%{search_type} search results

9,129 catalog results

RSS feed for this result
Book
1 online resource.
  • Preface vii List of Contributors ix 1 Mango Production, Global Trade, Consumption Trends, and Postharvest Processing and Nutrition 1Edward A. Evans, Fredy H. Ballen and Muhammad Siddiq 2 Mango Production 17Chantalak Tiyayon and Robert E. Paull 3 Biology, Postharvest Physiology, and Biochemistry of Mango 37Maria Gloria Lobo and Jiwan S. Sidhu 4 Pests of Mango 61Daniel Carrillo, Andrea Birke, Larissa Guillen and J.E. Pena 5 Mango Pathology and Diseases 91Andressa de Souza-Pollo and Antonio de Goes 6 Harvesting and Postharvest Technology of Mango 105Jeffrey K. Brecht and Elhadi M. Yahia 7 Packaging of Fresh Mangoes and Processed Mango Products 131Aman Ullah Malik, Farihah Siddiq and Muhammad Siddiq 8 Processing and Quality of Fresh-cut Mangoes 151Blanca Salinas-Roca, Jorge Welti-Chanes, Olga Martin-Belloso and Robert Soliva-Fortuny 9 Innovative Processing Technologies for Mango Products 169Deepti Salvi, Ender Arserim and Mukund Karwe 10 Mango Processing and Processed Products 195Muhammad Siddiq, Dalbir S. Sogi and Sunisa Roidoung 11 Composition and Nutritional Properties of Mangoes 217Tasleem A. Zafar and Jiwan S. Sidhu 12 Phytochemical Compounds in Functional Properties of Mangoes 237Yearul Kabir, Hossain Uddin Shekhar and Jiwan S. Sidhu 13 Microbiology of Fresh Mangoes and Processed Products 255Anu Kalia and Rajinder P. Gupta 14 Value-added Processing and Utilization of Mango By-products 279Poonam Aggarwal, Amarjeet Kaur and Suresh Bhise Index 295.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119014355 20170621
Written by noted experts in the field, Handbook of Mango Fruit: Production, Postharvest Science, Processing Technology and Nutrition offers a comprehensive resource regarding the production, trade, and consumption of this popular tropical fruit. The authors review the geographic areas where the fruit is grown and harvested, including information on the ever-expanding global marketplace that highlights United States production, imports and exports, and consumption, as well as data on the outlook for the European market. Handbook of Mango Fruit outlines the postharvest handling and packaging techniques and reviews the fruit s processed products and byproducts that are gleaned from the processing of waste. The authors include information on the nutritional profile of the mango and review the food safety considerations for processing and transport of mangoes. This comprehensive resource: Reviews global mango production trends and countries that are the major exporters and importers of mangoesExplores the burgeoning marketplace for mangoes with special emphasis on the US and European marketplaceAssesses latest trends in packaging of and shipping of mangoesProvides in depth coverage on value-added processing and by-products utilizationOffers vital information on the innovative processing technologies and nutritional profile of popular tropical fruit Written for anyone involved in the production, marketing, postharvest handling, processing and by-products of mangoes, Handbook of Mango Fruit is a vital resource offering the most current information and guidelines on the burgeoning marketplace as well as the safe handling, production, and distribution of mangoes.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781119014355 20170621
Book
xiii, 1004 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 29 cm
Science Library (Li and Ma)
Book
xxxvii, 297 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
  • Part I: The Nile, the Red Sea, and the Indian Ocean Basins Chapter 1: The Nile and Awash River Basins Chapter 2: East Africa and Offshore Islands Chapter 3: Lake Victoria: The Final Frontier Part II: South Africa and the Zambezi River Basin Chapter 4: South Africa, Swaziland, and Lesotho Chapter 5: The Zambezi River Basin Part III: The Congo and Niger River basins Chapter 6: The Congo River Basin Chapter 7: West Africa and the Niger River Basin Part IV: Conclusion Conclusion: Africa's Response to Water Hyacinth: A Story of Beauty and the Beast.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498524629 20180115
Humans and animals are not the only creatures that migrate. Plants also do. This book is a comprehensive and analytical account of the migration of an Old World plant, water hyacinth (also known to botanists as Eichhornia Crassipes) from the Amazon Basin and surrounding areas to Africa through human agency from about 1800 to the present. As an integrative work, which benefits from methodologies and conceptual approaches drawn from limnology, botany, biology, geography, history, ecology and other social sciences and humanities, the book further explores the political, economic, and ecological consequences of the spread of water hyacinth from its native habitat through European botanical gardens to Africa rivers, lakes, dams, and wetlands. In part, as a narrative of Western tinkering with African ecologies gone awry, the study has strong lessons for environmental historians, and social scientists as well as contemporary foundations, aid workers, development experts and African governments. Although it may appear to be a micro-history of a single plant, water hyacinth, it illuminates broader issues in the history of the modern environment in Africa and similar studies worldwide. This study is primarily rooted on the histories of colonialism, bioinvasion, environmental realities and experiences in Africa. The highly visible pathways of hyacinth's spread across international frontiers along watercourses and communication networks means that not only is this a trans-boundary environmental affair, but one which directly involves bilateral relations between African states.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498524629 20180115
Green Library
Book
1 online resource (xi, 234 pages) : illustrations (some color).
Book
1 online resource.
  • Strategic Disease Management in Wheat and Barley Devendra Pal Singh Management of Rust Diseases in Wheat and Barley: Next Generation Tools Siddanna Savadi, Pramod Prasad, Subhash C. Bhardwaj, Om P. Gangwar, Hanif Khan, and Subodh Kumar Holistic Management of Foliar Blight Disease of Wheat and Barley A. K. Chowdhury, P. M. Bhattacharya, S. Bandyopadhyay, and T. Dhar Overcoming Stripe Rust of Wheat: A Threat to Food Security Om P. Gangwar, Subhash C. Bhardwaj, Subodh Kumar, Promod Prasad, Hanif Khan, and Sidanna Savadi Powdery Mildew of Wheat and Its Management Ashwani Kumar Basandrai and Daisy Basandrai Management of Karnal Bunt and Loose Smut Diseases in Wheat Ritu Bala, Jaspal Kaur and Indu Sharma Flag Smut of Wheat and Its Management Practices Devendra Pal Singh Black Point of Wheat Caused by Bipolaris Sorokiniana and Its Management Mohammed Shamshul Q. Ansari, Anju Pandey, V. K. Mishra, A. K. Joshi, and R. Chand Important Nematode Pests of Wheat and Barley and Their Management S. S. Vaish Disease Resistance Breeding in Wheat - Theory and Practices Hanif Khan, Subhash C. Bhardwaj, Pramod Prasad, Om P. Gangwar, Siddanna Savadi, and Subodh Kumar Host Resistance to Spot Blotch (Bipolaris sorokiniana) in Wheat and Barley Devendra Pal Singh Molecular Markers for Wheat Improvement: Tool for Precision Rust Resistance Breeding Subodh Kumar, Subhash C. Bhardwaj, Om P. Gangwar, Pramod Prasad, Hanif Khan, and Siddana Savadi Gene Pyramiding for Developing High Yielding Disease Resistant Wheat Varieties M. Sivasamy, V. K.Vikas, P. Jayaprakash, Jagdish Kumar, M. S. Saharan, and Indu Sharma Breeding Strategies and Prospects of Wheat Improvement in North-Western Himalayas Dharam Pal and Madhu Patial Diseases of Wheat in Brazil and Their Management S. P. Val-Moraes Status of Wheat Diseases and Their Management in Gujarat State of India S. I. Patel, V. A. Solanki, B. M. Patel, and R. S. Yadav Disease Spectrum on Barley in Rajasthan During 2006-2015 and Integrated Management Strategies P. S. Shekhawat, S. P. Bishnoi, and R. P. Ghasolia Resource Conservation Agriculture Practices, Rhizosphere and Diseases of Wheat Under Wheat: Rice Cropping System Anju Rani and Devendra Pal Singh Survey and Surveillance of Wheat Biotic Stresses: Indian Scenario M. S. Saharan Evolution of Wheat Rust Pathogens in Indian Sub Continent Subhash C. Bhardwaj, Subodh Kumar, T. R. Sharma1, O. P. Gangwar, Pramod Prasad, Hanif Khan, and Siddana Savadi Stem Rust Pathotype Ug 99: An Indian Context Pramod Prasad, Subhash C. Bhardwaj, Hanif Khan, Om P. Gangwar, Siddanna Savadi, and Subodh Kumar Barley Stem Rust Resistance Mechanisms: Diversity, Gene Structure, and Function Suggest A Recently Evolved Host-Pathogen Relationship Robert S. Brueggeman and Shyam Solanki Inverse Gene-For-Gene: Necrotrophic Specialist's Modus Operandi in Barley and Wheat Jonathan Richards, Gazala Ameen, and Robert Brueggeman Wheat Blast Caused by Magnaporthe oryzae Pathotype Triticum-Present Status, Variability, and Strategies for Management Devendra Pal Singh.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781771885478 20171201
Both wheat and barley are two of the most important food and industrial crops in the world. Wheat and barley cultivation has experienced changes in practices due to factors such as methods of conservation agriculture, cropping systems, wheat varieties, changes in weather patterns, and international trade, necessitating new and different approaches for the successful management of emerging diseases and new pathotypes of pathogens. This valuable volume explores a multitude of new approaches and techniques for the effective management of emerging wheat diseases. This new volume presents the latest literature on management technology of diseases that affect the production of wheat and are capable of reducing grain yields as well as grain quality. These diseases include rusts, smuts, other foliar diseases such as blight, spots, blotch, powdery mildew, bunts, etc., as well as diseases such as Karnal bunt of wheat, which is of importance to international trade. This book will be highly valuable to researchers, students, teachers, farmers, seed growers, traders, and other stakeholders dealing with wheat and barley. It also advances our knowledge in the field of plant pathology, plant breeding, and plant biotechnology, agronomy, and grain quality and pesticide industries. The book will serve as a reference on disease management technologies for the containment of losses in wheat and barley yields and will assist in maintaining wheat quality, reducing the cost of cultivation, increasing yield, and thus in helping to ensuring food security on a global level.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781771885478 20171201
EBSCOhost Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource : illustrations.
Book
1 online resource (xxiv, 591 pages)
  • Part 1 Plant physiology and breeding1.Ensuring the genetic diversity of apples: Gayle M. Volk, USDA-ARS-CARR National Laboratory for Genetic Resources Preservation, USA-- 2.The apple genome - harbinger of innovation for sustainable apple production: Amit Dhingra, Washington State University, USA-- 3.Advances in understanding apple tree growth: rootstocks and planting systems: Dugald C. Close and Sally A. Bound, University of Tasmania, Australia-- 4.Advances in understanding apple tree growth: the manipulation of tree growth and development: Dugald C. Close and Sally A. Bound, University of Tasmania, Australia-- 5.Advances in understanding flowering and pollination in apple trees: Peter M. Hirst, Purdue University, USA-- 6.Advances in understanding apple fruit development: A.N. Lakso and M. C. Goffinet, Cornell University, USA-- 7.Evaluating and improving rootstocks for apple cultivation: G. Fazio, USDA-ARS/Cornell University, USA-- 8.Advances in marker-assisted breeding of apples: K. Evans and C. Peace, Washington State University, USA-- Part 2 Cultivation techniques9.Innovations in apple tree cultivation to manage crop load and ripening: Stefano Musacchi, Washington State University, USA-- and Duane Greene, University of Massachusetts, USA-- 10.Advances in soil and nutrient management in apple cultivation: G. H. Neilsen, D. Neilsen and T. Forge, Summerland Research and Development Centre Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada-- and K. Hannam, Natural Resources Canada-- 11.Mechanization and automation for apple production: Q. Zhang, M. Karkee and L. R. Khot, Washington State University, USA-- 12.Sustainable approaches to control postharvest diseases of apples: W. J. Janisiewicz and W. M. Jurick II, USDA-ARS, USA-- 13.Advances in postharvest handling and storage of apples: Christopher B. Watkins, Cornell University, USA-- Part 3 Diseases and pests14.Pre- and postharvest fungal apple diseases: Wayne M. Jurick II, USDA-ARS, USA and Kerik D. Cox, Cornell University, USA-- 15.Management of viruses and virus-like agents affecting apple production: Kenneth C. Eastwell, Washington State University, USA-- 16.Bacterial diseases affecting apples: John Norelli, USDA-ARS, USA-- 17.Sustainable arthropod management for apples: Elizabeth H. Beers, Washington State University, USA-- 18.Advances in pest- and disease-resistant apple varieties: Markus Kellerhals, Agroscope, Switzerland-- Part 4 Sustainability19.The economics of apple production: R. Karina Gallardo, Washington State University, USA-- and Hildegard Garming, Thunen Institute of Farm Economics, Germany-- 20.Consumer trends in apple sales: Desmond O'Rourke, Washington State University and Belrose Inc., USA-- 21.Assessing the environmental impact and sustainability of apple cultivation: D. Granatstein, Washington State University, USA-- and G. Peck, Cornell University, USA-- 22.Growing organic apples in Europe: Jutta Kienzle, Independent Researcher, Germany-- and Markus Kelderer, Research Station of Laimburg, Italy--.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760326 20171227
Originating in Central Asia, apples are one of the most important fruits globally and are grown in over 100 countries. Apple cultivation faces a number of challenges. Increasing global competition has put the focus on lowering costs whilst further improving sensory quality and shelf-life. There is a need to reduce inputs such as water, fertiliser and labour, both to save costs and reduce environmentally-damaging emissions and pollution. There is a continual battle with fungal, viral and bacterial diseases as well as insect pests. In the long term there is a need for new varieties able to withstand disease or more extreme conditions associated with climate change. This means preserving genetic variety and exploiting new molecular breeding techniques opened up by the sequencing of the apple genome in 2010.Drawing on an international range of expertise, this collection focuses on ways of improving the cultivation of apples as a food crop at each step in the value chain, from breeding through to post-harvest storage. The book first reviews research in apple physiology and breeding. The following sections focus on cultivation techniques through to post-harvest storage, followed by a discussion of diseases and pests and their management. Concluding chapters address wider issues such as economics, consumer trends and sustainability.Achieving sustainable cultivation of apples will be a standard reference for fruit and horticultural scientists in universities, government and other research centres and companies producing apples.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760326 20171227
EBSCOhost Access limited to 3 simultaneous users
Book
1 online resource.
  • Series list ; Introduction ; 1 The roles, challenges and opportunities for cassava in development ; 2 Science progress and the needs for supporting cassava ' s future roles ; 3 Bringing together the latest research and development information, and expected outcomes of this book ; 4 Section and chapter overviews ; The cassava plant and its uses ; Chapter 4 The emergence of cassava as a global crop ; 1 Introduction ; 2 Origins and early cultivation of cassava in the Americas
  • 3 Introduction of cassava in the Old World 4 Conclusion ; 5 Where to look for further information ; 6 Acknowledgements ; 7 References ; Chapter 1 Use and nutritional value of cassava roots and leaves as a traditional food ; 2 Diversity in traditional cassava products ; 3 Products from cassava roots ; 4 Products from cassava leaves ; 5 Chemical composition of cassava roots ; 6 Chemical composition of cassava leaves ; 7 Anti-nutrients in roots and leaves ; 8 Case study: biofortified cassava roots made into gari and fufu in Nigeria
  • 9 Future trends 10 Conclusion ; 11 Where to look for further information ; 12 References ; Chapter 2 Cassava for industrial uses ; 2 Cassava root composition ; 3 Cassava chips ; 4 Cassava starch: production and properties ; 5 Cassava starch: products ; 6 Cassava starch: industrial applications ; 7 Summary ; 8 Where to look for further information ; 9 References ; Chapter 29 New uses and processes for cassava ; 1 Introduction ; 2 Current and developing cassava production and use
  • 3 New products from cassava: the case of High Quality Cassava Flour (HQCF) in Africa 4 Summary and future trends ; 5 Conclusion ; 6 Where to look for further information ; 7 Acknowledgements ; 8 References ; Current cassava cultivation and opportunities for improvement ; Chapter 5 Cassava cultivation in Asia ; 1 Introduction ; 2 Cassava production in Asia: an overview ; 3 Varietal improvement ; 4 Other key research areas for developing cassava production in Asia
  • 5 Case study: developing sustainable cassava production in Cambodia 6 Summary ; 7 Where to look for further information ; 8 References ; Chapter 6 Cassava cultivation in sub-Saharan Africa ; 2 Cassava's contribution to incomes in SSA ; 3 Cassava's contribution to food and nutrition security ; 4 Drivers of change in cassava production in SSA ; 5 Future trends and conclusion ; 6 References ; Chapter 7 Cassava cultivation in Latin America ; 2 Global and Latin American approaches to cassava production
EBSCOhost Access limited to 3 simultaneous users
Book
1 online resource.
  • Part 1 Cassava genetic resources and breeding tools1.Advances in understanding cassava growth and development: Virgilio Gavicho Uarrota, Deivid L. V. Stefen, Clovis Arruda de Souza (UTM) and Cileide Maria Medeiros Coelho, University of the State of Santa Catarina (UDESC), Brazil-- Rodolfo Moresco and Marcelo Maraschin, Federal University of Santa Catarina (UFSC), Brazil-- Fernando David Sanchez-Mora, Technical University of Manabi, Ecuador-- and Eduardo da Costa Nunes, Enilto de Oliveira Neubert and Luiz Augusto Martins Peruch, Santa Catarina State Agricultural Research and Rural Extension Agency (EPAGRI), Brazil-- 2.Conservation and distribution of cassava genetic resources: Michael Abberton, Badara Gueye, Tchamba Marimagne and Folarin Soyode, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria-- 3.Developing new cassava varieties: tools, techniques and strategies: Hernan Ceballos, Nelson Morante, Fernando Calle, Jorge Lenis and Sandra Salazar, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia-- 4.Molecular approaches in cassava breeding: Luis Augusto Becerra Lopez-Lavalle, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia-- 5.Marker-assisted selection in cassava breeding: Ismail Y. Rabbi, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria-- 6.Advances in genetic modification of cassava: P. Zhang, Q. Ma, M. Naconsie, X. Wu, W. Zhou, National Key Laboratory of Plant Molecular Genetics, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Plant Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China and J. Yang, Shanghai Chenshan Plant Science Research Center, Shanghai Chenshan Botanical Garden, China--Part 2 Breeding improved cassava varieties7.Breeding cassava for higher yield: Piya Kittipadakul, Pasajee Kongsil and Chalermpol Phumichai, Kasetsart University, Thailand-- and Shelley H. Jansky, USDA-ARS Vegetable Crops Research Unit and University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA-- 8.Breeding, delivery, use and benefi ts of bio-fortifi ed cassava: Elizabeth Parkes and Olufemi Aina, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria-- 9.Breeding cassava to meet consumer preferences for product quality: Adebayo Abass, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania-- Wasiu Awoyale, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Liberia and Kwara State University, Nigeria-- and Lateef Sanni and Taofi k Shittu, Federal University of Agriculture, Nigeria-- Part 3 Managing pests and diseases10.Diseases affecting cassava: James Legg, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania-- and Elizabeth Alvarez, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Colombia-- 11.Integrated management of arthropod pests of cassava: the case of Southeast Asia: Ignazio Graziosi and Kris A.G. Wyckhuys, International Center for Tropical Agriculture (CIAT), Vietnam-- 12.Weed control in cassava cropping systems: S. Hauser and F. Ekeleme, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria--.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760043 20171227
Originating in South America, cassava is grown in over 100 countries around the world. It is the third most important source of calories in the tropics after rice and maize. Its caloric value, as well as its ability to tolerate dry conditions and poor soils, makes it a key food security crop in developing countries. As demand for food grows, there is an urgent need to increase yields in the face of such challenges as climate change, threats from pests and diseases and the need to make cultivation more resource-efficient and sustainable.Drawing on an international range of expertise, this collection focuses on ways of improving the cultivation of cassava at each step in the value chain, from breeding to post-harvest storage. Volume 2 starts by reviewing genetic resources, advances in breeding and their application to produce varieties with desirable traits such as higher yield. It then goes on to review developments in understanding and managing pests and diseases.Achieving sustainable cultivation of cassava Volume 2: Genetic resources, breeding, pests and diseases will be a standard reference for agricultural scientists in universities, government and other research centres and companies involved in improving cassava cultivation. It is accompanied by Volume 1 which reviews cultivation techniques.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760043 20171227
EBSCOhost Access limited to 3 simultaneous users
Book
1 online resource (xviii, 330 pages) : illustrations (some color), maps (some color).
  • Part 1 Genetic diversity and breeding1.Ensuring the genetic diversity of maize and its wild relatives: J. Stephen Smith, Iowa State University, USA-- Candice A. C. Gardner, USDA-ARS/Iowa State University, USA-- and Denise E. Costich, CIMMYT Germplasm Bank (Maize Collection), Mexico-- 2.Key challenges in maize breeding in sub-Saharan Africa: Baffour Badu-Apraku, IITA, Nigeria-- M.A.B. Fakorede and R.O. Akinwale, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria-- 3.Developing maize-breeding methods and cultivars to meet the challenge of climate change: Marcelo J. Carena, North Dakota State University, USA-- 4.Understanding and improving protein traits in maize: Yongrui Wu, National Key Laboratory of Plant Molecular Genetics, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Plant Sciences, Institute of Plant Physiology & Ecology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China-- and Joachim Messing, Waksman Institute of Microbiology, Rutgers University, USA-- 5.Advances in mycotoxin-resistant maize varieties: Marilyn L. Warburton and W. Paul Williams, USDA-ARS Corn Host Plant Research Resistance Unit, USA-- 6.Advances in cold-tolerant maize varieties: Csaba L. Marton and Zsuzsanna Tothne Zsubori, MTA Centre for Agricultural Research, Hungary--Part 2 Understanding and improving maize nutritional and sensory quality7.Nutritional and nutraceutical/functional properties of maize: Dharam Paul Chaudhary, Indian Institute of Maize Research (IIMR), India-- 8.Biofortification of maize: Eliab Simpungwe, HarvestPlus, Zambia-- 9.Assessing and improving the nutritional quality of maize: Elena Lima-Cabello and Paula Robles Bolivar, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Spain and Jose C. Jimenez-Lopez, Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), Spain and The University of Western Australia, Australia-- 10Analysing maize grain quality: Glen P. Fox and Tim J. O'Hare, The University of Queensland, Australia-- Part 3 Translating research into practice: improving maize cultivation in the developing world11.Constraints in adopting improved technologies for maize cultivation: the case of Africa: T. Abdoulaye, The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria-- A. S Bamire and A. A. Akinola, Obafemi Awolowo University, Nigeria-- and A. Alene, A. Menkir and V. Manyong, The International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria-- 12.Supporting small holders in maize cultivation: using an agricultural innovation systems approach: Mariana Wongtschowski and Remco Mur, Royal Tropical Institute (KIT), The Netherlands-- and Carolina Camacho, the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico-- 13.Women and maize cultivation: increasing productivity through gender analysis: Cheryl Doss, Oxford University, UK--.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760081 20170710
Maize is one of the most important and widely grown cereal crops in the world and is a staple food for almost a billion people, particularly in the developing world. It has been estimated that maize yields need to increase by 60% by 2050. There is an urgent need to increase yields in the face of such challenges as climate change, threats from pests and diseases and the need to make cultivation more resource-efficient and sustainable.Drawing on an international range of expertise, this collection focuses on ways of improving the cultivation of maize at each step in the value chain, from breeding to post-harvest storage. Volume 1 reviews research on breeding and its use in improving nutritional quality and agronomic performance. It then goes on to discuss the challenges in translating these advances into effective outcomes for smallholders in the developing world.Achieving sustainable cultivation of maize Volume 1: From improved varieties to local applications will be a standard reference for cereal scientists in universities, government and other research centres and companies involved in maize cultivation. It is accompanied by Volume 2 which reviews improvements in cultivation techniques as well as the management of pests and diseases.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760081 20170710
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource ( xx, 450 pages).
  • Part 1 Maize cultivation techniques1.Modelling crop growth and grain yield in maize cultivation: Alam Sher, Xiaoli Liu and Jincai Li, Anhui Agricultural University, China-- and Youhong Song, Anhui Agricultural University, China and The University of Queensland, Australia-- 2.Optimizing maize-based cropping systems: sustainability, good agricultural practices (GAP) and yield goals: Charles Wortmann, Patricio Grassini and Roger W. Elmore, University of Nebraska- Lincoln, USA-- 3.Maize seed variety selection and seed system development: the case of southern Africa: Peter S. Setimela, Global Maize Program, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre (CIMMYT), Zimbabwe-- 4.Good agricultural practices for maize cultivation: the case of West Africa: Alpha Kamara, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria-- 5.Zero-tillage cultivation of maize: Wade E. Thomason, Bee Khim Chim and Mark S. Reiter, Virginia Tech University, USA-- 6.Conservation agriculture for sustainable intensification of maize and other cereal systems: the case of Latin America: Bram Govaerts, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico-- Isabelle Francois, Consultant, USA-- and Nele Verhulst, International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), Mexico-- 7.Precision maize cultivation techniques: Louis Longchamps, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada-- and Raj Khosla, Colorado State University, USA-- 8.Improving nutrient management for sustainable intensification of maize: Kaushik Majumdar, International Plant Nutrition Institute - South Asia, India-- Shamie Zingore, International Plant Nutrition Institute - sub-Saharan Africa, Kenya-- Fernando Garcia and Adrian Correndo, International Plant Nutrition Institute - Latin America - Southern Cone, Argentina-- Jagadish Timsina, University of Melbourne, Australia-- Adrian M. Johnston, International Plant Nutrition Institute, Canada--9.Crop rotation: a sustainable system for maize production: Bao-Luo Ma, Ottawa Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada-- and Zhigang Wang, Inner Mongolia Agricultural University, China-- 10.Intercropping in sustainable maize cultivation: Abeya Temesgen, Shu Fukai and Daniel Rodriguez, The University of Queensland, Australia-- 11.Climate risk management in maize cropping systems: Daniel Rodriguez, Caspar Roxburgh, Claire Farnsworth, Ariel Ferrante, Joseph Eyre, Stuart Irvine-Brown, James McLean, Martin Bielich, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation (QAAFI), The University of Queensland, Australia-- 12.Advances in maize post-harvest management: Tadele Tefera, International Center of Insect Physiology & Ecology (ICIPE), Ethiopia-- Part 2 Maize pests, diseases and weeds13.Economically important insect pests of maize: William D. Hutchison and Theresa M. Cira, University of Minnesota, USA-- 14.Nematodes associated with maize: T. L. Niblack, The Ohio State University, USA-- 15.Control of rodent pests in maize cultivation: the case of Africa: Loth S. Mulungu, Sokoine University of Agriculture, Tanzania--16.Rapid response to disease outbreaks in maize cultivation: the case of maize lethal necrosis: George Mahuku, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Tanzania and P. Lava Kumar, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture (IITA), Nigeria-- 17.Controlling aflatoxins in maize in Africa: strategies, challenges and opportunities for improvement: Amare Ayalew and Martin Kimanya, Partnership for Aflatoxin Control in Africa, Ethiopia-- Limbikani Matumba, Lilongwe University of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Malawi-- Ranajit Bandyopadhayay and Abebe Menkir, International Institute of Tropical Agriculture, Nigeria-- Peter Cotty, USDA-ARS, USA--18.Integrated weed management in maize cultivation: an overview: Khawar Jabran, Duzce University, Turkey, Mubshar Hussain, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Pakistan and Bhagirath Singh Chauhan, The University of Queensland, Australia-- 19.Weed management of maize grown under temperate conditions: the case of Europe and the United States: Vasileios P. Vasileiadis and Maurizio Sattin, National Research Council (CNR), Institute of Agro-Environmental and Forest Biology, Italy and Per Kudsk, Aarhus University, Denmark--.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760128 20170829
Maize is one of the most important and widely grown cereal crops in the world and is a staple food for almost a billion people, particularly in the developing world. It has been estimated that maize yields need to increase by 60% by 2050. There is an urgent need to increase yields in the face of such challenges as climate change, threats from pests and diseases and the need to make cultivation more resource-efficient and sustainable. Drawing on an international range of expertise, this collection focuses on ways of improving the cultivation of maize at each step in the value chain, from breeding to post-harvest storage. Volume 2 reviews research on improvements in cultivation techniques such as nutrient management, crop rotation, intercropping and other aspects of conservation agriculture. It also discusses developments in methods for combatting pests and diseases. Achieving sustainable cultivation of maize Volume 2: Cultivation techniques, pest and disease control will be a standard reference for cereal scientists in universities, government and other research centres and companies involved in maize cultivation. It is accompanied by Volume 1 which reviews developments in breeding and ways research can be translated into effective outcomes for smallholders in the developing world.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760128 20170829
ProQuest Ebook Central Access limited to 1 user
Book
1 online resource.
  • Part 1 Rice breeding1.Ensuring and exploiting genetic diversity in rice: Jennifer Spindel and Susan McCouch, Cornell University, USA-- 2.Advances in molecular breeding techniques for rice: R. B. Angeles-Shim and M. Ashikari, Nagoya University, Japan-- 3.Breeding strategies to improve rice yields: an overview: K. K. Jena and G. Ramkumar, International Rice Research Institute, The Philippines-- 4.Improving photosynthesis in rice: from small steps to giant leaps: R. F. Sage, University of Toronto, Canada-- and Shunsuke Adachi and Tadashi Hirasawa, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan-- 5.Breeding green super rice (GSR) varieties for sustainable rice cultivation: Z. Li, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China-- and J. Ali, International Rice Research Institute, The Philippines-- 6.Mechanisms of drought tolerance in rice: Anuj Kumar, Supratim Basu, Venkategowda Ramegowda and Andy Pereira, University of Arkansas, USAPart 2 Rice nutritional and processing quality7.Advances in understanding the role of rice in nutrition: Melissa Fitzgerald, University of Queensland, Australia-- Adoracion Resurreccion, International Rice Research Institute, The Philippines-- and Julie Pua Ferraz, Diabetes Foundation Marikina and Calamba Doctors' Hospital, The Philippines-- 8.The nutraceutical properties of rice: Lu Yu, University of Maryland, USA-- and Margaret Slavin and Mengyi Dong, George Mason University, USA-- 9. Biofortified Golden Rice: an additional intervention for vitamin A deficiency: Adrian Dubock, Golden Rice Humanitarian Board, Switzerland-- 10.Development of rice varieties with improved iron content in grain: Navreet K. Bhullar, ETH Zurich, Switzerland-- 11.Quality parameters and testing methods in rice cultivation: Rachelle Ward, NSW Department of Primary Industries, Australia-- 12.Agronomic and environmental factors affecting rice grain quality: Chuan Tong and Jinsong Bao, Zhejiang University, China--.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760241 20171227
Rice is one of the most important foods in the world. As the demand for rice continues to increase, there is an urgent need to increase yields in the face of such challenges as climate change, threats from pests and diseases and the need to make cultivation more resource-efficient and sustainable.Drawing on an international range of expertise, this collection focuses on ways of improving the cultivation of rice at each step in the value chain, from breeding to post-harvest storage. Volume 1 reviews research in physiology and breeding and its application to produce varieties with improved traits such as higher yields. It then goes on to discuss nutritional and other aspects of rice quality and the ways these can be enhanced.Achieving sustainable cultivation of rice Volume 1: Breeding for higher quality and yield will be a standard reference for rice scientists in universities, government and other research centres and companies involved in rice cultivation. It is accompanied by Volume 2 which reviews improvements in cultivation techniques, pest and disease management.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760241 20171227
EBSCOhost Access limited to 3 simultaneous users
Book
1 online resource (xxxi, 406 pages) : illustrations (chiefly color), maps (chiefly color).
  • Part 1 Rice cultivation techniques1.Advances in irrigation techniques for rice cultivation: D. S. Gaydon, CSIRO Agriculture, Australia-- 2.Advances in nutrient management in rice cultivation: Bijay-Singh, Punjab Agricultural University, India and V.K. Singh, Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India-- 3.Sustainable rice cultivation in coastal saline soils: a case study: Sukanta K. Sarangi and Buddheswar Maji, ICAR-Central Soil Salinity Research Institute, India-- 4.Dry-seeded and aerobic rice cultivation: T. Parthasarathi, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel-- M. Kokila, D. Selvakumar, V. Meenakshi and A. Kowsalya, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, India-- K. Vanitha, Tamil Nadu Rice Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, India-- A. Tariq, University of Copenhagen, Denmark-- A. Surendran, Rutgers University, USA-- and Eli Vered, Netafim Irrigation Ltd, Israel-- 5.Processing rice straw and husks as co-products: Nguyen Van Hung, Carlito Balingbing, James Quilty, Bjoern Ole Sander, Matty Demont and Martin Gummert, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), The Philippines-- Part 2 Overall management of rice cultivation6.Yield gap analysis towards meeting future rice demand: Kazuki Saito et al., Africa Rice Center, Benin-- 7.Developments in the system of rice intensification (SRI): Norman Uphoff, Cornell University, USA-- 8.Assessing the sustainability impacts of rice cultivation: Wyn Ellis, Sustainable Rice Platform, Thailand-- Part 3 Rice pests9.Rice insect pests: biology and ecology: E. A. Heinrichs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA-- F. Nwilene, The Africa Rice Center, Nigeria-- M. Stout, Louisiana State University, USA-- B. Hadi, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), The Philippines-- and T. Freitas, Universidade Federal Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil-- 10.Management of rice insect pests: E. A. Heinrichs, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA-- F. Nwilene, The Africa Rice Center, Nigeria-- M. Stout, Louisiana State University, USA-- B. Hadi, International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), The Philippines-- and T. Freitas, Universidade Federal Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil-- 11.Plant protection products in rice cultivation: critical issues in risk assessment and management to promote sustainable use: Maura Calliera and Ettore Capri, Universita Cattolica Sacro Cuore di Piacenza, Italy-- 12.Integrated pest management for sustainable rice cultivation: a holistic approach: F. G. Horgan, University of Technology Sydney, Australia-- 13.Control of rodent pests in rice cultivation: P. R. Brown et al., CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia-- 14.Integrated weed management techniques for rice: Simerjeet Kaur and Gulshan Mahajan, Punjab Agricultural University, India-- and Bhagirath S. Chauhan, The University of Queensland, Australia--.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760289 20171227
Rice is one of the most important foods in the world. As the demand for rice continues to increase, there is an urgent need to increase yields in the face of such challenges as climate change, threats from pests and diseases and the need to make cultivation more resource-efficient and sustainable.Drawing on an international range of expertise, this collection focuses on ways of improving the cultivation of rice at each step in the value chain, from breeding to post-harvest storage. Volume 2 reviews research in improving cultivation in such areas as irrigation and nutrition as well as developments in disease and pest management.Achieving sustainable cultivation of rice Volume 2: Cultivation, pest and disease management will be a standard reference for rice scientists in universities, government and other research centres and companies involved in rice cultivation. It is accompanied by Volume 1 which reviews research in breeding, nutritional and other aspects of rice quality.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760289 20171227
EBSCOhost Access limited to 3 simultaneous users
Book
1 online resource (xxii, 542 pages) : illustrations.
  • Part 1 Cultivation techniques1.Modelling crop growth and yield in tomato cultivation: Kenneth J. Boote, University of Florida, USA-- 2.Optimizing yields in tomato cultivation: maximizing tomato plant use of resources: V. S. Almeida, F. T. Delazari, C. Nick, W. L. Araujo and D. J. H. Silva, Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Brazil-- 3.Improving water and nutrient management in tomato cultivation: E. Simonne, M. Ozores-Hampton, A. Simonne and A. Gazula, University of Florida, USA-- 4.Organic greenhouse tomato production:Martine Dorais, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Laval University, Quebec, Canada--Part 2 Plant physiology and breeding5.Understanding and improving water-use efficiency and drought resistance in tomato: A. Zsogon, Universidade Federal de Vicosa, Brazil-- and M. H. Vicente, D. S. Reartes and L. E. P. Peres, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil-- 6.Ensuring the genetic diversity of tomatoes: Andreas W. Ebert and Lawrence Kenyon, AVRDC - The World Vegetable Center, Taiwan-- 7.Tomato plant responses to biotic and abiotic stress: C. A. Avila, S. C. Irigoyen and K. K. Mandadi, Texas A&M AgriLife Research, USA-- 8.Developments in tomato breeding: conventional and biotechnology tools: Y. Bai, Wageningen University and Research, The Netherlands-- 9.Advances in marker-assisted breeding of tomatoes: Junming Li, Institute of Vegetables and Flowers - Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences (CAAS), China-- 10.Genetic engineering of tomato to improve nutritional quality, resistance to abiotic and biotic stresses, and for non-food applications: B. Kaur and A. K. Handa, Purdue University, USA-- and A. K. Mattoo, USDA-ARS, USA-- 11.Developing tomato varieties with improved flavour: M. Causse, E. Albert and C. Sauvage, INRA, France-- 12.Understanding and improving the shelf life of tomatoes: K. Wang and A. K. Handa, Purdue University, USA-- and A. K. Mattoo, USDA-ARS, USA-- Part 3 Diseases, pests and weeds13.Insect-transmitted viral diseases infecting tomato crops: H. Czosnek, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel-- A. Koren, Hishtil Nursery, Israel-- and F. Vidavski, Tomatech R&D, Israel-- 14.Genetic resistance to viruses in tomato: Moshe Lapidot and Ilan Levin, Institute of Plant Sciences - Volcani Center, ARO, Israel-- 15.Bio-ecology of major insect and mite pests of tomato crops in the tropics: R. Srinivasan, AVRDC - The World Vegetable Center, Taiwan-- 16.Integrated pest management in tomato cultivation: Robert L. Gilbertson, Marcela Vasquez-Mayorga and Monica Macedo, University of California-Davis, USA-- and R. Muniappan, Virginia Tech, USA-- 17.Developing disease-resistant tomato varieties: D. R. Panthee, J. P. Kressin and P. Adhikari, North Carolina State University, USA-- 18.Integrated weed management in tomato cultivation: Francesco Tei and Euro Pannacci, University of Perugia, Italy--.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760401 20171227
Tomatoes are the second most important vegetable crop in the world after potatoes. Originating in South America, they are now grown widely around the world. As the population continues to grow, there is a need to increase yields in the face of such challenges as climate change, threats from pests and diseases and the need to make cultivation more resource-efficient and sustainable.Drawing on an international range of expertise, this collection focuses on ways of improving the cultivation of tomatoes at each step in the value chain, from breeding to post-harvest storage. The book begins by looking at improvements in cultivation techniques, before moving on to review advances in ensuring genetic diversity, understanding of tomato physiology and breeding techniques. The collection concludes by discussing developments in understanding and managing pests and diseases.Achieving sustainable cultivation of tomatoes will be a standard reference for horticultural scientists in universities, government and other research centres and companies involved in tomato cultivation.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781786760401 20171227
EBSCOhost Access limited to 3 simultaneous users
Book
1 online resource.
  • Part 1 Wheat physiology and breeding >1.Wheat genetic resources: global conservation and use for the future: P. Bramel, Global Crop Diversity Trust, Germany ; >2.Sequencing and assembly of the wheat genome: Kellye Eversole and Jane Rogers, International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium, USA; Beat Keller, University of Zurich, Switzerland; Rudi Appels, Murdoch University, Australia; Catherine Feuillet, Bayer Crop Science, USA ; >3.Advances in wheat breeding techniques: Alison R. Bentley and Ian Mackay, NIAB, UK ; >4.Improving the uptake and assimilation of nitrogen in wheat plants: Jacques Le Gouis, INRA, France and Malcolm Hawkesford, Rothamsted Research, UK ; >5.Photosynthetic improvement of wheat plants: Martin A. J.
  • Parry, João Paulo Pennacchi, Luis Robledo-Arratia and Elizabete Carmo-Silva, Lancaster University, UK; and Luis Robledo-Arratia, University of Cambridge, UK ; >6.Improving drought and heat tolerance in wheat: Xinguo Mao, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China; Delong Yang, Gansu Agricultural University, China; and Ruilian Jing, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, China ; >7.Advances in cold-resistant wheat varieties: D.Z. Skinner, USDA-ARS, USA ; > > Part 2 Wheat nutritional and processing quality; >8.Genetic and other factors affecting wheat quality: A. S.
  • Ross, Oregon State University, USA ; >9.Measuring wheat quality: Ian Batey, formerly CSIRO, Australia ; >10.The nutritional and nutraceutical value of wheat: Victoria Ndolo and Trust Beta, University of Manitoba, Canada ; > > Part 3 Wheat diseases, pests and weeds >11.Wheat diseases: an overview: Albrecht Serfling, Doris Kopahnke, Antje Habekuss, Flutur ë Novakazi and Frank Ordon, Julius Kühn-Institute (JKI), Institute for Resistance Research and Stress Tolerance, Germany ; >12.Advances in control of wheat rusts: Z. A. Pretorius, University of the Free State, South Africa; M. Ayliffe, CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia; R. L. Bowden, ARS-USDA, USA; L. A. Boyd, National Institute of Agricultural Botany, UK; R. M. DePauw, Advancing Wheat Technologies, Canada; Y. Jin, ARS-USDA Cereal Disease Laboratory, USA; R. E. Knox, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; R. A. McIntosh and R. F. Park, University of Sydney, Australia; R.
  • Prins, University of the Free State, South Africa; E. S. Lagudah, CSIRO Agriculture and Food, Australia ; >13.Advances in control of wheat diseases: Fusarium head blight, wheat blast and powdery mildew: Hermann Buerstmayr, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria; Volker Mohler, Bavarian State Research Center for Agriculture, Germany; and Mohan Kohli, Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology, Paraguay ; >14.Advances in disease-resistant wheat varieties: James Anderson, University of Minnesota, USA ; >15.Recent molecular technologies for tackling wheat diseases: Indu Sharma, Pramod Prasad and Subhash C. Bhardwaj, ICAR-Indian Institute of Wheat and Barley Research, India ; >16.Integrated wheat disease management: Stephen N. Wegulo, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, USA ; >17.Wheat pests: introduction, rodents and nematodes: Marion O.
  • Harris North Dakota State University, USA; Jens Jacob, Kühn-Institut, Germany; Peter Brown, CSIRO, Australia; and Guiping Yan, North Dakota State University, USA ; >18.Wheat pests: insects, mites, and prospects for the future: Marion O. Harris and Kirk Anderson, North Dakota State University, USA; Mustapha El-Bouhssini, ICARDA, Morocco; Frank Peairs, Colorado State University, USA; Gary Hein, University of Nebraska, USA; and Steven Xu, USDA-ARS Northern Crops Institute, USA ; >19.The impact of climate change on wheat insect pests: current knowledge and future trends: Sanford D. Eigenbrode, University of Idaho, USA and Sarina Macfadyen, CSIRO, Australia ; >20.Integrated pest management in wheat cultivation: Abie Horrocks and Melanie Davidson, The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited, New Zealand; and Paul Horne and Jessica Page, IPM Technologies Pty Limited, Australia ; >21.Integrated weed management in wheat cultivation: K.
EBSCOhost Access limited to 3 simultaneous users
Book
1 online resource.
  • Series list ; Introduction ; Part 1 Wheat cultivation techniques ; Part 2 Wheat crop management ; Part 3 Improving wheat cultivation in the developing world ; Summary ; Key priorities in wheat research: the Wheat Initiative ' s Strategic Research Agenda ; Introduction ; The Wheat Initiative and its Strategic Research Agenda ; Core theme 1: Increase wheat yield potential ; Core theme 2: protect yield potential ; Subtopic 2.1: controlling wheat diseases and pests
  • Subtopic 2.2: improving tolerance of wheat to abiotic stress Core theme 3: protect the environment and increase the sustainability of wheat production systems ; Subtopic 3.1: nutrient use efficiency ; Subtopic 3.2: agronomy and crop management ; Core theme 4: ensuring the supply of high quality, safe wheat ; Cross-cutting theme 5: enabling technologies and shared resources ; Subtopic 5.1: enabling technologies and methods ; Subtopic 5.2: shared platforms and technologies ; Subtopic 5.3: genetic resources
  • Crosscutting theme 6: knowledge exchange and education Summary ; Part 1 Wheat cultivation techniques ; Chapter 1 Variety selection in wheat cultivation ; 1 Introduction; 2 Wheat variety selection methods: natural and traditional selection ; 3 Wheat variety selection methods: modern molecular breeding ; 4 Variety selection by plant breeders ; 5 Variety selection by farmers ; 6 Conclusion ; 7 Where to look for further information ; 8 References ; Chapter 2 Establishment and root development in wheat crops
  • 1 Introduction 2 Root development and growth during establishment ; 3 Crop establishment practices ; 4 Case study: the effects of embryo size and seed mass on early vigour ; 5 Research contributions to improved wheat establishment and production ; 6 Future trends in research ; 7 Where to look for further information ; 8 Acknowledgements ; 9 References ; Chapter 3 Conservation tillage for sustainable wheat intensification: the example of South Asia ; 1 Introduction ; 2 Factors affecting the diffusion of CT wheat in South Asia
  • 3 Recent evidence of the agronomic and economic impacts of CT wheat in South Asia 4 Constraints to the diffusion of CT practices in wheat in South Asia ; 5 Recent developments in CT wheat ; 6 Concluding remarks ; 7 Where to look for further information ; 8 Acknowledgements ; 9 References ; Chapter 4 Improving water management in winter wheat ; 1 Introduction ; 2 Winter wheat yield ; 3 Yield determination under water-limited conditions ; 4 The role of measuring evapotranspiration (ET) ; 5 Water-use efficiency
EBSCOhost Access limited to 3 simultaneous users
Book
1 online resource ( xviii, 339 pages) : illustrations (some color).
  • Foreword; Preface; Contents; About the Author; 1: Agro-Ecological Pest Management - An Overview; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Ecology and Agroecology; 1.2.1 Ecology; 1.2.2 Agroecology; 1.3 Agroecological Pest Management; 1.4 Goals; 1.5 Basis and Principles; 1.6 Key Elements of Agroecological Pest Management; 1.6.1 Crop Management; 1.6.2 Soil Management; 1.6.2.1 Preventive Options; 1.6.2.2 Supplemental Options; 1.6.2.3 Reactive Options; 1.7 Benefits and Limitations; 1.7.1 Benefits; 1.7.1.1 Increasing Species Diversity; 1.7.1.2 Enhancing Longevity; 1.7.1.3 Imposing a Fallow
  • 1.7.1.4 Enhancing Soil Organic Matter1.7.1.5 Increase Landscape Diversity; 1.7.1.6 Saving on Cost of Inputs; 1.7.2 Limitations; 1.8 Conclusions; References; 2: Conservation Tillage; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Weed Management; 2.2.1 Stale Seed Bed + Glyphosate Strategy; 2.2.2 Crop Rotations + Stale Seed Bed; 2.2.3 Integrated Weed Management; 2.3 Insect Pest Management; 2.4 Disease Management; 2.5 Nematode Management; 2.6 Nonpesticidal Management Practices; 2.6.1 Crop Rotation; 2.6.2 Field Sanitation; 2.6.3 Proper Planting Procedures; 2.6.4 Irrigation Management
  • 2.6.5 Variety Selection2.6.6 Scouting and Pest Identification; 2.7 Conclusions; References; 3: Crop Residue Management and Organic Amendments; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Weed Management; 3.3 Insect Pest Management; 3.4 Disease Management; 3.4.1 Biofumigation; 3.5 Nematode Management; 3.6 Conclusions; References; 4: Biofumigation; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Biofumigation; 4.3 Benefits; 4.4 Modes of Utilization; 4.4.1 Crop Rotation/Intercropping; 4.4.2 Incorporation of Biofumigants; 4.4.3 Green Manuring Cover Crops and Trap Crops; 4.4.4 Processed Plant Products; 4.5 Biofumigation Crops
  • 4.5.1 Brassica Plant Species4.5.1.1 Rapeseed (Fig. 4.4); 4.5.1.2 Mustard (Fig. 4.5); 4.5.1.3 Radish (Fig. 4.6); 4.5.1.4 Turnips (Fig. 4.7); 4.5.1.5 Rocket; 4.5.1.6 Processed Brassica Amendments; 4.5.2 Non-Brassica Plant Species; 4.5.2.1 Grasses; 4.5.2.2 Garlic and Onions; 4.6 Pest Management; 4.6.1 Diseases; 4.6.2 Nematode Pests; 4.6.3 Weeds; 4.7 Integration of Biofumigation and Solarization; 4.8 Conclusions; References; 5: Fertilizer Management; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Macronutrients; 5.2.1 Nitrogen; 5.2.1.1 Insect Pests; 5.2.1.2 Diseases; 5.2.2 Potassium
  • 5.2.2.1 Diseases5.2.2.2 Nematodes; 5.2.3 Phosphorus; 5.2.3.1 Diseases; 5.2.3.2 Insect Pests; 5.2.4 Calcium; 5.2.4.1 Diseases; 5.2.4.2 Nematodes; 5.2.5 Sulfur; 5.2.5.1 Insect Pests; 5.2.5.2 Mites; 5.3 Micronutrients; 5.3.1 Manganese; 5.3.1.1 Diseases; 5.3.2 Zinc; 5.3.2.1 Diseases; 5.3.2.2 Insect Pests; 5.3.3 Boron; 5.3.3.1 Diseases; 5.3.4 Iron; 5.3.4.1 Diseases; 5.3.5 Chlorine; 5.3.5.1 Diseases; 5.3.6 Silicon; 5.3.6.1 Diseases; 5.4 Conclusions; References; 6: Agro-Forestry; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Effect on Pests and Natural Enemies; 6.2.1 Insect Pests and Diseases
Book
xxxiii, 104 pages, 16 pages of plates : illustrations (some color) ; 25 cm.
Green Library
Book
76 pages : illustrations (chiefly color) ; 22 cm
  • Vorwort : Dr. August Ziegler : Leiter der Bayerischen Hauptstelle für Rebenzüchtung, Würzburg-Veitshöchheim
  • Josef Engelhart, Weinbautechniker und Ampelograph
  • Grusswort : Aus dem Leben eines Franken
  • Wolfram Ziegler
  • Aus dem Leben eines Franken : Dr. August Ziegler
  • Wer war Dr. Ziegler?
  • Seine Wurzeln
  • Die Familien Ziegler in Marktbreit am Main
  • Der Sohn August Ziegler : Schule und Studium, Promotion
  • Dr. August Ziegler in Togo, Westafrika
  • Deutsche Kolonie Togo, 1884 bis 1916
  • Saatgutzüchtung in Togo : Landeskulturanstalt Nuatjä
  • Das Ende des Ackerbauversuchs und der Pflanzenforschung in den Tropen
  • Kriegsgefangenschaft in Afrika und Frankreich
  • Ökonomierat Ziegler : Beruflicher Neustart in der fränkischen Heimat
  • Rebenzüchtung In Bayern
  • Dr. Ziegler als Leiter der Bayerischen Hauptstelle für Rebenzüchtung
  • Hochzuchtregister
  • Züchtung zusammengefasst
  • Die Wiederentdeckung der Rieslaner Rebe
  • Fazit und Dank
  • Danke für die Unterstützung
  • Ein Fazit
  • Anhang : Dr. August Ziegler : Curriculum Vitae in Tabellenform
  • Quellen und Literatur
  • Quellen
  • Literatur
  • Web-Links.
SAL3 (off-campus storage)
Book
xxii, 594 pages : color illustrations ; [ca. 23-29] cm
  • Global Overview : Economic Losses due to Bacterial Plant Pathogens and Diseases Introduction Overview of Losses due to Bacterial Plant Diseases Major Bacterial Plant Pathogens Influencing World Agricultural Crop Production Bacterial Diseases of Cereal Crops Wheat Rice Maize Barley Oats Sorghum Pearl Millet Minor Millet Bacterial Diseases of Pulse Crops Green Gram Black Gram Pigeon Pea Soybean Rajma Bean/Kidney Bean/Dry Bean Bacterial Diseases of Oilseed Crops Groundnut Sesamum Sunflower Safflower Mustard Castor Oil Palm Olive Bacterial Diseases of Cash Crops Sugarcane Tobacco Bacterial Diseases of Fiber Crops Cotton Jute Bacterial Diseases of Fruit Crops Apple and Pear Apricot Sweet Cherry Walnut Almond Plum Chestnut Hazelnut Cashew Grape Mango Banana Pomegranate Pineapple Guava Papaya Custard Apple Citrus Orange Raspberry Strawberry Mulberry Avocado Kiwi Watermelon Muskmelon Passion Fruit Bacterial Diseases of Vegetable Crops Potato Tomato Brinjal Capsicum Cauliflower Cabbage Broccoli and Brussels Sprout Beans Chili Pea Celery Leek Lettuce Parsley Cucumber Carrot Sweet Potato Radish Cucurbits Sugarbeet Clusterbean Spinach Coriander Colocasia Bacterial Diseases of Spice Crops Onion Garlic Ginger Turmeric Black Paper Saffron Clove Cardamon Betel Vine Bacterial Diseases of Flowering Plants and Ornamentals Rose Calla Lily Carnation Gladiolus Anthurium Tulip Orchids Chrysanthemum Marigold Zinnia Dahlia Geranium Gerbera Bird of Paradise Hibiscus Hortensia Hyacinth Ornamental Palm Bacterial Diseases of Forage Crops Alfalfa Forage Grasses Bacterial Diseases of Plantation Crops Tea Coffee Rubber Arecanut Cassava Bacterial Diseases of Forest Trees Poplar Teak Eucalyptus Bamboo Pine Neem Leucaena Casuarina Morus Flame of Forest Willow and Alder Oak Elm Wild Cherry Ash Oleander Fruit-Bearing Forest Trees Bacterial Diseases of Lawn Grass Turf Grass Bacterial Pathogens of Phytosanitary Risk in International Trade of Seed and Planting Stock Significance of International Trade of Seed and Planting Stocks International Agreement on Plant Protection World Organizations Dealing with Plant Quarantine Issues Organizational Set Up, Activities and Quarantine Bacterial Plant Pathogens in the Jurisdiction of Organizations Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures Agreement International Plant Protection Convention Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures Sanitary and Phytosanitary Agreement Developing Countries and SPS Agreements Principles of SPS Related to International Trade Efforts Made and Success Stories: Management of Bacterial Plant Pathogens International Introduction of Bacterial Plant Pathogens Stories of Eradication of Bacterial Plant Pathogens.
  • (source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498755986 20171218
Food and agriculture is an important component in the development and survival of civilizations. Around half of the world's population and their economies are influenced by agricultural farm production. Plant diseases take as much as a 30 percent toll of the crop harvest if not managed properly and efficiently. Bacterial diseases of crop plants are important in plant disease scenarios worldwide and are observed on all kinds of cultivated and commercial value plants including cereals, pulses, oilseeds, fruits, vegetables, cash crops, plantation crops, spices, ornamentals and flowering plant, forage crop, forest trees, and lawn grasses. Bacterial diseases are widespread and are difficult to identify and to control. Few pesticides are available for use in control, and many plant pathologists are not well trained in the management of bacterial diseases. Bacterial Diseases of Crop Plants offers concise information on bacterial diseases of crops, proving a valuable asset to students, scientists in industry and academia, farmers, extension workers, and those who deal with crops that are vulnerable to bacterial diseases. The book contains 13 chapters featuring bacterial diseases of individual crops and is illustrated with full color photographs throughout providing amazing characterization of the diseases. It also includes information on bacterial diseases that appear on different crops across the continents, thereby making the content of interest to plant pathologists around the world. Bacterial diseases are of great economic concern, and their importance in overall losses caused by various other pathogens, such as fungi and viruses, is often undermined in developing countries.
(source: Nielsen Book Data)9781498755986 20171218