Search results

RSS feed for this result

13 results

Book
xiii, 321 pages : ill. ; 25 cm
  • Contributors Acknowledgments Preface 1. Sustainability: A Wicked Problem 2. Production Efficiency of Ruminants: Feed, Nitrogen and Methane 3. Production Efficiency of Monogastric Animals 4. Animal Welfare: An Integral Component of Sustainability 5. Genetics and Sustainable Animal Agriculture 6. Minimizing Environmental Impacts of Livestock Production Using Diet Optimization Models 7. Sustainable Manure Management 8. Water-related issues in sustainability: Nitrogen and phosphorus management 9. Air quality issues in sustainability: Greenhouse gases and volatile organic compounds 10. Integration of Air and Water Quality Issues 11. The Environmental Sustainability of Food Production 12. Economic Sustainability in Animal Agriculture 13. Achieving Social Sustainability in Animal Agriculture: Challenges and Opportunities to Reconcile Multiple Sustainability Goals 14. Life-cycle Assessment in Ruminant Production 15. Quantitative Measurements of Ammonia and Methane Loss from Livestock 16. Manipulation of Microbial Ecology for Sustainable Animal Production 17. Emerging contaminants in livestock manure: Hormones, antibiotics, and antibiotic resistance genes 18. Animal Agriculture: How Can It Be Sustainable in the Future?
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780640426 20160613
In order to meet increasing global demand for meat and animal by-products increasingly intensive animal production is necessary. Creating a sustainable system in animal agriculture that works in different production environments is a major challenge for animal scientists. This book draws together themes on sustainability that have emerged as the most pressing in recent years. Addressing practical topics such as air quality, manure management, animal feeds, production efficiency, environmental sustainability, biotechnology issues, animal welfare concerns, societal impacts and an analysis of the data used to assess the economic sustainability of farms.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781780640426 20160613
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (440 p.)
Dairy products have always constituted an essential component in the Mediterranean diet. In addition to their nutritional values, they also represent a part of the cultural heritage of the people. Prospects for a sustainable dairy sector in the Mediterranean, preconditions for its development and the future consumer demand were some of the issues covered by the papers presented at the EAAP - CIHEAM - FAO Mediterranean symposium. It was organized by the Tunisian Office for Livestock and Pastures and the National Agronomic Research Institute and supported by the Government of Tunisia, FAO, ICAR and CIRVAL. Over 280 participants from 25 countries took part. The symposium identified a variety of technically viable and scientifically sound policy options, and defined the main fields requiring further scientific research and the development of new sustainable technologies. The available technologies to address intensive, semi-intensive and extensive production systems and the existing institutional framework (research, education, extension systems, organization of the sector), although requiring continuous adjustments and improvements, have proved to be in a position to meet a variety of demands and challenges. In this respect, the Symposium called for an increase in research for the semi-intensive farming systems in the South and emerging issues resulting from changes in agricultural policies in the North. It emphasized the importance of producers associations as representatives of the interests of the sector and partners in the overall dialogue on policy matters and in the identification of research needs. The Symposium confirmed the wish and capacity of the dairy sector in the region to contribute to the sustainable rural development, to the creation of new employment opportunities and to the reasonable and harmonious management of the natural resources.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789074134927 20160618
Book
1 online resource (255 pages) : map, illustrations.
  • Foreword-- Acknowledgments-- Livestock Farming Systems diversity and challenges for sustainable livestock development in selected countries in Central and Eastern Europe 1-- A. Gibon, S. Mihina, G. Zervas, J. Boyazoglu, J. Maki-Hokkonen and M. Zjalic-- Research approaches for livestock farming systems and their diversity in Central and Eastern Europe-- Case study of cattle farming systems in Bulgaria 25-- D. Dinev, N. Todorov, K. Koleva, and G. Kostov-- Study on livestock farming systems diversity in the Czech Republic 57-- V. Matlova, G. Mala, J. Knizek and D. Cerna-- Livestock farming systems in Hungary with special emphasize on beef cattle production 85-- Z. Wagenhoffer, F. Szabo and M. Mezes-- A characteristic of livestock farms with development potential in the lowland and mountainous regions of Poland 105-- A. Gut, P. Slosarz, A. Drozdz, B. Borys and J. Wojtowski-- Animal production farming diversity in Slovak agriculture 119-- S. Mihina, B. Valihora, A. Gibon, J. Bandosova, V. Tancin, J. Broucek, M. Zimkova, C. Raichon, E. Uhliarova and J. Golecky-- A case study on improving sustainability in dairy farming systems in Lithuania 141-- J.O. Christensen, J E. Hermansen, I.S. Kristensen, T. Kristensen, J. Jatkaukas, J. Gutsauskas and D. Sakickas-- SAPARD Programme in the Slovak Republic - A support for rural economic diversification with special emphasis on sheep and rural tourism 157-- J. Tvrdonova. Policy issues for sustainable LFS in Central and Eastern Europe-- Livestock production in Central and Eastern European Countries and the Commonwealth of Independent States: Selected issues 167-- T. Vares-- Changing livestock systems and markets in Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union, and the proposed World Bank agenda to reduce rural poverty 181-- T.W. Schillhorn van Veen-- Insights into the livestock sector and farms in national environments-- Profitability and scale of livestock production in Slovakia 201-- G. Blaas, M. Kubankova and J. Zatkovic-- A note on the opinions of farmers from lowland regions of Poland concerning factors affecting the operation of their family farms on the threshold of accession to the EU 215-- B. Borys and P. Slosarz-- Assessment of some technological aspects in Bulgarian dairy farms 223-- D. Dinev, N. Deltchev and K. Koleva-- Sheep and goat production in the Slovak Republic 235-- J. Dubravska and J. Vajs-- Status quo on beef meat sector in Hungary 239-- I. Feher, T. Toth and D. Rupp Daniel-- Evaluation of some environmentally-friendly private livestock farms in Central Slovakia 245-- V. Krajcovic, E. Uhliarova, M. Michalec and M. Zimkova-- Cattle and sheep farming systems in mountain and submontane areas of Slovakia 249-- V. Krajcovic, B. Valihora, J. Vano, J. Trnovsky, D. Krajciova and M. Zimkova.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9789076998299 20160618
This book examines the potential of Livestock Farming Systems (LFS) research to assess and understand the diversity of livestock farming systems in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE). LFS research based on systemic modelling has improved the understanding of livestock production realities at farm level and influenced agricultural development strategies in Western Europe. Researchers from both Western and Eastern Europe carried out this initial study, which was co-ordinated and sponsored under a collaborative agreement between EAAP and FAO, and was run in selected regions in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and the Slovak Republic. The results and conclusions of the study are reported in this book, together with other contributions of interest with respect to the sustainable development of livestock production in CEE presented and discussed during a workshop in Budapest in August 2001. The results of the study demonstrate the adaptability of LFS research to systems predominantly based on large-scale private, corporate and co-operative farms in the CEE countries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789076998299 20160618
Book
iii, 61 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
iii, 42 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
xiii, 266 p. : ill.
  • Preface ix Contributors xi 1 Introduction 1 Peter de Jong 1.1 Sustainability and the dairy industry: hype or trend? 2 1.2 Quantifying the issue: measuring footprints 4 1.3 Communication: telling the whole story 5 1.4 Structure of this book 6 References 8 2 Greenhouse gas emissions from global dairy production 9 Theun V. Vellinga, Pierre Gerber and Carolyn Opio 2.1 Introduction 9 2.2 Methods for calculating emissions 11 2.3 Total emissions of the dairy sector 14 2.4 Discussion 26 References 28 3 Life cycle assessment 31 Maartje N. Sevenster 3.1 Introduction 31 3.2 Current life cycle assessment 32 3.3 Life cycle assessment in application 37 3.4 Life cycle assessment of dairy products 41 3.5 Life cycle assessment in strategy and policy 50 Acknowledgements 51 References 52 4 Sustainability and resilience of the dairy sector in a changing world: a farm economic and EU perspective 55 Roel Jongeneel and Louis Slangen 4.1 Introduction 56 4.2 Dairy economics and sustainability 62 4.3 Sustainability evaluation of the EU dairy sector 71 4.4 Agricultural policy 79 4.5 Conclusion 83 References 85 5 Dairy processing 87 Arjan J. van Asselt and Michael G. Weeks 5.1 Introduction 87 5.2 Key unit operations and their water and energy use 89 5.3 Possibilities for optimisation 101 5.4 Revisiting dairy processing: breakthrough technologies 114 References 117 6 The role of packaging in a sustainable dairy chain 119 Erika Mink 6.1 Introduction 120 6.2 Packaging sustainability: a growing market expectation 123 6.3 Packaging's contribution to dairy sustainability 130 6.4 Global alignment of packaging requirements: implications for dairy 139 6.5 A company response: the example of Tetra Pak 150 6.6 Outlook: growing importance of economic and social pillars of sustainability 158 References 160 7 The business case for sustainable dairy products 163 Jaap Petraeus 7.1 Introduction 163 7.2 From a process-driven to a product-driven approach 164 7.3 Success factors for creating more sustainable processes and products 169 7.4 Implementation of sustainability within the company 175 7.5 The business case for sustainability 180 7.6 Policy and strategy adopted by different dairy companies 183 7.7 Looking to the future 183 7.8 Conclusion 184 References 186 Appendix: Overview of the sustainability policy and strategy of various companies 187 8 A case study of marketing sustainability 191 Grietsje Hoekstra, Corine Kroft and Klaas Jan van Calker 8.1 Introduction 191 8.2 What is sustainability? 193 8.3 Motivations for sustainability 196 8.4 Choose your battles: sustainability strategy issues 198 8.5 Getting to work 203 8.6 Communicating sustainability 212 8.7 Conclusion 217 Acknowledgement 218 References 219 9 Cradle to Cradle for innovations in the dairy industry 221 Wil A.M. Duivenvoorden 9.1 Introduction 222 9.2 A tool for C2C(R)-driven innovation (PROPER model) 229 9.3 Cradle to Cradle for the dairy industry 232 9.4 Conclusion 238 References 241 10 The future of sustainable dairy production 243 Peter de Jong 10.1 Future relevance of sustainable dairy 243 10.2 Next steps in chain innovation 244 10.3 Communication and marketing 247 10.4 Business case: people, planet and profit 247 10.5 Conclusion 249 References 250 Index 251.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118489451 20160802
This book offers a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in sustainable dairy production, helping the industry to develop more sustainable dairy products, through new technologies, implementing life cycle analysis, and upgrading and optimization of their current production lines. It aims to stimulate process innovations, taking into account environmental, economic and public relations benefits for companies. Topics covered include: How to set up a sustainable production line How to quantify the carbon foot print of a dairy product by using life cycle analysis Current technologies to improve the carbon foot print What measures can be taken to reduce the global warming potential of the farm Reduction of water use in dairy production Marketing sustainable dairy products Bench marking of dairy products against other food products Potential future technological developments to improve the carbon foot print for the following decades.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781118489451 20160802
Book
xv, 111 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
1 online resource (496 pages) : illustrations
An understanding of sustainability in animal production is becoming increasingly necessary since the global demand for food is expected to dramatically increase in the coming decades. In this context, raising animals for the production of food will become increasingly challenging. Farm animals should not adversely compete with humans for their own sustenance, and food of animal origin should be safe and affordable. The production of healthy animals will therefore be a prerequisite. Such animals will efficiently convert their feed into food that can be certified as nutritive and safe. In addition there is growing evidence that there should be a focus on animal welfare, and environmental pollution related to animal farming must be minimized. Indeed the equation to resolve the constraints on animal production is complex and multifactorial. It is inarguable that the environment and the feed that is offered to animals, are key elements of sustainability in livestock and poultry production.This book addresses the major issues related to animal health and welfare maintenance in relation to their environment, as well as housing emissions and waste management. Experiments, reviews and expert opinions and scenarios for the future are presented. Each of the chapters has been written by scientists with international reputations. The language used, and the examples and the illustrations provided, make it easy to read. The book is of major and current interest to teachers and students in animal and veterinary sciences and to professionals: veterinarians, farm managers, agricultural advisers worldwide.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9789086860999 20160618
Book
vi, 50 pages
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
1 online resource (pages cm.)
  • Preface ix Contributors xi 1 Introduction 1 Peter de Jong 1.1 Sustainability and the dairy industry: hype or trend? 2 1.2 Quantifying the issue: measuring footprints 4 1.3 Communication: telling the whole story 5 1.4 Structure of this book 6 References 8 2 Greenhouse gas emissions from global dairy production 9 Theun V. Vellinga, Pierre Gerber and Carolyn Opio 2.1 Introduction 9 2.2 Methods for calculating emissions 11 2.3 Total emissions of the dairy sector 14 2.4 Discussion 26 References 28 3 Life cycle assessment 31 Maartje N. Sevenster 3.1 Introduction 31 3.2 Current life cycle assessment 32 3.3 Life cycle assessment in application 37 3.4 Life cycle assessment of dairy products 41 3.5 Life cycle assessment in strategy and policy 50 Acknowledgements 51 References 52 4 Sustainability and resilience of the dairy sector in a changing world: a farm economic and EU perspective 55 Roel Jongeneel and Louis Slangen 4.1 Introduction 56 4.2 Dairy economics and sustainability 62 4.3 Sustainability evaluation of the EU dairy sector 71 4.4 Agricultural policy 79 4.5 Conclusion 83 References 85 5 Dairy processing 87 Arjan J. van Asselt and Michael G. Weeks 5.1 Introduction 87 5.2 Key unit operations and their water and energy use 89 5.3 Possibilities for optimisation 101 5.4 Revisiting dairy processing: breakthrough technologies 114 References 117 6 The role of packaging in a sustainable dairy chain 119 Erika Mink 6.1 Introduction 120 6.2 Packaging sustainability: a growing market expectation 123 6.3 Packaging's contribution to dairy sustainability 130 6.4 Global alignment of packaging requirements: implications for dairy 139 6.5 A company response: the example of Tetra Pak 150 6.6 Outlook: growing importance of economic and social pillars of sustainability 158 References 160 7 The business case for sustainable dairy products 163 Jaap Petraeus 7.1 Introduction 163 7.2 From a process-driven to a product-driven approach 164 7.3 Success factors for creating more sustainable processes and products 169 7.4 Implementation of sustainability within the company 175 7.5 The business case for sustainability 180 7.6 Policy and strategy adopted by different dairy companies 183 7.7 Looking to the future 183 7.8 Conclusion 184 References 186 Appendix: Overview of the sustainability policy and strategy of various companies 187 8 A case study of marketing sustainability 191 Grietsje Hoekstra, Corine Kroft and Klaas Jan van Calker 8.1 Introduction 191 8.2 What is sustainability? 193 8.3 Motivations for sustainability 196 8.4 Choose your battles: sustainability strategy issues 198 8.5 Getting to work 203 8.6 Communicating sustainability 212 8.7 Conclusion 217 Acknowledgement 218 References 219 9 Cradle to Cradle for innovations in the dairy industry 221 Wil A.M. Duivenvoorden 9.1 Introduction 222 9.2 A tool for C2C(R)-driven innovation (PROPER model) 229 9.3 Cradle to Cradle for the dairy industry 232 9.4 Conclusion 238 References 241 10 The future of sustainable dairy production 243 Peter de Jong 10.1 Future relevance of sustainable dairy 243 10.2 Next steps in chain innovation 244 10.3 Communication and marketing 247 10.4 Business case: people, planet and profit 247 10.5 Conclusion 249 References 250 Index 251.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470655849 20160611
This book offers a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in sustainable dairy production, helping the industry to develop more sustainable dairy products, through new technologies, implementing life cycle analysis, and upgrading and optimization of their current production lines. It aims to stimulate process innovations, taking into account environmental, economic and public relations benefits for companies. Topics covered include: How to set up a sustainable production line; How to quantify the carbon foot print of a dairy product by using life cycle analysis; Current technologies to improve the carbon foot print; What measures can be taken to reduce the global warming potential of the farm; Reduction of water use in dairy production; Marketing sustainable dairy products; Bench marking of dairy products against other food products; and, Potential future technological developments to improve the carbon foot print for the following decades.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9780470655849 20160611
dx.doi.org Wiley Online Library
Book
xv, 103 leaves.
SAL1&2 (on-campus shelving)
Book
1 online resource.
This volume of 18 chapters is the work of more than 30 authors, many of whom are natives of the Central Asian region or are researchers who have dedicated a large part of their working lives to studying the development dynamics in this vast and fascinating region. The work focuses on the 20 years since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990. But it also traces the attitudes of land users to the land dating from before the late 19th century, when Russian conquest and colonization occurred, and through the upheavals caused by Soviet-style collectivization and sedentarization. The book is rich
Book
1 online resource (viii, 242 pages) : illustrations.
  • Front Cover; Recent Advances in Animal Nutrition-1983; Copyright Page; PREFACE; Table of Contents; Part I: Evaluation of Nutritional Data; CHAPTER 1. THE NUMBER OF REPLICATES AND OTHER CONSIDERATIONS IN THE DESIGN OF FIELD TRIALS; Introduction; Control; Replication; Randomization; Number of replicates; Magnitude of experimental errors; Number of animals per experimental unit; Number of pens per house; Conclusions; References; CHAPTER 2. THE INTERPRETATION OF RESPONSE DATA FROM ANIMAL FEEDING TRIALS; Duncan's multiple range test; The bent stick; The parabola
  • The hyperbola (exponential and inverse polynomial models)The Reading model; Conclusions; References; CHAPTER 3. ERRORS IN MEASUREMENT AND THEIR IMPORTANCE IN ANIMAL NUTRITION; References; Part II: Pig Nutrition; CHAPTER 4. CEREAL REPLACERS AS ALTERNATIVE SOURCES OF ENERGY FOR PIGS; Cereal replacers in Northern Ireland; Cassava; Molasses; Silage effluent; Comparison of control diet with manufactured compounds; Conclusions; References; CHAPTER 5. PREDICTING THE ENERGY CONTENT OF PIG FEEDS; Predictors; Prediction of individual feedingstuffs; Prediction of mixed diets; References
  • CHAPTER 6. THE USE OF FAT IN SOW DIETSWhy is piglet mortality so high and what changes occur?; Does added fat improve piglet survival?; What factors are important?; Is adding fat economically advantageous?; Conclusion; References; CHAPTER 7. VITAMIN RESPONSIVE CONDITIONS IN BREEDING PIGS; Introduction; A model for the derivation of vitamin allowances; Vitamin requirements of breeding female pigs; Vitamin responses in breeding pigs; The response of the breeding female to additional biotin; Selection of parameters for measurement of a vitamin response; Possibility of responses to other vitamins
  • ConclusionsReferences; Part Ill: Calf Nutrition; CHAPTER 8. SYSTEMS OF CALF REARING; References; CHAPTER 9. MILK REPLACERS FOR CALVES; The digestive system of the newborn calf; Clotting and the digestion of milk; Nutrient requirements of the neonatal calf; Specification of a milk replacer diet; Alternatives to skim milk; Choice of ingredients in formulating a milk replacer; Acidified milk replacers; Conclusion; References; Part IV: Ruminant Nutrition; CHAPTER 10. NUTRIENT REQUIREMENT OF THE BREEDING EWE; Introduction; Targets for body condition; Nutrient requirement for early pregnancy
  • Nutrient requirement in mid pregnancyNutrient requirement in late pregnancy; Lactation; References; CHAPTER 11. GROWTH PROMOTERS AND THEIR IMPORTANCE IN RUMINANT LIVESTOCK PRODUCTION; Introduction; Efficiency of digestion in the rumen; The efficacy of antimicrobial feed additives with particular reference to beef production; Mode of action of growth promoting feed additives in ruminants; Conclusions; References; CHAPTER 12. SOME NUTRITIONAL ASPECTS OF HIGH YIELDING DAIRY HERDS; Introduction; 3000 Gallon Club high yield survey (HY survey); Nutrient requirements; Conclusions; Acknowledgements
Recent Advances in Animal Nutrition-1983 is a collection of papers that tackles the nutritional concerns of raising livestock. The text presents 14 studies that are organized into four parts. The first part covers the evaluation of nutritional data. This part discusses the interpretation of response data from animal feeding trials and errors in measurement and their importance in animal nutrition. Next, the book deals with topics relevant to pig nutrition, such as predicting the energy content of pig feeds and the use of fat in sow diets. Part III discusses the systems of calf rearing and milk.

Looking for different results?

Modify your search: Remove limit(s) Search all fields

Search elsewhere: Search WorldCat Search library website