issues Chapter 6_The crisis management of Amvrakikos Gulf (W. Greece) massive fish mortality: Lessons learned from the handling of a 950 tons dead farmed fish biomass Chapter 7_ The crisis management of a Chatonella fish kill within the semi-enclosed embayment of Maliakos Gulf (CE Aegean Sea), Greece Chapter 8_Clam harvesting in the Venice Lagoon, Italy Chapter 9_ The case study of the regional ICM system introduced voluntarily by the prefectural government in Omura Bay, Japan Chapter 10_Conservation of the short-necked clam in Yokohama, Japan Part 4_Overexploited and weakly governable fisheries Chapter11_A Balancing Act: Managing Multiple Pressures to Fisheries and Fish Farming in Marilao-Meycauayan-Obando River System, Philippines Chapter 12_Threats of extreme events to the Bangladesh Sundarbans: Vulnerabilities, responses and appraisal Chapter 13_Transition and Development in the Jin-shanzui Fishing Village near Shanghai, China Chapter 14_Climate variability, overfishing and transformation in the small pelagics sector in South Africa Chapter 15_Oyster Fishery in Rappahannock River, Chesapeake Bay, USA, East coast Chapter 16_ Local fisheries and land reclamation, The case of the Tokyo Bay Mantis Shrimp Fishery Chapter 17_ Natural, social and governance responses of a small-scale fishery to mass mortalities: the yellow clam Mesodesma mactroides in Uruguay Chapter 18_The Degradation of Cameroon's Mangroves: An Ignorance and/or Absence of a Legal and Regulatory Framework Issue Part 5_Habitat restoration programs Chapter 19_Social Responses to a Fishery-tourism Conflict in Onna Village, Okinawa, Japan Chapter 20_Coral reef restoration in Sekisei Lagoon, Okinawa, Japan Conclusion: Taking lessons from global change responses to advance governance and sustainable use of marine systems List of Tables and Figures Index List of abstracts.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138059221 20180213
Marine social and ecological systems around the world face multiple natural and anthropogenic stressors associated with global change. The resulting changes can create hardship for local societies that depend on them for food, livelihoods and wellbeing. Knowing how to respond to global change in a timely and appropriate manner is increasingly occupying the attention of researchers, policy makers, decision makers and practitioners around the world. ã Written by an international group of researchers from the natural and social sciences, Societal and governing responses to Global Change in Marine Systems analyses and appraises societal and governing responses to change, highlighting and explaining similarities and distinctions between successful, and less successful, responses. The authors present "I-ADApT", an analytical framework that enables decision makers to consider possible responses to global change, based on experiences elsewhere. Within this volume, I-ADApT is applied to 20 enlightening case studies covering a wide range of marine systems that have been challenged by critical global change issues around the world. ã Introducing innovative research to work towards a range of possible responses to global change, Societal and governing responses to Global Change in Marine Systems will appeal to undergraduate and postgraduate students, as well as postdoctoral researchers and practitioners interested in fields such as: Environment & Natural Resources, Marine Resources and social sciences.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781138059221 20180213
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
xxi, 267 pages : illustrations, map ; 22 cm
This book provides an in-depth study of Japanese whaling culture, emphasizing how the Japanese have considered whales and whaling in relation to their understanding of nature and religion. It examines why and how the Japanese have mourned the deaths of whales, treating them as if they were human beings, and assesses the relevance of this culture to nature conservation and management of sustainable use of natural resources. It also sheds new light on Japanese whaling, one of the most controversial issues in the contemporary world, by highlighting the hitherto unknown aspects of Japanese beliefs about whales and whaling, which constitute an integral part of their core concept of how they should coexist with nature. Through cross-examining previous studies of Japanese whaling, as well as analyzing new documents and conducting field research on location, this book presents a comprehensive survey of Japanese whaling culture and memorial rites for whales and offers viable insights on how the Japanese whaling culture can be applied to solving current global issues, including nature conservation, management of sustainable use of natural resources, and protection of wildlife and its habitats.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789811066702 20180403
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
240 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
  • Summer, Jericho Bay
  • Fisherman's day
  • Anatomy of a boom
  • Autumn, Goose Rocks
  • To market
  • Lobster wars
  • Winter, Gulf of Maine
  • The Chinese bubble
  • Tragedy of the Commons
  • Spring, Southeast Harbor.
"From the author of Skipjack & The Melting World comes a mystery: the curious boom in America's beloved lobster industry and its probable crash. Maine lobstermen have happened upon a bonanza along their rugged, picturesque coast. For the past five years, the lobster population along the coast of Maine has boomed, resulting in a lobster harvest six times the size of the record catch from the 1980s--an event unheard of in fisheries. In a detective story, scientists and fishermen explore various theories for the glut. Leading contenders are a sudden lack of predators and a recent wedge of warming waters, which may disrupt the reproductive cycle, a consequence of climate change. Christopher White's The Last Lobster follows three lobster captains--Frank, Jason, and Julie (one the few female skippers in Maine)--as they haul and set thousands of traps. Unexpectedly, boom may turn to bust, as the captains must fight a warming ocean, volatile prices, and rough weather to keep their livelihood afloat. The three captains work longer hours, trying to make up in volume what they lack in price. As a result, there are 3 million lobster traps on the bottom of the Gulf of Maine, while Frank, Jason, and others call for a reduction of traps. This may boost prices. The Maine lobstering towns are among the first American communities to confront global warming, and the survival of the Maine Coast depends upon their efforts. It may be an uphill battle to create a sustainable catch as high temperatures are already displacing lobsters northward toward Canadian waters--out of reach of American fishermen. The last lobster may be just ahead"-- Provided by publisher.
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
232 pages : illustrations (some color), portraits ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (iii, 13 pages) : color illustrations, color maps.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
"Aerial surveys are flown December 01 through March 31 each year in the Southeast United States to detect North Atlantic right whales in their primary calving area. The purpose of the aerial surveys is to contribute to (in prioritized order): • Population monitoring via detection and identification of individual right whales including cow/calf pairs occurring in the Southeast United States. • Monitoring trends in human-related serious injuries and mortality. • Vessel-strike reduction. Given these objectives, we focused aerial surveys in areas where we expected the highest number of right whale detections. Additionally, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric and Administration's National Marine Fisheries Service (NOAA Fisheries), U.S. Navy, U.S. Coast Guard, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have agreed to implement the "Early Warning System" (EWS) -a system of aerial surveys and communications designed to provide mariners with information on whale locations. The goal of the EWS is vessel-whale collision mitigation. This report briefly summarizes results from the NOAA Fisheries-administered aerial surveys and the EWS during the 2015/2016 North Atlantic right whale calving season"--PDF Introduction.
Book
1 online resource (v, 25 pages) : color illustrations.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
"The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) has enacted a climate science strategy as part of its proactive approach to better track, forecast, and incorporate information on changing climate conditions into living marine resource management. This strategy is being implemented through customized 5-year Regional Action Plans for climate science (RAPs). These RAPs detail regional climate science needs and specific action items to address them. The drivers and impacts of climate change vary greatly by geographic location. By creating action plans at the regional level, NMFS can tailor its response to meet specific challenges and forge critical partnerships at the local level. A first step in implementing that Pacific Islands Regional Action Plan for climate science (PIRAP) is to identify what information is needed by resource managers and what scientific research and data are available or being developed. Furthermore, regional staff will need to keep abreast of changes on these fronts. To this end, PIRAP authors decided to convene an internal Annual Collaborative Climate Science Workshop. The first workshop, detailed here, was held in September 2017. It was attended by scientists and advisors from NOAA Fisheries Pacific Islands Regional Office (PIRO) and Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC), as well as the Western Pacific Regional Fishery Management Council (WPRFMC). The specific goal of this workshop was to identify climate-related information needs, the science products available or in development that can address these needs, and also the potential existing gaps. The workshop spanned three afternoons, with each afternoon focusing on a specific topic: protected species, coral reefs and insular/bottomfish, and pelagic/highly migratory fish. Each afternoon, participants met in small groups for facilitated discussions to identify climate-related information needs, with each group choosing three "top priority" needs. Participants then reconvened for a plenary exercise to aggregate these "top priority" needs and look for commonalities. Once an aggregated list was generated, participants identified science products that could potentially address individual information needs. Current scientific and/or management limitations were also identified. This report synthesizes and summarizes the information gathered from this workshop"--Background. [doi:10.7289/V5/AR-PIFSC-H-18-01 (https://doi.org/10.7289/V5/AR-PIFSC-H-18-01)].
Book
1 online resource. Digital: text file; PDF.
  • 1. Aquaculture and the Environment: Towards sustainability - Salin, K.R. and Ataguba, G.A. 2. Sustainable Aquaculture: Socio-Economic and Environmental Assessment - Bishal Bhari and C.Visvanathan 3. Sustainable Fishing Methods in Asia Pacific Region - Sudath Terrence Dammannagoda 4. Sustainable Aquafeed - Salin, K.R., Arun V.V, Mohanakumaran Nair C and James H. Tidwell 5. Sustainable production of shrimp in Thailand - Pattira Pongtippatee, Krishna R Salin and Boonsirm Withyachumnarnkul 6. Aquaponics: A commercial niche for sustainable modern aquaculture - Paul Rye Kledal & Ragnheidur Thorarinsdottir 7. Aquaponics Production and Practices - a System Perspective - Edoardo Pantanella 8. Estimating Carbon Footprint under an intensive aquaculture regime - Maria Teresa Moreira, Sara Gonzalez-Garcia, Pedro Villanueva-Rey and Gumersindo Feijoo 9. Impact of Pharmaceutically Active Compounds in Marine Environment on aquaculture - M. B. Asif and Faisal I. Hai 10. Waste Treatment in Recirculating Shrimp Culture Systems - Ramaraj Boopathy.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319732565 20180514
This book is about important relevant recent research topics in sustainable aquaculture practices. A critical assessment of the sustainable fishing methods and the aspect of sustainable aquaculture feed is presented in this volume. A special focus has been given to socio-economic and environmental assessment of aquaculture practices and analysis of carbon footprint under an intensive aquaculture regime. Aquaponics as a niche for sustainable modern aquaculture has been highlighted. The effect of use of pharmaceuticals to prevent fish disease on the surrounding marine environment is an emerging area of concern, and a critical discussion on this aspect is included in the book. The spread of organic waste and nutrients released by fish farms to natural water bodies has raised considerable concerns. Therefore the methods to prevent their dispersion and removal (treatment) have been comprehensively covered in this book. This book is an essential read for academician, researchers, and policy makers in the field of aquaculture.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9783319732565 20180514
Book
viii, 211 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
  • Introduction: political roles for fish populations
  • The fishing empires of the Pacific: the Americans, the Japanese, and the Soviets
  • Islands and war
  • Manifest destiny and fishing
  • Tariffs
  • Industrialization
  • Treaties
  • Imperialism
  • Enclosure
  • Conclusions: updating the best available science.
Most current fishing practices are neither economically nor biologically sustainable. Every year, the world spends $80 billion buying fish that cost $105 billion to catch, even as heavy fishing places growing pressure on stocks that are already struggling with warmer, more acidic oceans. How have we developed an industry that is so wasteful, and why has it been so difficult to alter the trajectory toward species extinction? In this transnational, interdisciplinary history, Carmel Finley answers these questions and more as she explores how government subsidies propelled the expansion of fishing from a coastal, in-shore activity into a global industry. While nation states struggling for ocean supremacy have long used fishing as an imperial strategy, the Cold War brought a new emphasis: fishing became a means for nations to make distinct territorial claims. A network of trade policies and tariffs allowed cod from Iceland and tuna canned in Japan into the American market, destabilizing fisheries in New England and Southern California. With the subsequent establishment of tuna canneries in American Samoa and Puerto Rico, Japanese and American tuna boats moved from the Pacific into the Atlantic and Indian Oceans after bluefin. At the same time, government subsidies in nations such as Spain and the Soviet Union fueled fishery expansion on an industrial scale, with the Soviet fleet utterly depleting the stock of rosefish (or Pacific ocean perch) and other groundfish from British Columbia to California. This massive global explosion in fishing power led nations to expand their territorial limits in the 1970s, forever changing the seas. Looking across politics, economics, and biology, All the Boats on the Sea casts a wide net to reveal how the subsidy-driven expansion of fisheries in the Pacific during the Cold War led to the growth of fisheries science and the creation of international fisheries management. Nevertheless, the seas are far from calm: in a world where this technologically advanced industry has enabled nations to colonize the oceans, fish literally have no place left to hide, and the future of the seas and their fish stocks is uncertain.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780226443379 20170410
Green Library
Book
520 pages : illustrations (some color) ; 29 cm
  • Introduction: Salt in our veins
  • A life's work: the character of fishermen
  • Tribute to the lost: honoring those who slipped beneath the sea
  • Our changing oceans: the hand of man in a dynamic environment
  • Catch of the day: consumer demand and our evolving tastes
  • Hook, line, and sinker: fishing methods through the centuries
  • Heading in: exploring our inland fisheries
  • Aquaculture: farming our seas
  • Merroir: taste of the sea and all things in it
  • All that's old is new again: artisan preservation methods and early cuisine
  • A fish by any other name: seafood nomenclature
  • A short list of fellow sigh lovers
  • Fish species: a complete catalog of American seafood.
A must-have reference on every aspect of American seafood from writer, chef and sustainability advocate, Barton Seaver. This book looks at maritime history, including Native American fisheries, fishing technology (including aquaculture), the effect of imports on our diet, economy and the health of our seas, the biology of taste and the evolution of seafood cuisine. Although not a cookbook, it presents invaluable information on traditional culinary arts and ideas for taste pairings and preferred methods for cooking seafood.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781454919407 20180129
Marine Biology Library (Miller)
Book
xiii, 337 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
  • -: Foreword 1: General Overview of Aquaculture 2: Getting Started 3: Culture Systems 4: Understanding and Maintaining Water Quality 5: Diseases and Parasites of Aquaculture Species 6: Reproduction and Early Rearing 7: Prepared Feeds 8: Aquatic Animal Nutrition 9: A Pot-pourri of Additional Topics.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786390103 20170612
Providing a broad and readable overview of the subject, this updated third edition of Aquaculture: An Introductory Text covers issues associated with sustainable aquaculture development, culture systems, hatchery methods, nutrition and feeding of aquaculture species, reproductive strategies, harvesting and many other topics. While its main focus is on the culture of fish, molluscs and crustaceans for food, the book also covers other forms of aquaculture, such as the production of seaweeds, recreational fish and ornamental species, and live foods such as algae and rotifers that are used to feed larval shrimp and marine fish. Thoroughly updated and revised, the third edition of this essential textbook now includes: - Increased coverage of species under culture - Increased scope to cover species for enhancement, recreational fishing, commercial fishing and aquaria - Newly developed culture systems - Information on predictive impacts of climate change - Updated aquaculture production statistics Aquaculture remains one of the most rapidly growing agricultural disciplines and this book remains an essential resource for all students of aquaculture and related disciplines.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786390103 20170612
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
398 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (36 unnumberd pages) : color illustrations, color maps Digital: text file.
Collection
Government Information United States Federal Collection
At least seven species of octopus are found in the Gulf of Alaska (GOA). For management purposes, all octopus species are grouped into a single assemblage. Neither the relative abundances of the various species or the species composition of the commercial catch are well documented, but research indicates that the giant Pacific octopus Enteroctopus dofleini is the most abundant octopus species in shelf waters and makes up the bulk of octopus catches in commercial fisheries. Octopuses are taken as incidental catch in trawl, longline, and pot fisheries throughout the GOA; a portion of the catch is retained or sold for human consumption or bait. The highest octopus catch rates are from Pacific cod pot fisheries in the central and western GOA (NMFS statistical areas 610 and 630). Through 2010, octopuses were managed as part of the "other species" complex, with catch reported only in the aggregate along with sharks, squids, and sculpins. In 2011, the GOA Fishery Management Plan was amended to provide separate management for sharks, sculpins, squids, and octopuses. In compliance with the reauthorized Magnuson-Stevens Act, each complex has its own annual catch limit. Harvest recommendations for the octopus complex are made using a modified Tier 6 approach, where the overfishing level (OFL) is calculated by multiplying the best available estimate of octopus biomass by the best estimate of natural mortality for E. dofleini. Catch limits for octopus for 2011-2014 were set using the average biomass from the last 3 surveys. Beginning in 2015, a random-effects (RE) model is used to provide a minimum biomass estimate.